Leon T

Jerome Rand solo circumnavigation in a Westsail 32

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I heard about Jerome Rand doing a nonstop solo circumnav in a Westsail 32.  He used to work at Bitter End Yacht Club in BVI. He started the trip last October 3 out of Gloucester, MA, now he's approaching "Point Nemo" (traveling eastward) between NZ and the Horn.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1060676710732719/permalink/1231099403690448/

https://m22.com/blogs/news/around-the-world-solo-non-stop-circumnavigation

Should be interesting to see when he reaches the horn.

 

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Leon,

    I knew a Jeremy who worked at the Bitter End Yacht Club who was the resort engineer. Can't remember his last name but he got to be friends with a yacht owner who had a big Motorsailer that Jeremy helped out with some of the mechanical issues. The owner had a skipper who never had the boat up and running when the owner came down but Jeremy had a real knock for things and when the owner decided to sell the big white elephant he told Jeremy to hire a skipper and crew and take the boat to Ft Lauderdale and put it on the market. I took the delivery job and we had a great trip and I wonder if Jeremy might be the Jerome Rand in this thread. That would have been in 1987 if I remember correctly. 

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Dunno, IIRC Jeremy was head of watersports when we were last at BEYC about 5 years ago.

I've been trying to follow his inreach posts, but they only show current position, no tracks.  Frustrating.

https://inreach.garmin.com/textmessage/viewmsg?mo=c08cd169e42a4e258a1d4f5e5552c410&adr=%2b12318814762

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So this Jerome Rand is the polar opposite of Rimas: mechanically proficient, not afraid or too proud to break a sweat, actually accomplishes what he says he's going to do, doesn't brag about it, and does it on his own nickel.

About the only similarity is the potential top speed of their boats!

 

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To put things in perspective, the current record holder would be closing in on lapping him - for the 4th time. :D

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57 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

To put things in perspective, the current record holder would be closing in on lapping him - for the 4th time. :D

On a per-dollar basis (#days / $ spent), I bet the Westsail is on par with or ahead of the Sodebo Ultim (49 days, 3 hrs and time to slam down a 12-pack) :P

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I believe that if he finishes, he will be the first American unassisted, un-sponsored, non racing, non-stop solo.  I might be wrong. 

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16 hours ago, Leon T said:

Dunno, IIRC Jeremy was head of watersports when we were last at BEYC about 5 years ago.

I've been trying to follow his inreach posts, but they only show current position, no tracks.  Frustrating.

https://inreach.garmin.com/textmessage/viewmsg?mo=c08cd169e42a4e258a1d4f5e5552c410&adr=%2b12318814762

Best set of sails I've ever seen on a WetSnail!

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2 hours ago, 8:1 said:

I believe that if he finishes, he will be the first American unassisted, un-sponsored, non racing, non-stop solo.  I might be wrong. 

Note the BEYC logo on the fwd. topsides. 

logo.gif?1329184394

At least he got a nice sticker.

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27 minutes ago, 8:1 said:

Friends don't let friends buy cross cut...

Fibercon.jpg

Friends don't let friends buy wetsnails 

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He is doing it, on his Westsail 32, while we are all just watching.

Just sayin'

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1 hour ago, Rasputin22 said:

Poncho, you could have gone all day without bringing that up...

Has a good handicap though. If I recall there was a Westsail 32 that beat us on corrected time in a Marion-Bermuda race.

He finished almost 2 days after us.

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4 hours ago, 8:1 said:

I believe that if he finishes, he will be the first American unassisted, un-sponsored, non racing, non-stop solo.  I might be wrong. 

How about that guy (Jeff?) that sailed a Perry design D/E around last year? I think he met all those criteria.

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22 hours ago, 8:1 said:

I believe that if he finishes, he will be the first American unassisted, un-sponsored, non racing, non-stop solo.  I might be wrong. 

Hmm.

Sounds like that would be Webb Chiles, way way back in the 1970s on his Ericson 37 Egregious (although I'm not 100% up on my sailing records).

