Port Phillip Sailor

annoying use of the language

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In Oz we get off a boat, off a bus, off a train etc.

Not off of a boat, off of a bus and so on.....

We also usually know where the boat is - not where the boat is at. We don't tack at on the end of a sentence. Heard a Canadian yesterday saying "I'll see where we are at" It grates.

"We reached out to them" instead of "We'll ask them".

Hate all those.

 

 

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The one thing that grates me is saying "At University" or "At hospital".  No, you fucking commonwealth loving, bad teeth, fat ankle, fish and chips eating fuckwits - its "at THE university" or "I broke my leg, so I'm going to the hospital"

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22 minutes ago, Shootist Jeff said:

The one thing that grates me is saying "At University" or "At hospital".  No, you fucking commonwealth loving, bad teeth, fat ankle, fish and chips eating fuckwits - its "at THE university" or "I broke my leg, so I'm going to the hospital"

Think you will find that is the way some country folk in  parts of England speak. Never heard is said like that in Aus.

 

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Using the word "multiple" when describing more than a single instance, in an attempt to sound all official and shit, like.

FFS, just say "many", "some", "a few".

 

I am proud that I once used the phrase "let's throw that into the think-wok and give it a stir" in a meeting and only one other person noticed the sarcasm.

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1 hour ago, Port Phillip Sailor said:
1 hour ago, Shootist Jeff said:

The one thing that grates me is saying "At University" or "At hospital".  No, you fucking commonwealth loving, bad teeth, fat ankle, fish and chips eating fuckwits - its "at THE university" or "I broke my leg, so I'm going to the hospital"

Think you will find that is the way some country folk in  parts of England speak. Never heard is said like that in Aus.

Yorkshire.

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Anything that a sportsman says into a microphone.  Blah blah fucking blah.

"Our plan is to go out there and get some runs on the board early"

"We just have to get some points on the board and we can win this"

"I was really happy with my performance today"

"We are going to stick to our game plan"

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5 hours ago, Black Sox said:

Here's a rule I sometimes apply: 

Never use two words when one, or fewer, will do.

Yes, sometimes.  It all depends on what you want to say and who you are saying it to, and why.  There is a time and a place to be verbose or to be reticent.  Wisdom comes in knowing when to be the former or the latter.

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5 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

Yes, sometimes.  It all depends on what you want to say and who you are saying it to, and why.  There is a time and a place to be verbose or to be reticent.  Wisdom comes in knowing when to be the former or the latter.

:)

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9 hours ago, Shootist Jeff said:

I've never understand what's wrong with that phrase.  In this context Shrimp is a noun, not an adjective and saying "jumbo shrimp" is describing the relative size of an object compared to other objects of that same type. It would be akin to saying "he's a small giant".  

It's just one of those oxymorons - military intelligence, peacekeeping force and the like.

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4 hours ago, random said:

Anything that a sportsman says into a microphone.  Blah blah fucking blah.

"Our plan is to go out there and get some runs on the board early"

"We just have to get some points on the board and we can win this"

"I was really happy with my performance today"

"We are going to stick to our game plan"

Absolutely - why do they even bother talking to them? They never say anything other than meaningless shit like that.

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"It's a game of two halves."

Really? Wow. Thanks for the information. Now I understand everything about the finer technical points of the sport.

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Just today:

Tiger Woods told reporters after his third round at the Masters that he's aiming for an even-par or "in the red" for Sunday's final round. "That's a good goal for me."

 

D'oh!

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31 minutes ago, Port Phillip Sailor said:

Threepeat. Repeat for the 3rd time. Used by sports commentators when an athlete wins something for the 3rd time.

I thick Leonerd Marshalle crushted Joe Montanna and latere saide "nowe we dointe haft to heare that worde 'threepete' evere againe.                    :)

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Count the cliche's

"You've got to be in it to win it"

"ticked that first box"

"to be honest"

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Is that available with subtitles?

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1 hour ago, Snaggletooth said:

I thick Leonerd Marshalle crushted Joe Montanna and latere saide "nowe we dointe haft to heare that worde 'threepete' evere againe.                    :)

 

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Speaking of can't sing all that well but great songs.....Eddie Vedder from Pearl Jam........just as a random example this.......song..............

:P:P:P:P:P

(Go Cubbies)

 

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19 hours ago, Shootist Jeff said:

I actually heard an initially well-spoken local journalist on NPR the other day say something like "he was axed the question".  Since it was radio, I couldn't tell her melanin content ratio.  But I'm betting she was not of scandinavian or the British Isles decent.  

