southerncross

VOR Leg 7 Auckland to Itajai

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1 hour ago, jack_sparrow said:

After preparing for long night in front of the screen I lost internet access and missed all the action. Thanks for all the traffic people ..makes it so much easier to catch up. 

Ditto, thanks to SC, Stief, Fiji Bitter etc.  for all the info. I have been catching up as well as is obvious; was off the grid for the day, hiking into a glacier actually before the frozen lake to it thaws. Spring is coming.  Lots of action in the VOR.

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4 hours ago, yl75 said:

 Moreover I don't think the big multihulls ever get into an apparent wind angle that could get them into a crash gybe

Good point, when properly sailed and routed, they are always effectively upwind.  They don't try to hold 140-150 TWA.

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I will begin by quoting Peter Finch from the movie Network, "I'm mad as hell, and I'm not going to take it anymore!" 

Take anymore of what? 

Simple. Mr Brian Hancock.

I will put aside the appalling timing of his article and the extreme hurt he has caused to not just those close to John Fisher but the wider sailing community.

I will put aside his insinuation that the crews search and rescue mission ended prematualy. 

I will put aside his entire viewpoint being founded solely on speculation that Mr Fisher was washed overboard, whereas it came to light yesterday, courtesy of a statement from the Scallywag team, that Mr Fisher was in fact not "washed off" the vessel, but "knocked off" by the boom.

However what I won't put aside is that he keeps packaging in a guilded framework of self promotion that the sailing community should sit up and have regard for what he has to say. The experience to  back this up conveinantly ignores the fact that he has never stepped foot on a VO65 and his last Southern Ocean racing outing was 30 years ago in the maxi leadmine "Fazi" that needed a snorkle.

Unfortunately some of you support his utterences, such as the VO65 being "a death trap waiting to happen", and that "the management team at VOR are complicit in the death of John Fisher". 

So if you are one of Hancock's new deciples maybe you should also give thought to his viewpoint that tethers and Personal Floation Devices (PFD's) and by extension, intergral strobe lights and Personel Locator Beacons (PLB's) etc  are detrimental to safety at sea!!

That can't be right I can hear you saying, our new messiah on safety doesn't believe that. Well in his own words.

"This time it’s about the use of life harnesses. Yup as you might imagine I am not really big on them. I think that they give sailors a false sense of security. I have always been a “one hand for the task, one hand for the boat” kind of guy. Knowing that you are not clipped on heightens your awareness. Makes you super sensitive to your surroundings". 

"Seriously, it’s time we all started to think for ourselves again. What has happened to us? Why do we all just follow along like a bunch of sheep? It’s not just pfd’s, it’s everything".

It seems Hancock draws his inspiration on shipboard safety from a brother who lives in the bush in Botswana and never carries a gun even though it’s wildest Africa. His logic is you carry a gun you get careless. You know that you have a gun there to bail you out if you get in trouble. 

It seems without a gun and in sailings case, without a PFD and tether, your senses are heightened according to Hancock. He claims you are then very aware of your surroundings and you never take chances, relying on your senses to become honed and heightened.

Maybe when his brother confronts a lion he goes about talking it to death with gobblygook like his sailing sibling?

If Hancock was advocating the message "stay on board otherwise your potentially dead", no one would disagree. However to go on and effectively say if your dead why bother doning a tether and PFD in the first place because "awareness" without that gear provides greater protection! That is loonyspeak. 

I will leave it to you to decide where  Hancock's views lie in the ongoing discussions, evolution and actions by the world sailing community to improve safety in our sport.

My thinking is his views belong in a piece of his anatomy used when sitting down.

References

http://sailinganarchy.com/2018/03/27/extreme-anger/

http://sailinganarchy.com/2015/10/25/youre-pathetic/

http://sailinganarchy.com/2016/09/16/death-threat-anyone/

Fazi..note low freeboard and deck layout from an era that Hancock considers a safety benchmark and superior to the modern VO65.

fazisi-Barker-photo-3-1024x648.jpg

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Jack, nice write up.  But I think you meant the "Hancock" thread.  That's where all his disciples are.

