southerncross

VOR Leg 8 Itajaí to Newport

Recommended Posts

Morning all. Too much to acknowledge yet, still catching up. 

In the meantime, placing this here (was off topic in the IMOCA thread) cred FV for triggering the implications of allowing VIP guests on a leg,  Don't think these bits in the NOR have been used yet

  Quote

11.19  A VIP or media guest, approved by the OA, may be carried in full on any leg of the course. The PIC (sea) shall submit a request to the RC in writing at least one month before the start of the leg giving the guest’s name. The OA will not normally approve a current or past professional sailor as a guest for this activity. The guest will be required to have completed sea survival training approved by the OA.

11.20  A VIP or media guest, approved by the OA, shall be carried by all Teams on the final leg of the race. The PIC (sea) shall submit a request to the RC in writing at least one month before the start of the final leg giving the guest’s name. The OA will not normally approve a current or past professional sailor as a guest for this activity. The guest will be required to have completed sea survival training approved by the OA.

Wondered about the implications if a VIP guest like Torben Grael (who would "normally" not be allowed) , might join leg 8.

Lee Seng Huang joining SHKS? That would be a publicity bombshell, a huge security headache, and  . . . . 

VIPs SHALL be on the final leg. Royalty?  Billionaires? Shirley Robertson from CNN on TTOP?

We won't know until the crew lists are posted on Friday April 20 if the OA has approved anybody for Leg 8. Can't recall hearing of any VIP who has "completed sea survival training approved by the OA".

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems a Gold Lucky Cat has been spotted in the DFRT Container in Itajai. A picture was covertly taken and sent off for deciphering. 

The script in the cats right paw gives a brief outline of Telefonica in 2012 coming into Itajai 2nd, leaving in 1st position on the Table and it then all going downhill ending up 4th Overall.

The tablet in the cats left paw simply says "Nooo 2:1 Hoodoo"

Looks as though DFRT are leaving nothing to chance.   

chinese-luckycat.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, stief said:

Wondered about the implications if a VIP guest like Torben Grael (who would "normally" not be allowed) , might join leg 8.

Lee Seng Huang joining SHKS? That would be a publicity bombshell, a huge security headache, and  . . . . 

One would assume they are not interested in active coaching from experienced sailors. Which in a way is a pity.

Having Lee Seng Haung on board would be brilliant. If anything would raise the dick swinging stakes amongst the moneyed classes, this would.

I will have to start buying lottery tickets. Only way I'm going to see the inside of one of these boats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Francis Vaughan said:

One would assume they are not interested in active coaching from experienced sailors. Which in a way is a pity.

Having Lee Seng Haung on board would be brilliant. If anything would raise the dick swinging stakes amongst the moneyed classes, this would.

I will have to start buying lottery tickets. Only way I'm going to see the inside of one of these boats.

Sorry, could not withstand the following show-off...
Vestas, Lorient three years ago... Yes, it's a banana peel!!!!!!! :o
20150613_101402.thumb.jpg.325c66bbb8edfa353a8f37a4d172cbda.jpg

20150613_101407.thumb.jpg.07dc20e8398a70d14dbb8652dc28f433.jpg

20150613_101416.thumb.jpg.f66131ae5798a268089ecdfa4dfde0c7.jpg

5ad0c6a242dde_20150613_101507(2).thumb.jpg.e6f3904fe8eae3640b0a8d0e58330d6b.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5ad0c775810d7_20150613_101640(2).thumb.jpg.e0f92b54f0d34a46adc4bc2062d94a07.jpg

5ad0c77833237_20150613_102042(2).thumb.jpg.e698417eca1b3ca1bcbf4b5f21afe868.jpg

20150613_102501.thumb.jpg.c03e945c7fcf2222d5fb3eabb1881fa5.jpg

Hope, that thread drift is not too annoying, but while we're waiting... 
If they are too drifty, I can hide them.

By the way, we won that race... hmmm, it was the practice race, but very cool nevertheless.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Rennmaus said:

Sorry, could not withstand the following show-off...
Vestas, Lorient three years ago... Yes, it's a banana peel!!!!!!! :o

Bastard :D

Banana??!!  Lordy, they should have heaved you over the side at the windward mark and let you swim back. :P

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Francis Vaughan said:

Bastard :D

Banana??!!  Lordy, they should have heaved you over the side at the windward mark and let you swim back. :P

It was not me with the bananas. Man, I would NEVER do this!!! (IIRC, it was Nico, but my memory may deceive me.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Francis Vaughan said:

Bastard :D

Banana??!!  Lordy, they should have heaved you over the side at the windward mark and let you swim back. :P

Only if it is a fishing trip...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TEAM BRUNEL READY FOR LAST 11.000 NM TO THE HAGUE

With only 11.000 nm of the 45.000 nautical miles to go till the finish in The Hague. Team Brunel is in third place overall and has the second elapsed time sailed in the legs till now. While Vestas 11th Hour racing and Sun Hung Kai / Scallywag still have to dock in in Itajai, Team Brunel is ready for the In Port race on Friday, April 20th and leg start on Sunday, April 22nd.

Bekking: we are ready
Bekking: “If we had to leave today, we are ready. This last week our technical shore crew did an excellent job, helped by the boatyard and of course our own technical and painting specialists from Royal Huisman. In the meantime the sailing team had the opportunity to take some rest and spend some time with our loved ones. For me personally, it was the first time I was home in eight months so yeah that’s pretty special. But even when you’re at home you keep thinking about and preparing for the next leg. For example I did some high altitude training and went to the Norwegian snow with my wife and daughter.”