It can be said "ax" is the correct pronunciation, even though only southern north Americans use it these days. Most of them come from Scotch Irish stock, and it was pronounced that way in some areas of those countries until recently. The root word for "ask" is "axiom". 

 The downside of phonetic writing is all spoken languages inevitably change. All those funky extra consonants in French represent pronunciations which fell by the wayside somewhere along the line. As a comparison: Chinese. Things written a couple thousand years ago in that language are close to perfectly understandable today by all literate Chinese today (with a few exceptions), even though they can't understand each other's spoken dialects, and sure as shit couldn't have understood the spoken Chinese of a couple millennia ago. You will see Chinese from different regions ghost-writing the symbol for he word in the palm of their hand when trying to talk to someone from a far province today. 

 (this is the kind of shit one finds out if ya marry a linguist, btw)

  

 

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^ Don't know, Snaggs, though i was told once of the difference between a womens' cross-country track team and a group of pygmies sneaking up on some food: "Well,  you see, one is a band of cunning runts...."

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On 4/6/2018 at 11:20 PM, Shootist Jeff said:

The one thing that grates me is saying "At University" or "At hospital".  No, you fucking commonwealth loving, bad teeth, fat ankle, fish and chips eating fuckwits - its "at THE university" or "I broke my leg, so I'm going to the hospital"

Kids go to school.

Grown-ups go to work.

Smart people go to college.

Bad people go to prison, or to jail.

Religious people go to church.

Lawyers go to court.

So, why shouldn't sick people go to hospital?

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Anythink 

And;

De-plane de-bus de-train... The word is disembark!

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Here in AUS we have a really really fucking annoying pronunciation issue. 

Try saying the word "Medal", as in Gold Medal.  Now when you say "Med" the tip of your tongue touches your pallet just behind your front teeth.  Then in order to pronounce the "el" part, your tongue has to touch about the same place the second time.

People in the State of South Australia tend not to touch the pallet the second time,  so instead of "medal" they say "medeoww",  Try it.

Annoys the fuck out of me.

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12 hours ago, bowman81 said:

Anythink 

And;

De-plane de-bus de-train... The word is disembark!

I knew a lady who had that done to her yappy little poodle. 

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10 hours ago, random said:

Here in AUS we have a really really fucking annoying pronunciation issue. 

Try saying the word "Medal", as in Gold Medal.  Now when you say "Med" the tip of your tongue touches your pallet just behind your front teeth.  Then in order to pronounce the "el" part, your tongue has to touch about the same place the second time.

People in the State of South Australia tend not to touch the pallet the second time,  so instead of "medal" they say "medeoww",  Try it.

Annoys the fuck out of me.

You really shouldn't go around sticking your tongue on pallets - you might get splinters.

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18 hours ago, Mark K said:

It can be said "ax" is the correct pronunciation, even though only southern north Americans use it these days. Most of them come from Scotch Irish stock, and it was pronounced that way in some areas of those countries until recently. The root word for "ask" is "axiom". 

 The downside of phonetic writing is all spoken languages inevitably change. All those funky extra consonants in French represent pronunciations which fell by the wayside somewhere along the line. As a comparison: Chinese. Things written a couple thousand years ago in that language are close to perfectly understandable today by all literate Chinese today (with a few exceptions), even though they can't understand each other's spoken dialects, and sure as shit couldn't have understood the spoken Chinese of a couple millennia ago. You will see Chinese from different regions ghost-writing the symbol for he word in the palm of their hand when trying to talk to someone from a far province today. 

 (this is the kind of shit one finds out if ya marry a linguist, btw)

  

 

It seems to be the s & k transposed.

aks instead of ask.

I've tried to get people to change the way they say it. It seems to be impossible for them to pronounce it right, even though they can spell it correctly. I always comes out aks.

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On 08/04/2018 at 1:09 AM, SloopJonB said:

It's just one of those oxymorons - military intelligence, peacekeeping force and the like.

Nation Building.

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I thought that "axe" instead of "ask" was strictly an American ghetto patois thing.

I get the impression from some comments here that it is more widespread than that.

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It's a New Orleans thing to me. Although the Irish and African neighborhoods are so closely intertwined there that may have something to do with it.

   Ax goes back to Chaucer and the 'Canterbury Tales' although now is an Ebonics thing.