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Just scrolled the trackers forward a little. Big leg coming up still. Potentially some big winds in the next 10 hours followed by a hole in the wind. Getting round the highs may get tricky and, probably, at least 2 tricky transitions to deal with. About 5 days of hard graft left.

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1 hour ago, jack_sparrow said:

Its there too.. I got out the shotgun stief.

Why pick on me?

OK, but gonna have to give me a chance to recover: that's a lot to unpack!

1- thanks for the link to the B2K--just finished watching the live start. Good bunch of 'mates', I think you'd say. They and their threads can be hard on each other, crude, rude, and hilarious (goats! still shaking my head and chuckling over that one), but I the point I keep seeing, is they have each other's backs. Somehow that's related to your above post . . .  but have to think how. (probably that your implicit thesis, bush guns aside, is that BH's greatest sin is breaking "faith with the boys"- or whatever term NBG would use, because BH broke faith with her. )

2. Had to interrupt watching the latest Tally Ho history, thanks to a  tip from SC many months ago. Somehow that is related. Think it's the quiet British way he spends his youth and life restoring a boat that would seem to have no future utility other than being the vehicle of a dream of rugged but quiet individualists  . . .  and BH's article has broken faith with that too. I could just see someone showing up in that boatyard and crapping on the efforts of those who quietly show up, chip in lending a hand. a few bucks, a meal, for no apparent reason. Once upon a time, I think BH would have chipped in too. Somehow that part broke too.

3.Just about to find this book that Ian Walker tweeted about

which reminds me. Thanks again for the history of the Cape Horners you and (paps? DP? both? will have to check; "search term cargo is king will get me there). The posters here "got it." somehow that is related. random posters stayed out of the discussion, despite the tons of material in those vids trolls could have used to soapbox about safety at sea, exploitation of youthful adventurers, boys clubs, yada yada yada. 2 dead per voyage, no? Pretty wet boat. Should have been a steamer . . ..  True. Not the point though.

4. Really need to get you in a pub sometime over that history of the race piece, (don't take this the wrong way phrase goes here), I think is still more captivating that the above. And that's related too. I still think the underlying thesis of that piece should have been that the race has given those that 'get it' a chance to repeatedly fail, and fail, and fail, trying for the impossible and impractical chance to maybe get it right once. Sure some elephant will plop down and mock their efforts, but poopsie doesn't 'get' the point of the honour of the chance to fail.

5. Something else, can't remember. Oh, right. I should answer you here. Something about NBG and Potter and Hayles and Blue and you and more already have that thread closed. BH struck out, 3 of the 5 last times he's gone to bat. RIP.

Oh yes. RIP BH. Jack, your piece above is redundant. BH has been dismissed.

Nonetteless, I liked the outrageousness of the pigmy analogy. Bindi has company.

Thanks. 

now to figure out what  you asked me . . . . 

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Turn The Tide On Plastic by  Sam Greenfield — published Friday 30th Mar 2018 @ 03:55 UTC

Leg 7 from Auckland to Itajai, day 13 on board Turn the Tide on Plastic. Rounding Cape Horn. 29 March, 2018.

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Turn The Tide On Plastic by  Sam Greenfield — published Friday 30th Mar 2018 @ 03:50 UTC

Leg 7 from Auckland to Itajai, day 13 on board Turn the Tide on Plastic. Rounding Cape Horn. 29 March, 2018.

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15 minutes ago, Zander said:

Just scrolled the trackers forward a little. Big leg coming up still. Potentially some big winds in the next 10 hours followed by a hole in the wind. Getting round the highs may get tricky and, probably, at least 2 tricky transitions to deal with. About 5 days of hard graft left.

Thanks. . .  see what you mean now.. Thought Cape/ Bouwe were just winding us up of a MAPF chance to get back in it. Cool if it's more than remotely possible.I guess the inside track might offer Vial a path. Nothing to lose, I guess.

