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random

How “wet” the Volvo Ocean 65 yachts are?

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annie.jpeg

19 Dec

Posted by Brian Hancock

I saw on the Volvo Ocean Race website that Annie Lush, one of two women racing aboard Team Brunel, was injured when she and Peter Burling (remember him?) were washed into the aft guardrails by an errant wave. Burling was fine but Annie was in very real pain. “It felt like one of the wires had done something inside,” she said. “I had a big pain in my right hand side and couldn’t really move my right leg and I really needed to get off deck because we needed to gybe for the ice gate.” She continued, “I tried to crawl but in the end the guys had to drag me along the deck and then carry me downstairs.”
 
OK it’s a gripping account but there are two things wrong with this. Sadly, first there is going to be the usual backlash against women on boats. There will be Zac from Muskogie, Michigan decrying the day women were ever let into the Volvo Ocean Race, a place for men only. There will be those saying that women are not tough enough for this kind of sailing and there will be those defending women on boats. Ok fine, that’s bound to happen but I think that the second thing wrong with this is a much more important story. There is no need for the boats to be designed the way they are. These are crap boats and wrong for this race and we will be lucky if there are not many more injuries like this before the race is over.
 
So I have opened myself up to a lot of hate mail and I don’t care. Personally I am sick and tired of seeing icy cold green water cascading down the deck into the crew hanging on for dear life back aft. It was fun the first few times but seriously. Enough. It’s not necessary. The slogan for the Volvo Ocean Race was, and I think still is but I am not sure, “Life at the Extreme” but the extreme is caused by racing around the world in the wrong boats. It’s totally unnecessary. 
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Check this out!   Awesome so much water over the deck and everyone wants to see that right?

I mean how fucking cool is it to see crew washed to the end of their lines and get buried under tonnes of whit water!!!!

 

 

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“We went round the world last time without broaching once,” says Abu Dhabi’s skipper Ian Walker. “We broached around five times on the first leg alone – one of them was nearly to leeward.”

Couple of wipe-outs

His team is not alone in the struggle to keep the boat the right way up. “I had a couple of wipe-outs,” admits one of Vestas Wind’s helmsmen, Tom Johnson, “one was in just ten knots of wind!”

One of the reasons is that the new VO65s have significantly less righting moment than their 70ft predecessors, largely as a result of using weight that would have been in the keel bulb for greater internal structure to make the boats more robust. Even with the 1,000kg forward water ballast tank filled – included to improve upwind performance – crews talk of the difficulty in preventing the bow falling off to leeward in strong winds and big seas.

Downwind sailing in a breeze is even more challenging. Though you might expect a boat of this type to be travelling at 28-32 knots at 130° true, you wouldn’t expect it to be heeling at 25-30°, planing on its side.

“The 65s feel safer, and a lot of the time I like that,” declares Abu Dhabi’s Justin Slattery. “They don’t nosedive as much as the 70s. But to sail fast on a 65 you need to be right on the edge.”


Read more at http://www.yachtingworld.com/features/volvo-boats-tricky-beasts-sail-say-volvo-ocean-race-crews-61245#C2QlYWk03M7054q9.99
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The only person bringing up women on deck is that neanderthal prick. Forget about women on deck, why is he on the front page? If anything is unnecessary, its him.

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jesuskrist, give it a rest random, the only 'issue' with the 65 is that the vertical center of gravity is too high. glad you're not in charge of the VOR, it'd be a sporty version of the Clipper, the event would be fkg dead.

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Re Annie Lush's injuries, this provides some context about injuries "on a powerful, fast-moving sailboat." 

Quote

Nilson knew that he could call on an extensive medical kit; the contents reflected the race’s many years’ cumulative experience dealing with whatever befell the human body on a powerful, fast-moving sailboat. The equipment included staple guns, needles and glue to stop bleeding; antibiotics to deal with infections; splints for fractures, including equipment to stabilise the neck and immobilise a patient in a bunk in case of a spinal injury. They had everything they needed for intravenous therapy; a tracheotomy; burns treatment; and intramuscular andsubcutaneousinjections. Each boat had two trained medics aboard – although Nilson’s advantage was that he had qualified as a doctor, even though it was almost 20 years since he had practised.

