Worrell1000RR

2019 Worrell 1000 Reunion Race

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Worrell 1000 Reunion Race



Preliminary Notice of Race – 2019

(Revision 14MAR2018)

 

“The Worrell 1000 Reunion Race” (W1KRR) is an offshore long distance beach catamaran sailboat race to be held on/about May 2019 in the waters between Florida and Virginia Beach, VA. The race will cover approximately 1000 miles with overnight stops at multiple locations along the East Coast of the United States.  Through a collaborative agreement between “Worrell 1000, Inc.” and “Sail Series Promotions USA, Inc.”, an organization has been formed to oversee the Research and Development, and Running of the race.  This combined organization will be the Organizing Authority for the Worrell 1000 Reunion Race. 

The race will be governed by the rules as defined by the current edition of the “The Racing Rules of Sailing” (RRS 2017-2020)  and applicable Class Rules, except as modified by this NoR and/or the Worrell 1000 Reunion Race Sailing Instructions. Boats will be 20 foot production beach catamarans of a single type. The Organizing Authority is making efforts to tentatively have a limited number of charter boats available.  Final boat type has still to be determined and will be announced in a subsequent formal W1KRR NoR and/or W1KRR Sailing Instructions. Registration information, definitive dates, final course and checkpoint locations, and further information will be detailed in updates/revisions to this NoR and/or in the W1KRR Sailing Instructions and will be published soon after the completion of 2018 Florida 300 to take place in May 2018.

 

Additional contact information along with names, web locations, etc. will be advertised as the Organizing Authority continues to discuss further conditions for this race.

https://www.facebook.com/Worrell1000

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I think that I hold the distinction (dubious?) of having been a competitor, member of the race committee, AND a ground crew chief on the Worrell 1000 race ALL in the same year!

1987

Brutal conditions both on and off the course...

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10 hours ago, Worrell1000RR said:

Worrell 1000 Reunion Race

 



 

Preliminary Notice of Race – 2019

 

(Revision 14MAR2018)

 

 

 

“The Worrell 1000 Reunion Race” (W1KRR) is an offshore long distance beach catamaran sailboat race to be held on/about May 2019 in the waters between Florida and Virginia Beach, VA. The race will cover approximately 1000 miles with overnight stops at multiple locations along the East Coast of the United States.  Through a collaborative agreement between “Worrell 1000, Inc.” and “Sail Series Promotions USA, Inc.”, an organization has been formed to oversee the Research and Development, and Running of the race.  This combined organization will be the Organizing Authority for the Worrell 1000 Reunion Race. 

 

The race will be governed by the rules as defined by the current edition of the “The Racing Rules of Sailing” (RRS 2017-2020)  and applicable Class Rules, except as modified by this NoR and/or the Worrell 1000 Reunion Race Sailing Instructions. Boats will be 20 foot production beach catamarans of a single type. The Organizing Authority is making efforts to tentatively have a limited number of charter boats available.  Final boat type has still to be determined and will be announced in a subsequent formal W1KRR NoR and/or W1KRR Sailing Instructions. Registration information, definitive dates, final course and checkpoint locations, and further information will be detailed in updates/revisions to this NoR and/or in the W1KRR Sailing Instructions and will be published soon after the completion of 2018 Florida 300 to take place in May 2018.

 

 

 

Additional contact information along with names, web locations, etc. will be advertised as the Organizing Authority continues to discuss further conditions for this race.

 

https://www.facebook.com/Worrell1000

 

random capitalizations make me nervous.  This will be the fifth time by my counting that someone has tried to relaunch the W1000 since 2005.  I wish them best of luck.

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I'd love to see Randy Smyth race his little Tri! Sounds like one design again. That is why most of the attempts to relaunch that Mr Clean mentions failed. Run what you brung!

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I live in VB, totally down for this race... who has a boat? Details on the OD charter?

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I'll fly back to the US from NZ for this... wouldn't miss something like this for the world!