5abdaf07a825f_ScreenShot2018-03-29at9_28_45PM.png.04fa8a4f052d00e95736f041d2e086cd.png

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There looks to be only one potential  passing lane left and that is the angle of attack into the right hand lane of the high developing off Argentina that they encounter north of the Falklands. We might see a backmarker or two decide to go for broke here.

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1 hour ago, stief said:

Had to interrupt watching the latest Tally Ho history, thanks to a  tip from SC many months ago. Somehow that is related. Think it's the quiet British way he spends his youth and life restoring a boat that would seem to have no future utility other than being the vehicle of a dream of rugged but quiet individualists

Thanks Stief.  I had missed the latest episode.  And what a great history of the boat it has.

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2 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Its there too.. I got out the shotgun stief.

 

1 hour ago, stief said:

Why pick on me?

OK, but gonna have to give me a chance to recover: that's a lot to unpack

Not you stief...a figure of speech.. shotgun = wide hit, bullet = small hit on Hancock.

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29 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

The Dong hooking it around the Horn.

 

With that video  Martin Keruzore really hits it out of the park. The way he captured the almost spooky light at cape horn and the short interviews with the crew are very well done.

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1 hour ago, southerncross said:

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Turn The Tide On Plastic by  Sam Greenfield — published Friday 30th Mar 2018 @ 03:55 UTC

Leg 7 from Auckland to Itajai, day 13 on board Turn the Tide on Plastic. Rounding Cape Horn. 29 March, 2018.

m115702_crop110015_800x800_proportional_

Turn The Tide On Plastic by  Sam Greenfield — published Friday 30th Mar 2018 @ 03:50 UTC

Leg 7 from Auckland to Itajai, day 13 on board Turn the Tide on Plastic. Rounding Cape Horn. 29 March, 2018.

I’m happy Sam got himself in the picture. That’s a happy crew there. Goofball Boat Mom FTW. :)

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Impressive work by Dongfeng. 10 miles behind at the horn, they have overtaken Vestas. Mapfre is on the move again, hope they managed to fix the track and the main. Brunel seems to be feeling the effects of lighter winds at the Falklands. Battle between TToP and Akzo could also get good.

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3 hours ago, Sea Breeze 74 said:

Has anyone seen the crazy route the tracker is predicting? Got to be good Mapfre!

Screen Shot 2018-03-30 at 4.32.46 PM.png

It was like that yesterday night already, I guess they have set up the Le Maire strait as a way point, time to correct that ...

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4 hours ago, stief said:

Why pick on me?

OK, but gonna have to give me a chance to recover: that's a lot to unpack!

1- thanks for the link to the B2K--just finished watching the live start. Good bunch of 'mates', I think you'd say. They and their threads can be hard on each other, crude, rude, and hilarious (goats! still shaking my head and chuckling over that one), but I the point I keep seeing, is they have each other's backs. Somehow that's related to your above post . . .  but have to think how. (probably that your implicit thesis, bush guns aside, is that BH's greatest sin is breaking "faith with the boys"- or whatever term NBG would use, because BH broke faith with her. )

2. Had to interrupt watching the latest Tally Ho history, thanks to a  tip from SC many months ago. Somehow that is related. Think it's the quiet British way he spends his youth and life restoring a boat that would seem to have no future utility other than being the vehicle of a dream of rugged but quiet individualists  . . .  and BH's article has broken faith with that too. I could just see someone showing up in that boatyard and crapping on the efforts of those who quietly show up, chip in lending a hand. a few bucks, a meal, for no apparent reason. Once upon a time, I think BH would have chipped in too. Somehow that part broke too.

3.Just about to find this book that Ian Walker tweeted about

which reminds me. Thanks again for the history of the Cape Horners you and (paps? DP? both? will have to check; "search term cargo is king will get me there). The posters here "got it." somehow that is related. random posters stayed out of the discussion, despite the tons of material in those vids trolls could have used to soapbox about safety at sea, exploitation of youthful adventurers, boys clubs, yada yada yada. 2 dead per voyage, no? Pretty wet boat. Should have been a steamer . . ..  True. Not the point though.

