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hobot

DTS, R. Lee Ermey

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The stories about how he got the job on Jacket never get old.

Nor does his performance. I've watched the first 1/2 of that movie more times than I can count.

One of his best bits was the hard ass therapist.

 

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4 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

The stories about how he got the job on Jacket never get old.

Nor does his performance. I've watched the first 1/2 of that movie more times than I can count.

One of his best bits was the hard ass therapist.

 

Oh shit, that was funny.  I can relate.

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Your days of finger banging old Mary-Jane Rottencrotch through her pretty pink panties.... ARE OVER!

RIP Gunny!  Semper Fi! 

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The first half of FMJ is by far the most accurate, if a little condensed, depiction of boot camp I’ve seen. They took the whole 3 month experience and packed it into under an hour or so. Unlike a lot of movies made for Hollywood, there was very little to pick apart, in my opinion. It still makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up if I watch it.

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30 minutes ago, chum said:

The first half of FMJ is by far the most accurate, if a little condensed, depiction of boot camp I’ve seen. They took the whole 3 month experience and packed it into under an hour or so. Unlike a lot of movies made for Hollywood, there was very little to pick apart, in my opinion. It still makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up if I watch it.

You were a Marine?

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I don't recall combo locks on our lockers in Navy boot on Worm Island or after we crossed the bridge.

The only things in our lockers were our uniforms, skivies, t-shirts, socks, boot polish & brush.

All in all, I didn't think boot camp was all that tough. However I was raised in a household, where white glove inspection standards were the norm.

As I recall I was the only guy in our company who never got a demerit.

Shortly before or right after graduation my company commander said to me, "boot camp wasn't tough for you" 

My reply, "SIR, Senior Chief  Bennett, SIR - my Mom was stricter with higher expectations - she's also a lot tougher then you - SIR"

Senior Chief Bennett just smiled and said, "You'll go a long way in this man's Navy."

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In the movie, I do not know how recruit Pyle managed to secure two spare rounds of live ammo unless they were sloppy at the range, or how Pyle was able to get up unnoticed by the fire watch, unlock his rifle, load it and pull off his stunt in the head. Barracks are dead silent at night and the firewatch could hardly miss something like that. We did have one guy slit his wrists in the showers after bedcheck, but the duty firewatch probably figured he was just going to the can. The guy slit his wrists the wrong way - slicing across the wrists. The next day our company commander demonstrated the proper way to slit one's wrists.

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9 minutes ago, boomer said:

I don't recall combo locks on our lockers in Navy boot on Worm Island or after we crossed the bridge.

The only things in our lockers were our uniforms, skivies, t-shirts, socks, boot polish & brush.

All in all, I didn't think boot camp was all that tough. However I was raised in ahousehold, where white glove inspection standards were the norm.

As I recall I was the only guy in our company who never got a demerit.

Shortly before or right after graduation my company commander said to me, "boot camp wasn't tough for you" 

My reply, "SIR, Senior Chief  Bennett, SIR - my Mom was more strict and with higher expectations then what was expected of us here - so yes she was a lot tougher then you - SIR"

Senior Chief Bennett just smiled and said, "You'll go a long way in this man's Navy."

Mine was an unusual boot camp experience since I was in the BUDS company. Pretty much all we did was run, swim and PT. I think we had a lot less of the mind games.....we did get hollered at a fair amount though. :lol:

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After boot and then Seabee A-school in Port Hueneme, we had military training at Camp Broom with the Marines.

Once again I was expecting a much more rigorous training.

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25 minutes ago, boomer said:

In the movie, I do not know how recruit Pyle managed to secure two spare rounds of live ammo unless they were sloppy at the range, or how Pyle was able to get up unnoticed by the fire watch, unlock his rifle, load it and pull off his stunt in the head. Barracks are dead silent at night and the firewatch could hardly miss something like that. We did have one guy slit his wrists in the showers after bedcheck, but the duty firewatch probably figured he was just going to the can. The guy slit his wrists the wrong way - slicing across the wrists. The next day our company commander demonstrated the proper way to slit one's wrists.

That’s nuts. I watched a guy get carried out blubbering on a stretcher after using a razor to abrade his wrists raw. Our DI called us to  the quarterdeck for a class about exactly that same thing, how to properly cut your wrists. He said if any of his idiots were going to try, at least they better succeed at that.

