southerncross

VOR Leg 7 Auckland to Itajai

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I think we can really see the logistical capabilities and no drama approach of MAPFRE even when dealing with southern ocean damage. They had a contingency plan either quickly put together or prepared beforehand - managed to get folks and gear to Puerto Williams with a charter boat in under a week?

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2 minutes ago, Miffy said:

managed to get folks and gear to Puerto Williams with a charter boat in under a week?

What were they missing onboard to fix the track?

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17 minutes ago, southerncross said:

I think this has probably been the toughest Southern Ocean leg on record for quite some time," said navigator Simon Fisher. "I am on my fifth race so far and I don't remember one as hard. So we are looking forward to getting there."

Wow. No kidding.

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7 hours ago, ChristianSch said:

Looking closely at the marine traffic site all the ships have weird ancient old position reports but if you click on track usually the most recent track shows. Past the Falklands is a line of ships denser than in Hongkong. Probably fisherman but definitely noteworthy. Are there some without AIS turned on? You bet there are! 

No. It is very unlikely that there is anything there with AIS turned off provided they are inside the 200 Mile EEZs as AIS is compulsory in the fisheries of the Falklands and Argentina and both zones are patrolled and enforced. The fishing boats are mainly squid boats circa 2000 + Tonnes and lit with between 1 and 4 MW of lighting. If you hit one of them you are a cunt. There are some trawlers too but also big and well lit. There may be an unlit submarine lurking somewhere. 

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Merde. Ketchup sucks ;) 

Quote

BREAKING NEWS: PIT-STOP AT CAPE HORN

03-30-2012
 
normal_n_471.jpg

Iker Martínez: “I must thank the Spanish Navy and Vice Admiral Jaime Rodriguez-Toubes, the delegate for sailing, as well as the Chilean and Argentine authorities for the help and assistance they're giving us”

“Telefónica” has made a shift in strategy and instead of stopping of to carry out the forecasted repairs at Ushuaia (Argentina) the boat will stop at Cape Horn itself, more specifically at Maxwell Cove, a small and very well protected bay within the group of Wollaston islands, right at the heart of the Cape Horn national park (Chile).

Double-Olympic medallist and skipper Iker Martínez made the announcement this afternoon: “We have decided to make a quick stop at Cape Horn to reinforce the damaged section of the hull and to get back in the race as quickly as we can. If all goes well, we'll try to carry out the repairs without stopping off on land to avoid the stretch up to Ushuaia, which would mean another 100 extra miles. Horacio [Team Telefónica's technical director] is sailing from Port Williams now in a 50-foot steel sailboat which will bring them to the cape. We'll meet there to take shelter so that we can make the reinforcements to the area of the bow that's been affected”.

“The area around Cape Horn is a labyrinth of islands and this time they'll be help us to get some shelter so that we can work more effectively on the boat, with no movement and with the boat dry”, added the Basque skipper.

So the Spanish baot will avoid a trip to Ushuaia and will aim to stop only for the minimum period set out by the race rules, which is to say, 12 hours: “The rules state that if you stop it must be for a minimum period of 12 hours, so we'll try to get it all done within that time frame”, explained Iker Marínez. “First we'll check if the outside of the hull is still intact. If it is, which I hope it is, we'll position ourselves so we're shielded, just behind the island of Cape Horn, to be able to work comfortably. The rules also state that if you pay the 12 hour penalty you are entitled to external assistance, so our technical director Horacio and the shore crew will be giving us a hand with repairs”.

Thanks for the Spanish Navy and the Chilean and Argentine authorities

To be precise, the group of shore crewmembers are heading for Maxwell Cove with the equipment needed to carry out repairs and are making their way on the water, just like their fellow team mates. They are on a 50-foot boat having set sail from Port Williams, as the ESP-1 skipper told us.

“We've come sailing from New Zealand, the shore crew has left Argentina and we're meeting in Chilean waters, so if we'd had to take the time to do all of the paperwork we'd have to spend a lot longer than we'd planned at Cape Horn”, said Martínez.

The head of the Spanish crew also wanted to “thank the Chilean and Argentine authorities for their help and assistance, as well as the Spanish Navy and Vice Admiral Jaime Rodriguez-Toubes, the Spanish Navy sailing delegate”.

