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Future MOB

Any info on this cat?

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Saw this for sale - its cheap and near me (west coast US, CA). Asked the owner for additional info, but often this group knows more about a boat than the current owner. I don't recognizer the design: 1973 Lapari? 36 feet.

Worth looking into or is this a non-starter? (Yes, I asked the mast/rigging :lol:)

24059261_1686680828073061_1729367131221525360404_1943754752541056_948174965_n.jp

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3 hours ago, overlay said:
Butchered Crowther?
 
 
Any clues as to LOA?
 
 
scan_pic0001-jpg.80216

Owner said 36, so I think you might be right. 

I've never been on one, how do they sail? I had a Crowther tri and loved it... 

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Run away fast!!! That hulk was sitting in a derelict marina just inland from the Queen Mary. I walked by many times whiles gettin father-in-laws shitty powerboat running & ready for sale. I cannot begin to list the major issues visible from the dock. The port aft hull is worn COMPLETELY thru where it would rub on the docks. The alum toerail visible in a pic is only attached to the deck with zip ties. None of the cockpit seats/lockers had lids.

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6 hours ago, Future MOB said:

Owner said 36, so I think you might be right. 

I've never been on one, how do they sail? I had a Crowther tri and loved it... 

Foam sanwich hulls, ply decks if built to plan. <4 ton displacement, long skinny hulls, no shortage of sail area.

They sailed real well for their era. Still fast by todays roommaran standards. I could never live with that cabin. Could you?

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It's a CSK, but the original owner had the design modified by Choy to be narrow enough to fit in his slip at Dana Point. Also had a tall rig and more sail area than it should have. The second owner capsized it twice...

cap%20capsized%202.jpg

cat%20capsized.jpg

Lipari capsize.jpg

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Great info, cool pictures, and saved me a trip to see it. Hard to find a performance-oriented, racer/cruiser cat in this size range, maybe there is a reason...

Anyone know of comparable (but better) boats located in CA/SoCal? A spindrift or other Crowther cat seems to be what I'm after: good sailing characteristics, simple accommodations for weekend trips, relatively low price.There are a few others: Woods, TRT, or Offshore (like Sonrisa)?

@4SAIL Those pictures are amazing, appreciate the info. Your boat?

Edited by Future MOB

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Future,

I had a number of boats in Dana Point Harbor back in the day, and took a look at Lipari when the original owner had it for sale.

Didn't buy it.

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The hullshape of that boat is a real shocker!, and I’m sorry to say the Spindrift hull shape is not much better. The lack of buoyancy in the ends of both designs lends itself to extreme hobby-horsing. I know of this as I built a Spindrift in the early 80’s and lived aboard and cruised it for 6 years (including 3yrs cruising PNG, Solomons and Vanuatu). Before the offshore cruise I fitted her with bulbous bows and bustles at the stern which improved it heaps but still a long way from good. Hull design has improved heaps since those early days of bridgedeck cats that I think it would be wise for you to look for something with more buoyancy in the ends. Another disadvantage of the Spindrift was the masthead rig, tacking her with small crew numbers was hard work with a 600sq ft genoa. After the Spindrift Crowther designed the Catana which had a much better hullshape and fractional rig, this design went on to be the French production cat. A few of these were home built in Australia and come up in the second hand market occasionally, they would fit the bill of what you’re after but I don’t know if any were homebuilt in the USA.

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On 21.3.2018 at 11:55 PM, he b gb said:

The hullshape of that boat is a real shocker!, and I’m sorry to say the Spindrift hull shape is not much better. The lack of buoyancy in the ends of both designs lends itself to extreme hobby-horsing. I know of this as I built a Spindrift in the early 80’s and lived aboard and cruised it for 6 years (including 3yrs cruising PNG, Solomons and Vanuatu). Before the offshore cruise I fitted her with bulbous bows and bustles at the stern which improved it heaps but still a long way from good. Hull design has improved heaps since those early days of bridgedeck cats that I think it would be wise for you to look for something with more buoyancy in the ends. Another disadvantage of the Spindrift was the masthead rig, tacking her with small crew numbers was hard work with a 600sq ft genoa. After the Spindrift Crowther designed the Catana which had a much better hullshape and fractional rig, this design went on to be the French production cat. A few of these were home built in Australia and come up in the second hand market occasionally, they would fit the bill of what you’re after but I don’t know if any were homebuilt in the USA.

that you Ian, the vet, Dragonfly??? remember Monty's: the austrian Wharram?

