Streetwise

Best Race Committee Boats

Recommended Posts

This thread has been great: 

What are your favorite boats for race committee?

Our club has an Albin, not sure what model, something between 26-28.

I wish it had some more stability at anchor, and faster access to the bow.

If someone were designing an RC boat from scratch, I think it might be cool to have a totally curved stern with boarding possible anywhere along the back half of the boat. This would help with both mark boats and support boats, but also with the occasional competitor that needs to use the head, or get off for injury. I also think it would help with aggressive starts and lessen any damage.

I'm just a sailor who is aboard a couple of times a season to do volunteer RC, with a volunteer PRO who runs the show.

What do you folks like for this job?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

vka-swiftsure-0097-jpg.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anything with twin hulls. Very stable plus the harbourmasters are always selling them cheap at auction.

 

download.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Question: what bear is the best?

Answer: False. Black bear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

?format=500w

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We had a ok 22' Aquasport with a 225 optimax ex police boat that was

A good deal and fine for the bay but got rid of it after compressor on motor blew up and they wanted 3 grand to fix.the sailing instructors. Liked it for bar hopping

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Occasional competitor that needs to use the head..HaHa that's a good one on the second leg of the race Johnny comes up to the stern of RC boat and asks to relieve himself in their head and can he have redress also

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have used a pontoon boat for years. Pluses and minuses. Lots of room lots of storage but the staring line is just off our morning field so it’s doesnt have to go far. 

Minuses ...no place to hide in a rain storm (even with canvas awning ) and no place to piss in mixed company

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have 3 Steel Clippers. Hardy and nobody in their right mind hits one at the start.

escort.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On Long Island Sound it seems that many clubs use lobsterboat types for RC duty.  The large cockpit is good for handling signals and the hard canopy over the forward part of the cockpit provides good protection from the sun.  They're fairly stable and not overly expensive to maintain. Image result for race committee boats

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Skippers briefing meeting for Kings Cup in Thailand a few years ago...a hand goes up and asks..."will there be a starting line barging mark at the committee boat?" The naval commodore running the session explained "the committee boat is a naval gun boat with 2 inch armour plated steel....barge at your own risk!"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2018-03-04 at 10:52 PM, PaulK said:

On Long Island Sound it seems that many clubs use lobsterboat types for RC duty.  The large cockpit is good for handling signals and the hard canopy over the forward part of the cockpit provides good protection from the sun.  They're fairly stable and not overly expensive to maintain. 

That’s a very good choice.

National Yacht Club also uses a former lobster boat (Grand National), very similar to the one you posted. Thin plexiglass sheets have been fitted between the top sides and the hard canopy, giving the RC shelter from wind and spray when not working; and the starboard side was fitted with a course board, custom made by Henry Piersig.

img_2288.jpg

img_2290.jpg

img_2292.jpg

 

national-yacht-club-toronto.png

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2018-03-05 at 3:13 AM, Couta said:

Skippers briefing meeting for Kings Cup in Thailand a few years ago...a hand goes up and asks..."will there be a starting line barging mark at the committee boat?" The naval commodore running the session explained "the committee boat is a naval gun boat with 2 inch armour plated steel....barge at your own risk!"

30 years ago, I was a young officer in HMCS Porte de la Reine when we were tasked as committee boat for the start of the Swiftsure (same race as dash34 has referenced in post #2). It was pretty chaotic at the start and we were rammed by a couple of boats; it certainly didn’t do their fibreglass any favours.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎2018‎-‎03‎-‎03 at 4:41 AM, dash34 said:

vka-swiftsure-0097-jpg.jpg

HMCS Nanaimo.

Nice!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Svanen said:

30 years ago, I was a young officer in HMCS Porte de la Reine when we were tasked as committee boat for the start of the Swiftsure (same race as dash34 has referenced in post #2). It was pretty chaotic at the start and we were rammed by a couple of boats; it certainly didn’t do their fibreglass any favours.