If anybody wants crew, PM me, I've got lots of beach cat (Hobie 16, F18, various Nacras, never foiled though) experience both on salt and freshwater, good with wind shifts and coastal sailing, degree in fluid dynamics, mid 20s, 75kgs. 

Have sailed Ruff Riders (race around South Padre Island), the Matakana Raid (race around Matakana Island, near Tauranga, NZ) and the Dash (the last leg of the GT300), but not the GT300 itself. Regrettably left Texas too soon to do it :(

Cheers!

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Hopefully this comes to fruition but like all I have my doubts. Best move right now is to signup and support the Florida 300 this year, as I believe its the same group putting the Worrell together.

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Might have been better to keep it underground. Set the dates, let ppl self regulate. Couple of chase boats. OD would be good for spares but have to agree, keeping it open to all beach cats  would get the numbers up. 

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I raced monohulls with a guy, Rob, back in 1986 who said he had the record for W1000. When it was one leg, Florida/Virginia, Hobie 16s. One night at Captain Jack's he ordered and ate the bulk of "one gross" oysters on the half shell. I don't think there are people like that, who would sign up for a race like W1000 anymore. Even with legs, stops overnight, it's a brutal event, little services, or for the matter publicity. Would be popular as an on line event I reckon.

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Posted (edited)

this appears to me to be the most methodical and deliberate approach to bringing a 1000 mile race back to the east coast i have seen in a long time. i don't really get Clean's point of view (situation normal) regarding the classes invited - there are a ton of F18s racing in the US, and the boat has been very successful in races like the Tybee 500 and Texas 300. the Nacra F20 is offered in three configurations, but only one of those can beach launch and land, and that one happens to be the one that the majority of F20 owners have. if the classes and typos form the crux of your criticism, Clean, i think you've both feet off base.

i absolutely understand skepticism and the strong feelings that surround the event, both pro and con. i'm making plans, though - this effort is coming from a good place, involves the right people, and has the seed funding to get going. in fact, turtle permits and hotels have already been contemplated, ground-truthed, and figured into the checkpoints selected. some of the historical checkpoints have been lost to beach erosion and development - the fact that someone's made the trip to see what will work demonstrates to me that planning is farther along than i would have guessed.

so let's see - plenty of work to come no matter what role is taken; organizer, competitor, manager, press.

edit: oh, and that logo? it is the original logo - taps into that "reunion" nostalgia.

Edited by John Williams
and another thing...

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Good points John. The F20 you mention would be a fine boat for the race. But selling a one design boat for the race as was done for an earlier re-incarnation was a disaster in more than one way and probably the reason for Clean's comments. 

    Hopefully everyone can keep an open mind and work from a clean (pun not intended) sheet an make this race happen.

    I still treasure my original logo knit shirts from the 87 race (although I can no longer wear them...).

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Clean is waaay off base on the F18 front. 39 boats at the 2017 Nationals and 55 boats back in 2013 doesn't exactly strike me as a boat that is barely sailed in the U.S, especially as there are regular weekend regattas on boat coasts with 10+ F18's in attendance. What other twin trapeze, spinnaker equipped boat can boast similar numbers in the U.S?

The F20c is a rare boat but there are several in Florida and its proven itself capable of bashing upwind into 30+ kts. I just don't think the enthusiasm for a 300 mile race run during the middle of the week is there; do it Thursday-Sunday, slightly longer legs on a more compressed time scale that fits into peoples busy lives and it might be a winner. The Worrell 1000 is a different ball game but the people signing up know that.

In the end I hope this race comes to fruition and I'm glad the organizers didn't limit the fleet to F20c's only.

 

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On 3/17/2018 at 4:26 PM, Rasputin22 said:

Run what you brung!

I like this idea! Who's going to want to take their $30K Nacra F20 on such a punishing course? Inter 20s/ Prindle 19s/ Hobie 20's on the other hand...