Plenty of the equipment and training had already been tested. Tony Mutter’s evacuation from Ericsson 4 at the Cape Verde Islands on leg one was simply the most dramatic event. It sat alongside a steady drip of injuries: concussions, torn ligaments, prolapsed vertebrae discs, mangled fingertips, broken ribs, kettle burns, haemorrhoids and kidney infections, which had been responsible for many of the crew changes to date. Only Ericsson 4 had managed to keep the same crew through to the start of leg six. In contrast, their sister ship had made nine changes to the crew for the offshore legs in the same period.

The Race Management’s medical coordinator, Polly Gough, was compiling some telling statistics through the questionnaires filled in at the end of each leg. By the time Mike Pammenter cracked his ankle into the mast there had already been 349 reported medical issues from 107 sailing days, an average of one per boat every other day. While the big, bloody, concussive injuries usually grabbed the space in news reports, the most common complaint was the same one that had forced Ericsson 4’s detour to the Cape Verde Islands: the fungal infections and sores on infected skin. There were 59 reported cases on the first five legs of the race – clearly not everyone could cope as well as Stu Bannatyne and go 40-plus days without washing!

from Mark Chisel's book about the 2008 edition

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1 hour ago, 3to1 said:

jesuskrist, give it a rest random, the only 'issue' with the 65 is that the vertical center of gravity is too high. glad you're not in charge of the VOR, it'd be a sporty version of the Clipper, the event would be fkg dead.

But but I had to start a thread because I see in the OP of Leg 8 thread that it's not allowed there!

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Anyway, it seems a rather extreme way to ensure that a Farr boat wins ...

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34 minutes ago, hoppy said:

Wet is good

dsc01140oy1.jpg

 

mar-16-2009-panama-city-beach-florida-us5da19a9a25df3bc401594f6e55fb1bf8.jpg

Strict rule on my boat. Deck shoes and clothes or stiletto heels and naked. No exceptions.....well maybe.

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13 minutes ago, frant said:

Strict rule on my boat. Deck shoes and clothes or stiletto heels and naked. No exceptions.....well maybe.

sounds like a good rule. No damp clothes below deck to make it humid

_476784.jpg

326771-Deman1608.jpg

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24 minutes ago, hoppy said:

sounds like a good rule. No damp clothes below deck to make it humid

_476784.jpg

326771-Deman1608.jpg

Had my laptop and identity cards stolen a while ago. Police recovered my “identity” during a drug bust on an ice ring. Looks like my private onboard photos off laptop were hacked as well.

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59 minutes ago, frant said:

Had my laptop and identity cards stolen a while ago. Police recovered my “identity” during a drug bust on an ice ring. Looks like my private onboard photos off laptop were hacked as well.

Shit happens.

Are these from your laptop as well?

319058-svetik.jpg

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQljXtZWGFGfrMQoqHk6zg

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This Volvo is very wet

 

edatraffen_080614_052.jpg

edatraffen_080614_028.jpg

and this one too

car-wash-14.jpg

 

car-wash-16.jpg

 

 

The V70 is certainly wet

P5085897-S.jpg

 

 

 

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Volvo Ocean 65: The Boat

At top speeds, everything is fully loaded. It's extremely wet, and extremely noisy. When you sheet on, sounds come fast: water rushing past the hull, winches grinding, pedestals turning, and people huffing and puffing. As the boat loads up, it heels quickly and spray instantly comes over the deck.

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19 hours ago, frant said:

My gf is much wetter than a VO65. 

She sure is. And let me say you have got a nice house too.

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58 minutes ago, random said:

Volvo Ocean 65: The Boat

At top speeds, everything is fully loaded. It's extremely wet, and extremely noisy. When you sheet on, sounds come fast: water rushing past the hull, winches grinding, pedestals turning, and people huffing and puffing. As the boat loads up, it heels quickly and spray instantly comes over the deck.

Pretty much describes most boats. 

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19 minutes ago, SCANAS said:

Pretty much describes most boats. 

Randum probably wouldn't know that. 

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1 hour ago, LB 15 said:

She sure is. And let me say you have got a nice house too.