The two frontrunners 15-18 hours away

This bit of breaking news has added even more excitement to this regatta. As Iker Martínez wrote this email, “Groupama” and “Puma”, first and second on the fleet had just rounded Cape Horn although in the most recent report the boats were some 300 miles from the Spanish boat, so 15 to 18 hours away.

“Once we've finished the repairs we'll be aiming to get back to full speed. “Puma” and “Groupama” may not push forward so much over the next few hours but their lead might be just too much for us to catch them before we get to Itajaí”, said Iker.

However, anything's possible and the Basque skipper has opened up an interesting question mark: “Even though the gap seems insurmountable, the climb up to Brazil has some tricky points and we are likely to come across a complicated high that might shake things up, and that's given us a bit of hope that they may be stopped in their tracks ahead and we could catch up with them. You can always dream that something good might happen, right?”

Oops. wrong thread http://www.teamtelefonica.com/en/news/471/BREAKING-NEWS--PIT-STOP-AT-CAPE-HORN/page/1

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2 minutes ago, southerncross said:

What were they missing onboard to fix the track?

If I were asked to make a repair down there - I'd bring some spiral ventilation tunnels and a bunch of fans/diesel heaters. more lashings to secure while curing, cut/grind off the needed material - bond it right, wrap it up with the ventilation tunnel and keep it nice and warm for 10 hours. Can't hurt to dry the boat out while parked up too.

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It did seem Brunel was not sending it around the Cape in the pics and video, so perhaps their rudder/tiller problem is still slowing them down.

Also, running the weather ahead, might it not be worthwhile for TTOP and AKZO to take the inside channel north in anticipation of reaching conditions ahead after some upwind bashing?

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Just now, Miffy said:

If I were asked to make a repair down there - I'd bring some spiral ventilation tunnels and a bunch of fans/diesel heaters. more lashings to secure while curing, cut/grind off the needed material - bond it right, wrap it up with the ventilation tunnel and keep it nice and warm for 10 hours. Can't hurt to dry the boat out while parked up too.

That would be a nice wish list.  Just wondering what/why more was needed when Akzo/Dongfeng made the same or similar repair in the SO while underway.

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3 minutes ago, stief said:

Merde. Ketchup sucks ;) 

I don't know how you have all this at your fingertips!

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1 minute ago, southerncross said:

Screen Shot 2018-03-29 at 12.16.56 PM.png

They'll probably go into Caleta Martial - good anchorage. 

Cta Martial.png

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Nobel and Plastic only 5 miles apart, and when they get to Staten Island Dongfeng and Vestas will likely be on top of each other. Good stuff coming up. 

If the places were to hold exactly, and if SHKS has not in fact resumed racing, the standings after this leg would be:

DFRT 44

MAPF 43

TBRU 37

VS11 35

AKZO 31

SHKS 26

TTOP 18

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Just now, 2Newts said:

Nobel and Plastic only 5 miles apart, and when they get to Staten Island Dongfeng and Vestas will likely be on top of each other. Good stuff coming up. 

If the places were to hold exactly, and if SHKS has not in fact resumed racing, the standings after this leg would be:

DFRT 44

MAPF 43

TBRU 37

VS11 35

AKZO 31

SHKS 26

TTOP 18

Oh Lord.  We'll never here the end of SS ;)

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3 minutes ago, southerncross said:

That would be a nice wish list.  Just wondering what/why more was needed when Akzo/Dongfeng made the same or similar repair in the SO while underway.


It is much colder now than it was earlier in the season. We're wayyyy into the cold season in the southern latitudes. The next part of the race will be a lot of upwind conditions. I don't think MAPFRE would depend on a temporary repair with epoxy that won't cure.

It is a good exercise in loss management. Unfortunately with Scallywag out - the least amount of points MAPFRE will get is 4. If Brunel or Vestas hangs on - DF gains only 6 points relative to MAPFRE. If MAPFRE doesn't make the repair - and demasts, then +10.

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9 minutes ago, southerncross said:

I don't know how you have all this at your fingertips!

Just serendipity. Just happened to be rereading it a day or so ago,, trying to recall the spot (Maxwell Cove) Was a brilliant repair effort, only that time they had all kinds of issues finding a port, dealing with customs . . . . IIRC, Campos had a friend who had a charter, and knew of a little secluded anchorage in the right jurisdiction . ..  made calls, etc. Rather like the shore team drama Ken Read and Kimo (Worthington?) had getting a mast for Puma  . . ..