The padlock thing was no joke, a huge mess was made of any unlocked footlockers.

 

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A kid I went to school with, went in about a year after me in '72 or '73 to become a SEAL. They didn't have BUDS back then. After he went through Navy boot, he attended Underwater Demolition Team replacement training and they spent some time training in UDTs. Upon making it to a SEAL team, they then underwent a SEAL Basic Indoctrination (SBI) training class at Camp Kerry. After SBI training class, they entered a SEAL platoon  and conduct platoon training. After six years, he decided not to make a career out it, got out and became a cop, then a detective here in the PNW. After retiring he moved to Hawaii. https://www.facebook.com/rick.springs.5

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3 minutes ago, chum said:

That’s nuts. I watched a guy get carried out blubbering on a stretcher after using a razor to abrade his wrists raw. Our DI called us to  the quarterdeck for a class about exactly that same thing, how to properly cut your wrists. He said if any of his idiots were going to try, at least they better succeed at that.

 

We had one guy climb to the top of the roof in our three story barracks and jump off the backside (facing the Marine Boot Camp) head first into the pavement. I recall him saying, "I don't think I can do that," after our Company Commander demonstrated the proper way to slit one's wrists.

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I had no idea it was a tradition. I remembered expecting the guy to say something like “keep it in perspective” or something like that. Instead he rips open a disposable razor and takes the blade out.

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Regarding PT in the fleet, it is a whole different thing than PT in boot. It doesn’t take superman, but it does take a bit of “digging”...

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Marines usually had to stay in shape, with their daily PT. Guys in the Navy or Seabees not so much, though the Seabees today have much more PT then when I was in. When I was in, if one was in shape, it doesn't take much digging, but I was in shape coming into the service and stayed in shape, unlike many of them(Seabees). I was also the athletic petty officer for our company. Even after I'd been in four years, I was usually always the first to finish the 25 miler, and that's from sea level to 1000', back to sea level, then to about 1500-2000' depending on the route, then back to sea level with a pack,gear and rifle.

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12 minutes ago, boomer said:

If your in shape, it doesn't take much digging, but I was in shape coming into the service and stayed in shape, unlike many of them. I was also the athletic petty officer for our company. Even after I'd been in four years, I was usually always the first to finish the 25 miler, and that's from sea level to 1000', back to sea level, then to about 1500-2000' depending on the route, then back to sea level with a pack,gear and rifle.

That’s why they make Marine Corps boot camp so damn easy, so anyone can do it.

Athletic Petty officer. You guys have some funny rank structure in the Navy. 

They had a special place in Hell for prior service in boot camp. 

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Athletic PO in boot was for training purposes only, though the Athletic PO designated personnel by their capabilities for athletic week competitions.

Also Athletic POs didn't have to do galley duty during service week, we taught those who didn't know(usually African Americans) how to swim at the pool.

It comes down to nomenclature - enlisted was still E1-E9, warrant officer W1-W3, officers O1-O10 - regardless as to what there rank designations were.

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2 hours ago, chum said:

The first half of FMJ is by far the most accurate, if a little condensed, depiction of boot camp I’ve seen. They took the whole 3 month experience and packed it into under an hour or so. Unlike a lot of movies made for Hollywood, there was very little to pick apart, in my opinion. It still makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up if I watch it.

My brother went through Marine Boot Camp in 1971. He insists this is 100% accurate right up to when Pyle shoots Hartman. 

 

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I'd have to agree on the part where Pyle shoots Hartman. OTOH, Marines I've known, have commented and felt things were spot on, and for them that is probably the case. Each Marine’s experience depended on his particular series’ culture, battalion, and MCRD. Also, from what I heard talking with Marines - Depending where one was at Parris Island it was noticeably harder, than what I heard from recruits from MCRD San Diego. Allegedly this was because San Diego Marines, aka “Hollywood” Marines, had more exposure risk for DI’s trying to jack recruits up. Within Parris Island, it was well known that 3rd Battalion had experienced a lot of abuse because of their location further in the boonies. The Marines also said, Second battalion was reviled as being sissies - they were located nearer to the main base where the exchange and civilians could see what was going on.

