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BillDBastard

Grilling 2018

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My favorite marinade recipe:

 

2 T ground ginger

2 T garlic powder

1/4 c brown sugar

1/4 c oil

1/2 c honey

1/2 c soy sauce

1/4 c red wine vinegar

Mix in the order listed over medium heat until the sugar is melted.  Cool.  Place the meat in a container with a tight-fitting lid, cover with marinade, place in the freezer.  A couple of days before grilling, thaw the meat in the refrigerator.  As it thaws, the marinade infuses the meat with awesome flavor.  Great with chunks of top sirloin grilled on skewers, beef steaks, or pork chops.

Enjoy!

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10 minutes ago, mainsheetsister said:

My favorite marinade recipe:

 

2 T ground ginger

2 T garlic powder

1/4 c brown sugar

1/4 c oil

1/2 c honey

1/2 c soy sauce

1/4 c red wine vinegar

Mix in the order listed over medium heat until the sugar is melted.  Cool.  Place the meat in a container with a tight-fitting lid, cover with marinade, place in the freezer.  A couple of days before grilling, thaw the meat in the refrigerator.  As it thaws, the marinade infuses the meat with awesome flavor.  Great with chunks of top sirloin grilled on skewers, beef steaks, or pork chops.

Enjoy!

Great start on the marinade. Add some minced garlic to that Sis and let me know what you think. I'd also add a hint of Allspice too but then I've spent too much time in the Caribbean. 

Image result for smoke jerk

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Sure wish I could get my hands on the real deal Pimento Wood!

Bit pricey online. I have pimento corns (like pepper corns) that I will soak in water for a day or so with my regular cheap applewood smoking chips to give a hint of the true Jerk smoke flavor.

waterfalls

 

The real secret to a true Jamaican jerk is that small branches of green pimento wood are laid down over the cooking grate and then the chicken (or whatever, iguana?) is laid right over the wood to imbue the volatile oils and steam as it cooks. 

20121202-jerk-grilling.JPG

As the chicken cooks, it absorbs oils directly from the surface of the wood, and also gets imbued with the fragrant steam and smoke produced by the green wood and the charcoals underneath. Once the chicken is cooked—it takes about two hours for a butterflied chicken turned once— it's removed from the grill, stripped from the bone, and chopped up, all the better to expose it to fiery-hot Scotch bonnet sauce traditionally served on the side.

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2 hours ago, austin1972 said:

Wouldn't that make my WSM redundant then? I like the little guy. edit - that BBQ Guru accessory is pretty awesome. I think I could get away with the medium. Oh man, so many decisions now. Why did I walk into this thread???

Did anyone mention ash for wood? I like it. I'm in the dislike group for mesquite. It's bitter.

In MI, it's always apple or cherry because the orchards will give pruned branches away for free.

I would not say I dislike mesquite. It gives a good smokey flavor if used minimally combined with some other wood, but agree if that is the only wood used for the full cook, to my taste, it can give a bitter/acrid flavor . . . almost a burnt taste without being burnt.

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Ed, give that Orion Cooker a closer look. The beauty of it is that the fire (charcoal) is external to the cooking compartment. You can put some water in a drip pan at the bottom of the big drum and also put some wet smoking chips around the round pan so that they are right up against the hot wall so you end up with steam and smoke on the inside. The lid fits pretty tight and you simply 'load, light, and forget' until the time is up. No peeking! I've done the biggest turkey I can  fit in it (18 lb?) and it falls apart after only cooking 2 hours. When the water in the drip pan boils away, then the smoking starts and the heat goes up and then the bird browns up nicely without any extra effort. I've done great ribs which hang vertically on hooks around the perimeter. Check out the reviews and recipies on the website. I've seen the Orions for sale at Ace Hardware stores for less than the online price.

   Now this boy sounds like he knows his ribs!