Balcaen back on board for Leg 8
For the next 5.700 nm leg from Itajai (Brazil) to Newport (US) Louis Balcaen (BEL) returns on board Team Brunel. The talented 29 year old sailor that sailed Leg 3, 5 and 6 and who is sailing his second Volvo Ocean Race. He will replace Thomas Rouxel (FRA). Rouxel has other commitments with the Gitana project in the next weeks.

Bouwe Bekking: “From the beginning we knew that Louis wouldn’t be available for the whole race and it’s good to have him back here in Brazil. In the next leg it will be about steering and trimming. With Peter, Louis, Kyle, Alberto and myself, we have five excellent helmsmen.”

https://brunelsailing.net/us/en/news/brunel-ready-for-last-11000-to-the-hague

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 14/04/2018 at 1:03 AM, Rennmaus said:

Sorry, could not withstand the following show-off...
Vestas, Lorient three years ago... Yes, it's a banana peel!!!!!!! :o
20150613_101402.thumb.jpg.325c66bbb8edfa353a8f37a4d172cbda.jpg

20150613_101407.thumb.jpg.07dc20e8398a70d14dbb8652dc28f433.jpg

20150613_101416.thumb.jpg.f66131ae5798a268089ecdfa4dfde0c7.jpg

5ad0c6a242dde_20150613_101507(2).thumb.jpg.e6f3904fe8eae3640b0a8d0e58330d6b.jpg

I understand that this is the first post and all, and not withstanding titties (i could post mine) but what the fuck is this guy doing clutching a banana on a boat?? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, stamplicker said:

I understand that this is the first post and all, and not withstanding titties (i could post mine) but what the fuck is this guy doing clutching a banana on a boat?? 

As long as you're not a sock...

Anyway, IIRC, it was Chris Nicholson himself with the bananas. He had just came back from scratching his boat off some godforsaken atoll north-east of Mauritius. So, he had all the right to get stacks of bananas on board, it could not get worse - at least that was my rationale for not panicking.


Desperate try to get back to the actual topic:

Some surfing, some beach clean-up (well...) going on in Itajaí:
https://www.volvooceanrace.com/en/news/11508_Surf-and-clean-as-Volvo-Ocean-Race-sailors-hit-the-beach.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have Vestas and Scally both declared themselves out of the upcoming In-Port race, or is it possible one or both might participate?

The others are all scheduled to participate, right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, Your Mom said:

Have Vestas and Scally both declared themselves out of the upcoming In-Port race, or is it possible one or both might participate?

The others are all scheduled to participate, right?

Still checking, but looks like all will participate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Didn't Vestas already say they were out?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe, but not that I could find. 4 days to go before the in-port will be a tough schedule for sure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AIS shows V11 just off Florianopolis, or something like 40nm to Itajai, doing 7.2 knots.

AIS has Scallywag still something like 1,300nm doing 6.2 knots. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Foredeck395 said:

AIS shows V11 just off Florianopolis, or something like 40nm to Itajai, doing 7.2 knots.

AIS has Scallywag still something like 1,300nm doing 6.2 knots. 

Now? V11 is in Itajaí since a couple of hours. It's all in the Leg 7 thread, as it belongs to leg 7... in a way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like my AIS app data is a bit slow.  Good to hear V11 are in Itajai.  Hopefully Scallywag is a lot closer as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Things shore team...makes you think about how much work Vestas and Scally have to do when they turn up.

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4 days to the inport.  Not sure either Scally or Vestas will do it.  Better to prep for the Leg.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Neil Cox says the goal is to have the last two boats ready for the Leg start on the 22nd, so  doubtful either will make the in-port

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Crewlist Team Brunel – Leg 8:
  1. Bouwe Bekking – NED – Skipper
  2. Andrew Cape – AUS – Navigator
  3. Carlo Huisman – NED
  4. Kyle Langford – AUS
  5. Alberto Bolzan – ITA
  6. Louis Balcaen – BEL
  7. Peter Burling – NZL
  8. Abby Ehler – GBR
  9. Nina Curtis – AUS
  10. Sam Greenfield – USA - OBR

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Weather for the start on Sunday is a light NE, going moderate offshore and backing to the east as they get further north.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Weather for the start on Sunday is a light NE, going moderate offshore and backing to the east as they get further north.

image.thumb.png.90b68e3017dfb34467a1e1170bbb1a55.png

  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, stief said:

Neil Cox says the goal is to have the last two boats ready for the Leg start on the 22nd, so  doubtful either will make the in-port

 

One big benefit of the OD/one boatyard system, specialists in every field and lots of spare parts.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reality TV is like that.

Do you think that the modern race would still happen if it wasn't getting clicks on the net?

  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Crew list Brunel:

Crewlist Team Brunel – Leg 8:

  1. Bouwe Bekking – NED – Skipper
  2. Andrew Cape – AUS – Navigator
  3. Carlo Huisman – NED
  4. Kyle Langford – AUS
  5. Alberto Bolzan – ITA
  6. Louis Balcaen – BEL
  7. Peter Burling – NZL
  8. Abby Ehler – GBR
  9. Nina Curtis – AUS
  10. Sam Greenfield – USA - OBR

Sorry to see Annie is still not back. I wonder if she will return at all. 