At Parris Island, the SDI was usually the more “tolerant” guy, having the power of giving gifts of time or forgiveness to recruits, while the other DI’s, called “Hats”, were the bastards who did the dirty work. They had two-four DI’s and the SDI as I recall. All of the DI’s beat them in various ways, usually posting guards at either end of the squad bay to lookout for “spies”, personnel who might report abuse by the DIs.

They said, especially at the beginning of boot camp, it was rare to be yelled at by one DI. Often there would be three or four, one in your face, one on either side, and one at your back, screaming so hard their mouths would froth and spit would fly into their faces. Each gave contradicting commands and questions to rattle the recruit. However, they all got used to that pretty quick, but some recruits completely freaked out and went psycho - and were dropped. I recall one guy speaking of a recruit, he became so catatonic he couldn't speak, button his uniform blouse, or do anything.

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1 hour ago, boomer said:

I'd have to agree on the part where Pyle shoots Hartman. OTOH, Marines I've known, have commented and felt things were spot on, and for them that is probably the case. Each Marine’s experience depended on his particular series’ culture, battalion, and MCRD. Also, from what I heard talking with Marines - Depending where one was at Parris Island it was noticeably harder, than what I heard from recruits from MCRD San Diego. Allegedly this was because San Diego Marines, aka “Hollywood” Marines, had more exposure risk for DI’s trying to jack recruits up. Within Parris Island, it was well known that 3rd Battalion had experienced a lot of abuse because of their location further in the boonies. The Marines also said, Second battalion was reviled as being sissies - they were located nearer to the main base where the exchange and civilians could see what was going on.

At Parris Island, the SDI was usually the more “tolerant” guy, having the power of giving gifts of time or forgiveness to recruits, while the other DI’s, called “Hats”, were the bastards who did the dirty work. They had two-four DI’s and the SDI as I recall. All of the DI’s beat them in various ways, usually posting guards at either end of the squad bay to lookout for “spies”, personnel who might report abuse by the DIs.

They said, especially at the beginning of boot camp, it was rare to be yelled at by one DI. Often there would be three or four, one in your face, one on either side, and one at your back, screaming so hard their mouths would froth and spit would fly into their faces. Each gave contradicting commands and questions to rattle the recruit. However, they all got used to that pretty quick, but some recruits completely freaked out and went psycho - and were dropped. I recall one guy speaking of a recruit, he became so catatonic he couldn't speak, button his uniform blouse, or do anything.

My second brother went through boot camp In 75 or 76. He always had a nervous smile. Anytime he was under pressure he would have this shit eating grin, drove the drill instructors nuts and caused him some pain. 

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3 hours ago, boomer said:

Marines usually had to stay in shape, with their daily PT. Guys in the Navy or Seabees not so much, though the Seabees today have much more PT then when I was in. When I was in, if one was in shape, it doesn't take much digging, but I was in shape coming into the service and stayed in shape, unlike many of them(Seabees). I was also the athletic petty officer for our company. Even after I'd been in four years, I was usually always the first to finish the 25 miler, and that's from sea level to 1000', back to sea level, then to about 1500-2000' depending on the route, then back to sea level with a pack,gear and rifle.

Back in '76 a friend & I took a scuba course at Pendleton. We stayed in Oceanside for a couple of weeks and I have never seen so many incredibly fit young guys - their T-shits all hung straight down from their shoulders and none of them needed more than about 1/2 of a belt to hold their pants up.

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30 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Back in '76 a friend & I took a scuba course at Pendleton. We stayed in Oceanside for a couple of weeks and I have never seen so many incredibly fit young guys - their T-shits all hung straight down from their shoulders and none of them needed more than about 1/2 of a belt to hold their pants up.

Are you telling us you are ready to "come out?"  :lol:

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No doubt they were in top form. A few of my childhood friends went in the Marines at the same time as I. Fortunately they all came home afterwards.

One friend Johnny Peterson was one of the last at the American Embassy in Saigon, helping civilians depart from from the Embassy in buses and later in helicopters. As Johnny relayed the story to me, "They were having to pull people off or physically keep them from getting onto the buses," he said. "You couldn't blame them for wanting to get out, but it had gotten to the point where we could only take those that we absolutely had to. We couldn't take everybody. That's when your brain tells you this is really happening and we've reached the end, and hopefully we'll get out before the end gets here." Things were getting a wee bit tight, so they had to call in more helicopters to retrieve the last of the Marine contingent there. Those helos as I recall according to Johnny had to land in the parking lot beside the embassy to load out those Marines. Johnny stayed with the last remaining 13 members of the squad on top of the embassy, they had already lost two Marines from their squad in rocket attacks on the embassy.