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1 hour ago, swangtang said:

I like this idea! Who's going to want to take their $30K Nacra F20 on such a punishing course? Inter 20s/ Prindle 19s/ Hobie 20's on the other hand...

The Worrell is more like Figure Eight racing.

 

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H20's guys.  Open it up for more designs.

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Keeping the fleet compressed obviously helps the organisers with tracking the boats & chase boats etc. I understand that but run what you brung would give them the biggest fleet - safety in numbers. I hope they bring it back. 

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The Worrell has always been a 2 week deal. There is no good way around that, unless you want to sail 200 miles a day, which on the average equates to 20 hour days. This is a serious endeavor and work never stopped people who were serious from competing in the past.

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Like Sam said, nobody said it was easy... or even fun, lol.  If you go into this race thinking that it will be, expect to be disappointed.  It takes a level of commitment that most people don't have, and in many ways it is like climbing Everest used to be.  If you want to do the race, round the Capes and experience what this race is, you have to be prepared to put a lot on the line (time, money, your health).

I ran collegiately and honestly, that race is one of the most painful things I've ever done and am looking forward to doing it again!

Maybe I'm twisted and hope to see two night legs again, a race without them wouldn't be a Worrell.

I understand the logic behind two classes, it makes the race easier to run from the management side, but there is a lot of validity to the "run what you brung" mentality (see the success of the R2AK and Water Tribe races).  Which do I think is right?... I don't know.  Back in the heyday, there was a large I-20 class and that was a good boat for the race.  Now, there isn't a dominant 20' fleet and the F18 is the largest class in the US and world.  The F18's are more than capable of running this race and being faster than the I-20's were, but... some of the other platforms... maybe not so much.

 

 

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to be fair, will, the Hobie 16 is the largest class in the US and the world, but that is not the right boat for this event anymore.

run-what-you-brung? not for this event. i don't know that a 20-year-old Hobie 20 or Prindle 19 or nacra 6.0, no matter how well maintained, would make it. further, what qualified team is going to drag a Prindle out of the garage when there are plenty of F18s available? 

all that is moot - there are two fleets currently invited, though the OA has indicated they are open to a proposal from others. for now, teams that need the certainty for planning have it. if someone wants to get a fleet of G-cats rigged and ready, better start making some calls.

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On 5/15/2018 at 10:40 AM, John Williams said:

this appears to me to be the most methodical and deliberate approach to bringing a 1000 mile race back to the east coast i have seen in a long time. i don't really get Clean's point of view (situation normal) regarding the classes invited - there are a ton of F18s racing in the US, and the boat has been very successful in races like the Tybee 500 and Texas 300. the Nacra F20 is offered in three configurations, but only one of those can beach launch and land, and that one happens to be the one that the majority of F20 owners have. if the classes and typos form the crux of your criticism, Clean, i think you've both feet off base.

i absolutely understand skepticism and the strong feelings that surround the event, both pro and con. i'm making plans, though - this effort is coming from a good place, involves the right people, and has the seed funding to get going. in fact, turtle permits and hotels have already been contemplated, ground-truthed, and figured into the checkpoints selected. some of the historical checkpoints have been lost to beach erosion and development - the fact that someone's made the trip to see what will work demonstrates to me that planning is farther along than i would have guessed.

so let's see - plenty of work to come no matter what role is taken; organizer, competitor, manager, press.

edit: oh, and that logo? it is the original logo - taps into that "reunion" nostalgia.

Apologies if I have the numbers wrong JW, I am just parroting the F18 folks I know who said the fleets are becoming endangered species over the past couple years.  Apologies!

As have said, I will be super supportive and will try to get Scot to cover it as much as possible if it happens.  But I'm not going to put much stock into another effort until I see a half dozen entry fees paid and I can talk to them...

 

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I'm with you clean on the realities of this going forward, at the same time its a chicken vs. egg situation. The OA's have said the race is a definitive go, so for now we have to take that at face value.