4. Really need to get you in a pub sometime over that history of the race piece, (don't take this the wrong way phrase goes here), I think is still more captivating that the above. And that's related too. I still think the underlying thesis of that piece should have been that the race has given those that 'get it' a chance to repeatedly fail, and fail, and fail, trying for the impossible and impractical chance to maybe get it right once. Sure some elephant will plop down and mock their efforts, but poopsie doesn't 'get' the point of the honour of the chance to fail.

5. Something else, can't remember. Oh, right. I should answer you here. Something about NBG and Potter and Hayles and Blue and you and more already have that thread closed. BH struck out, 3 of the 5 last times he's gone to bat. RIP.

Oh yes. RIP BH. Jack, your piece above is redundant. BH has been dismissed.

Nonetteless, I liked the outrageousness of the pigmy analogy. Bindi has company.

Thanks. 

now to figure out what  you asked me . . . . 

 

3 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

The Dong hooking it around the Horn.

 

Obviously the shrooms are good this year Stief, but I think I get it.

These are not normal people, far from it. They hear a different beat and have their own sense of success, loyalty and what it means to live on the edge. They fart in the general direction of opinionated safety consumed armchair adventurers. They are warriors of a kind, pushing the limits of what is thought possible.

I have huge respect for the solo sailors but this is something completely different. They drive these boats hard for weeks at a time, they don't route themselves around the weather they search it out and take it head on.

Many things in this world are dangerous, some of us try it on for size but it only fits a few.

Shackleton, Hillary, Senna, Kingsford Smith, Houdini and others would "get it". The huge risk is the reward and simultaneously the enemy. I included Jacks video because you can see it in their faces. One of their own is down and it weighs heavily on them but they go on and rely on each other to stay alive as it has always been.

Back to scheduled broadcasting.
 

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Something broken on Mapfre’s boom end in the pictures

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20 minutes ago, LuisC said:

Nice find LuisC. We should let you off with the usual Newbie welcome for this :-). Amazing that just round the corner from the raging Southern Ocean a little piece of tranquillity can be found.

SS

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33 minutes ago, LuisC said:

Thank you so much for posting these, Luis. As Silex said, they are awesome. True artists at work. I am no expert by far (no pun) but I am amazed at how quickly this got completed. 

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9 minutes ago, shanghaisailor said:

We should let you off with the usual Newbie welcome for this :-)

Maybe because I am a very old Newbie... just from 2012 ;-)

Only writing when I have something interesting to tell.

Luis

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Mapre repair pics now on Raw Content.

Is it possible Mapre will take a hard left and sail with the Falklands to starboard?

Luis, writing only when you have something interesting to tell is a wise idea, I am starting to agree.

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On ‎28‎-‎3‎-‎2018 at 12:36 PM, northsea junkie said:

By the way, this same Roy Heiner witnessed the MOB situation on ABNAMRO II when Hans Horrevoets (also Dutchman) was wiped overboard and was declared deceased. He told  also that the crew then made the decision to continue with the race. Which the widow didn't appreciate, like many others.

But in theory it still stays  the best way for the crew to deal mentally with the loss and also to honour the victim

Now two days later, all boats have past Cap Horn except Scallywag. They all did a right and honourable little ritual in memorandum of Fisher.

I would say that's not only the proper way but also the logical sound way to deal with and close the emotional  processing.
So I keep wondering about the flee of Scallywag to Chili. And also the pampering of the Regatta Control in Allicante ( "first to a safe haven").
What safe? If they can sail to Chili why not rounding the Cap? 

Its more than obvious that this would the only real and sound way to deal with their emotions and give them the opportunity not to rest with a trauma.

In Yachting  World magazine april 2018 David Witt is described with words like ebullient, big character, big presence, big personality, etc."We never gave up in Scallywag".

I'm 72 years old and I witnessed in my life several fatal and near fatal accidents. Also including my self. That give me the right to adress to Witty:

" come on David, now its time to behave like a real captain, set course to the Cap. You have to!! "

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Wow that's incredible, not the way it says in the manual necessarily but who cares?