 

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21 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

Ed, give that Orion Cooker a closer look. The beauty of it is that the fire (charcoal) is external to the cooking compartment. You can put some water in a drip pan at the bottom of the big drum and also put some wet smoking chips around the round pan so that they are right up against the hot wall so you end up with steam and smoke on the inside. The lid fits pretty tight and you simply 'load, light, and forget' until the time is up. No peeking! I've done the biggest turkey I can  fit in it (18 lb?) and it falls apart after only cooking 2 hours. When the water in the drip pan boils away, then the smoking starts and the heat goes up and then the bird browns up nicely without any extra effort. I've done great ribs which hang vertically on hooks around the perimeter. Check out the reviews and recipies on the website. I've seen the Orions for sale at Ace Hardware stores for less than the online price.

Now this boy sounds like he knows his ribs!

 

Good thing I am coming to the US soon because I am getting hungry for some good BBQ and they don't know jack shit about that here.  Polish people smoke lots of pork but it's a whole different thing here.

Smoker recon will be one of my first missions when I get there, the first priority is cuddling my grand kids for a bit.

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8 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

Good thing I am coming to the US soon because I am getting hungry for some good BBQ and they don't know jack shit about that here.  Polish people smoke lots of pork but it's a whole different thing here.

Smoker recon will be one of my first missions when I get there, the first priority is cuddling my grand kids for a bit.

Where in the US Ed?

 If yer gonna be down south, I'd be happy to meet and feed you.

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9 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

Where in the US Ed?

 If yer gonna be down south, I'd be happy to meet and feed you.

Thanks for the offer but I'll be on the North Coast, up on Lake Erie, in Pennsylvania and Ohio.

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3 hours ago, austin1972 said:

Wouldn't that make my WSM redundant then? I like the little guy. edit - that BBQ Guru accessory is pretty awesome. I think I could get away with the medium. Oh man, so many decisions now. Why did I walk into this thread???

Did anyone mention ash for wood? I like it. I'm in the dislike group for mesquite. It's bitter.

In MI, it's always apple or cherry because the orchards will give pruned branches away for free.

7915433166_e9a804b195_b.jpg

 

7919003640_3f1e3d0d43_b.jpg

PLEASE Try ALMOND at least 1 time ......................  OMG !!!!!!!!

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23 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

Good thing I am coming to the US soon because I am getting hungry for some good BBQ and they don't know jack shit about that here.  Polish people smoke lots of pork but it's a whole different thing here.

Smoker recon will be one of my first missions when I get there, the first priority is cuddling my grand kids for a bit.

Wait, what? Grandkids? Stop this right now. It's hard to dislike grandpa....or should we say dziadek!

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4 minutes ago, DA-WOODY said:

PLEASE Try ALMOND at least 1 time ......................  OMG !!!!!!!!

I've done pecan in AZ. Almond in IL or MI is going to be hard to source.

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1 minute ago, BillDBastard said:

Wait, what? Grandkids? Stop this right now. It's hard to dislike grandpa....or should we say dziadek!

Twins, a boy and a girl!   

 

Reese and WIll Cuddle.jpg

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Just now, austin1972 said:

I hope you're not BBQ'ing them! :)

Unlikely.  My daughter would be really pissed, she quite likes them.

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1 hour ago, Son of a Sailor said:

I would not say I dislike mesquite. It gives a good smokey flavor if used minimally combined with some other wood, but agree if that is the only wood used for the full cook, to my taste, it can give a bitter/acrid flavor . . . almost a burnt taste without being burnt.

I like mesquite (could be all those years as a brush bunny :lol:), but not for all cuts of meat. Honestly, I only use it for tri tip combined with a nice Santa Maria rub. I don’t think any wood used for smoking is a universal yes.