In recent years the numbers of F18's sailing at smaller events on the East Coast and more specifically in the Florida area has dropped off some. Why exactly is hard to say, I think a few top sailors were lost to the N17 for a quad cycle, and some others have had family/life events take time away from racing but its not what I would say "endangered species" level when you have 8-15 boats at an event. That's more F18's than F20c's raced at their last world championship in Europe, and more than I believe are currently in the U.S but I don't have those specific numbers.

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On 5/16/2018 at 2:40 AM, John Williams said:

Texas 300

 

western clint eastwood GIF

Howdy... let me clear my throat...

*ahem... cough cough, ahem, ahem*

It's the GREAT Texas 300. 

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1 hour ago, John Williams said:

to be fair, will, the Hobie 16 is the largest class in the US and the world, but that is not the right boat for this event anymore.

What I meant to say was, "..the F18 is the largest class in the US and world of boats that a sane person would race in the Worrell..."

I thought the same thing that you did, "would I want to take a Hobie 20 or Prindle 19 (etc.) up the coast?"  Not so much from the point of view of being slow, more like, "will this thing make it?"  From a structural perspective, I'd have no problems taking a Marstrom Tornado up the coast, but having done the FL300 2x and the GT300 on one... lets just say that the systems aren't designed for that kind of race.

If you looked at the boats generally available that might actually finish, what is there?  N20c, F18, I-20, N6.0, ARC22 (or similar).  Like you said, so many other boats are long in the tooth and might not be up to the task anymore.  When that jackass skipper I was with caused me to nearly get separated from the boat around Hatteras, I remembered that I have an allergy to being picked up by the Coast Guard... so... our plans don't include a Mystere 6.0 (inside joke) or anything else likely to leave us floating.

This got me thinking about the impact that boat choice could have on the race.  If you take best case scenario; the course record is 71 hours, 32 minutes and 55 seconds, you could use SCHRS to estimate the ETs for other boats, assuming a tie race on CT.

I-20:  71:32:55
N20c:  65:21:45
F18:  74:31:47
H16:  88:54:51
(Of course that doesn't make any allowances for a slow year.)

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How many guys would want to run their F18's up the beach or cartwheel them down a wave & into the bottom.

Running one up the beach fully loaded with swell is not the same as resting it on the edge of the lake!  

What's a good 10yr old F18 worth in the US?

& How much for a set of tequila sunrise rags to suit aforementioned F18 in USD?

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I took one of the best Marstrom Tornados in the world with a fresh paint job/rework and beautiful set of half gaskets all done by Lars up the beach in the 2016 FL300.  This was only the second day sailing it after I bought it. Spinnaker up, +20% more sail area than stock, 20+ kts, full throttle.  (Still amazed that the gaskets made it through two FL300s and a GT300)

Not saying I wanted to do it, but... Some habits die hard!  I was more frustrated that the race officials didn't get video or pictures!

The foam core F-18's deal with it just fine... You might need some gelcoat after a while, but those things are so heavy that it isn't a big deal so long as you are smart about it.  Ask the regulars in the GT300.

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3 hours ago, SCANAS said:

How many guys would want to run their F18's up the beach or cartwheel them down a wave & into the bottom.

 

Nobody wants to. You can stop and put them on a launching trolley if you like............but this is about winning the Worrell1000!

Inter 20s have survived the race well and are built the same as F18s

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What I meant was how many of the boats sailing in the nationals would use those boats in this race. 

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Every boat I sailed in the Tybee 500 or GT 300 was a 2 year old or less boat that was sailed as Nationals/Worlds boat.  I hit every beach landing as hard and fast as possible and didn't think twice about it.  The ground crews always did a sweep of the finish line to make sure there weren't any rocks, shells or debris.  It was in their best interest, if they didn't want to be up all night repairing boats...

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8 hours ago, teamvmg said:

Nobody wants to. You can stop and put them on a launching trolley if you like............but this is about winning the Worrell1000!

