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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  
southerncross

VOR Leg 7 Auckland to Itajai

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3 hours ago, despacio avenue said:

Ditto. I take personal responsibility for getting into the down vote/BH/random/troll stuff, Not my battle and wish it was not in this thread. This race has made me sad. The finger pointing and baseless speculation has too. Not in the mood for a lot of negativity. But I  like the teams, the crew stories, the competition, and the information and expertise this forum provides. 

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4 minutes ago, animeproblem said:

Blowing my cover on the pretend ignore, but please fuck off & die already.

So you lied.  That's a required trait for VOR wet boat lovers.  They love the carnage of the crew, love to see injuries, cut faces, back injuries and submerged decks, but can;t admit that it's all designed for clicks.

Al-Pacino-LaughSmoking.gif

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1 hour ago, jack_sparrow said:

Chay..fuck the good old days of Anglo boats having gas ovens and a diesel Eberspacher heater. 

Yea with an Eberspacher or a webasto and few metres of hose with a sail draped over the top you could oven a whole rig up :)

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8 hours ago, stief said:

Thanks for the link SC, and Paps for the post. Strange watching that, and wondering if John Fisher was there. 

 

1 hour ago, angles said:

Fish was on board.

 

43 minutes ago, paps49 said:

 

The perfect place for a bit of troll sport, then move on.

 

 

Yes I wondered the same, seems he was.

Yes Fish a long term Rags member. While looking cool in that vid that Frankenboat boat put together by a passionate and very knowlegable owner, but unfortunately one with the means but had short pockets and where Witty to his credit as PM put it together around that constraint is a fail.

For instance they bought a discarded keel assembly from WOXI and it tried to fall off at the first outing in a northern race after that under new ownership, who is the current Scally underwriter.

While the VOR has been happening she has been revamped. When this edition is over and she cranks up again it will be interesting to watch as nearly all the worlds competitive 100's now reside in Oz and Witty has learned heaps from this outing.

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Randumb time to wake up your Brian Hancock down-vote sock you gave birth to this time last night from that cardboard box you live in behind TacoBills that luckily has free WiFi.

Baby Brian should be primed and ready to go to take over after you have exceeded your down vote limit against me today. 

Brian Hancock.jpg

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42 minutes ago, random said:

So you lied.  That's a required trait for VOR wet boat lovers.  They love the carnage of the crew, love to see injuries, cut faces, back injuries and submerged decks, but can;t admit that it's all designed for clicks.

Al-Pacino-LaughSmoking.gif

assclown.jpg

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2 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Month  ?????

He gets a new trophy every month for his cabinet

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR8wJTY-VVfS70DW7Vp__b

 

Because he down voted my last two posts, I responded in kind and now he has done more down voting. I can't be bothered responding. I do find it funny but his reaction to the sock down voting seems to show that he actually cares about his reputation points. LOL what an ass clown.... 

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13 minutes ago, hoppy said:

He gets a new trophy every month for his cabinet

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR8wJTY-VVfS70DW7Vp__b

 

Because he down voted my last two posts, I responded in kind and now he has done more down voting. I can't be bothered responding. I do find it funny but his reaction to the sock down voting seems to show that he actually cares about his reputation points. LOL what an ass clown.... 

The number is irrelevant, not sure you have noticed but there are no prizes awarded.  No cash-in offer.

The interesting part is the reaction of fuckwits who downvote people, then are pissed off when they. are, like you.

Funni shit dat

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8 minutes ago, random said:

The number is irrelevant, not sure you have noticed but there are no prizes awarded.  No cash-in offer.

The interesting part is the reaction of fuckwits who downvote people, then are pissed off when they. are, like you.

Funni shit dat

joojr.jpg

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44 minutes ago, random said:

The interesting part is the reaction of fuckwits who downvote people, then are pissed off...

 

14 hours ago, random said:

 

Next time you post a personal attack on me, or modnar downvotes me arbitrarily, I will report you for persistent stalking..

 

Strange logic but maybe understandable...my guess is the root cause of your ailment is you are being bullied by the Post Office on account your cardboard box home does not have a proper street address??

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3 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

 

Strange logic but maybe understandable...my guess is the root cause of your ailment is you are being bullied by the Post Office on account your cardboard box does not have a proper street address??

that's why Randum is a 

latest?cb=20130426170542

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Thanks for that engling...Scally looking good for the breeze backing and cracking up.

I see we share a common interest.."Firmness, and Delight"...How is that rudder of yours holding up btw?

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3 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

How is that rudder of yours holding up btw?

Centreboard maybe? Still in one piece, but not getting much use, unfortunately. I don't recall having any rudder issues.

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21 minutes ago, thengling said:

Centreboard maybe? Still in one piece, but not getting much use, unfortunately. I don't recall having any rudder issues.

Oggh dear..a delicate time. My only suggestion is to resist the temptation as using them appendage things with those unauthorised to do so, leads to one living in a trailer park.   

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No rest for the wicked; sleep deprivation in extreme conditions.

TToP-sleep.jpg

Sleep deprivation in extreme conditions in the world’s most remote oceans.