"Ax" is as integral a part of being a black American.

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I used to hear this a lot when I lived in New Orleans,

She axed me, so I jus' toad 'er

(idea) by panamaus Thu May 17 2001 at 3:17:06
A curious example of a regional speech pattern prevalent among some natives of the southern United States is the aberration of the words "told" and "asked". People who have adopted this speech pattern say the word "told" with a silent L, as in "tode" or "toad", while the word "asked" is pronounced as though the S and K were transposed: "aksed", sounding like the word "axed".

Growing up in the deep South, I have come into contact with a good number of people who speak this way. As a young child, my first recognition of this as an identifiable speech pattern came from individuals that were African-American, and since I had never encountered people from other races that spoke this way, I made the foolish assumption that this was some racial linguistic distinction. The term "ebonics" would not be coined for another two decades or so, but it was always clear to me that some people of color spoke English differently than others.

It wasn't until early adolescence that I recognized this speech pattern as being distinguished perhaps by region rather than by race. I have known several people over the years who spoke these variations of "told" and "asked" that were of mixed Creole descent, and more interestingly, they all grew up in parts of Mississippi and Louisiana.

The most recent example of this phenomenon I have is my supervisor at the job I have had for the past three years. His family has owned a large sugar plantation in Louisiana for over a century, and when I first went to work for him, he used "toad" and "axed" quite regularly in conversation. One day a few years ago I mentioned to him that I noticed he was using these pronunciations, and asked him pointedly: 1) if he was aware that he was doing this, and 2) if he knew that what he was doing was noticeable. He sort of shrugged off the questions, and ever since then he has never exhibited this speech pattern in my presence again. All I can figure is that I embarrassed him a little, and he has made a concerted effort to correct his pronunciation of these words.

I did a little research on speech pathology pertaining to this subject, and was surprised to find that the "ax" variation on "ask" is not only recognized as a nonstandard commonality of English as it is spoken the world over, but has been so since the first millennium. Chaucer used the two forms interchangably in The Canterbury Tales, as was the practice of those who spoke Middle English. Its use is still common in certain regions, including small areas of the American South and parts of New England.

The permutation of the ks and sk sounds is a linguistic process known as Metathesis, and is not necessarily the result of any speech defect. This rambling evolution of language to its "most easily pronouncable forms" could easily explain the story behind "told" and "toad" — or we could write that one off to lazy tongues. The most fascinating aspect of this phenom to me is its irony. Both "told" and "asked" are past tense verbs for the act of speaking; to give a detailed account of, and to put a question to. Yet when speaking these words, they are mispronounced. How strange and beautiful.

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On 4/7/2018 at 6:58 PM, Snaggletooth said:

a cunning oune?                                        :)

I learned the hard way not to try to pull the wool over her eyes. 

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47 minutes ago, Port Phillip Sailor said:

"Comfortable in my own skin"

Wouldn't feel too good if she wasn't in her own skin.

More bullshit speech!

Um, actually I think that is a very good idiomatic phrase for the many people that have very little self confidence or belief in themselves.  Or folks that suffer from depression, or a host of other things.  

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On 4/8/2018 at 2:28 PM, SloopJonB said:

I thought that "axe" instead of "ask" was strictly an American ghetto patois thing.

I get the impression from some comments here that it is more widespread than that.

It might be a short-circuit in the brain -- I know a old white lady who always says  "aks" and she just can't help herself despite her best efforts to say "ask" in normal conversation. She can actually say it, but only with heavy concentration. She also drives a Ford Excape and loves to show off photo "alblums" of her grandkids.

 

Now, the thing that's seem to come up in the last few years is liberally using the phrase "I feel" in place of "I think"  -- "I feel it might get warm today.."  -- Really? You can just feel that? Fuk, I have to think about shit like that...

 

 

 

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Better that than "You feel me"? instead of "do you understand"?

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22 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Better that than "You feel me"? instead of "do you understand"?

I grok that.

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On 4/8/2018 at 1:17 PM, random said:

Here in AUS we have a really really fucking annoying pronunciation issue. 

Try saying the word "Medal", as in Gold Medal.  Now when you say "Med" the tip of your tongue touches your pallet just behind your front teeth.  Then in order to pronounce the "el" part, your tongue has to touch about the same place the second time.

People in the State of South Australia tend not to touch the pallet the second time,  so instead of "medal" they say "medeoww",  Try it.