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On St John we were doing a big beach grill session when a guy said we needed some smoking wood to do a local version of Jamaican Jerk. He knew just enough to be dangerous. He said he would go get some sticks to add to our charcoal and was back in just a few minutes. He had an armful of small branches and twigs which he started to throw on the cooking coals which were just getting going. Our grillmaster told him to drop his bounty on the ground and we would add it in small incremental doses since we had a whole afternoon of varied dishes to cook. I noticed a small green apple looking fruit on one of the branches and asked the guy where the tree was that he got the wood. He pointed down the beach and said that he thought it was some sort of crabapple and since regular apple wood is good for smoking he thought it would be OK. I asked him to take me to the tree and as we walked that way I asked why he thought it was a local crab apple and he said he bit into one but it was too sour to eat. As I suspected the tree in question was the deadly Manchineel tree and I cut through the beach bush to the paved Nat Park road and we approached the tree from the road. There in front was a conspicuous red warning sign posted by the Park Rangers warning of the poisonous nature of the tree.

Image result for manchineel tree st john

    I pointed at the sign and then asked the poor guy to open his mouth and stick out his tongue. Sure enough he showed signs of swelling and we hightailed it back to the gathering where there was an EMT friend who took the guy to the clinic 'for observation'. We carefully disposed of the gathered smoking wood and vowed to be more careful in the future. The EMT was back after a while without his patient who he had left at the clinic. I asked why they had kept him and he said the whole staff was curious just how the 'apple' would affect the guy. I said that surely they had seen that sort of poisoning before and he said no, that no one had ever been stupid enough to eat one, especially with the big red signs warning of the hazard. 

 

https://www.scienceabc.com/nature/the-manchineel-tree-how-even-standing-near-the-worlds-most-dangerous-tree-could-kill-you.html

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Manchineel will kill you right quick.

 

Even sitting under it in a rain storm you can get blisters from the sap.

NOW..... Let's take a look at the Almond tree, and see what it looks like..... Peach. Apricot. Etc.

 It is essentially the same. The wood has a very similar aroma.

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I'm in ground zero for Pecan wood here in Baldwin Co on the Alabama Gulf. Pecan orchards everywhere. I should get out collecting the fallen Pecans and sell for smoking chips or logs. Money can grow on trees! I use the drops off of the Naval Live Oak scrub that grows on our bayou front when I can. They have a local name for these little stunted live oaks that grow in the white sugar sand here. An added bonus is the Florida Rosemary that grows along with it that I use when marinating meats.

 

Image result for perdido scrub oak

https://filmnorthflorida.com/photos/location/Perdido-Key:-Pine-Barrens

Wild Rosemary

Perdido-Key:-Pine-Barrens_06.jpg:  groundcover,  florida rosemary, sand dune, coastal forest

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12 hours ago, Ed Lada said:

Polish people smoke lots of pork but it's a whole different thing here.

OK, this sounds like the beginning of a bad joke, but I have to know what they do with pork? I figure that there can't be bad things to do, only different ones, and the more the better!

To the wood gatherers: if you happen through SW FL, I'm surrounded by dead orange trees, way more than your truck can carry. U-Pick!

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13 hours ago, BillDBastard said:

What marinade goes with that?

tequila

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applewood is very plentiful here in the Hudson Valley....this weekend at BIL's (where it's "supposed" to be 76 degrees finally) we'll be smoking a butt Saturday......

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27 minutes ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

OK, this sounds like the beginning of a bad joke, but I have to know what they do with pork? I figure that there can't be bad things to do, only different ones, and the more the better!

To the wood gatherers: if you happen through SW FL, I'm surrounded by dead orange trees, way more than your truck can carry. U-Pick!

Since Poland is a relatively poor country, the main dishes here are pork, chicken and fish, beef is rarely eaten and expensive.  With the pork, they use everything but the squeal. Tenderloin is usually oven roasted, sometimes with plums stuffed into it.  Thin, breaded and fried pork cutlet is a staple, usually made from pork loin.  All manner of hams of in the smoker.  Pork neck is very popular marinated and charcoal grilled.  Ham hocks are often smoked or slow cooked in the oven.  Ribs are popular, often baked with honey.  Then there is the sausage.  There are countless varieties of sausage, some of them smoked others not.  Big ones, little ones, blood sausage, just all kinds, an endless variety.  Plus pork appears in pirogi, in stews, soups, in side dishes, everywhere.  You want a burger? It's all ground pork.  They eat bacon but usually it's not smoked and it is not very good.   I like the tenderloin with a sauce made with fresh chantrerelle mushrooms that grow wild everywhere here.   For special events, a whole pig can get roasted.   In the summer, it isn't unusual to have spontaneous grill party.  Everybody brings some kind of kielbasa and pork neck, and some side dishes.  Fire up the grill and drink a lot of beer and vodka and eat all afternoon and drink into the long summer night.  Polish culinary life pretty much revolves around the pig.  The key is to know somebody's grandfather that lives out in the countryside.  There is always a pig or two around and grandpa has all the family sausage recipes in his head.  Good stuff.  So that's the pork situation here.