Inter 20s have survived the race well and are built the same as F18s

Actually that isn't true. Inter 20's were built in effectively a 1 piece mold with deck hatches bonded on post bulkhead installation. This means there is no hull seam at the bottom or top to fail, just the deck seams which are solid. I have seen a couple F18 hull seam failures; these are bonded in left/right halves and due to production constraints the seams aren't taped after fabrication in most cases. Still its unlikely on a newer build (haven't seen boats younger than 5 years old have issues) nor do I know of any issues with the F20c's in this regard. The failure points are daggerboard cases, rudders systems, spinnaker poles and masts.

Scanas,

  New a F18 is ~25-$28k for a boat with sails and maybe beach wheels, but no trailer or covers. Outside of the Mk. 1 Infusion re-fitted with the Mk. 2 long boards, a 10 year old F18 wouldn't be too competitive in this race. However, older Mk. 2's and C2's are selling for closer to $10-12k, they are still competitive boats and would be a good choice for this event. In many ways its hard to justify the $35-$36k new Nacra F20c when their are good F18's on the market.

Would I run my Nationals F18 up on the beach? Probably not, but I have a painted boat so that's a chunk of change post beach landing to get sorted. Its enough money that a used Infusion Mk. 2 that you sell for half off after the race starts to look like a good bargain.

-Sam

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2 hours ago, samc99us said:

Actually that isn't true. Inter 20's were built in effectively a 1 piece mold with deck hatches bonded on post bulkhead installation. This means there is no hull seam at the bottom or top to fail, just the deck seams which are solid. I have seen a couple F18 hull seam failures; these are bonded in left/right halves and due to production constraints the seams aren't taped after fabrication in most cases. Still its unlikely on a newer build (haven't seen boats younger than 5 years old have issues) nor do I know of any issues with the F20c's in this regard. The failure points are daggerboard cases, rudders systems, spinnaker poles and masts.

Scanas,

  New a F18 is ~25-$28k for a boat with sails and maybe beach wheels, but no trailer or covers. Outside of the Mk. 1 Infusion re-fitted with the Mk. 2 long boards, a 10 year old F18 wouldn't be too competitive in this race. However, older Mk. 2's and C2's are selling for closer to $10-12k, they are still competitive boats and would be a good choice for this event. In many ways its hard to justify the $35-$36k new Nacra F20c when their are good F18's on the market.

Would I run my Nationals F18 up on the beach? Probably not, but I have a painted boat so that's a chunk of change post beach landing to get sorted. Its enough money that a used Infusion Mk. 2 that you sell for half off after the race starts to look like a good bargain.

-Sam

Sam,  

i20's were built in half molds and then glued together.  The deck plates gave access to bond the bulkheads.  I can't remember if they were taped, but I definitely know the hills were seamed down the middle.

How many F20c's are there in the US?  Maybe 15 or so.  I just don't see that as a good boat for the race given the rarity of it and how pricey it is.  I am sure the OA is tossing it out there as that the handful of them in the US are being sailed by the distance racing stalwarts in Florida.  You could have a whole spare F18 plus the race boat for the cost of on f20c.  Maybe Performance can turn out a batch at a discount for the race but commitments would need to be made now.

 The biggest issue I see with two classes is that you are diluting the racing.  I think one class will make for the best racing and give the highest chance for success.  Given the number of good F18's available and the ability to source spare parts more readily I think it makes more sense.  I would also guess that a good percentage of participants will be buying a boat specific for the event so reducing that cost should help.

My $.02.

 

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How 'bout a Weta?  Randy's friend "Gadget Girl" runs one in the EC 300.  Lots of em around and maybe a more cost effective solution.

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I'd consider a Weta. After my ill-fated attempt in 87, I was convinced that a 20' tri would be the ticket. I even drew up something along the lines of the Gougeon SLINGSHOT with a cross beam/hiking rack with a couple of small amas that would slide to windward. WETA  would do well as a singlehand class. Plenty of them around.