Sorry. Back to the race. This will help teams needing more points, and make for better  Atlantic runs .

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4 minutes ago, Miffy said:

It is a good exercise in loss management.

It seems like they've been doing this since they last won Leg 3.

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2 minutes ago, southerncross said:

It seems like they've been doing this since they last won Leg 3.

 

Shrug - the team with the most points at the end wins. Except for leg 4, they've outscored DF on every leg. That's all they need. The more points the 3rd/4th place teams pick up along the way the more it hurts DF's chances to make up the difference. It must be tough being Charles because he is chasing points and has to cover potential leg winners - MAPFRE just needs to cover him. 

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MAPFRE suspends racing to deal with damaged mast track as fleet passes Cape Horn

While the fleet mark a major milestone with the passage of Cape Horn, MAPFRE suspends racing to work on a repair...

MAPFRE, the overall leader in the Volvo Ocean Race, has suspended racing to attend to damage to their mast track.

A section of the mast track came unglued from the mast five days ago, but until now the team has done a good job of limiting the impact of the damage on its performance through various jury-rig solutions.

But now, with 2,000 miles of racing left to the finish line in Itajaí, Brazil, skipper Xabi Fernández has elected to suspend racing as of 18:32:20 UTC, and just six miles west of Cape Horn, to make a more effective repair to both the mast track and mainsail. Three members of the shore team are in the area to assist the sailors.

Under the rules of the Volvo Ocean Race, a team that suspends racing may use its engine, get outside assistance or take on equipment to make a repair.

The penalty for suspending racing is that you must remain out of the race for a minimum of 12 hours, and return to the same location where you suspended before resuming the race. Given the speed of the other boats, this latest development has the potential to knock the overall race leader back significantly.

The forecast, however, works in MAPFRE’s favour. A ridge of high pressure is expected to slow the frontrunners and allow the trailing boats to catch up.

“A complete restart just after the Falklands,” is how leg leader Bouwe Bekking describes it.

https://www.volvooceanrace.com/en/news/11378_MAPFRE-suspends-racing-to-deal-with-damaged-mast-track-as-fleet-passes-Cape-Horn.html

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Donger has good chance of winning this leg. They have the inside on Vestas at the moment and Brunel may be wounded. Hard to image them hitting something hard enough to break a thick aluminum tiller bar without also damaging the rudder itself. Hope it wasn't the starboard rudder.

(Of course Donger might be wounded too, but they wouldn't tell.)

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4 minutes ago, Varan said:

Donger has good chance of winning this leg. They have the inside on Vestas at the moment and Brunel may be wounded. Hard to image them hitting something hard enough to break a thick aluminum tiller bar without also damaging the rudder itself. Hope it wasn't the starboard rudder.

(Of course Donger might be wounded too, but they wouldn't tell.)

Sunfish?  Like the wee voice in parenthesis.

220px-Enormous_Sunfish.jpg

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2 minutes ago, southerncross said:

The forecast, however, works in MAPFRE’s favour. A ridge of high pressure is expected to slow the frontrunners and allow the trailing boats to catch up.

“A complete restart just after the Falklands,” is how leg leader Bouwe Bekking describes it.

LOL! Cape was the navigator on Telefonica who routed the brilliant chase. Ken Read has a great vid about how worrisome it was to be chased down by "that damn blue boat."  Read was rightly worried--Cape got within meters of Puma near the finish from >200 nm back. Cape and Bouwe will be telling war stories.

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6 minutes ago, Varan said:

Donger has good chance of winning this leg. They have the inside on Vestas at the moment and Brunel may be wounded. Hard to image them hitting something hard enough to break a thick aluminum tiller bar without also damaging the rudder itself. Hope it wasn't the starboard rudder.

(Of course Donger might be wounded too, but they wouldn't tell.)

Yeah, or instead we could hope that they are all fit, and have a fair yacht race to the finish in equal circumstances.

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15 minutes ago, Miffy said:

 

Shrug - the team with the most points at the end wins. Except for leg 4, they've outscored DF on every leg. That's all they need. The more points the 3rd/4th place teams pick up along the way the more it hurts DF's chances to make up the difference. It must be tough being Charles because he is chasing points and has to cover potential leg winners - MAPFRE just needs to cover him. 

Then again, Charles has a good chance of winning this Leg.

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13 minutes ago, Miffy said:

If MAPFRE doesn't make the repair - and demasts, then +10.