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4 minutes ago, northsea junkie said:

Now two days later, all boats have past Cap Horn except Scallywag. They all did a right and honourable little ritual in memorandum of Fisher.

I would say that's not only the proper way but also the logical sound way to deal with and close the emotional  processing.
So I keep wondering about the flee of Scallywag to Chili. And also the pampering of the Regatta Control in Allicante ( "first to a safe haven").
What safe? If they can sail to Chili why not rounding the Cap? 

Its more than obvious that this would the only real and sound way to deal with their emotions and give them the opportunity not to rest with a trauma.

In Yachting  World magazine april 2018 David Witt is described with words like ebullient, big character, big presence, big personality, etc."We never gave up in Scallywag".

I'm 72 years old and I witnessed in my life several fatal and near fatal accidents. Also including my self. That's give the right to adress to Witty:

come on 

Yeah that didn't quite work out hey?

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Lol, But I find it inappropriate now and here to talk about my personal experience.
Sorry maybe another time. I think the focus now should be on Scallywag and John Fisher.

 

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9 minutes ago, northsea junkie said:

..What safe? If they can sail to Chili why not rounding the Cap?.. .." come on David, now its time to behave like a real captain, set course to the Cap. You have to!! "

They definitely have busted people...maybe even busted gear doing the SAR etc. How about leaving the armchair speculation to Hancock.

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Yes when there is practically no information, people start to speculate based on what they know. 

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20 minutes ago, northsea junkie said:

 

In Yachting  World magazine april 2018 David Witt is described with words like ebullient, big character, big presence, big personality, etc."We never gave up in Scallywag".

I'm 72 years old and I witnessed in my life several fatal and near fatal accidents. Also including my self. That give me the right to adress to Witty:

" come on David, now its time to behave like a real captain, set course to the Cap. You have to!! "

April 2018? 

I’m sure they discussed the option of continuing. We will get more info on that later. For now, we should respect their decision. They have a good reason behind it - that’s the only sure thing right now. 

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Yes you'r right. But my excuse is my military education many, many years ago. There was a training to cope with situations like this.

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40 minutes ago, northsea junkie said:

stuff

I think we have a sit com on our hands.

Run the conversation from post #2840 doing the accents in your head, it's hysterical.

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59 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

They definitely have busted people...maybe even busted gear doing the SAR etc. How about leaving the armchair speculation to Hancock.

Your doing a great job Jacky-boy, it's awesome that you jump on any dissenters, make sure the line is maintained in the best interests of the VoR.  Give it to em!

Leave the speculation to the professionals!  At times though, it's hard to pick the speculation from the facts when the official story is mixed up with pure speculation like Fish being unconscious when he went over!   Only Fish would have known.  See the problems here?

But ignore that shit Jacky-boy, point to how well the leaders are doing!  Let's go racing it's awesome!

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Map-ers is a machine. Interesting that they had shore crew waiting at CH but weren't necessarily intending to stop. Should be interesting to see if they can make any headway on the rest of the boats with a patched up main.

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Speak his name and he shall appear. Actually I have had a lot on my plate for a while.

I'll add a personal note about John Fisher's loss. He lived here in Adelaide, and his club - Christies Beach - is a bit further south from mine. I never net John, but it is a small community here, and Adelaide is highly connected. He knew and sailed with people that I know and sail with. I was having a beer after sailing last week with one of them, and we were talking about comments John had made about the safety and conditions on board in the context of the weather bearing down on the fleet. Hearing about the MOB was bad enough, then realising who it was, and waiting, and hoping for some miracle was bad for people everywhere. The reaction here has been widespread.  Everyone I know had heard, sailors or not. 

I think the reaction asking for Scallywag to rejoin and complete the leg is understandable. Not for any other reason than it gives the rest of us an outlet and a sense of closure. If we see the crew bridge that gap we can travel with them. 