You been around to my house? Cause it ain’t mine anymore after the family court had its way. If you were around there then I reckon you might have added to your one lousy goat experience.

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2017_MACIF2.jpg

800+ miles a day ...

compared to ...

image.png.67ba361eeea93af5a9d80668250a1581.png

Now why the fuck would they design this in?  WTF were they thinking?

 

 

 

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Would you rather go around the planet in this ...

dans-cockpit.-les-cordages-possedent-cod

or this?

image.png.52d34c86914b5cbb95d7136c5fe78fcf.png

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On 4/9/2018 at 2:51 AM, random said:

this offends me.

 

 

very fkg cool, look at the surf starting at 1:04, they're going ballistic.

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Just now, 3to1 said:

very fkg cool, look at the surfing starting at 1:04.

Isn't it the 65's randoms complaining about? every thing in that clip is a V70. :blink:

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This is some sensible designing, some real crew protection.  A safer workplace.

2012-10-11Jrenedo-BREST12-6213.jpg

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it also looks like the crew would be playing Twister trying to sail the boat in that tiny well.

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1 minute ago, 3to1 said:

it also looks like the crew would be playing Twister trying to sail the boat in that tiny well.

Clearly that boat was designed for solo sailing, no reason why a crewed boat could not offer the same protection.  It can be done easily, no new tech required.

The VOR crews have been hung out to get hosed on purpose.

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6 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

You have an advantage over us all.

depositphotos_4072993-stock-photo-funny-old-man.jpg

even with the hard-wired herd mentality, you see his point, too.

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14 minutes ago, 3to1 said:

even with the hard-wired herd mentality, you see his point, too.

No, but you can't miss Randumb's lead point ignoring everything design..HB soft is my guess.

f35d4f7cef8e933a4a7cac447fb57c60.jpg

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32 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Sorry but you and Randumb are on your own with your "reach around" shit.

15233625788121973630264.jpg

it ain't 'reach around shit' dough boy, it's an acknowledgement of someone else's perspective even if it's not mine. 

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Let's not see this excellent thread drift off-topic!
Here is a truly shocking example of practices which should be censured! I can't see the PFD or locator beacon, no guard rails! and I can't even be sure she is tethered to her ship even if I zoom right in to see the details. The yacht has insufficient crew protection, sea water is washing over the deck, and look! her rig has gone over the side!. This sailor despeartely needs Hancock to rush to her aid.

unsafe.jpg

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28 minutes ago, 3to1 said:

it ain't 'reach around shit' dough boy, it's an acknowledgement of someone else's perspective even if it's not mine. 

Well if you two ain't doing the "reach around" thing...you do really need to stop sucking Randumb's balls. 

Though at least there is no risk of choking involved.

 

15233663914161020129670.jpg

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26 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

OK..but quick tip ..take your teeth out and keep chewing...he will like that a lot.

nice edit jack, I see you utterly fucked up the first time, then you made it worse.

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I talked to Ian Walker about adding shelter for the crew. Apparently there was a provision in the original design, but it was vetoed by the crews.   I wouldn't put up with that shit for long, I would be building shelters out of the stack and anything else I could find ....

Also, remember that the VOR 65 is significantly heavier than as designed and as a result is going to throw more water around.

Replacing the fleet seems like a foolish thing. The boats are going plenty fast, they have some things that could be improved, but I would have to believe these could be done at a lower cost than building a whole new fleet. Look at how many times they have rebuilt WOXI.  Cutting off the front and adding replacing the front 20' of boat to reflect the heavier displacement and improve sea keeping  would change the boats dramatically, improve their performance and make them less like submarines. They could solve a lot of problems by just making the boat longer.  Making the boats more stable would require redesign of the masts and load bearing parts of the hulll.  This could be done, but it might be more attractive to use some form of DSS with a reduction of lead to get the same righting moment at lower displacement.  

SHC

 

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You started to make sense until I got to WOXI day racer cut and shunts to heavy boats with not enough low down RM, DSS remedies and to a platform that has already gone twice around the marble.

This is where that leads.