Please explain why they would loose their mast if the track came off ? 

 

7 minutes ago, southerncross said:

(From the VOR News)

and just six miles west of Cape Horn

Maybe they should put a big ships compass in the middle of that nice office in Alicante.

{and all this cleverness before coffee, ;)

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47 minutes ago, Miffy said:

If I were asked to make a repair down there - I'd bring some spiral ventilation tunnels and a bunch of fans/diesel heaters. more lashings to secure while curing, cut/grind off the needed material - bond it right, wrap it up with the ventilation tunnel and keep it nice and warm for 10 hours. Can't hurt to dry the boat out while parked up too.

I’m pretty sure the team have planned this to the smallest detail, including their toothbrushes. ;)

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1 minute ago, mad said:

I’m pretty sure the team have planned this to the smallest detail, including their toothbrushes. ;)

But are they allowed to bring beer?

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On 3/24/2018 at 8:33 AM, southerncross said:

Time to rethink the glue.  4th time and counting.

At the risk of really hacking off our Kiwi friends, I'll observe that 

Southern Spars has got some splainin' to do. 

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5 minutes ago, AJ Oliver said:

At the risk of really hacking off our Kiwi friends, I'll observe that 

Southern Spars has got some splainin' to do. 

 

When you design a mast - you have to evaluate the entire system and pick your preferred mode of failure. Do you want the mast track to separate or fracture the mast? People keep talking about how the mast system is fragile and failing as if they hadn't watched any southern ocean/round the world racing. I suppose if you want aluminium masts and fairly conservative design like series minis - okay? But this is the Volvo. Before the VOR65 - I'd have estimated that about 50% of teams lost their mast or damaged it to require diversion at some point. A crash gybe in the southern ocean shouldn't leave a boat unscathed. 

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2 minutes ago, Miffy said:

A crash gybe in the southern ocean shouldn't leave a boat unscathed.

They have.  Several crash gybes unscathed actually.  Seems like a weak point in the system that could be addressed.  Doesn't mean the mast will fail if the mast track doesn't.

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19 minutes ago, southerncross said:

 

Congrats to Charles and Pascal for making it round that Horny outcrop this time !

Very proper words from Charles on Scally's loss, and Pascal is mumbling a bit, is obviously tired and hard to understand. Carolijn says she is proud of her 3rd rounding, then becomes rather emotional thinking of John Fisher and his family. It's a special moment for Dongfeng, but they feel for Team Scally and their loss.

 

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9 minutes ago, Miffy said:

 

When you design a mast - you have to evaluate the entire system and pick your preferred mode of failure. Do you want the mast track to separate or fracture the mast? People keep talking about how the mast system is fragile and failing as if they hadn't watched any southern ocean/round the world racing. I suppose if you want aluminium masts and fairly conservative design like series minis - okay? But this is the Volvo. Before the VOR65 - I'd have estimated that about 50% of teams lost their mast or damaged it to require diversion at some point. A crash gybe in the southern ocean shouldn't leave a boat unscathed. 

Good point, but I'll wager that all those boats have crash jibed more than a few times . .

I don't think it can be avoided with the big air, shifty at times, and confused seas, esp. waves coming from different directions. 

and actually, last summer a sailor from our club had his face re-arranged during a crash jibe when the main sheet came across with great force and threw him onto the combings. 

well, actually, to prevent crash jibes there is this rig . . . but it might be too slow and/or put too much downward pressure on the bow in big air. 

(I am no expert, in case you had not figured it out already) 

image.jpeg.9f22bab8c4db3c071387744b4aa1d6a9.jpeg

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19 minutes ago, Miffy said:

 

When you design a mast - you have to evaluate the entire system and pick your preferred mode of failure. Do you want the mast track to separate or fracture the mast? People keep talking about how the mast system is fragile and failing as if they hadn't watched any southern ocean/round the world racing. I suppose if you want aluminium masts and fairly conservative design like series minis - okay? But this is the Volvo. Before the VOR65 - I'd have estimated that about 50% of teams lost their mast or damaged it to require diversion at some point. A crash gybe in the southern ocean shouldn't leave a boat unscathed. 

Sorry Miffy, I am not trying to pick on you, but you are really completely loosing it there.

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3 minutes ago, southerncross said:

You say, "we jibed".  I say, "they gybed".  Let's call the whole thing off.