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19 hours ago, checkstay said:

Has a good handicap though. If I recall there was a Westsail 32 that beat us on corrected time in a Marion-Bermuda race.

He finished almost 2 days after us.

If you mean Kamancha...yep. She won the whole thing in 1995.  I did the 1997 Bermuda One-Two on her and we placed first in class.   6 1/2 day crawler and I could not be more impressed, on how when sailed correctly, she could move, even in light air.

She was beautifully maintained with top notch gear and sails. 

If ya haven't sailed one....

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21 hours ago, 8:1 said:

Friends don't let friends buy cross cut...

Fibercon.jpg

Look again.  They are tri-radials.

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3 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Hmm.

Sounds like that would be Webb Chiles, way way back in the 1970s on his Ericson 37 Egregious (although I'm not 100% up on my sailing records).

No he called in at NZ (I think) after bailing for most of the way around the horn and then across the Indian ocean after a crack in the hull got worse and worse

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23 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

How about that guy (Jeff?) that sailed a Perry design D/E around last year? I think he met all those criteria.

Yeah, Jeff (aka the Jefe") did it a year or two so ago in a Baba.  His blog entries were posted by Bob in Cruiser Anarchy.

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3 hours ago, alctel said:

No he called in at NZ (I think) after bailing for most of the way around the horn and then across the Indian ocean after a crack in the hull got worse and worse

Nice catch (I think Webb was first American around Cape Horn singlehanded, and Dodge Morgan the firsts 'murican solo nonstop around the world (1986).

Far more impressive than Morgan (in my opinion) was Canadian/Kiwi Peter Freeman who did a solo nonstop unassisted (and definitely without corporate sponsorship) in a little 32 ferrocement boat in 1985 (from Victoria, BC).  Rudimentary boat, sextant nav, etc.  Very impressive!  (There used to be a really good series of articles on the web, from Pacific Yachting magazine, that he wrote about the voyage.).  See: https://ipfs.io/ipfs/QmXoypizjW3WknFiJnKLwHCnL72vedxjQkDDP1mXWo6uco/wiki/Around_the_world_sailing_record.html

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On 3/9/2018 at 2:00 PM, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Nice catch (I think Webb was first American around Cape Horn singlehanded, and Dodge Morgan the firsts 'murican solo nonstop around the world (1986).

Far more impressive than Morgan (in my opinion) was Canadian/Kiwi Peter Freeman who did a solo nonstop unassisted (and definitely without corporate sponsorship) in a little 32 ferrocement boat in 1985 (from Victoria, BC).  Rudimentary boat, sextant nav, etc.  Very impressive!  (There used to be a really good series of articles on the web, from Pacific Yachting magazine, that he wrote about the voyage.).  See: https://ipfs.io/ipfs/QmXoypizjW3WknFiJnKLwHCnL72vedxjQkDDP1mXWo6uco/wiki/Around_the_world_sailing_record.html

I'm stuck in bed sick today instead of working, so I've been looking for new trips to read about.  Came across this: 

https://www.couchsurfing.com/people/saltspringcyclists

So I guess if you ever want to meet him, you can!

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Is the Westsail 32 a "good" boat for this voyage? Could you get "more bang for the buck" with some other model?

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20 hours ago, plenamar said:

Is the Westsail 32 a "good" boat for this voyage? Could you get "more bang for the buck" with some other model?

I like sailing fast. So my first knee jerk response would be "of course not, its a pig!" And you've seen comments like in this thread before you got here. If someone races a Westsail 32 on a round-the-cans racing event, they will get trounced because the first upwind leg they won't get to the windward mark before their time allowance for the entire race is used up. They are s-l-o-w going upwind. The do keep going upwind no matter what happens, but its always slow motion.

However, on long hauls, waterline becomes a dominant factor of performance: most boats cover thousands of miles at pretty close to hull speed, with very few miles spent maximizing VMG upwind. And on extremely long legs, like a 30000 mile non-stop circumnavigation, the weight of stores will be enormous. So a light displacement boat will not be, whereas the Westsail will still seem pretty much the same, even if its boot top is 6" below water when setting out.