CQS-laying-over-on-Sydney-Harbour-–-ROLEX-Kurt-Arrigo.jpg

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Does anyone else think it funny that the video posted to start this thread about VO65's being wet has lots of boats with people getting wet but NOT ONE VO65 - they are all VO70s

Just saying

SS

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13 minutes ago, shanghaisailor said:

Does anyone else think it funny that the video posted to start this thread about VO65's being wet has lots of boats with people getting wet but NOT ONE VO65 - they are all VO70s

Just saying

SS

That and the sailors on the boats voted for no protection when they gave input on the design.

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5 hours ago, Steve Clark said:

I talked to Ian Walker about adding shelter for the crew. Apparently there was a provision in the original design, but it was vetoed by the crews.   I wouldn't put up with that shit for long, I would be building shelters out of the stack and anything else I could find ....

Also, remember that the VOR 65 is significantly heavier than as designed and as a result is going to throw more water around.

Replacing the fleet seems like a foolish thing. The boats are going plenty fast, they have some things that could be improved, but I would have to believe these could be done at a lower cost than building a whole new fleet. Look at how many times they have rebuilt WOXI.  Cutting off the front and adding replacing the front 20' of boat to reflect the heavier displacement and improve sea keeping  would change the boats dramatically, improve their performance and make them less like submarines. They could solve a lot of problems by just making the boat longer.  Making the boats more stable would require redesign of the masts and load bearing parts of the hulll.  This could be done, but it might be more attractive to use some form of DSS with a reduction of lead to get the same righting moment at lower displacement.  

SHC

 

Save all the trouble and just borrow the Clipper fleet. Might as well.

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6 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

OK..but quick tip ..take your teeth out and keep chewing...he will like that a lot.

Hey Jack, nice work on my community points.  I only started this thread because you trashed the first 100, but now you have wiped it to zero I have nothing to lose!  I think I'll keep up my good work now and start some more threads about anything I see in the VOR that is fucked up, plenty of material there.

Takes time and dedication to bother doing 172 downvotes, you must be really really pissed!

I guess that means....

who-s-my-bitch-you-are.png

 

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6 hours ago, Steve Clark said:

I talked to Ian Walker about adding shelter for the crew. Apparently there was a provision in the original design, but it was vetoed by the crews.   I wouldn't put up with that shit for long, I would be building shelters out of the stack and anything else I could find ....

Also, remember that the VOR 65 is significantly heavier than as designed and as a result is going to throw more water around.

Replacing the fleet seems like a foolish thing. The boats are going plenty fast, they have some things that could be improved, but I would have to believe these could be done at a lower cost than building a whole new fleet. Look at how many times they have rebuilt WOXI.  Cutting off the front and adding replacing the front 20' of boat to reflect the heavier displacement and improve sea keeping  would change the boats dramatically, improve their performance and make them less like submarines. They could solve a lot of problems by just making the boat longer.  Making the boats more stable would require redesign of the masts and load bearing parts of the hulll.  This could be done, but it might be more attractive to use some form of DSS with a reduction of lead to get the same righting moment at lower displacement.  

SHC

 

I read somewhere here before, might have been you that the 'crew' veto'd something.

How does that work?  What was the design decision-making process and who were 'the crews' at the time?  I don't doubt what you are saying but I thought the design process would have been well ahead of the crew selection.

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12 minutes ago, random said:

I read somewhere here before, might have been you that the 'crew' veto'd something.

..................   and who were 'the crews' at the time? 

These guys obviously.

 

BWAHAhahaha

Seal_boat.jpg

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1 hour ago, random said:

Hey Jack, nice work on my community points.  I only started this thread because you trashed the first 100, but now you have wiped it to zero I have nothing to lose!  I think I'll keep up my good work now and start some more threads about anything I see in the VOR that is fucked up, plenty of material there.

Takes time and dedication to bother doing 172 downvotes, you must be really really pissed!

I guess that means....

who-s-my-bitch-you-are.png

 

Hey Jacky-boy, you must have missed this one!

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3 hours ago, random said:

I read somewhere here before, might have been you that the 'crew' veto'd something.

How does that work?  What was the design decision-making process and who were 'the crews' at the time?  I don't doubt what you are saying but I thought the design process would have been well ahead of the crew selection.

You are nothing but a clown.

At the time the V65 was being designed, the crews of the V70's will be the ones who were consulted. People like Xabi will have been the ones who veto'd the idea of protection.