Let's go sailing without a bloody mast, any number of kites allowed with just some control pods, without glued on bits on it.

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Is the track only attached to the mast with glue? Would've thought there would be some bolts or rivets or whatever? Happy to be wrong. Modern industrial adhesives are insanely good, after all.

And while I'm here RIP John Fisher.

A terrible tragedy and a great loss. Sail on, brother. Fair winds.

 

 

 

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Seems like a lot of crash gybes in this race.  Is it more common for the Volvo boats than the Vendee IMOCA racers?  I also haven't heard of the big multihulls having that happen, probably worse for them.

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5 minutes ago, tama_manu said:

Seems like a lot of crash gybes in this race.  Is it more common for the Volvo boats than the Vendee IMOCA racers?  I also haven't heard of the big multihulls having that happen, probably worse for them.


The big multihulls don't leave Auckland in middle of March and also have the benefit of another additional 10 knots to sail around bad weather. The weather routing and risk management between Vendee and VOR are completely different. When conditions get bad, the IMOCAs button down, reef down, set the advanced autopilot and ride it out below. In the Volvo boats - the competitive pressure, they push push push. 

With the weather patterns clearly changing for the more extreme in recent trends - I suspect VOR will have to adjust the start and finish time more and we won't see as many long stops between Cape Town and Auckland going forward.

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10 minutes ago, Miffy said:


The big multihulls don't leave Auckland in middle of March and also have the benefit of another additional 10 knots to sail around bad weather. The weather routing and risk management between Vendee and VOR are completely different. When conditions get bad, the IMOCAs button down, reef down, set the advanced autopilot and ride it out below. 

A good point. Probably won’t be acknowledged by those in need, but thanks anyway :)

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10 hours ago, stief said:

Thanks for the heads-up on marine.tracker.com (not seeing a likely VOR boat yet  Perhaps these three pleasure craft at https://www.marinetraffic.com/en/ais/home/centerx:-75.1/centery:-56.7/zoom:7

In the meantime, good on Matt Allen (and Australian Yachting). cred Sailorgirl

 

I don't usually have much time for Australian Sailing - but thanks Matt Allen, you have represented, and spoken for us well.

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22 minutes ago, horatio_nelson said:

Is the track only attached to the mast with glue? Would've thought there would be some bolts or rivets or whatever? Happy to be wrong. Modern industrial adhesives are insanely good, after all.

And while I'm here RIP John Fisher.

A terrible tragedy and a great loss. Sail on, brother. Fair winds.

 

 

 

From every report the track is adhesive bonded only, no mechanical fasteners are used. 

It would be interesting to see how the failings compared to height and reefs in place at the time etc

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1 minute ago, mad said:

From every report the track is adhesive bonded only, no mechanical fasteners are used. 

Mad, seem remember they were riveted as well but spaced further apart then, say an alloy mast.

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25 minutes ago, Miffy said:


The big multihulls don't leave Auckland in middle of March and also have the benefit of another additional 10 knots to sail around bad weather. The weather routing and risk management between Vendee and VOR are completely different. When conditions get bad, the IMOCAs button down, reef down, set the advanced autopilot and ride it out below. In the Volvo boats - the competitive pressure, they push push push. 

With the weather patterns clearly changing for the more extreme in recent trends - I suspect VOR will have to adjust the start and finish time more and we won't see as many long stops between Cape Town and Auckland going forward.

 Moreover I don't think the big multihulls ever get into an apparent wind angle that could get them into a crash gybe

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5 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Mad, seem remember they were riveted as well but spaced further apart then, say an alloy mast.

I’m sure someone here can dig up the specs or reports of repairs. 

If they could rivet them, why haven’t any the crews used an emergency repair combination of both?? I’d glue and rivet the fucker back on every time if I could.

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Francis V and staysail discussed rivets IIRC, but the discussion moved on after the point twas made that rivets would create uneven stress points.  Glue was as strong and would be spread the load evenly, both on the track and the mast . . . .Sorry, drive-by-posting, and no recall of specs or reports, sadly. 

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16 minutes ago, stief said:

Francis V and staysail discussed rivets IIRC, but the discussion moved on after the point twas made that rivets would create uneven stress points.  Glue was as strong and would be spread the load evenly, both on the track and the mast . . . .Sorry, drive-by-posting, and no recall of specs or reports, sadly. 