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I've never had a pork burger but it sounds good. How can bacon be bad? I've wondered the same thing about pizza, but found that many countries can't make a good one.

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14 minutes ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

Grabs - you've got 2 grates in your Egg?  (In Polish the word for eggs is the same as the word for testicles.)

Damn, that's a mighty personal question!

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5 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

Damn, that's a mighty personal question!

The grill in Grabbler's pic is a "Big Green Egg" brand grill - I've got the little one, and it's only got one grate - he looks like he's got 2 in his grill,  and if that's the case - I'm curious about how he uses it.  Discussion about his huevos is one I don't think I'd be participating in - 

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1 minute ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

The grill in Grabbler's pic is a "Big Green Egg" brand grill - I've got the little one, and it's only got one grate - he looks like he's got 2 in his grill,  and if that's the case - I'm curious about how he uses it.  Discussion about his huevos is one I don't think I'd be participating in - 

Did you see the edit in my post?  ;)

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Still waiting on local corn here..... It's been cool and dry.... That stuff must be from Mexico....

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4 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

Still waiting on local corn here..... It's been cool and dry.... That stuff must be from Mexico....

Back home in PA, we wouldn't see sweet corn until about mid August.  Of course it snowed there last week, which brought the total for this winter to just shy of 200 inches.  The latest I have ever seen snow there was around May 10th.  This is on the shores of Lake Erie, not in the mountains somewhere!

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Little early in the year, but gigged about a half a dozen flatties last night (well only 5 if you're actually counting)...made for a late start on the job today...crab stuffed flounder tonight for me and The Missus...

20180412_195130.jpg

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5 hours ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

Grabs - you've got 2 grates in your Egg? 

There's all kind of expensive BGE rigs out there you can fork out for, but I'm tighter than a bull's arse in fly season...mine's a second 17" grate set on top of 3 small clay flower pots...I can use the grate a little further from the coals, or cook indirect on a pizza stone or cast iron griddle or skillet like I did for the flounder...

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Filet Mignon steaks

With a gas grill (unfortunately) and steaks massaged with olive oil and Montreal seasoning, or Maldon Salt, fresh ground black pepper, grated garlic flakes and a bit of cayenne pepper.  I cook them over indirect heat until the internal temperature reaches 120F (by thermometer).  I then place the steaks over direct heat to char the steaks and use a propane torch to char the opposite exterior.  Flip and continue searing until appropriately charred.  

I also have another gas (sacrificial) BBQ grill that I use for shellfish. . . I have planted 6,500 Pacific oysters, 12,000 Manila clams and have 15,000 Mediterranean mussels on my beach.  I poach/steam the oysters before I BBQ them. . . the raw ones can kill you. The oysters filter 65 gallons of saltwater and you need to be careful of what they eat.  This BBQ hates saltwater and needs to be replaced every couple of years.

 

 

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On 4/12/2018 at 2:43 PM, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

Grabs - you've got 2 grates in your Egg? 

 

yeah you can do different things like put in heat deflectors for indirect cooking...  i'm sure there's a whole line of accessories including the pizza stone..  almost got one off the back of a salvation army truck , but didn't have $40 cash it would have taken ... (it was a pickup in some neighborhood)

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Had some crab left over from stuffing last night's flounder...crap pepper poppers...and a couple errant shrooms...

20180413_194635_HDR.jpg

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Long day of boat work...just enough time to throw on some habanero-pineapple deer sausage before the front comes through...