This seems a well rounded and experienced team, I look forward to seeing them in this leg. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Elisa said:

This seems a well rounded and experienced team, I look forward to seeing them in this leg. :)

giphy.gif

  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Elisa said:

Crew list Brunel:

Crewlist Team Brunel – Leg 8:

  1. Bouwe Bekking – NED – Skipper
  2. Andrew Cape – AUS – Navigator
  3. Carlo Huisman – NED
  4. Kyle Langford – AUS
  5. Alberto Bolzan – ITA
  6. Louis Balcaen – BEL
  7. Peter Burling – NZL
  8. Abby Ehler – GBR
  9. Nina Curtis – AUS
  10. Sam Greenfield – USA - OBR

Sorry to see Annie is still not back. I wonder if she will return at all. 

This seems a well rounded and experienced team, I look forward to seeing them in this leg. :)

She was never going to return, Brunel just claimed that she was still injured so that they did not have to answer any difficult questions. Basically some of the sailors just decided they preferred someone else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Potter said:

She was never going to return, Brunel just claimed that she was still injured so that they did not have to answer any difficult questions. Basically some of the sailors just decided they preferred someone else.

Wow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Potter said:

She was never going to return, Brunel just claimed that she was still injured so that they did not have to answer any difficult questions. Basically some of the sailors just decided they preferred someone else.

Really? :o 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Potter said:

She was never going to return, Brunel just claimed that she was still injured so that they did not have to answer any difficult questions. Basically some of the sailors just decided they preferred someone else.

Well, so much for keeping that under wraps! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Potter said:

She was never going to return, Brunel just claimed that she was still injured so that they did not have to answer any difficult questions. Basically some of the sailors just decided they preferred someone else.

If so, that's pretty shitty of them to put her through all that pretense during the stopovers to save the team and management answering difficult questions.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a reflection of her. Some people gel, some don't. Fact of life. This thing is not a overnighter where you might bite the bullet on round pegs.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Not a reflection of her. Some people gel, some don't. Fact of life. This thing is not a overnighter where you might bite the bullet on round pegs.

That's fine but sticking around and doing interviews and videos talking about her recovery etc etc when there was never a chance of her return just to save face?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, southerncross said:

If so, that's pretty shitty of them to put her through all that pretense during the stopovers to save the team and management answering difficult questions.  

I find this hard to believe, sure looked like she was doing really well before she got injured. Brunel and Bouwe in general don’t seem the picky type and then go through these silly hopes to pretend it is just the injury that keeps her from returning. They could have just said others are a better fit or they needed a different set of skills, better helmsmen for example.. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Elisa said:

I find this hard to believe, sure looked like she was doing really well before she got injured. Brunel and Bouwe in general don’t seem the picky type and then go through these silly hopes to pretend it is just the injury that keeps her from returning. They could have just said others are a better fit or they needed a different set of skills, better helmsmen for example.. 

Maybe it's not clear what Potter meant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, southerncross said:

Maybe it's not clear what Potter meant.

True, let's wait, funny story..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Potter said:

She was never going to return, Brunel just claimed that she was still injured so that they did not have to answer any difficult questions. Basically some of the sailors just decided they preferred someone else.

Anyway, it’s always risky to bring people who have recent injuries. They will as a team have it in mind and that’s not what you need. 

I feel sorry for her, but at the same time I’m happy for the opportunity it gives her replacement. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, southerncross said:

Maybe it's not clear what Potter meant.

nope, everyone gets what I was saying. @Elisa has the right conclusion.

As Jack said, sometimes people don't gel. It is not a reflection on Annie's ability.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Potter said:

nope, everyone gets what I was saying. @Elisa has the right conclusion.

As Jack said, sometimes people don't gel. It is not a reflection on Annie's ability.

I get that.  The charade I don't get.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, southerncross said:

If so, that's pretty shitty of them to put her through all that pretense during the stopovers to save the team and management answering difficult questions.  

Totally agree. I believe that Annie deserved better treatment, although I agree with Jack that the 'fit' is important.  Nevertheless, I at least hope that the RO sees fit to have Annie back on board to be the primary commentator at the in-ports. Her comments were insightful and dearly missed in Auckland. Maybe also have her on a Daily Show. She brings so much vitality to the job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

She did two Daily Shows.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pretty quick work by the Boatyard.

"At last we have the #MAPFRE in the water after a great work of the ground crew here in #Itajaí.

This afternoon we have sailed and tomorrow we will focus on the official training regatta. It's nice to see the Village so crowded every day "-Xabi

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, DtM said:

She did two Daily Shows.

Fine, all I'm saying is more please, particularly for in-port commentary. As for the Daily Show, I'd like to see her or anyone else replace Niall, he twitters too much (not the social media kind). Give me Conrad anytime.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, southerncross said:

I get that.  The charade I don't get.

Maybe that is what Annie asked for or was a party to, to help keep her reputation intact, albeit unecessary?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Maybe that is what Annie asked for or was a party to, to help keep her reputation intact, albeit unecessary?

wouldn't be a bad idea .

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With 2 boats having to have work done last minute, maybe Scally not at a big disadvantage and they can turn around 2 more effectively with some overlap and not arriving together? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now is around when Witty (and team) visibly in a media sence have to show up in Itajai.