 

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Thanks for those photos Luis.  You know I'm itching to post them all here.

Remarkable feat by the Mapfre shore team.  And like Paps said, a different breed these sailors.  Affecting repairs like this in a yard on a sunny summer's day would be task enough.  But after the ride they just had and down there in the cold?  Monumental task.  The right stuff for sure.  

Edit:  By the time I slumbered they made the repair and resumed the race.

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MAPFRE by  Ugo Fonollá — published Friday 30th Mar 2018 @ 11:34 UTC

Leg 7 from Auckland to Itajai, day 13 on board MAPFRE, Crew picture rounding Cape Horn after resume the race, 30 March, 2018.

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There has been a lot of "maintenance" on the these new breed of Harken winches. Too many plastic bits to save weight?

m115726_crop110015_800x800_proportional_ 

MAPFRE by  Ugo Fonollá — published Friday 30th Mar 2018 @ 09:01 UTC

Leg 7 from Auckland to Itajai, day 12 on board MAPFRE, Sophier Ciszek fixing winches, 30 March, 2018.

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In the last live from Mapfre, Ñeti repeats more or less the same from the last video, but he says that they have restarted without the main. The sail in insaid the boat, for finish the dry and cure process of the adhesive. They expect to hoist it tonight.

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Just now, silex said:

In the last live from Mapfre, Ñeti repeats more or less the same from the last video, but he says that they have restarted without the main. The sail in insaid the boat, for finish the dry and cure process of the adhesive. They expect to hoist it tonight.

Thanks. I thought they might do that.

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Since NORBowGirl said they often bypass the front page, thought that might be the same for others... Here's a cut-n-paste -- sentiment that I appreciate and akin to what I feel planning and embarking on remote, solo motorcycle trips, which many people also don't understand.

Anyways...

 

the call

I didn’t know John Fisher, but I know many offshore sailors and a few solo circumnavigators. Offshore Sailors aren’t caught unaware, we are learned, intentional Sailors. We assess the high risks and contemplate the consequences before we untie our spirits from their mooring and head out to sea. We aren’t frightened by the dark prospects of being lost at sea; we are frightened by not giving life the chance to be lived to its fullest.

Fifteen years ago, I experienced losing a close friend offshore. It’s wasn’t easy for me. It’s not easy for anyone. As tough as we Sailors appear to be, we are an emotional lot.

Below I’ve included some words that helped me understand why I sought and aimed for Cape Horn. I hope by sharing these words, they help people understand the spirit of a sailor like John Fisher and the many of us who wander about the open waters of this earth.

The Island of Cape Horn lies at the end of the world, within reach of a sailor’s imagination, yet seemingly forever beyond their physical grasp. The mere task of crossing a line to start a quest to round Cape Horn is enough of a trial to turn back multitudes of seasoned sailors.

I don’t know what drives us to carry on and venture beyond known limits for days upon days, pacing the march of relentless storms to harness their frightening winds and live among ireful waves traveling unheeded around the high latitudes of the southern hemisphere. It’s an unexplainable character in a human being. A character neither good or bad.
For me, long ago, during a dark night at sea, battered beyond personal recognition by incessant winds and angry seas, I thought of these Cape Horn sailors battling a lottery of luck, altered only slightly by the thinnest differences of persistence and skill, to determine who passes Cape Horn and who settles to the bottom of the lonely sea.

Like a bacteria, the thought of rounding Cape Horn entered my life through cracks in my weathered hands and permeated my body, festering in my mind and soul, and leaving me infected with a petition to search out this darkest corner of the oceans. To sail past it, not as a conquering hero, but as a respected inhabitant of the earth, standing in honored tribute to the forces of nature and even greater, those of the universe.

Every unfulfilled minute of the past 40 years, this festering germ has reminded me that it controls my weakness as it taunts the disconnect between my imagination and reality. I try to dismiss it, but it’s futile. It drives me beyond reason. Cape Horn looms as the summit of sailing.

