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Spoonie

Mellow Yellow...

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The W36 From the FP.   I'm not a fan of flush decks from an looks point of view, but it looks like the designer of that thing has some interesting boats, including what looks like a class 40

 

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I went to the website and the boat looks awesome.
Pretty strange to have Sym Kite set up on such a sport boat look
I see the spin pole car on the mast and a spin pole on the stbd rail.

Is everything old, new again??

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or actually optimised for performance under irc/orc rather than fashion.   Website says the boat is specifically built for the 2018 irc/orc worlds.  ie, probably W/L course racing.   judging by the sterm, is probably got a little bit of weight on her.

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it's optimisation. back when I raced swan 42, we chose the boat layout depending on weather conditions. this meant we would switch to sym's when needed as well. 

 

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And it's got a water scoop bevel on the rail.  The crew will be stoked!

I guess the VoR 65s have started a demand for white water on the deck.  Everyone want a photo of "that's me under the foam".

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No bowsprit?? I see on the picture they have a good-old spinnaker pole... I think he just did a "modern" hull shape to look cool, but she's heavy and without a bowsprit it looks weird

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What strikes me is how high it is compared to its design waterline.

And there are already at least eight people on deck, so not much weight to add.

Numberwise, my money would still be on a race-ready 25-year old X-332 to beat it, especially on a W/L course.

We'll see, I guess...

img-20180303-wa00061383528285-1.jpg

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2 hours ago, Matagi said:

What strikes me is how high it is compared to its design waterline.

 

img-20180303-wa00061383528285-1.jpg

my guess the high freeboard  is to give it some sort of headroom inside without a coach house.

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yellow-768x512.jpg

Not sure about the yellow boat, but the green boat in the background is Xplore, an old BT Global Challenge 67' up for sale at Berthon's!

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This thing reminds me of the last IMS  Med Cup boats. Going slower to go faster...thanks ORC!

 

despegamos-06.jpg

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1 hour ago, Soley said:

This thing reminds me of the last IMS  Med Cup boats. Going slower to go faster...thanks ORC!

 

 

Not only that, but they had no other use after the rule changed or fell out of favor. Dual purpose boats hold their value much better.

Never did understand the concept of a stripped out race boat that competes under handicap - --> box rules aside, if a boat can't sail close to it's rating then the rating system is flawed and if a more comfortable boat can sail to it's rating why sail the stripped out race boat?

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7 hours ago, Matagi said:

What strikes me is how high it is compared to its design waterline.

I suspect it was originally designed with a coach house and furniture 

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I do not understand why anyone would want a boat that is intentionally slower than it needs to be.

Its a bold design! Arresting color and shapes.

But it was specifically designed to be slow: the part of the hull that provides the most stability -- the turn of the bilge -- is cut away for a higher drag and lower stability shape. Its obviously heavier than it has any reason to be. So heavy, more wetted surface, more rocker, less stability, and far too little sail area (especially downwind) than it would have been trivial to achieve. Why? The rule changes, so any advantage is ephemeral. Yet the disadvantage is permanent.

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1 hour ago, carcrash said:

I do not understand why anyone would want a boat that is intentionally slower than it needs to be.

Its a bold design! Arresting color and shapes.

But it was specifically designed to be slow: the part of the hull that provides the most stability -- the turn of the bilge -- is cut away for a higher drag and lower stability shape. Its obviously heavier than it has any reason to be. So heavy, more wetted surface, more rocker, less stability, and far too little sail area (especially downwind) than it would have been trivial to achieve. Why? The rule changes, so any advantage is ephemeral. Yet the disadvantage is permanent.

The midsection is reminiscent of an IOR hull.  Agree the slack bilge provides less stability,  but also yields lower drag.  Almost everything in yacht design is a trade off of some sort.

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4 hours ago, carcrash said:

 

I do not understand why anyone would want a boat that is intentionally slower than it needs to be.

 

 

Designed for one race.  What's the weather at the venue?  It might be a case of why would you want a boat that is faster than it needs to be?  Probably fits into ORC4.   Longer boat for the class, high ballast ratio, first to the top mark and hull speed with low angles to the bottom mark.  

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16 hours ago, Spoonie said:

It might be a case of why would you want a boat that is faster than it needs to be? 

Because its a RACING boat, not a SLOWING boat.

Speed never goes out of fashion. IOR midsections certainly went out of fashion for very good reasons, yet here we have it again. Not just this boat either, others (TP52, MAXI72, ...) exhibit this silly shape that is slower (more wetted surface and less stability for a given displacement) than it needs to be.

I can see it if one has infinite money. Otherwise, just does not make sense to me. Next race is different conditions, different class splits. Next year is different tweaks to the VPP. Different boat? I guess so.

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Tp52 and maxi72 are box rules, so if it was really slower then it's not going to appear there.   As a rule, Rounder bilges have less wetted surface than square ones.   I think in my amateur eye, the shape looks fine for the trade offs made. 

You need to imagine that hull leaned over 20deg and running square at less than hull speed. That is where that boat will spend most of its time.  Wide light flat hulls prove to be great reaching and under box rule conditions.   Longer, narrower, heavier hulls tend to do better when designed to a rating point and W/L racing.   Just look at the sqm, meter, AC class yacht design trends. 

Race boats are designed to win races. This one I'd say is designed to win W/L races in 8-12 knots and sloppy water against a mixed boat fleet separated by rating boundaries.  The fact it resembles some IOR shapes is possibly no surprising 

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The comparison would be the sun fast 3600.  This boat is a little longer, a little narrower, 400kg heavier (8%), but no cabin or (probably) furniture. About the same sail area.   It's definitely pegged into a design corner but it isn't extremely so I would say *shrug*

Key would be in the orc ratings.   I'm too lazy to log on and have a look

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No ORC certificate available at orc.org yet but the boat has registered for the ORC Worlds 2018 with a GPH of 608,6

https://offshoresailingworlds2018.com/participants-class-c/

 

The cruising version of this boat with a full interior is spect at a displacement of 4,95T.   So with the 5,3T for the racing version it's either a typo or a fat pig.

http://www.waarschip.info/waarschip/waarschip-1095-ld/

 

The boat does look nice though.  But waarschip has made more beaties in the past, especially the Waarschip 1010

 

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