On the single handed transpacific, a Westsail 32 has performed admirably. Five crossings 1978-2014 (I think 4 more in 2016 alone), with elapsed times (not including 2016 which I cannot find) of 16:03:54:13, 16:09:19:38, 17:02:48:00, 17:03:01:41, and 19:06:46:33. Much higher performance boats with similar elapsed times on a given 2+ week SHTP race include a Ranger 37 (2 hours slower than the W32), Swan 51 (7 hours faster than the W32), Santa Cruz 40 (8 hours faster than the W32), Olson 34 (1 hour faster than the W32), Valiant 40 (18 hours slower than the W32). In other words, they tend to keep up with the fleet.

The first single handed, non-stop round-the-world boat, Robin Knox-Johnson's Suahili, is almost exactly the same as a Westsail 32, but made of teak.

I doubt you can get much better bang for the buck, for this course (single handed non-stop around the world), than a Westsail 32.

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44 minutes ago, carcrash said:

 

I like sailing fast. So my first knee jerk response would be "of course not, its a pig!" And you've seen comments like in this thread before you got here. If someone races a Westsail 32 on a round-the-cans racing event, they will get trounced because the first upwind leg they won't get to the windward mark before their time allowance for the entire race is used up. They are s-l-o-w going upwind. The do keep going upwind no matter what happens, but its always slow motion.

However, on long hauls, waterline becomes a dominant factor of performance: most boats cover thousands of miles at pretty close to hull speed, with very few miles spent maximizing VMG upwind. And on extremely long legs, like a 30000 mile non-stop circumnavigation, the weight of stores will be enormous. So a light displacement boat will not be, whereas the Westsail will still seem pretty much the same, even if its boot top is 6" below water when setting out.

On the single handed transpacific, a Westsail 32 has performed admirably. Five crossings 1978-2014 (I think 4 more in 2016 alone), with elapsed times (not including 2016 which I cannot find) of 16:03:54:13, 16:09:19:38, 17:02:48:00, 17:03:01:41, and 19:06:46:33. Much higher performance boats with similar elapsed times on a given 2+ week SHTP race include a Ranger 37 (2 hours slower than the W32), Swan 51 (7 hours faster than the W32), Santa Cruz 40 (8 hours faster than the W32), Olson 34 (1 hour faster than the W32), Valiant 40 (18 hours slower than the W32). In other words, they tend to keep up with the fleet.

The first single handed, non-stop round-the-world boat, Robin Knox-Johnson's Suahili, is almost exactly the same as a Westsail 32, but made of teak.

I doubt you can get much better bang for the buck, for this course (single handed non-stop around the world), than a Westsail 32.

+1

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I worked for Jerome for three years as a sailing instructor. First, during a summer up in Northern Michigan at Camp Michigania on Walloon Lake and then for 2 seasons at the Bitter End Yacht Club on Virgin Gorda. The journey he is currently on is truly incredible and he has been planning it since well before I met him.  Jerome saved up for the better part of a decade for this and has undertaken the trip completely unsponsored. He bought Mighty Sparrow (originally named Cyrano) in Florida in September of 2016 and then stored her on the hard and came down to help us open up Watersports at BEYC. Around November of 2016, his dad Jim and him sailed Sparrow down from Florida to VG. On the first day out they lost the engine lol. They wallowed in no wind for several days and then hit some serious conditions. I don't remember exactly what Jerome reported but it was at least Force 7. I remember when they finally sailed into the North Sound and onto a mooring ball in front of BEYC. It took them a whole lot longer than they originally intended but I believe that initial journey gave Jerome a lot of confidence in his vessel. He proceeded to spend the winter in the Caribbean, making several solo sails down to Dominica and back from the BVI all while operating out of BEYC. He also took a several week solo trip into the Atlantic out toward the Cape Verde Islands and back. I believe he learned about the boat during the time - especially operating the wind vane. I don't think this was stated earlier in the thread, but Jerome is doing this entire voyage with an Aries windvane. No auto pilot on board. He also has no water maker on the boat and is sustaining himself by collecting rainwater.