– David Rearick

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Bouwe Blog 64
Painful
The southern ocean just doesn't want to let off us on the hook and keep us fully in its grip. The wind direction and prognoses are such that we are still not really heading north, tight reach in 28-35 knots in still very cold water of around 8 degrees. It is also painful to see we will lose every position rapport, the boats behind getting the more lifted breeze. There is one forecast where Mapfre even will win this leg. But that is yacht racing, not always fun, never predictable and that makes it special.

The coldest part of the leg
Writing this report in my on deck watch time, since we are jib reaching, so only the mainsail needs to be adjusted frequently, so only three on deck, but they are getting pasted with cold water and air.....yes, this is the coldest part of the entire leg.

19 days
On deck it is horrible, cold and miserable, the waves keep bashing into your face and body, face and fingers are numb even with full protection. We were just smiling, if this was a soccer team, then most likely hardly anybody would have been any more on the field. But we play a match for 19 days, no stopping and only complaining a tiny little bit :-)
And yes, we still do love our sport, next week we will have forgotten all the bad things or at least almost all.

Cheers,

Bouwe
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Great live show today.  Very informative explanation and cool video of Mapfre’s repairs. Unbelievable they could fix both the mast track AND main sail simultaneously, and do it in a little over 12 hours in cold, wet, and salty conditions.  According to Xabi, the main sail cannot he hoisted for at least 24 hours, so they are sailing on headsail alone for the moment. Pretty impressively that they were able to claw back a mile in Brunel in the last sked. 

Also, great videos of the boats crossing the Horn. 

I loved the Charles interview. He didn’t have full information about what happened to MAPFRE, but recognized this is a huge opportunity for DF, and they will keep pushing even though they have been lacking in the sleep department. 

Finally, some heart felt tributes to John Fisher. Great stuff all around. 

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40 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

The elastic band is getting smaller with the Paintwagon the big mover. Getting their Mojo back?

"Paintwagon"... bah-ha-ha!

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At first, I was surprised that Mapfre was so quick to resume racing.  I was thinking... yes, they can talk about the possibility of a restart if the fleet hits light winds...  but that probably isn't realistic.  They're unlikely to do better than last among finishers in this leg.  Under those circumstances, minimizing the impact to their prospects for the next leg would be the priority, and spending a few more hours (or even a day) anchored to let the repair dry and to test its strength, etc, might be better for that purpose than hurrying back out to sea.  If the repair fails a day from now, they'll have a real mess trying to get to Itajai in time to prepare properly for the next leg.

But then I realized why I think they were in a hurry to get out of there...  The huge weather system that's been following the fleet was coming in.  Their anchorage may be getting pounded soon, and the waters on the race course in that area are going to be ugly.  They needed to go ahead and get going to stay ahead of that system and get clear of its path.  (Of course, there's also the benefit that if the fleet has a park-up, or someone breaks something, they might still be able to regain a position)  I'm still thinking, though, that as long as they're able to stay clear of that system, they might as well wait longer than prescribed before hoisting the main.

Question...  Does flexing of the mast hinder the drying or quality of the repair?  When they said they're sailing under headsails only, all I could think is that it must be causing more mast flex than usual, without the main to balance the headsails, and that the mast flex may be pumping with the waves, etc.  I guess if the track is equally flexible and it's ratcheted to the mast in several places, its flex may match the mast's and allow quality drying to proceed...  but I'd be worried about that track popping off the first time they load it back up.

 

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2 hours ago, southerncross said:

There has been a lot of "maintenance" on the these new breed of Harken winches. Too many plastic bits to save weight?

 

Might be the case, but it could also be that Mapfre simply used the opportunity of the moment to really do only maintenance because i kinda doubt that all 12 people were working on their 2-3 main problems (main sail, mast track, boom, ...) all the time.

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20 minutes ago, Your Mom said:

Question...  Does flexing of the mast hinder the drying or quality of the repair?  When they said they're sailing under headsails only, all I could think is that it must be causing more mast flex than usual, without the main to balance the headsails, and that the mast flex may be pumping with the waves, etc.  I guess if the track is equally flexible and it's ratcheted to the mast in several places, its flex may match the mast's and allow quality drying to proceed...  but I'd be worried about that track popping off the first time they load it back up.