I have hit it once (minor contact when well-meaning crew tried to fend off in light air, the boat stood up and the windward shroud tagged it), and almost hit it twice, once missing hanging the backstay up on the bow (and dropping the rig) by less than a metre.  We are super careful at Swiftsure starts now.  No matter how tempting that empty lane by the committee boat is, don't do it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/5/2018 at 3:52 AM, PaulK said:

On Long Island Sound it seems that many clubs use lobsterboat types for RC duty.  The large cockpit is good for handling signals and the hard canopy over the forward part of the cockpit provides good protection from the sun.  They're fairly stable and not overly expensive to maintain. Image result for race committee boats

That is a beautiful boat. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, willp14335 said:

That is a beautiful boat. 

I cared for Coast Pilot, a ' lobster boat' type. Albin 29 I think. Working for St. Pete Yacht Club, Florida. Lots of problems with the Volvo. Convenient for RC duty. However, really rolls. ESPN guy dropped his very expensive camera while we were chasing the 1996 Olympic Torch on a 72' sloop across Tampa Bay. Snap roll.

Dave Ellis

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This one is OK if you happen to be on the start line side of the boat. The view of the flags is not too flash from this angle if you're in a pre-start and doing the right thing by keeping clear of the line.

5aa8a88ddef6f_Endeavour4.thumb.jpg.cac8f9788d0fbcdeb6f9b18d11804c5a.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems a shame to have a foredeck you could play tennis on and display all your signals in the cockpit.:huh:

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/4/2018 at 7:52 PM, PaulK said:

On Long Island Sound it seems that many clubs use lobsterboat types for RC duty.  The large cockpit is good for handling signals and the hard canopy over the forward part of the cockpit provides good protection from the sun.  They're fairly stable and not overly expensive to maintain. Image result for race committee boats

We’ve got one of those at our club, and the mentioned fore-aft flag poles. We use bungies on the flags to you preload the bungee and then at zero, just release the flag.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, SPORTSCAR said:

This one is OK if you happen to be on the start line side of the boat. The view of the flags is not too flash from this angle if you're in a pre-start and doing the right thing by keeping clear of the line.

5aa8a88ddef6f_Endeavour4.thumb.jpg.cac8f9788d0fbcdeb6f9b18d11804c5a.jpg

HaHa, they won't like you posting that but I have to agree with you there Sporty. That fly-bridge creates a massive blind spot. Hard enough for those of us in keel boats, must be extra hard for little kids in dinghies sitting so much closer to the water. Only club on the Bay using a FB cruiser for RC work. I heard they got it cheap.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The ideal race committee boat would have:

  1. A good signal-flag mast or masts that allows competitors to view all signals 360-degrees around the boat.
  2. A course-display system (letters and numbers in holders is nice) which is likewise visible from 360-degrees around the boat.
  3. Both signal flags and course identifiers need to be quickly and easily and safely operated from as secure a cockpit as is possible. I've seen several set-ups where placing the course info was a risky endeavor.
  4. Should not roll excessively. Power catamarans can be a decent choice for this.
  5. Should be set-up for easily towing dinghies or other engineless boats, whether it be a common part of RC duty or only in emergencies.
  6. Should have shelter for RC members in foul weather.
  7. Communications equipment for multiple purposes including transmission of results to the clubhouse or the internet.
  8. Adequate and easy-to-operate ground tackle.

On that 3-tiered wedding cake above, the only signal I can see is the "2" pennant.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/13/2018 at 8:59 AM, Streetwise said:

Here is ours:

 

Albin 27.jpg

Nice looking boat..

I'm wondering why the guy standing forward with the hand held telltale doesn't look at the Windex mounted much higher above the RC Flag?

  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, familysailor said:

Nice looking boat..

I'm wondering why the guy standing forward with the hand held telltale doesn't look at the Windex mounted much higher above the RC Flag?

My guess is that he is communicating with the mark boat (radio in hand) and advising on the positioning of the windward mark. It would be much harder to judge looking up at the windex and then back at the mark. Streetwise will be better positioned to comment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, KC375 said:

My guess is that he is communicating with the mark boat (radio in hand) and advising on the positioning of the windward mark. It would be much harder to judge looking up at the windex and then back at the mark. Streetwise will be better positioned to comment.