After the 2016 winter in the Caribbean, Jerome found a yard in Maine that would allow him to haul the boat for the summer and do significant work on Sparrow. He solo-sailed Sparrow from the BVI to Maine in May 2017 and then hauled the boat for the summer. He ripped up the entire wood deck and relaid fiberglass with non-skid. He also rebed several of the bobstays supporting the boomkin and bowsprit. In addition, he remodeled the interior of Sparrow for increased storage capacity and to create a workbench area. I'm sure there were many other projects he undertook that I am also unaware of. 

He then left in October of 2017 on this current trip. 

At any rate, I'm incredibly proud, impressed and humbled by this journey of Jerome's. I am so lucky to have had him as a mentor in my sailing career and he truly is a hero and role model of mine. I guess what it comes down to for me is that some people have dreams and some people live them. Jerome is definitely living his right now!

Most recent update on Jerome: He's not quite as fast as the Volvo boats, but he is currently taking on the same nasty Southern Ocean conditions! It sounds like he just suffered a pretty serious knockdown, everything but the dodger held up though. Current location as of this morning is below. 

He's come a long way but he has a long way to go. Getting around the Horn here is a major obstacle obviously, keep your fingers crossed for a good weather window! I know food is also running low, so also cross your fingers the fish start biting in the Atlantic for him! 

If you have any questions about Jerome or his journey feel free to ask me. I'll be more than happy to answer if I can!

 

 

image.png

Edited by SimplyDabbling
Posted a picture multiple times.
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Almost at the Horn...

Quote

4/7 Almost to the Horn
(1/2) Frustrating calms all day yesterday. Snow squalls and below freezing temps kept up under a bright sun. Stunning clouds down here. Each squall takes
(1/2) On a different color if it is rain the normal dark under cloud, hail turn this more off white, and snow is brilliant white from the cloud top to
(1/2) The horizon. Like giant white mountains coming out of the sea. Winds came up after nightfall and running before a squall the boat jibed and broke
(1/2) The VHF Ariel off the mast. Still connected and working I will fix it when the sea goes flat in a few days. Catching lots of snow/water for drinking
Almost 30 gallons in reserve now. Fingered crossed for the Horn tomorrow! inr.ch/R6SC7WR - Jerome Rand
(1/2) The AIS works with the VHF. So it might not work so well until I can get it back in
Place. It's very rough right now so it will have to wait.
Yep flying right now. Seas are changing fast. No north or east waves. inr.ch/JYJ2MMZ - Jerome Rand

 

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So this is my brother.  He saved for years to do this trip, it’s been a plan for quite some time.  He has always been the kind of person that sets his mind to something and just runs with it, he did a through hike of the Appalachian trail a few years ago.   We’re a family of three sons who learned how to sail by taking rides with our Dad on a Hobie 16, that we still have, and started to take it out when we had the ability to sail it out and sail it back to the dock, that was the start of a career in sailing for all of us.  He and I have both taught sailing for years, done deliveries and worked as yacht crew, but he has always had a connection to sailing that surpasses most people.  He is the kind of person that takes the helm and the boat just rides a little bit smoother and a little bit faster.  Our brother is a sailmaker and made the sails that he is using on this voyage, I helped him with refitting for this trip, as well as working weather routing as needed.  He’s currently underway on a nonstop solo circumnavigation and has just left Port Stanley in the Falkland Islands.  The Pacific was slower and more confused than planned so he pulled into the Falklands to get a provisioning drop.  He picked up his additional stores and is back underway headed to Gloucester Mass, the port he left on October 3,2017.  I can’t begin to say how proud I am of my brother and what he is doing, at this point he is 191 days at sea and still has a couple of months left in his voyage.  We’re all looking forward to a smooth ride as he makes his way up the Atlantic back to Gloucester.  (Our Mom is looking forward to the arrival the most.)

unnamed.jpg

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On 4/12/2018 at 7:23 PM, ensignsb@gmail.com said:

So this is my brother.  He saved for years to do this trip, it’s been a plan for quite some time.  He has always been the kind of person that sets his mind to something and just runs with it, he did a through hike of the Appalachian trail a few years ago.   We’re a family of three sons who learned how to sail by taking rides with our Dad on a Hobie 16, that we still have, and started to take it out when we had the ability to sail it out and sail it back to the dock, that was the start of a career in sailing for all of us.  He and I have both taught sailing for years, done deliveries and worked as yacht crew, but he has always had a connection to sailing that surpasses most people.  He is the kind of person that takes the helm and the boat just rides a little bit smoother and a little bit faster.  Our brother is a sailmaker and made the sails that he is using on this voyage, I helped him with refitting for this trip, as well as working weather routing as needed.  He’s currently underway on a nonstop solo circumnavigation and has just left Port Stanley in the Falkland Islands.  The Pacific was slower and more confused than planned so he pulled into the Falklands to get a provisioning drop.  He picked up his additional stores and is back underway headed to Gloucester Mass, the port he left on October 3,2017.  I can’t begin to say how proud I am of my brother and what he is doing, at this point he is 191 days at sea and still has a couple of months left in his voyage.  We’re all looking forward to a smooth ride as he makes his way up the Atlantic back to Gloucester.  (Our Mom is looking forward to the arrival the most.)

unnamed.jpg

Fantastic effort! Do you have any pictures of the prep on the hard or otherwise. Would love to know details of what went into getting the boat ready for this. Twin backstays and reinforced boomkin, any bottom fairing? Max prop?

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Unfortunately all the pictures of the refit are on his computer on the boat.  I helped him with some of the structural installs.  He went with the twin backstays, reinforced the boomkin.  We had a machine shop make new whisker stay chainplates for the boomkin and bowsprit.  He made them larger and longer so they're now three bolts instead of two.  We rebeded most of the deck hardware, previous owner had a love of silicone.  Seems westsail is second only to hinckley for genny track access but we pulled and rebeded with new fasteners.  He picked up a new aries unit but has his old one along for spares as well.  We also added a padeye in the cockpit with a big G10 backing plate for a tether in the really nasty conditions.  We also sealed the cockpit floor engine room access figuring that footwell would be full of water more than once on the trip.  There is a forward hatch that we added additional locks to and new gasket material, figured once he left port that hatch is sealed up for the whole trip.  He switched to hank on foresails instead of the old furling unit.  Other than that there wasn't much structural changes, the boat was someones project boat for about a decade on the hard so a lot of what we did was just better sealing and bedding throughout the boat as well as inspection deeper than what you get from a survey.  Overall the boat was dry and strong when he got it, it was a really lucky find.  It's held up really well, he just cleared the 50's yesterday now that he is back in the Atlantic. In hindsight one thing that should have gotten more attention was electrical, old connectors weren't heat shrink, no dielectric grease, thankfully there just aren't that many electronics.  He has a Standard Horizon plotter/VHF combo probably from the late 90's, the only instrument tied into that is a transducer for depth(thru-hull also found to be beded with silicone), his only wind instrument is a windex, haven't asked if that has survived.  He added solar panels on the bimini and has a small goal zero inverter to charge computer, camera, etc, and he does grib file downloads through the sat phone for weather forecasting.  One of the nicest things he brought is a Garmin Inreach, so he can keep in touch through text but also receive so a friend and I help him with weather routing.     

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Thanks for that! He looks to be in some nasty stuff right now... 

what is his strategy for the really bad stuff? Does he have a drogue... go with it with just a scrap of headsail..?

does he have a regular 3 blade prop..?

 

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He's got a really small staysail and the main has a third reef added.  When it comes to the nasty stuff I don't think he has had to go bare poles is just rode it out with his staysail.  No drogue going out, just surfing the swell, the best SOG he's seen surfing is around 20 knots.  I can't remember what prop he has, wouldn't be surprised if it is just a three blade that was already on the boat.  The boat has done a great job of rolling with the really nasty gales, the toughest part has been the lulls, the boat has a really uncomfortable motion if the sails aren't powered up.  Other than that the heavy weather times have been the hardest when it gets so confused that he takes a wave over the stern, it fills the cockpit and sprays in through the companionway hatch seams.  