Once the Marines got word that they were to abandon their posts and prepare to evacuate, they moved up to the roof, where they could see parts of the city burning. Most had not slept in two or three days and were running only on adrenaline. There were about 80 people crowded on the rooftop - hoping and waiting more helicopters were coming for them to board. A couple of hours passed. No choppers. The Marines thought they  forgot about them. Everybody was in their own thoughts. They passed around a bottle of whiskey and waited. Finally, they heard the whirring of helicopter blades. They stripped off their flak jackets, helmets and packs to save weight and stuffed as many people as possible into the last birds that landed. Their Master Sargent took one last glance to make sure all of his men were loaded up, and was the last to board.

One last Marine story.

Fast forward to after 9/11/01 one of our close family friend's son Leo Pendergraft who spent many a weekend at our home with his brothers and had planned to go into the Marines since he was a lad, joining the local cadets at Submarine Base Bangor for drills and training since he was in 10th or 11th grade. On weekends mornings and evenings at our house, he was always working out and pumping iron. Leo had planned to make a career in the Marines - after boot and training for a year or so, he went to Iraq.

After Iraq was taken, he was involved in the Battle of Fallujah against the rebels. While clearing buildings and residences, he went into a room and a rebel was there. The rebel raised his pistol and Leo took him out. The rebel hit the floor and an unpinned grenade rolled out of the dead rebel's other hand.  Leo turned and warned his two comrades, "live grenade" then started to bend over and retreat himself, when the grenade went off, which took off most of the flesh on backside of his left leg.

A Corpsman did the best he could to stem the bleeding and Leo was rushed to a field hospital. They did what they could do, and medi-vaced him to Germany. From Germany he went stateside for more surgeries and skin grafs. Finally he ended up back at Camp Pendleton for a year where he recouped and was discharged.

In 2007 when my middle son was married, Leo joined us with his wife Jen, when we took several boats to the San Jauns for my son's honeymoon. He showed a lotta gotta wanna, hiking out to the lighthouse on Stuart Island and hiking all over Sucia with us. He went to dive school after that and worked as a diver for several years, before going back to school a cartographer. He was just hired by the federal government in Washington, DC as a cartographer, and he and his wife and three boys will be making their new home in Virginia.

There is no doubt, I have a lot of respect for those who make it through boot to become a Marine.

1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

Back in '76 a friend & I took a scuba course at Pendleton. We stayed in Oceanside for a couple of weeks and I have never seen so many incredibly fit young guys - their T-shits all hung straight down from their shoulders and none of them needed more than about 1/2 of a belt to hold their pants up.

 

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One point he got wrong - since D-Day the Seabees are among the first to go ashore as part of Naval Combat Demolition units. Working with U.S. Army Engineers, their crucial task is to destroy barriers blocking a beach landing. Then  direct the landing craft to the correct beaches and help clear the beaches of debris.

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Army Basic isn't as bad as the Marine's but it's still no picnic.  I am one of the few, the proud, the idiots, that have gone to Basic twice.  First time in 1974, the 2nd time in 1988.  The 2nd time around, you know how the game is played and it isn't terrifying as much as boring and tiring.

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Well..........lets see. Mrs PB's grandfather english army followed by a career in the US Army. Her Dad US Army career & was in Pearl for the Japanese attack. My Dad USMC career, my brother USMC for a hitch. Me USN for a hitch. One of our sons US Army Calvary Scout 18 months in Sadar City on Quick Reaction Force. Another US Air Force for a hitch.

We have a passel of boot camp/service stories...........a passel...........

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2 hours ago, boomer said:

No doubt they were in top form. A few of my childhood friends went in the Marines at the same time as I. Fortunately they all came home afterwards.

Boomer...  we're you ever at Pt. Hueneme?

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48 minutes ago, nacradriver said:

Boomer...  we're you ever at Pt. Hueneme?