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I'd like to see I-20s out there as well.  I feel like they were the dominant distance racing class, but imagine the choices of the organizers have been carefully made after consulting with those who have done distance racing before.  Nothing wrong with the F18 and there are a lot of them out there now.

I think the Weta would be way too slow compared to the rest of the fleet.  No organizer wants to keep the finish line open for a lot of hours each day, though they have done it for probably 8+ hours when we tore a kite and suffered on for miles without one.

 

 

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Getting too far behind the fleet after our dismasting in the 87 Worrell was the reason we got tossed from the lineup. Didn't make it to the checkpoint before the start in the morning by about 45 minutes and Mike Worrell hated to say "Thanks for the effort boys but we can't be responsible for looking boats that fall more than 24 hrs behind." Next breathe he asked if I wanted to join the Race Committee! 

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The i20 is a great boat for this race, unfortunately most are getting long in the tooth and Nacra isn't building any more. Hence the switch to the "current" F20c. Of those currently registered, (over here, https://www.catsailor.com/forum/ubbthreads.php/topics/288679/worrell-1000-reunion-race#Post288679) , I'm guessing they will be on F20C's; Steve and Jay already own one, I'm betting Key Sailing will be there on their boat etc.

T Sailor, copy that on the i20 hulls. I do believe they were at least taped along the seam from the inside, but I could be wrong. Haven't seen one fail there though which is my main point.

I do agree with T Sailor that logically and financially the F18 is the right boat for this race today, but the teams above and others not listed at near or over 400 lbs of crew weight aren't going to be super competitive on the F18, where they will have no issue on the very powered up F20c. I myself am on the fence about what to do, realistically I don't see a title sponsor coming in and allowing us to purchase a new F20c, then you add the cost of spares (mast tube alone is >$6500+shipping) and it makes you think twice, especially when I already own a F18 with a healthy stash of spares including rig.

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So I have an question about durability. Yall are saying that it's rough on the boats to do this long of a race but as far as fiberglass is concerned does it really matter if 40 hours of sailing is done all at once or broken up into 2 hour blocks like most people that weekend sail on their boats. One of my boats is a spin equipped H18 that I've sailed easily a few thousand miles in the past few years. Done distance races up and down both Florida coasts, with daily total distances over 80 miles on occasion. Everything's fine with the boat and I'll probably do a leg or 2 of the Worrell on it realistically. Apart from the risk of a storm popping up and having to reef or drop the main, why would multiple days in a row of sailing stress the boat any more than normal? It's not like fiberglass needs to sleep.

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Look up the number of flex cycles for different materials. Then factor in offshore.

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Right, but that supports my question in that why would sailing multiple days in a row be any different than single days spread out over weeks/months/years as far as "flex cycles" goes. Offshore or not, if a material will fail say after 1 million units of use then whats the difference in doing 1million units back to back or a single unit once a week?

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Their are two issues at stake, both related. The first is the fatigue life of the material, which is a function of the stress it sees:

image.png.16357c018c60f8fc7805c6fc7aca3c4c.png

The second is the stress itself may be close to ultimate in certain situations. It is extremely rare in a week or even an entire boats life of buoy racing in protected waters to come anywhere near the fatigue limits of the materials, nor the ultimate load capability of the materials. That is no longer the case when you are launching through surf for 12 days, landing in surf, coming ashore at 20+ kts possibly hitting sand banks at speed, and sailing in 8+ ft ocean swells and winds in excess of 20 knots, all while racing as hard as possible against some of the best sailors in the world.

Not all boats can take this punishment. Those discussed here generally can with regular maintenance along the way. The hulls, boards and rudders themselves are usually fine, as we aren't generally near the structural limits of those materials. Masts are also usually okay but a bad wave in the surf can easily flip you, in shallow water, drive the top of your mast into the sand and ruin your day (and possibly race chances). I haven't seen beam failure distance racing beach cats but that would be a concern of mine on older boats. I have seen beam/hull connections fail on older Inter 20's that have done a few Worrells (lots of waves cause racking->fatigue). The weakest link in all of the boats tends to be the rudder systems which take a pounding going in and out of the surf, and if there is one spare bit of kit to have in your trailer it is basically a complete rudder setup.