 

red-nose-clown-hed.jpg?itok=ZX1GxhNK&res

 

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10 hours ago, staysail said:

Let's not see this excellent thread drift off-topic!
Here is a truly shocking example of practices which should be censured! I can't see the PFD or locator beacon, no guard rails! and I can't even be sure she is tethered to her ship even if I zoom right in to see the details. The yacht has insufficient crew protection, sea water is washing over the deck, and look! her rig has gone over the side!. This sailor despeartely needs Hancock to rush to her aid.

unsafe.jpg

With her lack of safety consciousness, she is clearly asking for a good bottom spanking.. 

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Quote

From paper to plywood - in pursuit of perfection

7 September 2012, 08:09 UTC

While the hull’s plug is being built at Persico Spa, Italy, another team is working on the deck of the 65-foot one-design that will contest the next two editions of the Volvo Ocean Race. 

The group of Volvo Ocean Race sailors, shore crew, designers and engineers met at the Multiplast plant in Vannes in western France to assess a plywood mock-up of the deck.

It's the next stage in the process of building the new boat – a follow-up to the extensive consultation process that was started towards the end of the last race, and a chance to figure out how the boat will be sailed and where to position deck hardware and other critical components.

Among the group meeting up in Vannes at the start of the week were Chris Nicholson and Neil Cox, skipper and shore crew manager of CAMPER with Emirates Team New Zealand, sailor Phil Harmer and shore manager Ben Wright of Groupama, Sanya’s Richard Mason and female navigator Sam Davies. Also taking part were project manager James Dadd, Pat Shaughnessy for Farr Yacht Design and Jean-Baptiste Mouton for Multiplast.

"With Coxy in charge of the master list, Chris takes control of getting everyone in position to make manoeuvres,” explained Rick Deppe, attending the workshop for the Volvo Ocean Race.

"They think of everything and the day started with them getting the boat off the dock. Can the helmsman see the guy on the bow, etc, etc? Next they hoisted the main and at every stage of the manoeuvre anyone can stop the process and throw out ideas. It may seem strange but doing it this way can lead to tiny but important changes of position."

The workshop has been going on all week with the plug being modified according to the group’s requests.

Stay tuned to www.volvooceanrace.com for more updates about the construction of the new boat at Persico in Italy, Multiplast in France, Decision in Switzerland and Green Marine in the UK.   

More 7 September 2012, 08:09 UTC
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Just giving readers an option to Cliff.  Easy to follow links to the playlists . Took about 30 minutes to dig up.

Nice bags, btw. 

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As I said in another post, the others all run on autopilots so they can have the shelters, they would be better having a chest height panel in front of the steering pedestal so the waves go either side.  Also from the earlier videos the 70's had a wave deflector on the foredeck near the mast 

image.png.02e2759beaecfe851b8b89457b5d80e5.png

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9 hours ago, hoppy said:

At the time the V65 was being designed, the crews of the V70's will be the ones who were consulted. People like Xabi will have been the ones who veto'd the idea of protection.

 

 

 

So you are trying to tell me that the sailors decided to sail around the world cold and wet?  Really

Well I think this is complete bullshit.  Got any evidence?

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Randum, I know its a shock but if you google it you'll find that sailors usually like to sail around on water which is wet and go places where the water is cold,  not all of them are middle aged fat cunts  who's closest relationship to water is with an enema.

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Go buy a cold wet boat and see how many friends you have on the next ocean race.  

Anyone who thinks that the product of the Farr office, contracted by the VOR, is driven by crew saying that they want to be cold wet and injured ... is delusional.

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42 minutes ago, random said:

So you are trying to tell me that the sailors decided to sail around the world cold and wet?  Really

Well I think this is complete bullshit.  Got any evidence?

Yep..and you really need to leave that minute thing alone Cliffy.

tumblr_mihxd0BOeP1ro7bjlo1_250.gif

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41 minutes ago, Bill E Goat said:

they would be better having a chest height panel in front of the steering pedestal so the waves go either side. 

Yep, it's not hard really is it.  But the combined brains trust either didn't think of that, or they deliberately did not do it, so the video was more 'exciting'.

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