Yes I went to A-School training there for three months, and my battalion MCB 5 was homeported there when not on deployment,  though they didn't return from deployment that year, having to build the "Rose Garden" in Thailand, now known as the Ryal Thai Air Base Nam Phon. Got lucky and qualified for B-school and returned to Port Hueneme for a muster and make it for 30 days, followed by 90 days of training in B-School - I was able to talk my way into a oversea shore duty billet at Guantomeno Bay, however figured I wouldn't get much of a chance to sail, with all the officers getting the sailboats. So traded that billet for Adak, AK where they had a fleet of sailboats that wasn't being sailed. I talked about it here before, way back in the day.

Also sailed out of Channel Islands Yacht Club back then on a Islander 30 owned by a guy, I can't recall his last name, first name I think was Dick. Also more then a few times drove 60+ miles south out of Marina Del Ray crewing on a friend of my skippers boat -a crusty old sailor who I can't recall his name either, everyone knew him - he had an 8-Meter racer.

The beach scene was fairly party and drinking either at the Yacht Club, or a couple local Bars, one of which was to the west on a beach. All those places, they drank a lot more then what I was used to - no way I could keep up with their "Olympic Style" two handed drinking. Pretty much a party, eating & drinking scene going on all the time, before, during and after racing.

I remember one hot shot young sailor down their with a Ranger 26, already married at an early age, he had his 4-5 year old son driving his boat in and out of the marina under sail -  that's the way I trained my kids, too - sailing not long after they could walk.

I remember the on base golf course, ugh! Totally flat, hard and dry. Only golfed it a couple times. I  remember one time us Seabees had to handle traffic control for the AIr Show at Point Mugu. Pissed us Seabees off having to do traffic control for the airdales - but we were well behaved and kept our mouth shut about it.

Heard last year from one of my buds, the old Broom Ranch where we did our field exercises before doing annual military training at Pendleton is nothing but suburban sprawl full of neighborhoods.

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Today I tried contacting my old class mate, I spoke of above, who was a SEAL, and found out he passed away in September. I was wrong, he did go through BUD/S training but not til well after boot camp, he became a Navy Diver first, spent some time in UDT and then was accepted tp BUD/S for the first class of '75. He was a good guy and a straight shooter. Tough when one of the good guys dies young.

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Thanks for that Hobot. I barely knew him, though we sat next to each other in study hall in the 7th grade. Getting him to talk and open up,  was like squeezing blood from a turnip.  Though I made a habit of always saying Hi when our paths crossed over the next six years.

Rick was always shy and quiet in school, didn't hang with anyone - however he was a good student and a top 85% athlete in gym (though he didn't participate in school team sports). He did enjoy practicing his guitar, but don't recall him having any other passions or hobbies,  not even cars or having a hot rod, or into chasing skirts like a lot of us were in high school. Just a real studious kid, who quietly went about his business. When he finally got his first motorcycle in the 11th grade, I was a bit surprised, because he never expressed an interest in motorcycles that I'd ever recalled.

Still I kept a distant contact with him over the years, as a habit, as I did with most everyone I'd met in the past. He was quite involved with the "Wounded Warriors Project" before and after his retirement. His family - wife, daughters and grandchildren meant a lot to him and he was quite devoted as a family man - they meant everything to him. Other then that Rick exemplified the "Quiet Man."

Some chosen comments from my graduating classes Facebook page yesterday, after I posted about his history and passing.

Brian P Murphy Thanks for letting us know. Knew him a long long time ago. Thanks for your service, Rich, R.I.P. and the best to your loved ones.

Tim Eagon Rick was a great guy. I knew him at Butler and Shoreline. I saw him about 15 years ago in Redmond. Another fallen Spartan.

Paul Gorgen Sorry to hear that. I remember him bring quiet and easy going. Not to bring up a sad news, but I just found out I have cancer. Thanks for the information.
Enjoy the summer, hope I'll still be here.

Cindy Conner Sadly I hadn't seen him for years....we were pretty close in school. When he became a cop my husband met him and mentored him when he would ask questions. Bob is so sad to hear of his passing as well. Prayers to his family.

Rebecca Watne Rick and I grew up in the same neighborhood. He was always such a nice kid. Somewhere I still have a photo of him from 7th grade. Sending the light of peace to his family.

Robin King So sad to hear another Spartan is no longer with us...

MaryJane Van Hollebeke LeBeau What a legacy! I have goosebumps! I love all stories about our class.

Diane A. D. Smith What an inspirational man and great family. I wish I had know him better.