20180414_202331.jpg

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You people rock. Great info on wood/meat combos. Keep 'em comin'.

 

Once we exhaust the wood supply, sauces and marinades. To me the wood sets a tone, but it is the sauce or marinade that makes the meal. Screw up the sauce and the dog eats well, so to speak. So tell me what sort of sauces you whip up for what meats/poultry/fish......

Now over in the pizza thread I was thanking Jason Oz for a sugar free dough recipe. Others chimed in that sugar feeds the yeast, which I understand. However, sugar, as wonderful it can be, well type 2 diabetes  precludes using such if one wants to keep the blood sugar under control.

When I grill pork loin or ribs, I sometimes make a sauce, sometime store bought, but more than likely a hybrid. Sauces that call for molasses are a bit of a pain.... but there are some very good sugar free maple syrup type stuff (not sure what it is actually made of). I tend to use that for pork dishes along with ketchup, mustard, cayenne, ground black pepper and what ever is taking over the herb garden that week!

Any of you guys using an old family recipe for yer meats? Rubs count here people. Wathca got?

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Full circle back to lamb...boneless leg...marinated for the day at room temp in garlic, rosemary, olive oil, s&p...seared at around 550, then wrapped in butcher's paper and finished low and slow over Georgia peachwood, theory being that paper lets smoke in where foil doesn't...pulled at 125° IT...

20180415_182412.jpg

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On 4/12/2018 at 9:13 PM, Grabbler said:

There's all kind of expensive BGE rigs out there you can fork out for, but I'm tighter than a bull's arse in fly season...mine's a second 17" grate set on top of 3 small clay flower pots...I can use the grate a little further from the coals, or cook indirect on a pizza stone or cast iron griddle or skillet like I did for the flounder...

Ahh - OK - thanks! 

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Lay day yesterday...but back on point...venison burgers with home made honey bacon...slipped a fried egg on mine...

20180417_194445_HDR.jpg

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Been a while...grill's been busy, but this seared venison backstrap was worth a post...

20180501_200426_HDR.jpg

20180501_202520.jpg

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On 4/2/2018 at 11:43 AM, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

do those in a frypan, get some butter real hot, toss in , couple of turns and pull out..  add seasoning of choice, usally a little salt and pepper.

I got good asparagus this week. Yum.

Ended up buying a Broil King. Seemed sturdy with SS burners and thick iron grates. Now I have to learn how to cook on gas. I've only done Royal Oak on a Weber kettle in the past.

image.thumb.png.65499d807125f59530aa7e095948817a.png

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"Can't get a decent steak here in FL"...so ya just have to settle for whatever you can...

20180506_193703.jpg

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Ran the Egg at about 180° for 4hrs this afternoon...hickory smoked bacon...

20180507_183645.jpg

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Grabbler, 

    That steak should come with a NSFW warning!

     I'd bite it.  I did some fine chops on the grill tonight in anticipation of the grilling season. I have to clean all the 'smoke pack' dregs out on my gas grill that I put foil packets of soaked pecan chips in. 

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On 5/6/2018 at 2:55 PM, austin1972 said:

I got good asparagus this week. Yum.

Ended up buying a Broil King. Seemed sturdy with SS burners and thick iron grates. Now I have to learn how to cook on gas. I've only done Royal Oak on a Weber kettle in the past.

image.thumb.png.65499d807125f59530aa7e095948817a.png

nice...  did they include instructions on how to season the grates? 

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2 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

nice...  did they include instructions on how to season the grates? 

Step 1. Cook shit on grates.

Step 2. Repeat step 1.

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19 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

nice...  did they include instructions on how to season the grates? 

I'll probably just do the same thing as I do with my iron cookware. Wipe with canola and bake at 350 for an hour or so. I'll probably do it in my oven since that's way cheaper than propane. It comes tomorrow. I have a prime ribeye waiting for it but I'll do burgers and chicken until I figure it out before I wreck a steak.