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Hi Tane, no I’m not Ian but my Spindrift hulls were built by Monty’s (1981) Then trucked up to Noosa where I finished construction late 82. It was called ‘Nambawan’. Wasn’t ‘Dragonfly’ the Spindrift that broke up in the Indian Ocean? Cheers, Gerald. 

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I did my time at Monty's too. Some interesting things happened to me there, including a close call with a brown snake and being bitten by a mud crab.

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8 hours ago, Russell Brown said:

I did my time at Monty's too. Some interesting things happened to me there, including a close call with a brown snake and being bitten by a mud crab.

Better than the other way around.

Sometimes the animals further (arguably) up the evolutionary tree are the worry at Monty's.

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Dragonfly was indeed the Spindrift that broke up a few days out of Coco Keeling

@animals @Monty's: 84 or so it was...we called h.. "L... the crocodile"......

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Geoff and Lucy (RIP) Montague ran a pretty well organised boatyard in those days and were pretty much multihull pioneers having circumnavigated on a tri in the 70’s. Their spindrift ‘Skedaddle’ was nearing completion when I ordered my hulls back then, when launched it was the coolest looking cat (IMO) that I had ever seen. I got to sail on her from Noosa to Monty’s on her while I was building my boat (it was my first sail on an offshore multi even though I was in the process of building one!!??) On board also was the future owner of ‘Scott Free’ a new Crowther design which burnt to the waterline not long after launching (this itself is a interesting story full of political corruption and intrigue). Hey Russell, when did you do your time at Monty’s? And yes Peter, I’ve heard that Monty’s has become another boatyard of broken dreams and shady characters:-)  Tane, why “L the crocodile”?

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well, s you ask (even though "de mortuis nihil nisi bonum!" holds with me) just one of the many very similar "customer-care-utterances" of her's:

having been on the hard for abt 1/2 year with our cat we finally were ready & got launched. our hardstand-place was still paid for some time so we thought we'd get 2 or 3 days "alongside" (you might remember the "facility"..:) without being charged extra for it (getting supplies, etc. onboard for the nonstop to Madang, PNG). L was of the opinion that those two places were totally "unconnected" & wanted payment for those two days "alongside" even though our unused hardstand-fee amounted to much more. after some discussion (we didn't give in straightaway...) L finally agreed with a very gracious "..if you're so bloody hard up!" (& I don't mention the special "hot-shower-fitting" working on 230V...after a slight "prickly" feeling we chose to shower cold - musta been straight from Auschwitz that showerfitting...)

J wasn't much better: one day he hauled a beautiful Coles 42 (if I remember correctly...that was 84 or 85...) built from sandwich. due to his rough handling & uneven propping the hull groaned terribly. J: "this are just the frames settling..."

how they went about their fibreglasswork going in their shed was antideluvian too: completely open one side the shed was scorching hot during the day, dust blowing through it & Caboolture being a bit inland quite cool during the night. undeterred they built big cats in there...

after 34 or so years & 2 more rtws we have forgotten 98% of the then-grievances, but I can assure you we were not the only ones put out by those two. not only we called her L the crocodile. but nevertheless: RIP Lucy, you taught us a lot!

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Monty's had some shady characters when I was there, but there were also some really fine people building or working on their boats. I left my boat there at the end of 2000, went home to work and returned 1 1/2 years later and spent about 3 months working on the boat before cruising Queensland and then sailing to NZ.

The scariest part of being there wasn't the snakes and crabs, but the bicycle ride to the title town at the end of the road or to the bigger town the other way (Caboulture?). I spent many years riding a bicycle in places where I was a target, but Queensland takes the prize for deadliest place to ride a bike.

The boat yard itself reminded me of all the boatyards in California that I was dragged to as a kid, where people were living in trailers or whatever and building boats in makeshift sheds in a fairly relaxed environment. Matthew & Donna were building a cat and became good friends and had a nice living space where I got a bit high a few times.

I came to Monty's after looking for a place to leave the boat (that I could afford) all the way across the pacific. I thought it was going to be Fiji, but the boatyard was right next to an oil refinery, there was a coo on and I got mugged. Someone in New Caledonia told me about Monty's and I called them to ask what they would charge. I was pretty happy with what they told me and I said I'd be there in a week. Walking away from the phone booth I realized that they were talking Australian dollars and it was really going to be about half of what they quoted.

I got my boat all gussied up there and the day after leaving I got nailed crossing the Wide Bay bar, which I won't soon forget.

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