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So a "provisioning drop" in the Falklands, does that not rather invalidate the whole effort?? 

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Only the "non-stop" part.

Still one hell of an accomplishment.

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Essex and SloopJonB: He never actually stopped, dropped sail or touched land for the provisioning drop in the Falklands. He contacted a shipping company out of the Falklands who came out in some kind of launch boat - I have no idea what type of vessel that was - and they dropped the food off to him while he was still sailing. I am assuming he went hove-to for the exchange but I don't know how it was done to be honest. At any rate, it required some serious seamanship from both parties as it looks like the weather was pretty gnarly during the drop.

In my mind that still qualifies the trip as non-stop. The unassisted portion is probably out the window. 

I attached some photos below from the food drop in the Falklands. 

30707404_10213466688036525_1892278786238963275_n.jpg

30714320_10213466693596664_1588974870791257720_n.jpg

30726214_10213466686516487_5692927702858548685_n.jpg

30728056_10213466685196454_6644344019267556467_n.jpg

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That is right he never did stop, also he wasn't boarded as well.  The Falklands government allowed him to approach with out boarding or checking the vessel.  I rack this up with someone throwing you a beer.  

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Loading more supplies because you can out of food? I mean good job and all but no.

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Well, it can still count as non-stop, just not unassisted.

However you look at it, it's a big accomplishment.

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18 hours ago, Essex said:

Loading more supplies because you can out of food? I mean good job and all but no.

Sound the troll alarm!

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On 5/9/2018 at 12:31 PM, Essex said:

So a "provisioning drop" in the Falklands, does that not rather invalidate the whole effort?? 

I’d say it perhaps invalidates your whole effort...

I mean, c’mon, the dude is undertaking an epic voyage...

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Here's Jerome getting some BEYC love as he sails through the North Sound of the BVI. Looks like he'll be home in Gloucester in about 2 weeks.

 

 

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Heh...it's beautiful there. What's the rush to get back to Gloucester? The boat looks in fine shape.

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No regrets for this guy on his death bed! I love it when people do stuff like this for no other reason than they want to. Life is to be lived.

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1 minute ago, LB 15 said:

No regrets for this guy on his death bed! I love it when people do stuff like this for no other reason than they want to. Life is to be lived.

Exactly. But there are people in this world who try as hard as they can to put a negative spin on everything. LB is another story!! (snark tag)

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Update from FB:

Quote

Jerome will be arriving at the Maritime Gloucester dock, Gloucester, MA at approximately 11:00am Saturday morning.

 

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     I'm pretty certain that Jerome did one of his first offshore passages with me on a big British motorsailer that had sat at the docks in North Sound without being used for a couple of years. Jerome was working at Bitter End as the 'house engineer' and was really getting a lot of sailing with the Bitter End Sailing staff and it was a pretty magical time for a young guy in the Islands. I met Jerome via my windsurfing buddies and he had gotten to know the owner of the big motorsailer who was disappointed in the boat and told Jerome to put together a crew and sail the boat to Ft Lauderdale and put it up for sail. I got hired as skipper and a couple other sailing/windsurfing buddies joined us for a very smooth luxurious passage in ideal conditions. The boat was somewhat of a white elephant and very complex systems wise and my previous offshore experience had been on very simple boats and Jerome was the best mate/engineer I could have hoped for. I wasn't sure if he was the same kid who had sailed with me until I watched the video of his 'flyby' of Bitter End and this video pretty much confirmed that he was the one. Good to see his success even if I am a bit jealous...

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On 6/29/2018 at 6:29 AM, Ajax said:

Man... Congrats to him.

Yeah -it’s a very rare sailing accomplishment - kinda the “pinnacle,” I’d say, one that few people have done (especially non-racer pros).

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He said that he now "almost agrees" with people who said that the Westsail 32 had no business being out in the open ocean. I don't understand that. I thought that back in its day, the W-32 was the boat people trusted for that kind of work?  Slow, but tough.