Right now, the majority of the Volvo Ocean Race fleet are in safe harbour in the port of Itajai Brazil after certainly one of the most gruelling Southern Pacific and Southern Atlantic Ocean passages in the 45 year history of the race.

Leg 7 of this incredible sailing adventure sent a brave fleet of sailors to the bottom of the world, deep in the Pacific Southern Ocean where they experienced incredibly close and intense racing, bitter cold sea temperatures and sub zero wind chill while barrelling towards Cape Horn at incredible speeds. Enroute to Cape Horn the fleet lost a well-loved and highly respected comrade when John Fisher was sadly lost overboard in an accident that reminds us all of the reality of sailing in these waters*.

The brutality of this ocean endurance race is clearly showing in the souls, voices and eyes of these incredible sailors. One of the strongest observations is simply how physically and emotionally demolished they are from dealing with relentless weather conditions and huge seas. They have been living in a permanently cold and wet environment, managing a cocktail of fear and adrenalin. The loss of a dear friend is a constant and daunting reminder of the possible consequences that face them all. Each day they have to execute manoeuvres that require enormous amounts of physical effort with very little chance or opportunity to properly rest. There is no eight hour sleep and a good meal to see them through. There is no time for a solid recovery. They move through each day on a broken resting rhythm within their watch system fuelled on a freeze-dried diet.

In the world of professional offshore yacht racing, our fitness training tends to focus on strength, resistance, flexibility and cardiovascular health along with a balanced diet. However, two of the most important factors that do not receive the attention they deserve are the damaging and debilitating effects of emotional trauma and a lack of sleep. In the text below I am going to focus on sleep, often said to be more devastating to your health than a bad diet, stress and even smoking. Lack of sleep is a well-known and utilised form of human torture.

So how do sailors manage sleep in the world’s most gruelling offshore yacht race? For many in this fleet, coming to terms with the punishment that this race inflicts on even the most experienced veteran is an art of dealing with discomfort that can be partially relieved through a better understanding of our bodies, good equipment, planning and a little science. Hopefully some of the following insights will help not only sailors, but also any reader juggling the ever-growing demands of day-to-day life on land. Here are some insights and learnings that I have discovered or received in my time chasing new horizons in crazy craft with inspiring people on the most beautiful but unforgiving oceans.

There are two main aspects in connection to sleep deprivation; the physical and the mental.

Let’s begin with the physical as it is the easiest to rectify and I shall write this article to sailors but the content and message is easily applicable to us all. We all have a responsibility to ourselves and those around us to be functioning well, and in order to function to the best of our ability we simply need to be rested and rejuvenated as much as any environment will permit. If you or one of your teammates is struggling from a genuine lack of sleep then protect each other; manage, hydrate, feed, rest and recover. You are a team, you are reliant on each individual for results and you are all intricate parts of a performance machine. This applies to business environments as well as friendships and your family unit. Look after each other and also allow yourself to be open to the protection and help of others. In a basic summary, it is simple: always be sure that you are maximising your rest, recovery and sleep!

The mental effects of sleep deprivation are the most dangerous and disruptive to any individual or team in a performance or high-risk environment. There are several stages of mental fatigue, from just plain irritability or moodiness, to outright delusional. The latter is simply unacceptable in a team environment unless something catastrophic has happened. I have often heard sailors bragging about how little they slept during a yacht race. The reality is that, generally unbeknown to that person, they have most likely let their teammates down through their inability to perform, communicate and think at a level that provides the maximum positive contribution to overall performance. It takes a clear and fresh mind to perform well.

For this race it is important for the sailors to understand the cycles of sleep and waking, and develop simple strategies to improve sleep quality, but the most necessary item of sleep consideration has to be the ability to get to sleep quickly. When sailing offshore we often catnap for 15 to 30 minutes at a time or enter deeper sleep for around one hour. Once you have developed a watch system or identified a potential catnap window, between manoeuvres for example, you must manage to fall into a state of sleep quickly in order to maximise the small window of time that you have to achieve best rest and recovery. This can be achieved in several ways.

The art of catnapping encompasses the ability to get to sleep quickly. Catnapping is an important skill and a basic technique that each individual crewmember needs to embrace and learn. One way of training to catnap that has worked for me has been a process of routine disruption. In preparation for offshore racing (particularly solo endurances races) I try to heavily disrupt my routine over several days, a few weeks or months prior to the event, to develop the ability to confuse my headspace. This enables me to drift quickly off to sleep. Too often we dwell on specific thoughts that stir emotions whilst trying to get to sleep and these thoughts need to be pushed out of our mind.

This training is not recommended close to the start. It is a process of developing a skill that will stay with you for a very long time, weeks, months and even years in some cases.

In reality, a good understanding of the art of catnapping is valuable to us all, as we should be protecting our personal health against lack of sleep. I remember a day on the water with a journalist who was clearly intrigued by the sleep deprivation studies and assessments that I was undertaking with Dr. Claudio Stampi and Boston University. When I asked her why she was so interested she responded, “I am a mother to a new born, and I am about to throw my husband out the window!”