 

That makes sense...

Edit:

After looking at the photo again I'd probably find a way to stick the handheld gizmo into the Burgie post on the bow so I could sit on my ass behind it. I'd enjoy  either a cup of coffee or beer depending on time of day....

Yes, I am lazy.

  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, familysailor said:

Nice looking boat..

I'm wondering why the guy standing forward with the hand held telltale doesn't look at the Windex mounted much higher above the RC Flag?

A question for the RC gurus: Given the usual windshear with height (image below from Frank Bethwaite’s High Performance sailing) what wind direction would be ideal for RC to set the windward mark, wind at water level, at mid point for the average mast height,....?

image.thumb.png.7b65cc5405d97cb926396232a5d7a444.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup, that's our Race Tactician (and a PRO) for our Viper 640 Regatta checking the top mark and offset. He's an Etchells sailor, so he's got high standards for a square course! It was a beautiful day to be racing. Photo credit on both to Gerry Davis. More photos here: https://lcyc.info/racing/viper_640

Viper 2017 Regatta-064.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/4/2018 at 10:52 PM, PaulK said:

On Long Island Sound it seems that many clubs use lobsterboat types for RC duty.  The large cockpit is good for handling signals and the hard canopy over the forward part of the cockpit provides good protection from the sun.  They're fairly stable and not overly expensive to maintain. Image result for race committee boats

 

I'm also a fan of lobster boats. All the bigger clubs up near me that can't afford a brand-new boat tend towards used commercial boats. A little bit of gelcoating and teak trim (if that's what gets your rocks off) and you have a seaworthy, near-indestructible boat. Yacht club duty will hardly phase a boat designed to haul traps and it should last a long time. Nice cabin down below for storing things, good visibility from the cockpit, big open deckspace for spectators and officials, and stability as they're designed to be a stable platform for hauling traps in all but the worst weather. Some have an open transom or a transom door, which is nice for access from the water.

 

Plus there's just something about Downeast-style boats that just works

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have a Colne Cat 7m (no Design Catamarans: https://www.designcatamarans.com/) at Whitstable Yacht Club for dinghy and catamaran race starts. Based on a fishing boat, offset cockpit to provide full access to the port side, nice and stable, and pretty fast. All the visiting PROs love it!

SWOUb8OaZVRzpcikLVlmMrZ09M5shzTCiM7algeBKxbs1t_2cmOgyJG1WVr0w7yoDG6piV72QA7m_jvkoNvtV6PVi-PjovaJ7Sn3bhipx7N2vxA-MLjE_Y8SrRv67KgRxKAOMlH8ZuASKqyNOt8s_qWBIqL5vdZxiSWm5kWGGzma23dSG2f7hHClvMR1TybfUjB4oH_zYfgn8q6oTfizkR4laY2y0sqsV46xXh64F0dEJ4Nk82JrNBt-0FnUFzgfeK6zmvUw6tFvzSCdVES0itzx1D1kE8doEFj_hrsbZbhS_eUwrrPGWBKyq5KPS4LIpbowq6ipXyuw9sTURVrG4XIaBFwRFQZLb25qnA5KSojB8IZSK4-oPyRYrWBc02krxH7kO_K-tlaEWHBxh-io6W5_nJlKhtJEZn7aKeXAx-0GtmNFN5fL7X8GLTROUgyWbZgWcIrFzDsPPuYJ-8ILNzNz3Wpora3aop4JaOPC4kW1k8R2A31a21eYsHKp80Tq08EIvpNukfO0_N3aayvHN3lqt2IHIxMMgEPEoP0423Y1v2BlpH8ET0aHS5n4B9J7eopLDUGkQAkGVwPDmE3oRM0jVaLUDsBCG9s3qcZy=w433-h467-no

They're difficult to find second hand as they're very popular with small scale professional fishermen, so we ordered it new 5 years ago, and fitted it out using club volunteer labour (thanks Stuart, Jason and Ian!). 