I just hope the media vultures (that like it or not all professional sports have to feed to survive) conduct themselves with some semblance of understanding and respect.

That means accepting Scally's media releases and no more and not chasing a Witty soundbite, how tempting it is.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Volvo Ocean Race Diary part 14: Coming to terms with a friend missing at sea

If ‘Fish’ was still around he would tell us all to carry on and live his dream for him

Annalise Murphy

It’s a bit mad really. Three months ago if you’d told me that’d I’d be raring to get going on yet another leg of the Volvo Ocean Race I’d never have believed you. Yet here I am, in Itajai in Brazil, just a few days away from Leg Eight and another 5,700 nautical miles to Newport, Rhode Island, one of the great world sailing destinations.

Since that hard leg from Melbourne to Hong Kong, I’ve completely changed my outlook, and am determined to see this race through to the end in 10 weeks’ time.

This race isn’t for everyone, and it probably isn’t for me, but I’m still determined to finish; I’m really glad I’ve done this and have got my head around it, and I’ve learned stuff about myself that are just life lessons.

In particular, I’ve learned not to give up when you really, really want to give up. I definitely wanted to, but I’m glad I didn’t.

I’ve also had a full month off for a holiday with friends in New Zealand.

From what I can tell, most people involved in the race have a leg that they feel bad and regretful about, and for me that fourth leg was pretty miserable.

But after resolving in Hong Kong to persevere, the leg south again to Auckland was super as we showed we could lead the race to within a few hours of the finish before we were becalmed and we were overtaken.

Down but not out, more and more we’ve proven that we’re getting the hang of these boats and how to race them as good as the established teams. Most of us on our crew are newcomers to ocean racing at this level, most are under-30 and we have a 50:50 male/female line-up; all unlike any of the other six teams.

With four legs left in the race before the finish in The Hague on June 30th, we’re determined to deliver our goal of a podium result in one of these stages.

As I was rotated off the boat for the last leg, I missed out on another Southern Ocean leg and Dee (Caffari) and everyone on board did well to finish with the mast still standing after some rigging damage.

Turn the Tide on Plastic has now had a full boatyard overhaul and inspection, and is now back in the water. Before Sunday’s start we have training, an in-port race, pro-am sailing and boat-loading to complete.

The next leg should actually be quite pleasant. Although we’re expecting light winds at times and plenty of slogging upwind as we’ll be sailing northwards off the coast of Brazil and later the Caribbean there’ll be plenty of trade-wind conditions and sunshine too.

We’ll have the Doldrums – again – but these shouldn’t be too bad as we’ll be crossing so far west. But knowing our luck we’ll get stuck anyway for two weeks!

Newport is something of a sailing mecca, and gets great local support so it will be a super stopover. From there it’s the home straight to Europe and the finish.

After many previous visits to Brazil, mainly to Rio preparing for the 2016 Olympics, I’ve grown to love this country – the people are very warm and friendly. But Itajai is a much smaller city than Rio, and feels a little bit safer. People are very relaxed.

The race is hugely popular here – there were around 47,000 visitors to the race village on one day alone last week, that’s what other ports might expect for the entire stopover. People will stop and ask you interesting questions or just say nice things.

Apart from a brief stint at Christmas, I haven’t been home since August, so leaving Brazil means one step closer to getting home. But behind all the preparations for the start, all of us in the race are conscious of our friend John Fisher from the Scallywag team who was lost overboard in the last leg thousands of miles from land during a Southern Ocean gale three weeks ago.

It’s incredibly sad. I’ve been extremely upset about it, and in a way I’m glad I wasn’t on the boat when the news came through that Fish was lost. I would have found it very hard to hear such news in those kind of conditions.

Unfortunately in this race there are risks and we knew this from the outset – that it isn’t 100 per cent safe. Pushing these boats to the max in some of the remotest parts of the world isn’t completely safe.

I met Fish first back in September when we did the crew medics’ course together. While I grappled with training for techniques that could literally save someone’s life, as I questioned my ability he was calm and assured throughout; he just knew what to do. You could just tell that he had a massive amount of experience, and knew what to do but not in a know-it-all kind of way.

Ever since then we were quite good friends, and always stopped for a chat, which was typical of him, always making time for other people.

He was just one of the nicest people you could meet, and knew everyone involved in the race, not just crew. He was universally liked and admired.

Ocean sailing

Although he had never sailed in this race before, he was very experienced at ocean sailing, and would definitely have been one of the safest people around. What happened to him – moving forward on the deck – is something that all of us do a hundred times a day, and it was simply bad luck that the boat launched off a wave and gybed unexpectedly. He was hit by the mainsail control tackle and knocked overboard, and was probably unconscious by the time he hit the water.

It was Fish who in Hong Kong took me aside and talked it through about me wanting to quit the race. Basically he told me I’d be stupid to drop out!

He was probably the person I spoke to most outside our team, and was a huge influence not just for me but on many others and very generous with his time. He just loved every minute of his involvement in the race.

We are all devastated at his loss and for his family. But like his Scallywagteam who are determined to carry on, because of the effect he had on the whole race family, we’re all getting on with what we have to do.

If he was still around he would certainly give us all the same pep-talk: that we should carry on and live his dream for him.