As our conversation continued it became clear that the baby was in fact sleeping (or catnapping if you will) for more than 15 accumulated hours a day. I shared with her my written notes and thoughts on the techniques I use to catnap and in this case the results were positive. I have since also put these techniques to the test with my own two daughters and while this is not the complete answer for everyone, the art of catnapping should certainly help. Embracing this technique also means losing some aspects of normal day-to-day life and routine. As with many who are forced to fight for small windows of rest or sleep, our intrepid Volvo Ocean Race crews will become desperate and will need to place the highest priority on the single answer to performance and self-preservation… recover, rest, reset.

Another part of the psychological battle is simply thinking that you have not had enough sleep when you actually have. When I am fighting for sleep and desperately looking for windows to rest or sleep in short bursts, I always log and monitor the minutes that I have rested or actually dozed off. Whilst solo racing over long distances I used electronic motion monitors to measure resting patterns and periods. Often I can get to the end of a 24 hour cycle to read my notes or assess the data, add up the minutes / hours, and realise that I have actually scored an acceptable amount of collective short bursts of sleep to warrant sufficient physical recovery. Just knowing this can change your thought process and make you feel better immediately.

Adult humans usually sleep between six to nine hours a night. There are several stages of sleep and several incredible biological events occur during these stages. Deep sleep is the goal and during this period our body releases growth hormones which aid cellular repair and regeneration, immune function, bone density, connective tissue and muscle mass. It is also believed that the consolidation of memory takes place during REM sleep. Sleep is also fundamental to mending blood cells, repairing the daily wear and tear on the body and restoring efficiency of the brain. It is no secret that it is essential for our emotional and mental wellbeing.

Research shows that if we are deprived of sleep for one night we usually make up almost all of the lost deep sleep on the following night. During periods of heavy interruption on board a yacht it is often a great challenge for sailors to get into the rhythm of life at sea. With the aid of a well thought out practical (and even scientific) watch system and the skill of falling to sleep quickly, the sailors can enter deeper sleep earlier in watches to maintain fair to good levels of recuperation. An understanding of individual cycles should always be considered in the development and execution of watch systems and the rotation of crew over a rolling 24-hour period. The ability for each individual crew member and collective team to find their recovery rhythm as early as possible after a new leg start leads to accelerated overall performance early in that leg. Good management and concentration on this is a pure performance gain.

Another difficulty with watch systems is that you should not eat within 3 hours of trying to sleep. Eating increases our metabolic rate and causes our body temperature to rise and the perfect time to fall asleep is when our body temperature is dropping. Watch systems and meal preparation should also be of high consideration to the general crew’s sleep management.

Three major sleep thieves are caffeine, alcohol and nicotine and in the world of measured performance and results then this is a ‘no brainer’ for me. The majority of high-level professional sailors are very fitness conscious and smoking is generally taboo anyway. Coffee or caffeine is a common vice and my suggestion for the benefit of performing at your peak is to simply grunt up and ditch it. Alcohol should not be consumed at least 48 hours prior to a leg start and obviously not seen again until the finish. Again, these are simple, easy ways for teams and individuals to gain a clear performance edge and for us on land to perform better in the general game of life.

At sea or on land many respond well to a bedtime ritual before getting into your bunk or bed, like washing salt from your eyes and face or brushing your teeth. At sea I also flush the salt out of my ears with fresh water since your ears are usually pressed against some form of makeshift head support or pillow.

A day in the life of a Volvo Ocean Race sailor means a 24-hour 7 days a week rolling watch system, and this is in the perfect world without sail changes. You can survive and function safely in a dangerous environment with 4 to 5 hours of accumulated sleep or deep resting state per 24 hours. Everyone should be able to obtain a minimum of 4 to 5 hours sleep per day even if it is made up of short naps, whether on board a yacht or on land.

Meditation is another very useful tool. Simply relaxing without actually sleeping has very good results in assisting the various bodily functions that need repair or recovery through sleeping.

I cannot prove it but I do feel that it is possible to store sleep. The first night of every offshore race is intense due to the close proximity of the competition and general costal influences that force regular manoeuvres. During my time in this particular race, our team would have the day off prior to the start of each leg. During this period I would stay in my hotel room for most of the day prior to departure, read books, sleep, eat well and drink lots of water. I try to store sleep prior to every distance event that I do and I have a very firm belief that this significantly enhances performance during the first night of any offshore race.

There is no substitute for sleep. It is vital and it is one of the many major threats to a Volvo Ocean Race sailor’s safety, performance and wellbeing. This race is brutal. This race will test the sailors’ bodies, minds and nerves beyond any prior strain threshold. For all of us on land and at sea there are some very basic virtues that we can embrace to simply and easily balance our emotions, increase our productivity, enhance our physical and mental capacity, and make our lives, relationships, character and ability to achieve our general personal objectives infinitely better.

Sleep or rest is possibly the single greatest thing you can do today and every day.

***

*(Note) It is not my position to make comment on the events that led to John Fisher being lost at sea and this article in no way makes any reference to this sad tragedy. The loss of John has broken hearts; his family, friends, crewmates, the extended Volvo Ocean Race fraternity as well as the broad sailing and general sports / adventure communities miss him dearly. Detail of the events that occurred can be found via www.volvooceanrace.com. John, you, will be forever missed but never forgotten and now sadly immortalised through the history of this race. Sail on ‘Fish’.

http://www.nickmoloney.com/no-rest-for-the-wicked-sleep-deprivation-in-extreme-conditions/

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35 minutes ago, southerncross said:

[Nick Moloney]: The mental effects of sleep deprivation are the most dangerous and disruptive to any individual or team in a performance or high-risk environment. There are several stages of mental fatigue, from just plain irritability or moodiness, to outright delusional. The latter is simply unacceptable in a team environment unless something catastrophic has happened. 

Another difficulty with watch systems is that you should not eat within 3 hours of trying to sleep. Eating increases our metabolic rate and causes our body temperature to rise and the perfect time to fall asleep is when our body temperature is dropping. Watch systems and meal preparation should also be of high consideration to the general crew’s sleep management.

Three major sleep thieves are caffeine, alcohol and nicotine and in the world of measured performance and results then this is a ‘no brainer’ for me

Thanks again for finding this really good piece. Worth requoting in full.  Appreciated how he handled John Fisher's memory. 

Found myself mentally clicking "check, check, after almost every paragraph, but, despite what  he says about caffeine and nicotine,  I find eating usually leads to being drowsy and sluggish thinking. Obviously not the case in his experience.

And for a moment wondered if the first part was advice to posters. Have to sleep on that one.

 

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His Leg 3 blog turned out to be a good read too, from Dec 28 last year.  One small example I wish I'd know about before reading the Front Page.

Quote

Many who have sailed in this race previously may feel that it was harder in their day and I am glad that we will never really know who did it tougher. It is tough, period! But this most recent passage through the Southern Indian Ocean was quite simply relentless.

Relentless was a word that many sailors have used to describe the conditions in their messages home and as an avid follower of the race it is certainly something that really stood out for me personally. In many historical editions of the race, vessels were not as fast as they are today and this led to storms regularly overtaking the fleet. Behind these weather systems there would often be a period of reprieve, even calms, between one storm and the next. Given the speed of these yachts and the skill of these sailors, the fleet can now hang onto storms literally for weeks and this sets the stage for not only a fast passage, but also an endless cycle of stress, fatigue, high speed, danger and huge levels and duration of physical discomfort.

http://www.nickmoloney.com/volvooceanraceleg3/

Thanks SC. Once again, following the links turned out to be rewarding. Added @nickmoloney to my twitter feed as a person worth following up.

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^^ MAPF "working hard"  Yep ;)

Intermission. Knot tying contest again, and more.

 

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5 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Oggh dear..a delicate time. My only suggestion is to resist the temptation as using them appendage things with those unauthorised to do so, leads to one living in a trailer park.   

Ha. It's all about risk and reward. ;)

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16 hours ago, despacio avenue said:

Ditto. I take personal responsibility for getting into the down vote/BH/random/troll stuff, Not my battle and wish it was not in this thread. This race has made me sad. The finger pointing and baseless speculation has too. Not in the mood for a lot of negativity. But I  like the teams, the crew stories, the competition, and the information and expertise this forum provides. 

Ditto, mostly. I'll put my hand up for whining too much, but nothing beats the VOR threads.  Can't recall ever getting such good chances to really think about the sailing teams (not the kit), thanks, as you say, to the unprecedented excellence of the information and the expertise found here. I often check out other forums. Haven't found anything to compare (Facebook, VOR Race Blog, Sailing Illustrated, and even Reddit. Click that link for a laugh).

15 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Stief I obviously have to take some blame for the shit fight. That said it is difficult to sit back and watch this disrespectful fuckwit trash this thread and others and to boot use his Hancock sock to deliver a down vote deluge upon me. I hope he does go whining to the mods and they read between the lines and act accordingly.

As for your Xabi post not getting a lot of airplay. I think a combination of things. Obviously with racing at an end interest here has dwindled (particular with no retiree tracker going) and without sounding critical of Xabi I found it a bit flat other than the last word (defensive) and his MOB comments, the latter a subject already canvassed in detail. 

He in fact is maybe the wrong person to be doing these. For instance I don't think a coincidence Akzo's excellent one came courtesy of Nico and not the more reserved skipper, like Xabi, Tienpont.

That's the key, IMHO. You are a pain to read often, and use far too few links IMHO, but you put your hand up quickly and have such unpredictable and useful takes that the pain of reading your stuff is hard but mostly worthwhile. Thought it was a great idea to bait the troll over to the Clean GA thread (gad! what a circular washing machine that forum is! Still trolling each other after all these years). That's where the shit fights belong, or PA. The VOR threads have been mostly content driven thanks, mostly, to SC's lead.

Ignoring the trolls works (virtually or actually). What jars is when I start reading and working on understanding one of your posts, and suddenly you or others who are rewarding to read switch to bait mode and I've got shit all over me. My problem, not anyone else's. Just FYI, I think the next step I'll take is to put anyone who quotes a persistent troller on ignore, and catchup on the threads without login to check if I missed anything worthwhile. That might smooth the speed bumps. 

I'm not worried about *my* (really Jack? check out the OP, LOL) post--it was SC's find I was talking about. I'd agree with you about Xabi's miserable media presence. Iker's "ummm, ahh" was irritating enough, but Xabi (and the Spanish media feeds) are still tiresome. "we will fight!."

But who cares? Worse scenario is a sailor whose media savvy is better than their sailing talent. 

And his 'gentle giant' demeanour is such a crock. I still haven't' got my head around how close to abusively / brutally he (?) drives the team. 

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12 hours ago, hoppy said:

He gets a new trophy every month for his cabinet

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcR8wJTY-VVfS70DW7Vp__b

 

Because he down voted my last two posts, I responded in kind and now he has done more down voting. I can't be bothered responding. I do find it funny but his reaction to the sock down voting seems to show that he actually cares about his reputation points. LOL what an ass clown.... 

If he or his socks get booted, do your down votes disappear  ...?

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Neptune celebrates her return to Volvo Ocean Legends Race

Neptune, a 59' sloop who first raced in the WRTWR 1977-78, will compete in the Legends Race this summer, along other historic boats such as Flyer from 1981-82 and Copernicus from the first race in 1973-74.

Neptune was a private entry in the WRTWR 1977-78 although she had some support from the French yachting magazine of the same name. She was constructed in 1976 in Pouvreau, Vix en Vendée, France, under supervision from her designer naval architect André Mauric. She was launched July 1977. It was the second running of the Whitbread Round the World Race and Neptune finished in eighth place on corrected time, out of a fleet of 15.

https://www.sail-world.com/news/204042/Neptune-celebrates-her-return-to-the-Legends-Race

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1 hour ago, stief said:

Ignoring the trolls works (virtually or actually). What jars is when I start reading and working on understanding one of your posts, and suddenly you or others who are rewarding to read switch to bait mode and I've got shit all over me. My problem, not anyone else's. Just FYI, I think the next step I'll take is to put anyone who quotes a persistent troller on ignore, and catchup on the threads without login to check if I missed anything worthwhile. That might smooth the speed bumps.

I'm ignoring the prick now on serious threads...there are other places to bait the fucktard if so inclined.

 

1 hour ago, stief said:

I'm not worried about *my* (really Jack? check out the OP, LOL) post--it was SC's find I was talking about. I'd agree with you about Xabi's miserable media presence. Iker's "ummm, ahh" was irritating enough, but Xabi (and the Spanish media feeds) are still tiresome. "we will fight!.

My bad ..sorry SX.

1 hour ago, stief said:

And his 'gentle giant' demeanour is such a crock. I still haven't' got my head around how close to abusively / brutally he (?) drives the team.

You are not wrong there. Anyone who signed up not expecting that found out quickly on probably the first training run.

And stief I will try to be more linky, but it is hard when a lot of it comes out of my arse.

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2 hours ago, stief said:

And his 'gentle giant' demeanour is such a crock. I still haven't' got my head around how close to abusively / brutally he (?) drives the team. 

Is this speculation?  Have any of the team members shown signs abuse or complained or asked to get off the boat?  Was Neti eager to get back on the boat after his back injury? :D

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8 hours ago, stief said:

(Nick Maloney) Three major sleep thieves are caffeine, alcohol and nicotine and in the world of measured performance and results then this is a ‘no brainer’ for me

Now that explains why I can get 10 years out of a set of bedsheets  :-)

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1 minute ago, southerncross said:

Is this speculation?  Have any of the team members shown signs abuse or complained or asked to get off the boat?  Was Neti eager to get back on the boat after his back injury? :D

Leg 3/Ice Fence/Gybing still makes me shudder. If your at the front of the fleet I doubt even a thought of discontent, however out the back might be a different box of monkeys. 

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9 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Leg 3/Ice Fence/Gybing still makes me shudder. If your at the front of the fleet I doubt even a thought of discontent, however out the back might be a different box of monkeys. 

They do look miserable in the light stuff.  I think they like to race hard or not at all.

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1 hour ago, PIL007 said:

If he or his socks get booted, do your down votes disappear  ...?

It seems that whilst I've been away, he's been busy down voting me. He should get a life, but I guess being an ASS CLOWN troll on SA is his life.

 

goodvibes_thumb-480x480.thumb.jpg.129d0c

 

afa8a1afff1939a6664cca07ac178583_884564_

 

I could go tit for tat but I can't be bothered down voting him, so I'll just go tatt for tits instead

superman-tattoos-featured.jpg

 

ff747c760fb820106493b41ce0d13f63.jpg

 

breast-tattoos-2.jpg

 

and because it's funny...

Asshole_beb1e8_1804087.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

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8 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Is this speculation?  Have any of the team members shown signs abuse or complained or asked to get off the boat?  Was Neti eager to get back on the boat after his back injury? :D

Rather than 'speculation, I think it's more of an Hypothesis.

Agree . .  no sign of any team dysfunction, but was watching for it in the arrivals. 

After the gybe-fest (and your boxing comparison), the takeaway I had was a unionized team just in the race for the money would NOT have put up with that kind of Captain Bligh-like treatment. Yet they did, and willingly. From what was reported in this leg about the leg 3 gybing, Xabi and Vila do not sit down with the crew, pour the chamomile tea, and ask everyone "how do they feel about doing 40 gybes" (IIRC, Sophie reported that Pablo just came up on deck as said: "they [Xabi and Vila] are calling for 40 gybes". 

After leg 3, Xabi said something about "we don't 'kid-kick kids'" (hilarous machine trans).  

I said back then it was brutal (and impressive). Sustainable? Different question, and maybe that's what Im watching for, again. Still hoping they win overall. After all these attempts and effort, still think they're the most impressive team. Not so biased, I hope, that can't judge the evidence if and when it shows.

hmmm. did  I just get trolled? ^_^

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15 minutes ago, hoppy said:

It seems that whilst I've been away, he's been busy down voting me. He should get a life, but I guess being an ASS CLOWN troll on SA is his life.

Hoppy.  For God's sake.  Wrong thread mate.

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2 minutes ago, stief said:

hmmm. did  I just get trolled? ^_^

You did.  The smily face was a warning sign. Nice reply though.

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6 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Hoppy.  For God's sake.  Wrong thread mate.

This thread should be retired, the leg well and truely over. 

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Shouldn't they be resting up, healing arms, and bodies and all that? :D

g'night all. Safe watch. only  2 more to arrive..

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1 hour ago, hoppy said:

This thread should be retired, the leg well and truely over. 

No, imo this thread is not over until the other two boats dock in Itajai. But, seriously, take the T and A elsewhere, as well as the crap with random and the down voting. You guys (I am assuming you are guys) are grown ups and if you really need to engage in this bullshit  behavior do so on a forum or thread that  is designed for and/or thrives on it. 

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28 minutes ago, despacio avenue said:

No, imo this thread is not over until the other two boats dock in Itajai.

Totally agree, but it's frustrating not having the tracker.

15 hours ago, thengling said:

Thanks for the chart belin zeneize.

Hi thengling, any chance belin can give a couple of updates over the next few days?

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27 minutes ago, Retired Sailor said:

Totally agree, but it's frustrating not having the tracker.

Hi thengling, any chance belin can give a couple of updates over the next few days?

Totally agree re the tracker; really disappointing. I second your request to thengling to see if belin can give us updates. 

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With all due respect to many good posters here...... Firstly, this is SA and second, the thread was over for most of us a week back..... There was no stopping the drift / shit show after certain peoples opinions were published so Desp Ave you might want to ease back on directing people elsewhere... By posting your comments on the drift, you feed the drift.

BTW... Re your comments below.....Are there threads with no bullshit on SA....?

1 hour ago, despacio avenue said:

 if you really need to engage in this bullshit  behavior do so on a forum or thread that  is designed for and/or thrives on it. 

 

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The SW that Scally would have been enjoying is fast coming to a close and I hope they got north enough to avoid the coming northerly airflow if they hugged the coast or more likely well offshore and enough easting in to avoid the wind hole coming up shortly. As for Vestas they should have had enough east in to start with to avoid having to go back to the iron sail doing all the work.

The forecast order in their time is

Current Friday 0200  (-4 hrs UTC) , Saturday 0200 and Saturday 1400  

 

 

Friday 2.00am GMT -4.jpg

Saturday 2.00am GMT -4.jpg

Saturday 2.00pm GMT -4.jpg

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5 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Now that explains why I can get 10 years out of a set of bedsheets  :-)

Wow. 35 years out of your washing machine too, by the sound. ;)

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1 hour ago, despacio avenue said:

second your request to thengling to see if belin can give us updates

Not sure why Retired and Slow are asking me; all I did was re-post (with due acknowledgment) what belin zeneize had already posted, albeit in a different format ...

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11 hours ago, stief said:

...nothing beats the VOR threads.  Agree completely. 

Can't recall ever getting such good chances to really think about the sailing teams (not the kit), thanks, as you say, to the unprecedented excellence of the information and the expertise found here. Yep.  That includes you, SC, Rennmous, jbc, benin, Miffy, thengling, Jack -when not troll or sock ranting - and many others. I often check out other forums. Same here. Haven't found anything to compare (Facebook, VOR Race Blog, Sailing Illustrated, Me too and even Reddit. Click that link for a laugh. A laugh is right. Ahhhhhrg.

 

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2 hours ago, belin zeneize said:

Here we are with an update

You are a gent if only for those who before racing them, delivered them before moving up the ladder.

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4 hours ago, Sailbydate said:

Wow. 35 years out of your washing machine too, by the sound. ;)

What is this washing machine thing you speak of Sail that lasts 35 years? If I can get 12 months out of one before they run back home I'm happy?

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11 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

I'm ignoring the prick now on serious threads...there are other places to bait the fucktard if so inclined

Actually I have decided just giving this prick oxygen is a sin, no matter how enticing.

 

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Some Boatyard repair details. Especially "core shear"

Quote

After a brutal Southern Ocean leg, it's no surprise there are some minor repairs for the fleet in Itajaí – here's a look at what's on the list...

https://www.volvooceanrace.com/en/video/11504_Behind-the-scenes-in-the-Boatyard.html

transcript:

Quote

so the most common failure we've been having in the holes is actually core share which is where actually the foam core and the slamming area of the boat may actually split on a 45 degree angle between the two skins can happen one or two ways one is actually impact from the boat actually falling down onto something the other thing is also the load that these areas of the boat work on so on two of the boats we've got it just up here underneath what would be bulkhead B just forward of the cradles splash here we remove the outside skin expose the damaged foam to be quite honest it's a simple repair so right now our entire boat building team is responsible for all of this they're obviously quite busy they are that's getting everything measured up ready to go we're cutting the outside skin laminate so we've got eight layers to know different different types of lemon at different orientations stack it all up on the table it's right outside working on the boat back back it down after a look like that this head I'm not surprised that a couple of boats our header the ones that we have fits though we haven't had seen the problem again so what we're doing seems to be working a little hard to tell though probably personally ours turn the tide which we haven't fixed before and we've also got pretty much the same the same area but a little bit smaller patch on on dump on so we're gonna be out 30 plus 2 degrees of heat here and we've got so hardener but it's still going off fairly quickly so I've got to go outside get this on the boat wrap it up so seven Isaac Arvid but some people on top of the carbon little snack - back boatyard ears from the rig department to boat building all the way through sale department electronics it's always you've been a pretty tough leg right now it's a full stretch we've got a lot of work to do from that pre we've got a lot of work turn the tide Don thing so everyone's quite busy nothing is showstopper but right now based off a six day turnaround everyone is under the pump both to be in a race ready condition and polished up ready for launching.

 

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Just now, southerncross said:

Core issues.  Haven't seen that in a while.

New for DFRT and TTOP.  Guess that means they were pushing their boats as hard as anyone ;)

(aside: the latest Tally-Ho vid is great watch, especially when contrasted with the boatyard vid above)

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1 minute ago, stief said:

(aside: the latest Tally-Ho vid is great watch, especially when contrasted with the boatyard vid above)

It's great.  The franken mill is a work of art.

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2 minutes ago, southerncross said:

It's great.  The franken mill is a work of art.

Agree. And a poetry reader :P His accent was great, and his setting another unintended advantage of dead-thread drift while we await more news of the two remaining teams to arrive.

The owner is the Yves Parlier of boat building, at the boat yard end of the scale?  

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31 minutes ago, southerncross said:

It's great.  The franken mill is a work of art.

Isn't it just. OH&S would be having kittens.  

It is people like that that make you feel there is hope for the world still.

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4 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Actually I have decided just giving this prick oxygen is a sin, no matter how enticing.

 

You are a wise man, Jack Sparrow.

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1 hour ago, southerncross said:

It's great.  The franken mill is a work of art.

Priceless. I sent the video to my brother in VA, who is a master woodworker as a hobby. He scours the East Coast for wood. 

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1 hour ago, southerncross said:

Core issues.  Haven't seen that in a while.

Pretty impressive to only have a couple of small areas on 2 of the boats after that leg. The old V70s would have been absolute carnage after that leg. 

Edit, are they foam core throughout or just up forward and below the waterline? Can’t remember 

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7 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

What is this washing machine thing you speak of Sail that lasts 35 years? If I can get 12 months out of one before they run back home I'm happy?

Jeebus, you're a hard man, Jack. 

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1 hour ago, mad said:

Pretty impressive to only have a couple of small areas on 2 of the boats after that leg. The old V70s would have been absolute carnage after that leg. 

Edit, are they foam core throughout or just up forward and below the waterline? Can’t remember 

 

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4 hours ago, stief said:

"everyone's quite busy nothing is showstopper but right now based off a six day turnaround everyone is under the pump both to be in a race ready condition and polished up ready for launching".

Another productive day at the Boatyard. Having the confidence to drive the boats hard

knowing these boys and girls have your back. Priceless. 

Screen Shot 2018-04-14 at 7.01.40 AM.png

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12 hours ago, thengling said:

Not sure why Retired and Slow are asking me; all I did was re-post (with due acknowledgment) what belin zeneize had already posted, albeit in a different format ...

My apologies for using you as an intermediary, but I don't know on which forum benin is posting. Please enlighten?

I second DA's thanks to benin.

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Thanks to a tip from the Front Page, thought this little snip from SeaHorse Magazine was interesting. Trickle-down software development from ocean racing to short courses for the dinghies.

Quote

Solving the problem of predicting weather and current conditions has gone through a quantum leap in the past few years, particularly in long-distance offshore racing. But big gains are also being made in short-course competition, particularly in Olympic sailing. At the forefront of this drive for greater knowledge and forecasting accuracy is Buell Software, in Germany.

It all started just over 20 years ago when Ingo Buell, a PhD in physics, entered a national competition to win a prize fund put forward by Daimler Benz Aerosail to develop technology that would help Germany’s Olympic sailors succeed at the Atlanta Games in 1996. Aided by his Masters students at Kiel University, Buell developed some routeing software. Jochen Schümann, competing in the Soling keelboat, analysed the printouts every morning before racing. He went on to win the gold medal, and so Buell Software was born.