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2 hours ago, Ajax said:

He said that he now "almost agrees" with people who said that the Westsail 32 had no business being out in the open ocean. I don't understand that. I thought that back in its day, the W-32 was the boat people trusted for that kind of work?  Slow, but tough.

Just a guess - perhaps he was referring to the speed, the desire to move along faster, to shorten the time at sea, especially in the high latitudes?

In an early classic, famous “cruising” book, the French book “Damien Autour du Monde” (Damien Around the World, which sadly isn’t available in English), the authors talk about their self-built light displacement boat.  Jerome Poncet and Gerard Janichon are/became well known after their multi year around the world via high latitudes voyage (Poncet eventually settling in the Falklands, where he ran —still runs?— an expedition voyaging business).  Their voyage started way back in the late ‘60s (when heavier, full keel boats were certainly the norm); the book was written in the ‘70s. In “Damien”, they specifically mention the speed and handling benefits of their light displacement cold-molded (I think) boat.  They were a couple of ballsy fucking 20-something year olds!  (Spitsbergen, S. Georgia, Antarctica...long before GPS...)

http://www.gerardjanichon-damien.fr/damien-autour-du-monde/

Just a guess as to what Jerome Rand may have been referring to re: Westsail 32.

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12 hours ago, Ajax said:

He said that he now "almost agrees" with people who said that the Westsail 32 had no business being out in the open ocean. I don't understand that. I thought that back in its day, the W-32 was the boat people trusted for that kind of work?  Slow, but tough.

I mean, he did make it around the world non-stop via the capes so I'd say the design has some serious merit as an blue water ocean going vessel. I don't think Jerome would ever want that to be said about the W32. I know he absolutely loves that boat, design and the community/history that comes with it. If I had to guess about the quote based upon speaking with him during his trip I believe the Southern Ocean and Cape Horn was just a bit more than he expected. I think he experienced some incredibly scary and dangerous conditions (as saw by the life lost during the VOR) and it was just incredibly dangerous to be out there, by himself, in a boat of that size. 

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 SA needs a proper interview of this guy.   I’d love to heat more about the highs and lows of his journey.

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On 3/7/2018 at 11:14 PM, Leon T said:

On a per-dollar basis (#days / $ spent), I bet the Westsail is on par with or ahead of the Sodebo Ultim (49 days, 3 hrs and time to slam down a 12-pack) :P

If he's enjoying himself, that's all that counts. Bonus points for a tiller.

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The boat held up fantastically, it was in surprisingly good shape when he came in and very few structural issues underway.  I think what he meant is the overall motion of the boat is not so great.  I helped him take the boat from Maine to Gloucester for the departure and in mild conditions it has a really uncomfortable motion even in small seas.  The revolving door of lows in the Southern Ocean supplied some bad conditions, definitely some worrisome times in the bigger gales, but the calmer times between lows (when you need to get some rest) were still difficult due to the way the boat rides without powered up sails.    

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On 7/3/2018 at 8:16 PM, Alexander Dobbs said:

I mean, he did make it around the world non-stop via the capes so I'd say the design has some serious merit as an blue water ocean going vessel. I don't think Jerome would ever want that to be said about the W32. I know he absolutely loves that boat, design and the community/history that comes with it. If I had to guess about the quote based upon speaking with him during his trip I believe the Southern Ocean and Cape Horn was just a bit more than he expected. I think he experienced some incredibly scary and dangerous conditions (as saw by the life lost during the VOR) and it was just incredibly dangerous to be out there, by himself, in a boat of that size. 

 

Just now, Bombaround said:

The boat held up fantastically, it was in surprisingly good shape when he came in and very few structural issues underway.  I think what he meant is the overall motion of the boat is not so great.  I helped him take the boat from Maine to Gloucester for the departure and in mild conditions it has a really uncomfortable motion even in small seas.  The revolving door of lows in the Southern Ocean supplied some bad conditions, definitely some worrisome times in the bigger gales, but the calmer times between lows (when you need to get some rest) were still difficult due to the way the boat rides without powered up sails.    

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