But I still can’t believe he’s gone.

https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/other-sports/volvo-ocean-race-diary-part-14-coming-to-terms-with-a-friend-missing-at-sea-1.3464976

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Team AkzoNobel sailors return to the water in Itajaí as in port race and Leg 8 start loom large 

April 18, 2018 

Team AkzoNobel’s sailors have returned to action in an upbeat mood after a welcome break with their friends and family over the last week. 

The sailing team reconvened in Itajaí, Brazil yesterday and after a quick catch up and debrief with the team’s technical shore crew, were soon back out on the water for a successful shakedown test sail ahead of Friday’s in port race and the start of Leg 8 to Newport, USA on Sunday.

While the sailors were away re-charging their batteries the five-strong technical team had worked flat out to give the team AkzoNobel yacht a full overhaul after two and a half weeks of fast and furious racing on Leg 7.

Team AkzoNobel has been the best performing crew in the seven-boat fleet over the last four legs, having clocked up consecutive podium results in the previous three open ocean stages. 

This impressive performance puts the team in fourth place overall with seven legs sailed – three points adrift of Team Brunel (NED) in third, 12 points behind second-placed Mapfre (ESP), and a further point back from overall leaders Dongfeng Race Team (CHN). 

Team AkzoNobel Boat captain Nicolai Sehested (DEN) believes the team has the potential for more top three scores over the final four legs of the race. 

Moreover, with one of those – the transatlantic crossing on Leg 9 – counting for double points, the Dane says there is plenty of scope to reel in Brunel and the top two red boats before the finish in The Hague at the end of June. 

“We are in a good position with a great boat and a solid crew that is pretty happy in the way it is working together,” Sehested said. “We have grown stronger throughout the race and we are still growing. 

“It’s all about the mental strength and focus now from here on in for the rest of the race.

Sehested said the sailing team had come back stronger after its week-long break from the race.

“We were pretty tired when we arrived here after Leg 7, but probably more mentally fatigued than physically. Everyone needed a break and so we all went our separate ways for a week to regroup, recover and just clear our minds for a bit. 

“It’s vital to give people the chance to do that at this stage as this is a key turning point in the race. 

“It’s been a long, long race already and often this point in the schedule can be make or break for a team. Either the wheels can come off the bus, or you can push on and keep strong – the choice is yours.”

With the sailors all now back in Itajaí revived and refreshed after their time away, attention has turned to the eighth leg of the race – a 10,500-kilometer northerly route across the equator and up the eastern seaboard of the United States to Newport, Rhode Island. 

According to Sehested, although the route looks easier in comparison to Leg 7 which took the teams deep into the perilous and unforgiving Southern Ocean and around Cape Horn, Leg 8 has plenty of challenges and should not be taken lightly.

“It could be tricky,” he said. “We have another Doldrums to negotiate along the way and we are expecting to be making a lot of sail changes to deal with the changeable conditions you encounter on the way north from here to Newport. 

“A regime of constant sail changes can be really hard on a crew – especially one that is already tired from six months of racing.”

Nevertheless Sehested is confident the team AkzoNobel sailors are more than up for the challenges that Leg 8 has in store and aim to keep on doing what they have been doing to get them to this stage in the race.   

“I think this will be a tough leg for a lot of teams,” he said. “We know we need to come out with a lot of energy, so that we can keep on pushing, keep on focusing on doing the right things, and keep on chipping away – even when it gets tough. 

“If we can maintain that level of focus and intensity then we should be in good position coming into Newport.”

Asked about possible tactics and strategy for Leg 8 Sehested said the overall plan would be to stay with the fleet and protect the boat, especially in the expected bumpy and unpleasant sea state generated by the warm waters of Gulf Stream as it winds its way northwards.

“We shouldn’t be going all out to try to win the leg outright,” he said. “But rather to keep the boat in one piece and to be in a position to be in the mix over the last few days when we get out of the Gulf Stream. 

“The big picture strategy for Leg 8 will likely be to stay with the fleet, because we are confident in our boat speed if we need to sprint when we get nearer to the finish.

Sehested is hopeful the crew has another podium place in its repertoire on Leg 8.

“That would set us up nicely for the next leg – the double points transatlantic leg back to Europe,” he said. “The goal is consistency from here on in to the finish of the race, so it’s not about winning every leg but more about not wasting any points un-necessarily – beginning now with Leg 8.”

https://www.teamakzonobel.com/article/team-akzonobel-sailors-return-to-the-water-in-itajaí-as-in-port-race-and-leg-8-start-loom-large

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Volvo Ocean Race – Rookie perspective 3: Francesca Clapcich

April 18, 2018

In the third of our five-part mini series, Rob Kothe gets the rookies perspective from Volvo Ocean Race first timers…

Read rookies part 1 – Peter Burling
Read rookies part 2 – Martine Grael

Francesca Clapcich, 30 from Trieste Italy, is sailing aboard Turn the Tide on Plastic for every leg of this Volvo Ocean Race (VOR).

Clapcich has been sailing dinghies since she was a teenager, first in the Laser Radial, in which she competed at the London 2012 Olympic Games. She then followed this up by moving over to the 49er FX, in which class she won the 2015 World Championship and went on to compete in Rio 2016, finishing fifth.

“Obviously I come from a performance background, during in port races, I am the mainsheet trimmer, with very much a speed focus, talking to the driver about the numbers and then offshore we all do a bit of everything,” Clapcich says.

