Ajax

Cabin storage fasteners

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Tartan originally installed these sort of industrial velcro type closures on some of my cabin storage cubbies.

It's not really velcro, but a small plastic disc of plastic stems that interlock when you squish the other disc up against it. There is no "fuzzy" half. Anyway, after many years, the plastic is brittle and the little teeth have broken off and the discs no longer stick together. The discs are a little smaller than the size of a .25 cent piece.  They're probably 3/8" thick when stuck to each other. This was a shit way of doing things from the beginning, in my opinion.

What do you guys like for a replacement?

 

20180305_162557.jpg

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My boat's interior is more practical than pretty, and has holes in the doors where you put your finger through and feel around for a catch on the inside.

If your doors don't have holes, maybe something like this:

Double Ball Catch - Cabinet Accessories - Cabinet Hardware ...

(Sorry for unnecessarily large pic!)

It appears you can adjust the retention pressure too (?) 

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 These lids are upholstered back rests,  so no finger pulls. 

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I love it when someone gets a fix that doesn't involve putting more holes in the boat.

I bet Ajax replaces all of them.

Cheers

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23 hours ago, Ajax said:

This was a shit way of doing things from the beginning, in my opinion.

What do you guys like for a replacement?

 

20180305_162557.jpg

So Keffer, that’ll be a negative. 

 

Ajax: I have the metal catches Seabell suggested on a panel which covers a watermaker (nothing to fall out). They work for that, but I don’t think I’d use them in a situation where the cabinet door has to hold items in in a seaway. You could double them up for additional holding and that might work if the aforementioned is the case.

 

edit: Upon reflection, I’m guessing that the weight of the upholstered panel is mostly what holds it, so Seabell’s idea probably would work 

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The upholstered backrest panels have little, wooden feet that hook into the bottom of the cutout. The 3M dual lock fasteners hold the top closed.

Right now, I don't have anything heavy or dangerous stored in there that would necessitate holding against a seaway but in the future, there might be canned food in there.  Magnets might not be good for that kind of holding power either, unless they were neodymium harddrive magnets.

Thanks for pointing out the source of the original fastener. I'll order some to keep things closed for the moment, while I research other hardware options.

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Thanks for trickling out some more detail Ajax (Is that 'eye-axe' or 'A-jacks' BTW?).

I was going to suggest magnets, but really, considering their requirement for a ferrous component, even if plated, along with the obvious drawbacks of potential interference with compasses, credit cards etc. I thought better of it.

So your backrest upholstery is fixed to the door? Sounds like a bit of a kludge, but probably looks nice. Maybe a photo would help us provide better input?

To limit the effect of cargo shifting you could consider secondary restraints such as a net or canvas attached to the inner face of the aperture surround, or drop-in wood bars in cleats such as I recall we used to use to keep a horse in it's stable while both halves of the door are open to facilitate 'room service'.

If you want to improve the boat, why not separate the cushions from the boards? Then you could use elbow catches (Thanks Max!) and velcro the cushions to the boards. Would probably help when it comes to laundering the upholstery too.

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My boat came equipped with various styles of "snaps" to hold that sort of thing.  Like for dodger canvas, but used to hold doors in the open position, etc.  The problem is, they don't seem to be designed for frequent opening and closing - takes too much force to open and close and eventually they break.  I haven't yet identified the exact snap system used in the V-berth - only the bases are present, though someone did a neat job of fastening the base pieces to the liner without punching holes in the hull.  

For doors that are expected to hold back a load, like canned goods, I'd want a positive latch.  The bayonet-style latches that I've been using, following what existed in the galley, do not hold back canned goods, I can tell you.  Nor do they hold the hanging locker doors closed, even though there is a preventer keeping the clothes from swinging.  

Anyway, that's the main design stumbling block that has stalled my settee-back lockers.  To experiment, I've bought a few of these for about $5

s-l1600.jpg

and a few of these for about $2

413MyIN8wZL.jpg

But I'm having a hard time envisioning how either would work with a backrest cushion velcroed onto the door.  I'd like to propagate just one type of latch through all the interior cabinetry, so inexpensive would be nice.  

Dunno - maybe the elbow catch is the way to go. I'm just not super fond of the hole-in-the-door look.  Plus I could probably manage to fall while my finger's in there and break myself.  

As far as I can tell, my boat has never had positive latches on anything except the companionway door.  Supposedly the boat was raced. Nobody ever heeled it over before? :unsure:

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20 minutes ago, toddster said:

But I'm having a hard time envisioning how either would work with a backrest cushion velcroed onto the door.  I'd like to propagate just one type of latch through all the interior cabinetry, so inexpensive would be nice.  

Hehehe; toddster, as mentioned earlier, my 50 year old boat, while strong, and pretty on the outside, is purely practical on the interior. It doesn't even have boards/doors for the stowage behind the saloon seatbacks. Cushions just velcro over them, and thinking about it now, I haven't noticed a need for boards, either in terms of back comfort or retaining the stuff kept in there. But full disclosure: I haven't loaded them up with corned beef and tins'o'beans for a Southern Ocean passage yet, though the previous owner seems to have manged just fine criss-crossing the South Atlantic with this config.

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The boat likes to sail at 15° - 18° heel.  At that angle, with even a light chop, all the stock locker doors fly open, even if there's little or nothing inside.  It's weird that they'd make it like that.

In my case, I'm trying to build a tool-chest into the settee back.  There's a bit of weight in that.

The galley has by-pass doors, which are light and easy to make and do seem to stay closed with no help. I'm copying those in the head and V-berth cubbies.  Probably not the best for Ajax's application though.

Wall-Cabinet-With-Sliding-Door-I14-For-Y

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30 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

image.png.df840a4f0f312721473c3e3ea01c9e53.png

Very positive latching

Absolutely. But the wooden ''Poggenpohl' hole-liner' things are a complete waste of time, adding unnecessary complication and bumps to what can be a simple effective solution. 

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My old boat had elbow catches. While they are functional, they can also be a hazard. If the boat takes a bad roll while your finger is in there, you can easily break your finger. 

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26 minutes ago, seabell said:

Absolutely. But the wooden ''Poggenpohl' hole-liner' things are a complete waste of time, adding unnecessary complication and bumps to what can be a simple effective solution. 

But they look slick! :D I changed all the bare holes on my Hunter to them and it looked a whole lot better for it. They're kind of fun to make with 3 different hole saws as well.

I've heard of and can understand the broken finger thing but I've never heard from anyone it's actually happened to - only speculation about it being possible.

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17 minutes ago, Tom Keffer said:

My old boat had elbow catches. While they are functional, they can also be a hazard. If the boat takes a bad roll while your finger is in there, you can easily break your finger. 

 

1 minute ago, SloopJonB said:

I've heard of and can understand the broken finger thing but I've never heard from anyone it's actually happened to - only speculation about it being possible.

Right. I've heard that some people have been killed trying to cross the road.

Crikey, wouldn't it be ironic if you broke your finger trying to get into the 'first aid' locker?

Maybe either your holes are too small, or your fingers too big?

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On 3/12/2018 at 7:09 PM, SloopJonB said:

I've heard of and can understand the broken finger thing but I've never heard from anyone it's actually happened to - only speculation about it being possible.

That's why they are commonly called "knuckle busters"

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I have been using childproof kitchen cupboard latches. Cheap, effective and can be installed hidden.

3R

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