Annoys the fuck out of me.

What annoys the fuck out of me even more are the lazy shits in the US who can't pronounce a hard "t" if you had a gun to their head.  For example:

Buh un (Button)

Meh ul (metal)

Keh ul (Kettle)

 

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On 4/9/2018 at 12:16 AM, Mark K said:

I knew a lady who had that done to her yappy little poodle. 

What you did there...... I saw it.

HA!  :lol:

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On 4/9/2018 at 12:33 AM, Rasputin22 said:

It's a New Orleans thing to me. Although the Irish and African neighborhoods are so closely intertwined there that may have something to do with it.

 

I was in Elementary school down in Miami - 5th or 6th grade or something - and my (very large, very black and very nice IIRC) teacher told me to "go axe your mother about such-n-such when you get home"  So later that night I said to mom.... "Mrs Jones told me to axe you if you could do ______".  Mom made me repeat it just to be certain she heard it correctly and I repeated it.  She hit the roof!  She was not pleased to say the least.  I think she even called the teach up that night to ask WTF?  The teacher reconfirmed she used the word "axe" and didn't understand what all the kerfuffle was all about.  That was just normal to her.  And she was an English teacher.  :wacko:

 

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1 hour ago, Shootist Jeff said:

What annoys the fuck out of me even more are the lazy shits in the US who can't pronounce a hard "t" if you had a gun to their head.  For example:

Buh un (Button)

Meh ul (metal)

Keh ul (Kettle)

 

This seems to be more common in the under-30 set. 

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It's called a "Glottal Stop" - it's when they speak out of their throat instead of their mouth.

It's getting really bad in England. They call it an accent but it isn't - just lazy, sloppy, ignorant speech.

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1 hour ago, Shootist Jeff said:

I was in Elementary school down in Miami - 5th or 6th grade or something - and my (very large, very black and very nice IIRC) teacher told me to "go axe your mother about such-n-such when you get home"  So later that night I said to mom.... "Mrs Jones told me to axe you if you could do ______".  Mom made me repeat it just to be certain she heard it correctly and I repeated it.  She hit the roof!  She was not pleased to say the least.  I think she even called the teach up that night to ask WTF?  The teacher reconfirmed she used the word "axe" and didn't understand what all the kerfuffle was all about.  That was just normal to her.  And she was an English teacher.  :wacko:

 

I wound up in serious hot water with Mrs PB years ago when son #3 brought a note from his teacher (elementary school) about this event or that request, the point is it was a note sent to everybody in the class. Throughout the year, this teacher would send notes home that ALWAYS had punctuation or grammar mistakes. Always. Now my grammar isn’t perfect and I have made punctuation mistakes from time to time. Additionally, I know schools/teachers are understaffed and often poorly equipped for the various educational efforts, so..........fine. This particular note caught me in an especially critical mood and sent me over the edge. In addition to the typical mistakes, he had misspelled a word and used “there” instead of “their.” So I corrected the note in red ink and told my son to take it back to his teacher. When Mrs PB found out she was really pissed.....not about my underlying point, but instead my method of making the point. “Tell me that you at least put it in a sealed envelope.” “Uhhhhhh.....no”.........then came the lecture about undermining the teacher’s authority and our son’s confidence in his teacher and ended with “we’re not in the f#^*ing firehouse.” As usual, she was correct. So I made an appointment with the teacher and apologized for the note. I also explained my motivation. The teacher was very gracious, said he understood and would be more attentive to those concerns. The rest of the year, notes home were perfect. 

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Only ever seen this on Sailing Anarchy forums.    "bigly"   WTF is that bastardization of the English language about

 

And using z instead of s, as in gunz instead of guns. That to me indicates the mental age of the user - primary school age. No wonder kids can't spell correctly these days.

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1 hour ago, overbend said:

My hate is the expression "my bad", whats wrong with I was wrong, or,   I fucked that one up.

"My bad is fine", just shortens "I fucked up".

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Might be just and Aussie thing but the term 'old mate' really shits me.

"Old mate said ...."

"I was talking to old mate this morning ..."

Well who the fuck is that?  It is used in general conversation where you are expected to know who 'ol mate'  is.  Most often I have no fucking idea who they are talking about.

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1 hour ago, random said:

Might be just and Aussie thing but the term 'old mate' really shits me.

"Old mate said ...."

"I was talking to old mate this morning ..."