“I had done very little offshore sailing prior to the VOR and I know having done all seven legs so far I have improved a lot. It’s really nice to sail with a full team, I am used to sailing with smaller crews, everyone is coming from different experience and I have learned a lot from sailors who have been more offshore focused.

“After seven legs, as a group we have improved a lot, our leader board results are not showing that yet, but on the water, we have gained a lot of respect.

“We have been working hard on making sure our shift handovers are better on mode and conditions, as we are trying to push the boat as hard as possible.

“Maybe future Volvo races will be done in a boat with some foils, maybe a little less wet that the boat we have now.

‘Will I want to do another VOR? I don’t really know. I am 30 now and to have a family would be good. I did a lot of years of Olympic campaigns, it absorbs so much energy and it’s so self-focused. The VOR is an amazing experience, but it too absorbs a lot of energy and it’s a huge effort for your partner or your family who are waiting for you. During the last leg a lot of people at home were worried for us.

“But on the other side, I’d like to come back, having learned so much, to race with more confidence, but I don’t know if I want to put family through the worry of me being out there for more than 20 days each month. So, we will see.

“After this race, first up I need to finish my University degree. I am not planning another Olympic campaign, I am quite happy, it’s a real bubble and I have had enough of that.

“I really am looking at new sailing opportunities and this race can provide more as very few Italian women sailors have had this experience.

“Of course, foiling is not the future, it’s the present. It’s still a bit male focused but that is changing and looking forward to the America’s Cup and more. The important thing is that this race will open a lot of doors for women in sailing.

“Up to now in this race I’ve not been injured, and I’ve been maintaining my weight and increasing my strength, so it seems that I can recover quite well, even after the toughest legs.

“The next legs are going to be short and shorter again, so they will be very much performance focused, so everyone will need to be ready to push as much as possible. I know myself quite well from 12 years of Olympic campaigning, so I know when I need to rest and when I can push, perhaps it’s good to be a little bit older. I don’t feel guilty if I must sleep or eat more during the stopover, we all need to recover and its part of the game. Staying injury free is massively important so I do a lot of elastic work for the shoulders, the knees and the back.

“I am a CrossFit trainer, so I always work hard in the gym. Of course, here in Itajai we have the beach, so we can play a little football, I am Italian, so I love my football. And the food is great here, we struggle a little on freeze dried food for 20 days at a time so it’s wonderful to have good food when we are ashore.”

http://www.yachtsandyachting.co.uk/volvo-ocean-race/volvo-ocean-race-rookie-perspective-3-francesca-clapcich/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, southerncross said:

 

I'm surprised they let the guy 3rd from the right sail with an earring that big!!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting perspective on the impact on the families of the sailors.

School of Management senior tutor Dr Jo Mutter has spent long periods over many years solo parenting her two children. Hers is one of a growing number of "stay-behind families", where partners choose the stability and safety of home over the expatriate lifestyle of a "trailing spouse".

Her husband Tony Mutter is a professional sailor and two-time winner of the Volvo Ocean Race. He is currently halfway through the 2017-18 race and she, as usual, is watching his progress from afar. Writing her PhD thesis on the impact global mobility has on families has been a very personal experience.

Ms Mutter says global mobility is a growing trend that applies far beyond the world of professional sport. Businesses are increasingly sending staff to offshore locations, either to work on short-term projects, as commuters (where the employee has a roster of away and at-home time), or as frequent international travellers.

http://www.voxy.co.nz/national/5/308837

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, paps49 said:

I'm surprised they let the guy 3rd from the right sail with an earring that big!!

You're kidding, right?

That's his sunglasses keeper....

  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, familysailor said:

You're kidding, right?

He's kidding.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Volvo Ocean Race – Rookie perspective 4: Blair Tuke

By Toby Heppell

April 19, 2018

In the fourth of our five-part mini series, Rob Kothe gets the rookies’ perspective from Volvo Ocean Race first timers…
Read rookies part 1 – Peter Burling
Read rookies part 2 – Martine Grael
Read rookies part 3 – Francesca Clapcich

Blair Tuke, 27 is another Kiwi sailing Rockstar who at the same time is a Volvo Ocean Race rookie.

London Silver and Rio Gold medallist in the 49er class, crewing with Peter Burling, found widespread fame aboard Emirates Team New Zealand when they thrashed Oracle Team Australia/USA in the 35th America’s Cup.

However, Tuke unlike his good mate – and 49er skipper with whom he has won a gold and silver medal in the skiff – Peter Burling already knew the pointy end from the blunt in offshore racing before he stepped aboard Mapfre.

He had sailed in a lot of New Zealand Coastal Classics as well as Auckland to Fiji races and obviously Tuke absorbed sailing knowledge like a sponge.

Mapfre Navigator Juan Vila said after the boat arrived in Melbourne that watching Tuke in action, you’d assume he was a three or four VOR veteran, high praise indeed.

“The race so far has been everything I had hoped it would be. Tough, relentless but really good fun.

“So far both the best and worst times would both be in the Southern Ocean. The sailing down there is awesome, like nowhere else in the world. But the cold and the relentless wind are pretty draining on the body, so you go through some tough times for sure. Anyone would be lying if they said they enjoyed every moment down there. The good times make it well worth it though.

“This race has definitely taught me more about pushing when your body is on the limit, the endurance side.

“There are loads of skills that I have learnt that I will take back to my other sailing. A big part of this race for me was to become a better all-round sailor and I feel each leg I am doing that.