 

Akzo did their whole repair to the mast track while sailing with only a headsail. Mapfre quite possible have spent at least some time curing their mast track repair without sailing since suspending had the mandatory 12 hour "rest" period. So i think it should be possible that at least that area could work for the rest of the leg.

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2 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Now there finally heading places where paint dries.

Dry painters, haha.

Liked hearing a cheerful Nicho recalling childhood reading in the above vid.

Here is the standalone bit (thanks Renny)

 

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^ You're welcome. I like this chap, he does not hold back his emotional state, rare for an Aussie ;)

More Mapfre and other stuff:
 

 

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12 minutes ago, Rennmaus said:

^ You're welcome. I like this chap, he does not hold back his emotional state, rare for an Aussie ;)

More Mapfre and other stuff:

 

Thanks, as ever. Speaking of rare emotional states, I have subbed in a time-stamped link above -- the moment when Xabi (I think), has a rare outburst. Funny-not funny-moment.

and Ñeti's foulies all messed up would make a fine "SANS FILTROS" episode prize. ;)  How he can be so cheerful is right on after all the work he did.

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8 hours ago, LuisC said:

Maybe because I am a very old Newbie... just from 2012 ;-)

Only writing when I have something interesting to tell.

Luis

Thanks Luis, best new find of the thread IMHO. I have some questions about crediting infosailing.net. They are MAPF's commercial media/events company, right?  I'm not sure whether to thank you, or that company, for their MAPF galleries, especially the one that puts names and faces to the shore team.  

Really liked this pic . Any advice on how to credit and display it in this thread? I haven't seen if I can sign up for an account there yet.

https://infosailing.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/RACING-EN-REGATA/G0000lqfd_SovwXg/I0000jebqIIyUpVE/C0000Y503PSgYSK8

(help, SC? Couldn't  figure out how to display it here)

And if you know of a similar gallery/ source for the earlier editions Campos ran, would be great to have those. The old 2012 Telefonica campaign video galleries are very hard to negotiate these days ( Flash pages, ugh)

Thanks again. Glad you and Silex are posting. 

 

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7 minutes ago, stief said:

Thanks Luis, best new find of the thread IMHO. I have some questions about crediting infosailing.net. They are MAPF's commercial media/events company, right?  I'm not sure whether to thank you, or that company, for their MAPF galleries, especially the one that puts names and faces to the shore team.  

 

Hi Stief

You can find it from images on Mapfre team page: http://desafiomapfre.com/2017-fotos/

luis

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43 minutes ago, stief said:

Thanks, as ever. Speaking of rare emotional states, I have subbed in a time-stamped link above -- the moment when Xabi (I think), has a rare outburst. Funny-not funny-moment.

and Ñeti's foulies all messed up would make a fine "SANS FILTROS" episode prize. ;)  How he can be so cheerful is right on after all the work he did.

Really interesting video, watching the work. However the shore crew guy, Neti  (yes, gluey foulies are a real fashion statement for his fan club!) and this time even Xabi talked really fast in Spanish. Brief summary translation anyone:  Silex or Luis?

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13 minutes ago, LuisC said:

Hi Stief

You can find it from images on Mapfre team page: http://desafiomapfre.com/2017-fotos/

luis

Thanks. I was asking about crediting infosailing, the company, I've been using JBC's index http://vor.jbcsystems.com 

m115593_crop110015_800x800_proportional_1522284604E91E.jpg

OBR Ugo Fonollá
description

Leg 7 from Auckland to Itajai, day 11 on board MAPFRE, Aerial shot, the crew were peeling with 35-40 kts of wind, 28 March, 2018.

filename 13_07_180328_MPF_UGF_00011.jpg
photo M115593 crop110015 800x800 proportional 1522284604E91E.jpg
published Thu, 29 Mar 2018 00:47:58 UTC
team MAPFRE

 

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