Well who the fuck is that?  It is used in general conversation where you are expected to know who 'ol mate'  is.  Most often I have no fucking idea who they are talking about.

It's a QLD thing. Seems to be used when they don't know the persons name. Annoying.

 

Another annoying use of words is "goto". Somebody has a "goto". A sort of standard action in certain circumstances.

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...I was named a "grammar-nazi" because I (as non-anglo-nativespeaker- I'm a krautophone) complained about the endless misspellings in many, many posts...

& I still hate the MISSPELLINGS!

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7 minutes ago, tane said:

...I was named a "grammar-nazi" because I (as non-anglo-nativespeaker- I'm a krautophone) complained about the endless misspellings in many, many posts...

& I still hate the MISSPELLINGS!

Who is Miss Pellings? What did she do that you hate her?

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4 minutes ago, tane said:

...I was named a "grammar-nazi" because I (as non-anglo-nativespeaker- I'm a krautophone) complained about the endless misspellings in many, many posts...

& I still hate the MISSPELLINGS!

Yeah but as a krautophone you've got those good probiotic thingys in yer gut so at least the malaprops don't upset yer stomach. The simple misspellings annoy all the intelligent readers.

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9 hours ago, Port Phillip Sailor said:

Only ever seen this on Sailing Anarchy forums.    "bigly"   WTF is that bastardization of the English language about

It's a Trumpism.

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Has someone mentioned "impact" 

He impacted  us greatly with his kindness and humour. 

Impact is not a verb 

His kindness and humour had a great impact on us.

Or 

Q. How are you ?

A. I'm good 

Like you run good?

No,  you run well

so I'm well is correct

I have badgered my kids and their friends for years on this (in a good hearted manner) but maybe I need to take some meds.  It just annoys me.  

 

  

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Just now, artie_pitt said:

In our house we prefer the above.                     :)

Yes of course sorry for the oversight 

 

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On 4/7/2018 at 3:15 PM, Port Phillip Sailor said:

Threepeat. Repeat for the 3rd time. Used by sports commentators when an athlete wins something for the 3rd time.

Sadly, I was informed by a friend who is the Head of the Department of Modern Languages at a Ivy League School that this is indeed a real word, as is "winningest" They are older english, but still real words.....

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1 hour ago, cbm said:

Sadly, I was informed by a friend who is the Head of the Department of Modern Languages at a Ivy League School that this is indeed a real word, as is "winningest" They are older english, but still real words.....

Languages are a living thing, they change all of the time by necessity because the world cahnges.   It's all arbitrary anyway.  New words become a part of the language after repeated use makes them ubiquitous and acceptable, or technology creates brand new things that need to have a name such as cell phones, laptop computers, DVD player, etc.   

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One of God's little jokes is that English became the dominant language because it is a living language but it is mostly the illiterates who drive the changes that make it so.

If English had always been spoken and used correctly we would all sound like Shakespeare or an even older version.

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3 hours ago, floating dutchman said:

And, can we sea her tit's?

Her tit's what? Colour? Side? Shape?

 

(See what I did there?)

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"Piece".  Not a piece of ass; who would complain?  Not a concealed sidearm. Not even a slice of pizza.  Nope, 'piece' instead of 'aspect' or 'part' or 'element' or 'component' or any other superior fucking word.  

That about wraps up the assessment piece for me.  Is there anything in the parking lot we need to check on?  

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My boss asked me to "establish the fact-pattern and circle back on that piece". I shit you not.

May have mentioned this before but it still bothers me.

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"Optics" as anything other than a discipline or physical object (e.g. "the congressman's bad conduct made for bad optics")

"Informed" as an intransitive verb (e.g. "my opinion is informed by my experience as a circus clown")

"Impactful" in any context

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1 hour ago, Ed Lada said:

Languages are a living thing, they change all of the time by necessity because the world cahnges.   It's all arbitrary anyway.  New words become a part of the language after repeated use makes them ubiquitous and acceptable, or technology creates brand new things that need to have a name such as cell phones, laptop computers, DVD player, etc.   

New words are going to be created for  the many new thing that come into existence. That's inevitable & acceptable.

Misuse & incorrect pronunciation of words, such as  "aks"  and the creation of bullshit words like "bigly" and "crystalballing"  just get up my nose.

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42 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

One of God's little jokes is that English became the dominant language because it is a living language but it is mostly the illiterates who drive the changes that make it so.