Committee Boat

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another in the workboat style - the Carl Alberg - 

getImage.gif?ID=100054

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

our club's rc boat down here in southern brazil.

the donator hull comes from an o'day 37 sailboat

 

leopoldo_geyer.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CYC Seattle Nearly 50 years old and still Getting it done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sweet. I'm glad that we all value a nice race committee boat!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ve got to run a few races this summer solo, on our RibCraft 6.5. The club has an automatic timer / horn arrangement, so I just have to handle the flags and it’s only one fleet.

Anyone rig a pole with halyards for flags? I was thinking of making up an aluminum pole with a crosstree with pulleys. Should be able to mount it in a rod holder. But looking for ideas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/15/2018 at 3:12 PM, Slim said:

That is Eastern Yacht Club’s (Marblehead, MA) Boat. It was designed for two engines but there were so many changes that they went to one. As a result, it is really slow, and had a very uncomfortable motion at anchor. A professional Naval Architect in the club suggested it was too stiff and needed some weight in the cabin top to improve the ride motion. That was hotly debated for years as well.

Boston Yacht Club and Corinthian Yacht Club both purchased commercially-available lobster boat / work boat hulls and added the RC equipment. The Carl Arlburg is pictured above. Corinthian’s is very similar. This gave them proven performance at production (instead of one-off custom) prices.

 

JrRaceWeek1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Dervish said:

... A professional Naval Architect in the club suggested it was too stiff and needed some weight in the cabin top to improve the ride motion. That was hotly debated for years as well...

 

 

Why hotly debate something that could so easily be tested empirically. Rig up improvised weights (e.g. barrels on the cabin top that could be filled with water) and observe the ride with and without the weight. You could do inclination tests and measur roll period in sheltered location. More practially the barrels and water would allow you to vary the weight nearly real-time to compare changes in motion under nearly identical conditions. Why get hot and bothered by opinions when you could have facts?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Dervish said:

I’ve got to run a few races this summer solo, on our RibCraft 6.5. The club has an automatic timer / horn arrangement, so I just have to handle the flags and it’s only one fleet.

Anyone rig a pole with halyards for flags? I was thinking of making up an aluminum pole with a crosstree with pulleys. Should be able to mount it in a rod holder. But looking for ideas.

Do not go for flags and halyards.

Make flags on sticks (plastic electrical conduit), with fishing rod rocket launcher holders or sockets made out of larger diameter conduit, broomsticks and cable ties.

Much quicker and neater for the race officers.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Brass said:

Do not go for flags and halyards.

Make flags on sticks (plastic electrical conduit), with fishing rod rocket launcher holders or sockets made out of larger diameter conduit, broomsticks and cable ties.

Much quicker and neater for the race officers.

I was going to suggest the same, that's what we use. Far quicker and easier than running flags up and down halyards. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
49 minutes ago, T39andcounting said:
Do not go for flags and halyards.

Make flags on sticks (plastic electrical conduit), with fishing rod rocket launcher holders or sockets made out of larger diameter conduit, broomsticks and cable ties.

Much quicker and neater for the race officers.

I was going to suggest the same, that's what we use. Far quicker and easier than running flags up and down halyards. 

Also more portable (from RC boat to RC boat), and far less likely to encourage partial raising of flags (which can be very confusing for competitors and is a personal point of irritation for me).

Exact configurations will vary depending on the setup of your RibCraft, but it's pretty easy to work out a way to zip-tie fishing rod holders to grab rails so as to display flags well. Make sure they are mounted high enough that your body doesn't obscure them, and be careful to spread them out as far as you practically can while still reaching them, so that they can be easily seen by competitors and don't obscure one another. Also, if you fill the conduit with polyurethane foam wall insulation sprayed from a can (available at Home Depot or Lowes), the conduit will get stiffer, and the flagpoles will float if dropped in the water.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have to think about that. We have to get them high enough to be seen. Perhaps I can put 3-4 rocket launchers on the t top. I was thinking one pole with a yardarm and halyards would be easier, but poles have the advantage of simplicity.

This is the boat.

i-4sL3jhD-L.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Dervish said:

Have to think about that. We have to get them high enough to be seen. Perhaps I can put 3-4 rocket launchers on the t top. I was thinking one pole with a yardarm and halyards would be easier, but poles have the advantage of simplicity.

This is the boat.

i-4sL3jhD-L.jpg

 

You need a tall pole to mark the starting line - I'd put that on the port side such that it rises above the T-top, but extends down to the deck so as to be easily sighted from the helm station (alternatively, you could put it forward of the console, so as to be conveniently sighted from the front bench seat) - you would let it rest on the cockpit sole, and zip-tie it to the t-top to keep it stable. That's the only one that really needs to be straight up and down (so the position of the line isn't confusing), so the two rod holders already on the aft bench will serve as places to put timing flags, AP, etc. Code flag "X" and the first repeater can go on opposite ends of the same pole, and can be hand held for the brief times they need to be displayed (or you could zip-tie a couple more rocket launchers to the backs of your jockey seats if you like).

You might also build some sort of frame or box that sits atop and is lashed to the aft bench and is easily accessible from the helm that has several rocket launchers on/in it and raises them to a visible height, but you'd have to vary the height of the flag poles, so they don't obscure each other when raised. That alternative would have the advantage of possibly providing a place to store stuff between races.

Nice boat, by the way! I've been thinking about getting a 5.85, but that looks very comfy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can move the holders from the rear seat to the back of the T top, I think. I was thinking some foam in PVC would work, any trick to it? I’d spring for 6-8’ 1.5” Aluminum if I could find who sells it locally.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Dervish said:

I can move the holders from the rear seat to the back of the T top, I think. I was thinking some foam in PVC would work, any trick to it? I’d spring for 6-8’ 1.5” Aluminum if I could find who sells it locally.

No trick, really - you just get the spray foam cans that come with a little hose - they're made for insulating around plumbing fittings and electrical junction boxes. You do need to provide enough holes for injecting the foam into the poles that it doesn't expand and harden too quickly to fill the poles. That leaves gaps in the foam, which is still OK for flotation, but doesn't provide stiffness where there isn't foam. How close together those holes need to be will vary with the diameter of the conduit you use - you'll need to experiment a little.

Aluminum would be fine, I guess, but it strikes me as both expensive and heavy. I have no good suggestions, other than to call a local party tent rental place and ask them where they source their tent pole stock.

Out of curiosity, what kind of boats will you be officiating for? Do you really need flags as high as the t-top?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/15/2018 at 12:29 PM, KC375 said:

My guess is that he is communicating with the mark boat (radio in hand) and advising on the positioning of the windward mark. It would be much harder to judge looking up at the windex and then back at the mark. Streetwise will be better positioned to comment.

 

 

why do all the PRO's line up the windward mark to the committe boat and then place the pin 200 yards / meters away ?   I go out,  find a nice spot for the leeward , get the mark boats to line up on the wind and then I go move the committee boat 90's off of that and line length however you want..   I've watched people take 30 mins to setup a course..  and there it is, the marks are out of alignment.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thought of something long enough, light enough, stiff enough, floaty enough, and cheap enough for flag staffs. Bamboo poles are available in 5’ to 8’ lengths for $2-6 each. 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/18/2018 at 4:13 PM, Dervish said:

Thought of something long enough, light enough, stiff enough, floaty enough, and cheap enough for flag staffs. Bamboo poles are available in 5’ to 8’ lengths for $2-6 each. 

The only downside is they're fragile (and I don't know how they'll respond to marinating in the water on deck for a few hours), but they're cheap enough to carry a couple of spares.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PVC pipe.

It can be assembled in any number of configurations, limited only by your imagination. Cheap. Can be converted to a bong in a pinch.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Athwartship is the way to go.

 

Now - you could go bamboo - certainly easy - but for a larger vessel with a perm structure - we have PVC sliders over a tall PVC tube - and we bungee launch - there is a bungee that - when the flag is down - is in tension - and when the gun goes off you just release the flag.

 

41.jpg?rand=0.051661484449626316

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/18/2018 at 5:41 AM, Dervish said:

Have to think about that. We have to get them high enough to be seen. Perhaps I can put 3-4 rocket launchers on the t top. I was thinking one pole with a yardarm and halyards would be easier, but poles have the advantage of simplicity.

This is the boat.

i-4sL3jhD-L.jpg

 

Nice ride Dervish.       And by the way....it has been a very long time.  Next time I am in Mumblehead I will ping you. 

If you had not dragged me down to Eastern one fine evening many years ago, I would not have had  my first ride in the Viper...and written a check the same evening.  350+ boats later and a World Sailing Class.  We really need to invite you as guest of honor at a Viper dinner at the NAs or New Englands.  

   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh.....and back on topic. I am a big fan of the lobster boat cttee boat.  

It provides good visibility for both competitors and RC.  

They tow great (which when the wind dies on LIS is a useful attribute)

They are weatherly boats

They look great.

Our visitors go home happy with the "New England" experience.    To complete the look, our launchs  are NE lobster boat hulls .

6a00e5521e1d86883401a73df2bc51970d-320wi.jpg.6dcaff4152e91223dfcd22906c5f8e4c.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Somebody Else said:

PVC pipe.

It can be assembled in any number of configurations, limited only by your imagination. Cheap. Can be converted to a bong in a pinch.

 

But so “noodle like.”

HD and Lowes have hardwood dowel in 1” or 1-1/4 in 4’ and 6’ lengths.

Did find someone who foam filled PVC. They got on a porch and sprayed the “High Expansion” version down the tube, then tapped so it would go to the bottom and expand up. Also because the Urethane needs moisture to cure they wet the inside with water first. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/5/2018 at 4:52 AM, PaulK said:

On Long Island Sound it seems that many clubs use lobsterboat types for RC duty.  The large cockpit is good for handling signals and the hard canopy over the forward part of the cockpit provides good protection from the sun.  They're fairly stable and not overly expensive to maintain. Image result for race committee boats

Wrong place for the orange flag... It must be the upper one on board;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been doing RC work for 30+ years, including 10 years paid. Never heard of the orange flag being the highest. Only that it must be visible. Show me.

Dave Ellis

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, sailwriter said:

I've been doing RC work for 30+ years, including 10 years paid. Never heard of the orange flag being the highest. Only that it must be visible. Show me.

Dave Ellis

Dave, I wasn't saying that there was any requirement that it be the highest (there isn't), but I find that it's more visible to the competitors and less likely to be in the RC's way if the flag is above the RO's line of sight and the staff it flies from is as easily sighted as possible. In the case of the RIB that Dervish is using, I think that will be above the T-top, with staff descending below it to the deck, as I described. That's all I meant by "You need...".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, sailwriter said:

I've been doing RC work for 30+ years, including 10 years paid. Never heard of the orange flag being the highest. Only that it must be visible. Show me.

I nearly said the same thing until I checked.

Not in written words, but see the picture in Section H1 of the Race Management Manual

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, point taken.

Don't want the flag in the spotters' line of sight. Besides, that flag is noisey right above those gazing eyes.

I worked for a decade with the writer of that RC Manuel. When you say she did everything by the book, it was literally so.

Dave Ellis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/14/2018 at 3:47 PM, SPORTSCAR said:

This one is OK if you happen to be on the start line side of the boat. The view of the flags is not too flash from this angle if you're in a pre-start and doing the right thing by keeping clear of the line.

5aa8a88ddef6f_Endeavour4.thumb.jpg.cac8f9788d0fbcdeb6f9b18d11804c5a.jpg

Pain in the arse to get a transit. Even on a keelboat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, that's why those high, comfy RC boats may be nice for the Signal Boat staff, but not for competitors.

I do dinghy fleet's. They must be able to sight from the non-start side, through the orange flag,  over or through the RC Signal Boat to the windward edge of the start pin and to something beyond. Yes, the skipper usually has to stand.

For dinghies, the big RC boats also cast a significant wind shadow. 

Tougher to find volunteers on those big boats, though!

Dave Ellis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I consider it a "fail" if you can't see the signals from 360-degrees -- all directions.

The course should also be clearly visible from all directions. If the course is only visible in a small sector, it leads to boats crowding the start area even though it's not yet their sequence.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In terms of setting up the RibCraft 6.5 as an RC boat:

-We purchased some smaller signal flags, 9-12” on the hoist. Taylor Made.

- Also purchased a 12” RC flag. Helpful in Boston Harbor so rec boaters understand what you are doing.

- Mounted “Rocket Launchers”  AKA rod holders on the T top. Easily reached using the back bench as a step. 

- A 1” ID schedule 40 PVC pipe is about $4 for a 10’ section. Cut in half (60”) it was plenty high and stiff enough, as were the 48” dowels. But looks a little tacky, going to see if Acetone will remove the printing.

 

25B448F2-E654-4493-85D4-5AC311D52426.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/23/2018 at 2:13 AM, Somebody Else said:

I consider it a "fail" if you can't see the signals from 360-degrees -- all directions.

The course should also be clearly visible from all directions. If the course is only visible in a small sector, it leads to boats crowding the start area even though it's not yet their sequence.

 

Being able to see signals from all directions is a major plus.  We use cylindrical shapes on the RC boat for the starting sequence instead of flags because of this. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We are just grateful to have someone volunteer their boat and time, and sometimes they don’t even ask for us to pay the fuel!

 

+1 on the PVC/conduit flag staffs. Essential in our sitch, must be transferred easily. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Acetone does indeed remove the printing on PVC. 

1” [ID] Schedule 40 PVC has an OD of 1.315”. It fits well in the standard Rocket Launchers. As mentioned standard length is 10’, so you get two 60” staffs. On the RibCraft that puts them about 11’ above the water, which the competitors seemed to identify without issue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/22/2018 at 10:32 PM, sailwriter said:

Yes, that's why those high, comfy RC boats may be nice for the Signal Boat staff, but not for competitors.

I do dinghy fleet's. They must be able to sight from the non-start side, through the orange flag,  over or through the RC Signal Boat to the windward edge of the start pin and to something beyond. Yes, the skipper usually has to stand.

For dinghies, the big RC boats also cast a significant wind shadow. 

Tougher to find volunteers on those big boats, though!

Dave Ellis

I love our RC boat. It’s a 32’ Edgewater center console with a stainless rail full of flag holders running bow to stern. Minimal wind shadow, outboards are less scary for volunteers to drive, has a head, set up with an automatic timer to run the horns, and just plain fun to drive!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, sailwriter said:

Sounds ideal, and comfy enough to attract volunteers.

It is!  It helps that we had an incredible benefactor that bought us a small armada to run races. I thoroughly enjoy doing RC just as much as racing, and it makes it so much better when you’ve got purpose built equipment for the job. 

(Sorry North Sails haters, but the owner threw the profits back into promoting sailing.  We’re a tiny city with world class toys for hosting races. The Para-Worlds will stretch us to the limit, but it should be manageable)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Added a 3rd rod holder more or less in line with my seat at the helm so I can sight the line by myself. Probably add a 4th on the other side.

The club uses 14 letters and numbers to designate marks. So I’m thinking about buying some magnetic printer paper to print 10” magnetic letters. I can mount them on a magnetic white board.

 

i-dJmLBch-L.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Dervish said:

Added a 3rd rod holder more or less in line with my seat at the helm so I can sight the line by myself. Probably add a 4th on the other side.

The club uses 14 letters and numbers to designate marks. So I’m thinking about buying some magnetic printer paper to print 10” magnetic letters. I can mount them on a magnetic white board.

Did you knock out the cross pieces in the rod holder so the staff goes all the way through, or will you sight the bottom of the holder?

As an alternative to magnetic printer paper, what about making rigid placards with two s-hooks on top, and holes drilled at the bottom. You could hang the top placard from the back of the t-top, and the rest of the marks below the top one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/5/2018 at 5:14 PM, Katydid said:

Did you knock out the cross pieces in the rod holder so the staff goes all the way through, or will you sight the bottom of the holder?

Weighted cord.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now