condor1

engine starter troubles

Recommended Posts

Howdy yall,
first time poster here
I recently did a bunch of work to the motor, perkins 4.108, and when i went to start nothing. so i replaced the solenoid that is seperate from the starter and then i heard the starter trying to engage but not turn over. so i thought the starter and then changed that and still same problem. so i measured the voltage at each side of the solenoid and it goes from 12-13v to around 8v on the other side. so then i think bad solenoid from the store. well two more solenoids later and still same thing. there are three power wires going to the in side of the solenoid. one comes from the battery, one to the alternator voltage regulator, and the third i dont know where. 
any help in getting this engine started would be greatly appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At that point I'd get a man in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd start with looking for a bad battery, connection, cable, ground connection.

What's the voltage at the start bank?

12-13volts isn't enough to turn over a cold 4.108

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Decent Jumper pack, positive straight into the solenoid and the negative onto the starter housing. This will eliminate the boat wiring issues and show if the engine does indeed crank. Before you crank it over can you bar it over on the front pulley nut or on the flywheel ring gear? If yes go to electrical crank and see what happens

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a similar issue last year. Even after I replaced it with a brand new starter. Then I found the nice dark black ground wire hiding behind it that I had not hooked back up in the dark late at night. It's amazing what having all the correct wires connected will do for your success rate.

Now being curious I put the old starter back in, hooking everything up dutifully to find it didn't actually work. So having the new starter was well worth it.

Lesson: photos before and during disassembly of everything every time, plus notes saves time, money and tears.

Oh and I bench tested both starters before trying to put them on the engine. Also a time and pain saver. Granted my starter is very easy to access, but it's still insanely easy to test on a bench, or the cabin sole next to the battery back with a pair of jumper cables.

PS, a new starter was cheap too. My local starter specialist said it was $150 to rebuild my old one or $165 to get a brand new one that appears to be identical. It was not a difficult choice to go for the new one. Given what we had already spent in the year on rebuilding the engine this was a comparative rounding error.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Start by measuring all your voltages from the ground post of the battery. 

Find out what ground voltage is at the engine  when cranking or trying to crank. If that pops up to more than 0.5 volts you got a crappy ground from the battery. 

After you fix your ground side, try it again at the battery feed to the solenoid (stick with that ground post on the battery) That should be 12V-14V without trying to crank, and be 10V or better when cranking. (numbers may vary)

After fixing the battery to solenoid side, see if the starter side of the solenoid has a similar set of voltages as the battery side. When cranking they should be less than 0.2V difference. (preferably less)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now