If English had always been spoken and used correctly we would all sound like Shakespeare or an even older version.

I've been teaching English to non-native speakers for a long time.  Most people in Europe learn British English for obvious reasons.  I hate it!  As an American I find British English far more formal and rule bound than the much more informal American variety.  My experience with our neighbors to the north is you sound more like us than those folks across the pond.  I tell my students, forget that British crap, we are going to learn real English.  'At the weekend' indeed!

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28 minutes ago, Port Phillip Sailor said:

New words are going to be created for  the many new thing that come into existence. That's inevitable & acceptable.

Misuse & incorrect pronunciation of words, such as  "aks"  and the creation of bullshit words like "bigly" and "crystalballing"  just get up my nose.

True and true, but get used to it.  If they butcher the word long enough, it will become part of the lexicon.  When I was young, the word 'busted' was considered slang.  Now I hear news reporters saying something like "The cause of the accident was likely a busted tire."  Like fingernails on a chalkboard!  

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18 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

I've been teaching English to non-native speakers for a long time.  Most people in Europe learn British English for obvious reasons.  I hate it!  As an American I find British English far more formal and rule bound than the much more informal American variety.  My experience with our neighbors to the north is you sound more like us than those folks across the pond.  I tell my students, forget that British crap, we are going to learn real English.  'At the weekend' indeed!

You mean you are teaching them American - not English.

There are a lot of countries in the world that speak English - not American.

I once heard a 10 year old American kid, in Italy,  complaining loudly to his family "Why can't they speak American".

Americans also change the spelling of some words. Theater instead of the correct theatre. Centre instead of centre. Meter instead of metre (a French word). Actually meter is an instrument for showing a measurement such as altimeter.  

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12 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

True and true, but get used to it.  If they butcher the word long enough, it will become part of the lexicon.  When I was young, the word 'busted' was considered slang.  Now I hear news reporters saying something like "The cause of the accident was likely a busted tire."  Like fingernails on a chalkboard!  

Busted has been in use for donkeys years. I remember my mother using the word more than 60 years ago. Her favourite expression was "he's got a face like a busted fart".

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1 minute ago, Port Phillip Sailor said:

Busted has been in use for donkeys years. I remember my mother using the word more than 60 years ago. Her favourite expression was "he's got a face like a busted fart".

That's exactly my point.  Once it was slang and not acceptable proper English and now it's acceptable.  T

 

9 minutes ago, Port Phillip Sailor said:

You mean you are teaching them American - not English.

There are a lot of countries in the world that speak English - not American.

I once heard a 10 year old American kid, in Italy,  complaining loudly to his family "Why can't they speak American".

Well, it is technically referred to as 'American English' to differentiate it from the inferior British version.   ;)

Don't get me started on ignorant tourists!  "What, you don't speak English, here let me shout, maybe then you will understand."  I tell them;  Of course, the most widely spoken language in the world based on the number of countries that use it as their primary language, is... 

 

 

 

 

 

Spanish.

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On 4/10/2018 at 8:36 AM, Point Break said:

 “we’re not in the f#^*ing firehouse.” 

I'm stealing this

You best behave yourself. We got your kryptonite right here ! ^_^

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24 minutes ago, Ed Lada said:

That's exactly my point.  Once it was slang and not acceptable proper English and now it's acceptable.  T

 

Well, it is technically referred to as 'American English' to differentiate it from the inferior British version.   ;)

Don't get me started on ignorant tourists!  "What, you don't speak English, here let me shout, maybe then you will understand."  I tell them;  Of course, the most widely spoken language in the world based on the number of countries that use it as their primary language, is... 

 

 

 

 

 

Spanish.

Knew that. But the most widely used SECOND language is English. (and that doesn't half piss off the French)

And the English version existed long before America did.

Very rarely hear "busted" used but it was common in the 50s & 60s. Might have come into use from WW2?

ps, Googled "busted", 18th century meaning broken, burst. Meaning changed maybe '60s to being 'busted",  caught doing something you shouldn't - like smoking dope.

 

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3 minutes ago, Port Phillip Sailor said:

And the English version existed long before America did.

The Amer. vers. wase the same as Eng. vers. at the time.  They juste wentte diffent dirrectiones.                        :)

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1 minute ago, Snaggletooth said:

The Amer. vers. wase the same as Eng. vers. at the time.  They juste wentte diffent dirrectiones.                        :)

Hence the saying "separated by a common language".