“As you spend more time on the boat, what you do on the boat falls into your natural skill set, so my role in the boat is the same as what is was at the start of the race as a trimmer / driver.

“This race is pretty full on for the body. It has been such an endurance battle but for the most part I am healthy. Obviously I’ve lost a little bit of weight since the start of the race due to fitness and strength but no major injuries or anything like that so just maintaining each stop over trying to get as much fitness in and as much core strength and that’s sort of thing as you can while you are on land and then you are back out into it so it is definitely draining on the body but it is all part of the challenge.

“It has been a little bit frustrating that we haven’t won any legs since the one into Melbourne. It was nice to get onto the podium back into Auckland after doing it tough for most of that leg.

“All in all, we were a little bit disappointed at our performance over the last few legs and we are going to have to pick it up if we want to win the race. We are still in a very good position overall and we have just got to try and do a few things better like we did at the start of the race and then we will be right back up there. We are excited about the challenge that lies ahead, and I think we are ready for it.

“I would love to do another Volvo race but at this stage it is hard to say would it be the next edition or the one after. It just depends on how things track and the rest of my career, but I have done this race now and doing it with Mapfre has taught me a lot and I would love to be able to lead a team in the future.

“I’m not making too many plans now. I am concentrating on the race and the challenge we have on our hands now which is a big one.

“This has been a pretty busy last eight years doing the Olympics, America’s Cup and Volvo back to back has been pretty full on, so a month or two off relaxing in New Zealand is going to be on the cards to start with and then we will go from there.”

http://www.yachtsandyachting.co.uk/volvo-ocean-race/volvo-ocean-race-rookie-perspective-4-blair-tuke/

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, southerncross said:

He's kidding.

Good---

Hard to tell here sometimes...

Although, since it was Paps I should have known.

  • Like 1
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎18‎/‎04‎/‎2018 at 8:47 PM, southerncross said:

Volvo Ocean Race Diary part 14: Coming to terms with a friend missing at sea

If ‘Fish’ was still around he would tell us all to carry on and live his dream for him

Annalise Murphy

It’s a bit mad really. Three months ago if you’d told me that’d I’d be raring to get going on yet another leg of the Volvo Ocean Race I’d never have believed you. Yet here I am, in Itajai in Brazil, just a few days away from Leg Eight and another 5,700 nautical miles to Newport, Rhode Island, one of the great world sailing destinations.

Since that hard leg from Melbourne to Hong Kong, I’ve completely changed my outlook, and am determined to see this race through to the end in 10 weeks’ time.

This race isn’t for everyone, and it probably isn’t for me, but I’m still determined to finish; I’m really glad I’ve done this and have got my head around it, and I’ve learned stuff about myself that are just life lessons.

In particular, I’ve learned not to give up when you really, really want to give up. I definitely wanted to, but I’m glad I didn’t.

I’ve also had a full month off for a holiday with friends in New Zealand.

From what I can tell, most people involved in the race have a leg that they feel bad and regretful about, and for me that fourth leg was pretty miserable.

But after resolving in Hong Kong to persevere, the leg south again to Auckland was super as we showed we could lead the race to within a few hours of the finish before we were becalmed and we were overtaken.

Down but not out, more and more we’ve proven that we’re getting the hang of these boats and how to race them as good as the established teams. Most of us on our crew are newcomers to ocean racing at this level, most are under-30 and we have a 50:50 male/female line-up; all unlike any of the other six teams.

With four legs left in the race before the finish in The Hague on June 30th, we’re determined to deliver our goal of a podium result in one of these stages.

As I was rotated off the boat for the last leg, I missed out on another Southern Ocean leg and Dee (Caffari) and everyone on board did well to finish with the mast still standing after some rigging damage.

Turn the Tide on Plastic has now had a full boatyard overhaul and inspection, and is now back in the water. Before Sunday’s start we have training, an in-port race, pro-am sailing and boat-loading to complete.

The next leg should actually be quite pleasant. Although we’re expecting light winds at times and plenty of slogging upwind as we’ll be sailing northwards off the coast of Brazil and later the Caribbean there’ll be plenty of trade-wind conditions and sunshine too.

We’ll have the Doldrums – again – but these shouldn’t be too bad as we’ll be crossing so far west. But knowing our luck we’ll get stuck anyway for two weeks!

Newport is something of a sailing mecca, and gets great local support so it will be a super stopover. From there it’s the home straight to Europe and the finish.

After many previous visits to Brazil, mainly to Rio preparing for the 2016 Olympics, I’ve grown to love this country – the people are very warm and friendly. But Itajai is a much smaller city than Rio, and feels a little bit safer. People are very relaxed.

The race is hugely popular here – there were around 47,000 visitors to the race village on one day alone last week, that’s what other ports might expect for the entire stopover. People will stop and ask you interesting questions or just say nice things.

Apart from a brief stint at Christmas, I haven’t been home since August, so leaving Brazil means one step closer to getting home. But behind all the preparations for the start, all of us in the race are conscious of our friend John Fisher from the Scallywag team who was lost overboard in the last leg thousands of miles from land during a Southern Ocean gale three weeks ago.

It’s incredibly sad. I’ve been extremely upset about it, and in a way I’m glad I wasn’t on the boat when the news came through that Fish was lost. I would have found it very hard to hear such news in those kind of conditions.