That was pretty much my recollection, the tube laminate spec wasn’t designed for multiple fasteners, if any. 

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Looks to me like a 12 hour delay will be slower than not since the ridge off Uruguay will continue to grow and it could be a long way around it.  But that's a 48 hour forecast, so who knows?

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13 minutes ago, mad said:

That was pretty much my recollection, the tube laminate spec wasn’t designed for multiple fasteners, if any. 

Sorry,: did not recall correctly. http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?/topic/165763-vor-2017-18/&do=findComment&comment=5556559  Glue  vs rivet discussion was elsewhere, but couldn't find it quickly. 

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3 hours ago, southerncross said:

Well,  looks like it will be tight at the leaderboard.

Agreed. More parity than apparent early on.

(I can't help but think what the scoreboard would look like had VS gotten safely into HK in 2nd and then raced to Auckland. Coulda shoulda...)

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FWIW, this is close to the point where the tracker status for MAPF = "SUS", so this the point where they need to restart.

(seemed like an odd choice)

5abd64a2e56d2_ScreenShot2018-03-29at2_50_52PM.png.a0fff959d66beb34b571526de8f2cea8.png

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m115682_crop110015_800x800_proportional_

Vestas 11th Hour Racing by  Jérémie Lecaudey — published Thursday 29th Mar 2018 @ 22:35 UTC

Leg 7 from Auckland to Itajai, day 13 on board Vestas 11th Hour. 29 March, 2018. Cap Horn Rounding. Nick Dana, Simon Fisher, Stacey Jackson, giving a tribute to John Fisher.

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Vestas 11th Hour Racing by  Jérémie Lecaudey — published Thursday 29th Mar 2018 @ 22:35 UTC

Leg 7 from Auckland to Itajai, day 13 on board Vestas 11th Hour. 29 March, 2018. Cap Horn Rounding. The full team happy to be in the Atlantic Ocean after 13 days in the Southern Ocean.

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Vestas 11th Hour Racing by  Jérémie Lecaudey — published Thursday 29th Mar 2018 @ 22:35 UTC

Leg 7 from Auckland to Itajai, day 13 on board Vestas 11th Hour. 29 March, 2018. Cap Horn Rounding. The Volvo Ocean Race had brought a full team to cover the passing of the Cape Horn.

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So tonight I went to a pub ( not the one in the village because it hasn't reopened yet but it's coming ) and the head chef of the most successful longstanding restaurant in the town was espousing about his eight year old daughters upcoming birthday party for which they were paying for a child beautician to paint the nails and face of her and her friends.

I'm hoping that this is an activity unique to Falmouth but regrettably I fear not. Talk about sustaining stereotypes................

Fucked if I know what's going on but I hope something good comes in the end....

Bravo the Cockroaches - Bravo the Ginkgo - Respect for those who are out there doing it xxx

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10 minutes ago, southerncross said:

m115682_crop110015_800x800_proportional_

Vestas 11th Hour Racing by  Jérémie Lecaudey — published Thursday 29th Mar 2018 @ 22:35 UTC

Leg 7 from Auckland to Itajai, day 13 on board Vestas 11th Hour. 29 March, 2018. Cap Horn Rounding. Nick Dana, Simon Fisher, Stacey Jackson, giving a tribute to John Fisher.

One for the brother. 

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I don't recall if there are rivets or not on the mast track but I still think one of the main issues (no pun intended) is the spacing of the cars which are about every meter or so.

Sail area = 161.8 m² X 40 knots = how many kilograms per square inch in a crash gybe?

The mast is 28.4m high.  

Main luff maybe 26m.  

30 - 40 mast track cars handling the above loads makes how much load per car pulling on the track in a crash gybe?

Double the number of cars on the mast.  Decrease the load points by half.  Increase by 50% etc.

There are numerous main/luff attachments at 100% on many different rigs.  Don't need 100% but spreading the load might help lessen the track pulling off.

yysw185224.jpg

 

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3 minutes ago, southerncross said:

I don't recall if there are rivets or not on the mast track but I still think one of the main issues (no pun intended) is the spacing of the cars which are about every meter or so.

Sail area = 161.8 m² X 40 knots = how many kilograms per square inch in a crash gybe?

The mast is 28.4m high.  

Main luff maybe 26m.  

30 - 40 mast track cars handling the above loads makes how much load per car pulling on the track in a crash gybe?

Double the number of cars on the mast.  Decrease the load points by half.  Increase by 50% etc.

There are numerous main/luff attachments at 100% on many different rigs.  Don't need 100% but spreading the load might help lessen the track pulling off.

yysw185224.jpg

 

Food for Southern thought - the wonderful thing about one design :-)

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1 minute ago, rogerfal said:

Food for Southern thought

Where in the bloody hell have you been? 

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1 hour ago, mad said:

I’m sure someone here can dig up the specs or reports of repairs. 

If they could rivet them, why haven’t any the crews used an emergency repair combination of both?? I’d glue and rivet the fucker back on every time if I could.

Good question, it seems to be common practice in composite repairs. And there are special load spreading rivets for thin laminates.

 abulb.JPG

Another contributing factor would be the colder temperatures. It makes the glue more brittle, induces stress in different materials, and increases fatigue as well.

If I would go into the Southern Ocean with a carbon mast and a glued track, I would seriously think about doubling up the stress points of a reefed main with rivets. The glue might still crack, but over a shorter distance, and you might make it safely to the next port.

Where is Francis V. when you need him?  ;)

Oh, and SC, it are just the batten cars that are (point) loaded. More battens would spread that load, but who wants that?

 

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2 minutes ago, Fiji Bitter said:

More battens would spread that load, but who wants that?

Not more battens.  More cars.  One in-between each batten for example.  It's not uncommon to have them more evenly distributed.

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11 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Mapfre blew out the main.

That’s a little tougher to fix in 12 hours compared to gluing track on 

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4 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Not more battens.  More cars.  One in-between each batten for example.  It's not uncommon to have them more evenly distributed.

Sorry, disagree. All the maximum loads will be on the batten cars (and headboard of course), guaranteed.

And even more so in a crash jibe where the battens and up on the runners, methinks.

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3 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Where in the bloody hell have you been? 

Well it's easy for me to become too obsessed with anything but in geographic terms no more than 10 miles north of Falmouth.

My main concern is writing invoices which is always the case.................

The van is now legal although the MOT will have to wait till next week - all's well and has been.

Never been very good at keeping in touch but I'm always here.

Thanks for asking and trust you are well.

Cheers

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18 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Mapfre blew out the main.

Shit, that explains why they went in. 

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8 minutes ago, Fiji Bitter said:

Sorry, disagree. All the maximum loads will be on the batten cars (and headboard of course), guaranteed.

And even more so in a crash jibe where the battens and up on the runners, methinks.

More load maybe but not all.  But lets drop it before Stief wraps us on our knuckles.

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Just now, southerncross said:

More maybe load but not all.  But lets drop it before Stief wraps us on our knuckles.

Nother one for Southern as in North

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5 minutes ago, rogerfal said:

Nother one for Southern as in North

Do you mean a North mainsail on a Southern spar, is asking for problems? (sorry Steif, will stop now)

And good to see you back Roge, just write less invoices, but add a 0.

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1 minute ago, Fiji Bitter said:

Do you mean a North mainsail on a Southern spar, is asking for problems? (sorry Steif, will stop now)

Nah just hoping they know better than me - Stum. 

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I'm guessing Mapfre's spare main will be in Itajai.

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After preparing for long night in front of the screen I lost internet access and missed all the action. Thanks for all the traffic people ..makes it so much easier to catch up. 

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55 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Mapfre blew out the main.

Thanks for the find. Day 2 or 3, huh.  Listened for the main being replaced, but didn't hear that. Did only TBRU replace theirs?. Odd. (oops . . . shakel moment? Sorry, all)

and about time you came back glad you're back, Roger. Cornish wreckers would know what to do :D 

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2 minutes ago, stief said:

Day 2 or 3, huh.  Listened for the main being replaced, but didn't hear that

Blew out 6 miles from the Horn as they were taking in the sheet because the wind had dropped.

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2 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Blew out 6 miles from the Horn as they were taking in the sheet because the wind had dropped.

Ah . . .  that might explain the odd spot they chose to SUS.

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1 minute ago, southerncross said:

Team AkzoNobel by  James Blake — published Friday 30th Mar 2018 @ 01:02 UTC

Leg 7 from Auckland to Itajai, day 13 on board AkzoNobel. 29 March, 2018. Chris Nicolson- 5th time around Cape Horn.

Should have been 6. And he gets to round this one still racing the others. He has earned this moment.

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