 

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On 4/15/2018 at 8:01 AM, BillDBastard said:

You people rock. Great info on wood/meat combos. Keep 'em comin'.

 

Once we exhaust the wood supply, sauces and marinades. To me the wood sets a tone, but it is the sauce or marinade that makes the meal. Screw up the sauce and the dog eats well, so to speak. So tell me what sort of sauces you whip up for what meats/poultry/fish......

Now over in the pizza thread I was thanking Jason Oz for a sugar free dough recipe. Others chimed in that sugar feeds the yeast, which I understand. However, sugar, as wonderful it can be, well type 2 diabetes  precludes using such if one wants to keep the blood sugar under control.

When I grill pork loin or ribs, I sometimes make a sauce, sometime store bought, but more than likely a hybrid. Sauces that call for molasses are a bit of a pain.... but there are some very good sugar free maple syrup type stuff (not sure what it is actually made of). I tend to use that for pork dishes along with ketchup, mustard, cayenne, ground black pepper and what ever is taking over the herb garden that week!

Any of you guys using an old family recipe for yer meats? Rubs count here people. Wathca got?

 

well for pork you could do a carolina sauce while it cooks  which is basically  white vinegar and red pepper flakes..  baste a pig with that stuff for 12 hours and the meat just melts in your mouth..

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Most any dry rub calls for sugar. Can you use honey? Sorry, not that versed in diabetes needs. I just know it sucks.

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On 5/9/2018 at 8:04 AM, austin1972 said:

I'll probably just do the same thing as I do with my iron cookware. Wipe with canola and bake at 350 for an hour or so. I'll probably do it in my oven since that's way cheaper than propane. It comes tomorrow. I have a prime ribeye waiting for it but I'll do burgers and chicken until I figure it out before I wreck a steak.

 

never have done it for an hour... 

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7 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

never have done it for an hour... 

Oh yes.....an hour. I do it twice. My cast iron is like Teflon now. 

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35 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

never have done it for an hour... 

It's what Lodge recommends. I figure they know what they're doing since all they do is cast iron cookware. Also, turn off the heat and let it slow cool in the oven, door closed.

Here -

 

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I was cooking something (steak?) in an old Lodge cast iron skillet and I like to get it smoking hot to get a good sear before I put a nice filet in. My GF kept turning it down crying about 'You're going to burn the house down...' After about the fourth time I had turned it back up and telling her 'Am I doing this or you?' and finding it still back to a medium heat which makes it cook all the way through with no crispy outside, I just grabbed the skillet and stepped out on the porch and flung it off towards the bayou into our white sand (salty) and gave up.  I refused to come back into the kitchen the rest of the evening except to pour another drink and she ruined a perfectly good steak in the larger skillet and we had an uncomfortable mediocre meal. 

    About a week later I found the sacrificed skillet half buried in the sand and brought it back in the kitchen and left on the counter to reiterate my point. When she came home and saw it she started whining about 'ruining her Grandma's skillet and I said that it was MY GRANDMA'a skillet and at least my granny had taught me how to re-season it. I did the process mentioned above and restored it to its former glory but I still can't convince the GF to NEVER us soap or detergent on it. She claims she doesn't but I can always smell any detergent product the next time I pre-heat cast iron. I only scrub with salt and rinse well and they give a quick light spray of Canola in a Spray can and put it UPSIDE down in a still hot oven. 

Image result for cast iron skillet

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I just wipe mine out. Nothing sticks. I season it now and again but otherwise, a damp paper towel and on the burner for a minute to dry is the extent of cleaning it.

Sounds unsafe. Works.

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You just gotta get the chunky bits out, rinse, and dry over heat. That last part is important. Every time it gets hot, it's sterilized.

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Yep to all of the above, except I recoat with just little crisco after it dries. We had (have) cast iron pans in the firehouse I spent most of my career at that are probably older than the firehouse. They been getting the same treatment for.....................50? years now. One of the first things you learn as a rookie just out of the Academy when you hit that station is how to care for those pans.

Here you go.....I love this guy.............