I should also add that these boats are running high loads on modern sail cloth materials that tend to explode rather than stretch like dacron would. I think the newer sails from all the builders are high quality and will hold up to the challenge but I have been offshore on big boats with sails that were designed for inshore use and the results weren't pretty.

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I hear what you are saying, but all the instances of beach launching/landing in 20(30+) knots Ive done countless times before. Many more times than you would encounter in only 12 days of racing. I've sailed the miami/daytona waters plenty of times and have seen worse conditions in the gulf off Tampa where I live actually, not all the time just saying though.

I'm not arguing that ocean racing causes more stress on a boat, but from what I'm reading everything you are saying isnt explaining to me how experiencing the stress 12 days in a row is any different that experiencing the same stress 12 different times spread out as far as the boat is concerned. That's what I'm getting at. What the boat/sails or anything else is made of I'm not calling into question. Just the mere fact that if a boat has experienced the same conditions before at a cumulative amount more than the distance of the race, it seems a reasonable assumption that it would have survived the conditions if those instances were done back to back.

I think the real breaking point is the person on the boat not the actual equipment. Decision making in high winds, waves, etc I feel is more responsible for failures than a sudden breakage just because it's the XX day in a row you have sailed your boat.

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My point is that you have some unknown but finite number of cycles for a material, where would you choose to experience that failure?

If you have been doing 80m coastal races then that's a good test, H18s were built better than H16s but, as noted above, alot of times its the connections and small parts that fail leading to larger problems. If you just plan to sail 1 or 2 days then it's probably fine, beach cats finish the Lahaina return often in the past. But I would always plan for a breakage or two. A 20'er sounds better over that  course to me.

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You have 100 parts that might fail independently, after N cycles. Sail 100 hours over a year, couple hs a time, and they'll break in separate outings, in conditions that are easy to recover from. In between the outings, you rig up, down, wash it, drive it home, all chances to spot things that have come loose, cracked or otherwise "tired", and fix/replace them before they give up.

Sail 100 hours in 15 long days, and you'll get all the failures together, plus those that you couldn't catch on the trailer. Some stretches of the W1000, the coast isn't all the friendly to approach, and no one can get close to help you with repair.

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A production boat of a design that is made correctly should not fail out of the blue.  Pilot error or horrible conditions can cause a failure.

Older boats tend to twist a little more and not be quite as fast as a fresh boat, but they should hold up fine.

In the past the race was 4 days long on used and/ or new hobie 16s.  Done non stop in the 70's. Those days are long gone, but Cape Hatteras still has big storms.

The stretched out version has legs where you can be done sailing by 2 or 3:00 in the afternoon.

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It's probably worth mentioning that the original off the beach catamarans, the Hobie 14/16 and 18 were designed and seriosuly tested in true ocean conditions off the beach in California.

The Nacra 6.0 and Inter 20 both underwent non-zero design changes as a result of testing in the Worrell 1000. The F20c has the benefit of incorporating many of those lessons learned/beefed up parts but still hasn't quite had the testing that the Inter 20 did.

Even some of the F18's which are rightfully regarded as beefy boats by modern standards have weaknesses when beach launched into the ocean. Namely, boats like the C2, eXploder Scorpion and Hobie Wildcat have lock down rudder systems that don't work well in the surf and need pull down systems to be rigged. All of these boats have deeper rudders that are more prone to bottoming out and none of them are friendly to back downs in the surf. Under normal day racing or even recreational sailing off the beach these are much less problematic as you don't surf launch for day racing and in a recreational environment you have the freedom to pick your day and your wave train to avoid situations that lead to breakages otherwise.