Buell have provided current and tidal analysis to a number of Olympic teams for the past two Games, London 2012 and Rio 2016, but their new program for 2020, SailTokyo, takes things to a new level with integration of wind data and many other new features, as sales manager Yvette von der Burchard explains: ‘It’s a cloudbased team solution designed to prepare your sailing team for the Olympic Games – Tokyo 2020, Marseille 2024 – and all the World Sailing events and Olympic class world championships.’

Many more details at https://www.seahorsemagazine.com/current-issue/130-content/april-2018/598-power

Often FP click bait works ;) 

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The boatyard vid makes you appreciate how much money is saved with the rent a boat concept. If each team was doing their own thing just the cost of that alone at each stopover as a proportion of total team campaign costs would be horrendous. In fact it was never done to this level and everyone just prayed the things would stay together, which often they didn't. 

In fact for crewed RTW boats that are driven so much harder than others, the concept of DIY box rule boats etc is probably as dead as a duck. While appealing to purists those writing the cheques are not going to have a bar of that largese anymore.

Wonder what the difference in resistance is to core shear between foam and end-grain balsa?

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53 minutes ago, stief said:

Thanks to a tip from the Front Page, thought this little snip from SeaHorse Magazine was interesting. Trickle-down software development from ocean racing to short courses for the dinghies.

Thanks stief. The analyser apps for each location look to be good value ie around £40. I wonder how much the grib ones are which I suspect is where the real money is.

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1 hour ago, jack_sparrow said:

The boatyard vid makes you appreciate how much money is saved with the rent a boat concept. If each team was doing their own thing just the cost of that alone at each stopover as a proportion of total team campaign costs would be horrendous. In fact it was never done to this level and everyone just prayed the things would stay together, which often they didn't. 

In fact for crewed RTW boats that are driven so much harder than others, the concept of DIY box rule boats etc is probably as dead as a duck. While appealing to purists those writing the cheques are not going to have a bar of that largese anymore.

Wonder what the difference in resistance is to core shear between foam and end-grain balsa?

Some of the newer PVC, Corecell, Airek core materials are pretty damn good. Not heard of balsa being used for a long while in prepreg race boats. But I can remember it being talked about somewhere a few years ago. 

I can try and find some figures, but I’m sure someone here has the details closer to hand. 

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15 minutes ago, mad said:

Not heard of balsa being used for a long while in prepreg race boats.

Because, as you already know Mad, balsa absorbs moisture.  What about Divincycell?  And Diab PVC core is used in some of the newer boats I've seen.

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6 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Because, as you already know Mad, balsa absorbs moisture.  What about Divincycell?

I’m well aware that it does, and it’s also not very consistent at times in its density, definitely not my material of choice. Maybe it was for an industrial discussion or in the early days when divinycell used to ‘gas out’. It’s late, and I’m drinking wine. Try and remember later. :P

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53 minutes ago, mad said:

Some of the newer PVC, Corecell, Airek core materials are pretty damn good.

 

43 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Because, as you already know Mad, balsa absorbs moisture.  

Yeah realise balsa going Mr Soggy is an issue. Question was more a case of if there is a man made product that matches something that has come out of nature for just that one structural aspect. 

I cut a big hole in a 20yo balsa cored deck the other week and found it to be as good as the day it was laid up. Tried some destruction tests on the throwaway piece which took some doing.

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Interesting that the shearing occurred close to a bulkhead. I don't know anything about carbon fiber construction, but the problem of bulkhead stiffness relative to adjacent cored laminate strength was solved a long time ago in glass fiber construction. Maybe if Francis is still reading this thread, he can provide comment?

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53 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

 

Yeah realise balsa going Mr Soggy is an issue. Question was more a case of if there is a man made product that matches something that has come out of nature for just that one structural aspect. 

I cut a big hole in a 20yo balsa cored deck the other week and found it to be as good as the day it was laid up. Tried some destruction tests on the throwaway piece which took some doing.

With a good laminate and well sealed it can be pretty good, maybe in odd industrial applications. Modern cores are just that much better in properties and consistent, also they don’t suck up potentially as much water. Down to built quality as well 

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Vestas 11th Hour Racing

Our delivery crew continues to make progress up the coastline of South America. The wind has finally come around for some welcomed downwind sailing for the rest of the foreseen journey. Current ETA is early next week, which would give the Shore Team enough time to service the boat and get it back on the water during the Itajaí stopover.

Some of you have been asking who’s on board on this trip. Here are a few more details on our five committed and experienced crew members:

Damian Foxall - Ireland - Team sustainability manager and alternate race crew who raced onboard on winning first leg

Diego Torrado Gonzalez - Spain  Head of our shore team and an RYA Offshore Yachtmaster 

Andres Guerra Font - USA- One of our Oakcliff Sailing shore team members who also holds his Yachtmaster 

Spencer Loxton - New Zealand - Worked and sailed with the team in pre-race training last summer as both shore and sailing crew

Diego Stefani Turell - Uruguay - Professional yachtsman with local knowledge of the South American coastline

 

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6 hours ago, Francis Vaughan said:

Isn't it just. OH&S would be having kittens.  

They'd be having kittens over the VOR guy using scissors to cut the CF without a day glow vest and a hard hat.

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