Leo Valenzuela He was a quiet respectful and studious young man. Remember him very well. Our deepest Sympathy and Condolences to all his Family.

Nancy Morris So proud he was in our class. Truly he was a great man who lived his life well. Condolences

Mark Hagreen He was a very brave man. I know this from his many years of service with the Redmond Police Department. Rick did it all...Patrol ,K9, SWAT, Narcs, Detectives and Supervision. We shared many hours late at night talking about our families. Mark Hagreen, Commander, Redmond Police (Ret.)

Jeff Moormeier Damn!

The day his youngest daughter was born and a few years later posing with the same daughter.

 

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15 hours ago, boomer said:

The beach scene was fairly party and drinking either at the Yacht Club, or a couple local Bars, one of which was to the west on a beach.

 

That would be the Rudder Room...  where else could millionaires and Hell's Angels hang out get drunk together...  I use to tend bar at the Whale's Tail, lived on Silver Strand aka Beirut, and crewed on a Moore 24 that was out of AYC...  we probably crossed paths at sometime..

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Since we are talking about marines and others who passed to young. 

My father joined the Marines on his 17th birthday and did his first Beach landing on Saipan on his 18th birthday. During that year there was a division in the pacific who formed a scout sniper platoon. This group did great stuff and my fathers division decided they also needed scout snipers.  My Father volunteered for the unit and was eventually picked to be one of the original members. 

There is a book being written about this unit, it's through its website I have learned of my father's service. I was too young for the stories when he passed in 1971. It jumps around but there is interesting info there. Between this and the Facebook page there are several stories about my father. http://www.40thievessaipan.com/

they were called the 40 thieves because they stole everything that wasn't nailed down, unless they needed nails. 

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On 4/16/2018 at 7:30 PM, boomer said:

I don't recall combo locks on our lockers in Navy boot on Worm Island or after we crossed the bridge.

The only things in our lockers were our uniforms, skivies, t-shirts, socks, boot polish & brush.

All in all, I didn't think boot camp was all that tough. However I was raised in a household, where white glove inspection standards were the norm.

As I recall I was the only guy in our company who never got a demerit.

Shortly before or right after graduation my company commander said to me, "boot camp wasn't tough for you" 

My reply, "SIR, Senior Chief  Bennett, SIR - my Mom was stricter with higher expectations - she's also a lot tougher then you - SIR"

Senior Chief Bennett just smiled and said, "You'll go a long way in this man's Navy."

Jesus, your mother must have been a piece of work.  That explains a lot......

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On 4/16/2018 at 7:44 PM, Point Break said:

Mine was an unusual boot camp experience since I was in the BUDS company. Pretty much all we did was run, swim and PT. I think we had a lot less of the mind games.....we did get hollered at a fair amount though. :lol:

So PB, I never fully groked your military experience.  Did you go through BUDS??  I get the impression you were one of the small boat guys for the teams.  I had a crew that raced with me in Pensacola that was a member of the SEAL teams but did all the boat recovery/driving/gunner/etc stuff rather than being a direct action, door kicking "shooter".  Was that you as well?

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2 hours ago, Shootist Jeff said:

Jesus, your mother must have been a piece of work.  That explains a lot......

You appear to be as insecure as you always were.

She wasn't insecure like you, didn't suck her thumb like you and was a lot tougher then you could ever dream of being.

All in a calm polite manner, without having to pack a sidearm - carry on lad and without any thumbsucking or that tooth will just continue to fold back.

 

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4 hours ago, Shootist Jeff said:

So PB, I never fully groked your military experience.  Did you go through BUDS??  I get the impression you were one of the small boat guys for the teams.  I had a crew that raced with me in Pensacola that was a member of the SEAL teams but did all the boat recovery/driving/gunner/etc stuff rather than being a direct action, door kicking "shooter".  Was that you as well?

Enlisted declared for UDT/SEAL. Didn't make it through - old ankle injury couldn't take the running. Still was required to fulfill enlistment time, spent some time in small boats, didn't like it so much and changed rate to missile guidance tech and finished enlistment on a destroyer.

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10 hours ago, Point Break said:

Enlisted declared for UDT/SEAL. Didn't make it through - old ankle injury couldn't take the running. Still was required to fulfill enlistment time, spent some time in small boats, didn't like it so much and changed rate to missile guidance tech and finished enlistment on a destroyer.

Cool.

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