 

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On 5/10/2018 at 5:07 PM, austin1972 said:

Some bacon works good too. It'll really shine that pan up!

 

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I have been in the US for more than a week now and in spite of the impending political disaster it feels so good to be back in a country where they understand that a BBQ grill is useful for far more than grilling grandpa's homemade kielbasa.

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Well welcome to America Ed.

What's wrong with kielbasa?

Maybe you could share your kielbasa recipes and cooking technics?

In fact, ethnic grill could be a thread of its own! Watchayagot people?

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3 hours ago, BillDBastard said:

Well welcome to America Ed.

What's wrong with kielbasa?

Maybe you could share your kielbasa recipes and cooking technics?

In fact, ethnic grill could be a thread of its own! Watchayagot people?

I already posted this upthread but since you asked, here's Argentina:

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4 hours ago, BillDBastard said:

Well welcome to America Ed.

What's wrong with kielbasa?

Maybe you could share your kielbasa recipes and cooking technics?

In fact, ethnic grill could be a thread of its own! Watchayagot people?

Nothing wrong with kielbasa, it's an art form here but there are other things you can cook on a grill too!  Not a lot of money in Poland and they mostly eat chicken and pork and that's it for grilled meat.

Recipe?  Find a Polish dziadek (grandfather).  Get some homemade sausage he made from his own pigs.  Put it on the grill until it's done.  Serve with dark rye flour bread and various forms of cabbage, pickles, and mustard on the side.  Wash down with beer and afterward have some of dziadek's homemade vodka, called bimbir (I'm pretty sure that's Polish for moonshine), but don't try to drive after that.

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Jr. took over the grill tonight to take care of Mom...ribeyes with a crawfish sauce from his shenanigans last night...

20180513_203025.jpg

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1 hour ago, Ed Lada said:

Nothing wrong with kielbasa, it's an art form here but there are other things you can cook on a grill too!  Not a lot of money in Poland and they mostly eat chicken and pork and that's it for grilled meat.

Recipe?  Find a Polish dziadek (grandfather).  Get some homemade sausage he made from his own pigs.  Put it on the grill until it's done.  Serve with dark rye flour bread and various forms of cabbage, pickles, and mustard on the side.  Wash down with beer and afterward have some of dziadek's homemade vodka, called bimbir (I'm pretty sure that's Polish for moonshine), but don't try to drive after that.

That sounds outstanding. Maybe you're spoiled.

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7 hours ago, austin1972 said:

That sounds outstanding. Maybe you're spoiled.

Nah, I appreciate all the homemade stuff here, it's amazing.  We also have all kinds of honey available and it's cheap.  I just get tired of eating chicken and pork all of the time, those are the main Polish meats.  Nobody eats beef here often if at all.  I am not really a big meat eater it's just that I would like something besides chicken and pork all of the time.  Chicken and pork, pork and chicken, and that's it.  But at least it's usually well prepared and often local and fresh. so there's that.  I have a friend that hunts and he gives me sausages and cuts of meat from wild boars and I like that a lot.

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On 4/9/2018 at 2:03 PM, Rasputin22 said:

Ed,

    I would recommend this Orion Cooker over the Pit Barrel.

Main image

I bought one a couple of years ago and swear by it! On sale now for $180 and its SS will far outlast the rig you show.

https://www.theorioncooker.com/

Hey Rasp??  Does it go through a ton of charcoal??  Reviews say yes, but cooking time is low so I donno if it evens out.  Can it do turkeys like they say??  If so, the dual purpose sounds great...  Looking to pick one up for party this weekend, would mostly do ribs, and turkey.  might try some brisket if it does what it says.

 

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That thing looks like an advanced engineering degree is required for operation.

I just have an old swimming pool filter case that my brother converted to a grill years ago. Does the job.

grillsteaks.jpg

I also have a fancy charcoal rotisserie grill that came from Williams Sonoma or some such pricey place. My dad found it on a trash pile years ago and rescued it. Trashpile shopping in a good neighborhood can be rewarding. I don't use that one much.

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