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On 5/18/2018 at 4:49 PM, TAMUmpower said:

I'm not arguing that ocean racing causes more stress on a boat, but from what I'm reading everything you are saying isnt explaining to me how experiencing the stress 12 days in a row is any different that experiencing the same stress 12 different times spread out as far as the boat is concerned. That's what I'm getting at. What the boat/sails or anything else is made of I'm not calling into question. Just the mere fact that if a boat has experienced the same conditions before at a cumulative amount more than the distance of the race, it seems a reasonable assumption that it would have survived the conditions if those instances were done back to back.

I think the real breaking point is the person on the boat not the actual equipment. Decision making in high winds, waves, etc I feel is more responsible for failures than a sudden breakage just because it's the XX day in a row you have sailed your boat.

You touched on the point that is the real problem; it isn't that we sail 13 days in a row, it's that we sail 13 days in a row in challenging conditions.

An easy day during the Worrell tends to fall in the upper range of where most people are comfortable.  So now, you aren't just talking about 13 days of normal sailing, you are talking about 13 days of sailing that most people only sail in once or twice a year.  As such, the loads, especially the dynamic loads are high and repeated more often over a shorter time span.  The wear and tear experienced on those days is I suspect, exponential; e.g. the wear from five hours in 10 knots is not linearly related to the wear from five hours in 25-30 knots.  So, excluding the beach launches and landing, a Worrell puts the equivalent wear and tear of 2-3-4 years of normal sailing on a boat?

For example, I don't know about you, but the majority of the times that I've launched a non-foiling boat completely out of the water has been during a distance race like the Worrell/Florida 300/Great Texas 300, etc.  Most people don't go out in 25+ and the seas are that big.

The number of slamming/pounding cycles imparts pretty significant fatigue to every part on the boat.  The platforms that were well prepared and tight to start (beams faired, bolts regularly torqued, tight tramp and rig) seemed to stay tighter than the rest.  No matter how tight you got things though, equipment still stretches enough that the rig would still move and slam against the mast tang.  It is eye opening to see how elongated the hole in the stainless mast tang would get on an Inter 20 because of the repeated pounding it would take.

Also, the potential for wear/chafe is much greater because of the conditions.  As the saying goes, to finish first, first you have to finish...  The team I worked and sailed with spent a lot of time on small details to try to reduce unnecessary movement so that the equipment didn't work harder than needed.  You could see the results of those efforts because there were fewer failures.

In the end, sh*t just takes more abuse in a race like the Worrell... there isn't any question that those 13 days equate to a lot more than 13 "normal" days of sailing.

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Obvious now the set launching and landings have been standard for years, I was ignorant of this when I first expressed interest. As an east coast surfer, I have to say forcing landings at specified dates and locations adds danger /wear rather than making it safer. There may only be a couple of high surf days over this time period, easy to avoid if you kept sailing another day or two. Hard to find a good surfing day on the east coast unless you really pay attention. 

How does the saying go? When in doubt stay out. Dropping a small hook and swimming in to get more fresh water or some other necessity is safer. I guess only if you are a good swimmer, which one should be if they are up for this kind of thing.  Plus it can be really hot during the day, I’d rather make some miles at night and sleep under the tramp during the day if there is no wind. This approach would allow for safer more comfortable passage in really any production cat. 

Kept  a Track 16 on the beach in Nags Head a few summers in college. Only ever got into trouble launching in the shorebreak. Was also a great way to get girls to go “look at the stars.”

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I did enough sleeping on the tramp in the spi bag trying to get caught up with the fleet on my Worrell adventure. Wind drops to nothing at night and hard to make enough speed to overcome counter current inshore. Woke up in the surf after my mate fell asleep at the helm one night at 3AM! Should have seen the looks of the 7-11 store attendant when I came walking in wearing a dripping wetsuit for some hot chocolate! When I went back for seconds he locked the door when he saw me coming.

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