Unfortunately in this race there are risks and we knew this from the outset – that it isn’t 100 per cent safe. Pushing these boats to the max in some of the remotest parts of the world isn’t completely safe.

I met Fish first back in September when we did the crew medics’ course together. While I grappled with training for techniques that could literally save someone’s life, as I questioned my ability he was calm and assured throughout; he just knew what to do. You could just tell that he had a massive amount of experience, and knew what to do but not in a know-it-all kind of way.

Ever since then we were quite good friends, and always stopped for a chat, which was typical of him, always making time for other people.

He was just one of the nicest people you could meet, and knew everyone involved in the race, not just crew. He was universally liked and admired.

Ocean sailing

Although he had never sailed in this race before, he was very experienced at ocean sailing, and would definitely have been one of the safest people around. What happened to him – moving forward on the deck – is something that all of us do a hundred times a day, and it was simply bad luck that the boat launched off a wave and gybed unexpectedly. He was hit by the mainsail control tackle and knocked overboard, and was probably unconscious by the time he hit the water.

It was Fish who in Hong Kong took me aside and talked it through about me wanting to quit the race. Basically he told me I’d be stupid to drop out!

He was probably the person I spoke to most outside our team, and was a huge influence not just for me but on many others and very generous with his time. He just loved every minute of his involvement in the race.

We are all devastated at his loss and for his family. But like his Scallywagteam who are determined to carry on, because of the effect he had on the whole race family, we’re all getting on with what we have to do.

If he was still around he would certainly give us all the same pep-talk: that we should carry on and live his dream for him.

But I still can’t believe he’s gone.

https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/other-sports/volvo-ocean-race-diary-part-14-coming-to-terms-with-a-friend-missing-at-sea-1.3464976

A very mature piece from such a relatively young person

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, shanghaisailor said:

A very mature piece from such a relatively young person

A lot of good reads coming out.  Check out the piece by Jack Bouttel I posted on the Leg 7 thread. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, southerncross said:

A lot of good reads coming out.  Check out the piece by Jack Bouttel I posted on the Leg 7 thread. 

Jackson is pretty cool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How about this for a bottom finish -  a lot of hours went into that

IMG_5909.JPG

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stu Bannantyne is rejoining Dongfeng for Leg 8, replacing Jereme Beyou who is "taking a well-deserved rest".

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone know what the deal is with Mapfre's main? The one they used for the practice race clearly isn't their SO special ... so is it a new sail or their old training one?

Mapfre.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe Brunel was the only boat to switch to their second main at this point. I'm pretty sure eveyone else will switch now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, shanghaisailor said:

A very mature piece from such a relatively young person

 

Fuck you sound like a condescending old prick saying that. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, jack_sparrow said:

Mad he may be might be old but he thrashed us at Dodgems the other day.

15241775882701799746456.jpg

Is that from the Sun Yuan installation at the Saatchi Museum I posted in the last Leg?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is he but didn't realise or remember it being aired here before. His stuff very wicked and must offend some serious types.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Six teams to take start of Itajaí In-Port Race

Six teams will be competing in the Itajaí In-Port Race on Friday, as SHK/Scallywag, newly arrived in Itajai, races against time to be ready for Sunday's leg start...

Six teams will be on the start line on Friday afternoon for the Itajaí In-Port Race in Brazil, with Vestas 11th Hour Racing joining the fleet following its dismasting, and subsequent repair and relaunching.

Team SHK/Scallywag, who only arrived in Itajaí on mid-afternoon on Thursday won’t be taking part as the team races the clock to prepare for the start of Leg 8.

This is the seventh event in the Volvo Ocean Race In-Port Race Series.

The Spanish MAPFRE team, skippered by Xabi Fernández, is at the top of the leaderboard for the series, with two race wins and three second place finishes to boast the most consistent podium results.

But just three points back is Dongfeng Race Team, winners of three races, but held back by one disappointing result in the China stop.

The two Dutch-skippered entries, team AkzoNobel and Team Brunel are battling for the final podium spot, with Simeon Tienpont’s AkzoNobel squad just one point ahead of Bouwe Bekking’s Brunel.

The Volvo Ocean Race In-Port Race Series acts as a tie-breaking mechanism for the overall race leaderboard. And with just one point separating first from second place after seven legs of racing, the results here could be crucial by the time the race finishes in The Hague at the end of June.

How to follow the Itajaí In-Port Race

Racing starts at 1400 local time (1700 UTC), on Friday, 20th April.

https://www.volvooceanrace.com/en/news/11519_Six-teams-to-take-start-of-Itajai-In-Port-Race.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, southerncross said:

Is that from the Sun Yuan installation at the Saatchi Museum I posted in the last Leg?

Yes; at least, I saw it at the Saatchi Gallery in London, and you did post it on the previous, or some other, Leg (where I made the same comments).

Edited by despacio avenue
clarification

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, despacio avenue said:

Stu Bannantyne is rejoining Dongfeng for Leg 8, replacing Jereme Beyou who is "taking a well-deserved rest".

 

Jereme would no doubt prefer to do the whole thing on his own. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, familysailor said:

Good---

Hard to tell here sometimes...

Although, since it was Paps I should have known.

I'll take that as a compliment Family, things good with you?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, mad said:

Fuck you sound like a condescending old prick saying that. 

Very unfortunate Colonial era stumble might be a nicer way to put it Mad.........................................................................emoticon thingy here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites