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Swimsailor

New White Brightside yellowing

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Here's one for the gallery.  I have spent the winter restoring the deck on my Capri 25.  I removed all the hardware, sanded, de-waxed and prepped very thoroughly.  I sprayed the glossy parts of the deck with white Interlux Brightside.  Non-skid is Kiwigrip.  There was 1-3 days between the 3.5 coats of paint.  A full week before I started the Kiwigrip.

On the main companionway hatch l, the sliding part turned yellow while open and underneath the fixed hood of the hatch.  The yellow partion is almost an exact "shadow" of the hood.  The sliding hatch has been open and underneath the hood for about 2 weeks.

The boat is indoors, 65 degrees, sun through a window for a few hours.  Anyone know what would cause the yellowing???

 

FB_IMG_1523934871990.jpg

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Is the underside of the hatch degrading and dropping stuff (moisture, solvent) on the new paint?

What does Interlux say - their tech people generally know their stuff.

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6 hours ago, Fleetwood said:

Is the underside of the hatch degrading and dropping stuff (moisture, solvent) on the new paint?

What does Interlux say - their tech people generally know their stuff.

I called Interlux and they said they had no idea.

The underside of the hatch is bare fiberglass which i wiped off the dirt and spider webs with a dry rag, no solvent.

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Did you oil the wooden hatch slide and does it continue underneath the hood. Oil has a nasty habit of creeping around ...

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57 minutes ago, Feisty! said:

Did you oil the wooden hatch slide and does it continue underneath the hood. Oil has a nasty habit of creeping around ...

There in no oil on the slide.  I definitely thought about the teak oil, though.  However, the slide does not come in contact with the wood and any oil would have to travel uphill.

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50 minutes ago, toecutter said:

Enamel paints can yellow if not exposed to light.

Seriously? Makes sense in this case since NOT being exposed to light is the only thing different than other parts od the boat.  So does the tendency to yellow diminish over time? There are parts of the boat that get covered.

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3 hours ago, toecutter said:

Enamel paints can yellow if not exposed to light.

Something i found...

"However, a photochemical reaction also occurs to produce chromophores, coloured compounds.  The chromophores are light sensitive and readily breakdown when exposed to light, but when the film is left to dry in dark areas the yellow coloured compounds remain in the film."

So I must have hidden the paint for too long too soon after painting.

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Yellowing of enamels in the bilge areas is well-known; I guess this is just an extreme example of it. Maybe next time I'm painting white enamel I'll do a test.....

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So, I just moved some rags I had laid down to protect the paint from my tools and sure enough, that yellowed too!  Basically the yellowing happened anywhere the paint had been covered for a few weeks.  I'm really bummed since I worked so hard to prep the surface.  No where anywhere did I ever read about allowing the paint to be in consistent light for weeks after curing.  I can't be the only one who has had this problem.

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No matter how hard I try, I can’t seem to convince every single person on the planet  to never ever paint a fiberglass deck with a regular single part enamel. 

The good news?? None of the yellowing will even catch anyone’s attention after a few months. The paint will soon  be all faded, dull, and perhaps even peeling . 

 

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10 hours ago, Gouvernail said:

No matter how hard I try, I can’t seem to convince every single person on the planet  to never ever paint a fiberglass deck with a regular single part enamel. 

The good news?? None of the yellowing will even catch anyone’s attention after a few months. The paint will soon  be all faded, dull, and perhaps even peeling . 

 

Thanks for the supporting words!  lol

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13 hours ago, Swimsailor said:

So, I just moved some rags I had laid down to protect the paint from my tools and sure enough, that yellowed too!  Basically the yellowing happened anywhere the paint had been covered for a few weeks.  I'm really bummed since I worked so hard to prep the surface.  No where anywhere did I ever read about allowing the paint to be in consistent light for weeks after curing.  I can't be the only one who has had this problem.

I wonder if they'll bleach to white now that they're exposed. 

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48 minutes ago, IStream said:

I wonder if they'll bleach to white now that they're exposed. 

That's what I'm hoping.  It's going to be sunny and dry for the next 2 days here in Utah so I'm putting the boat outside.  It goes up to the lake for the summer in 2 weeks.  

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Good news about some single part enamels is they can have a longer cure curve, temperature, humidity etc

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2 days direct sun has bleached out some of the yellow.  A third day tomorrow.  The boat goes up to the lake in a week anyway.  We'll see whay happens.

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Well, the yellow isn't visible now.  Whether it was the sun bleaching and curing it out or just simply that the white is so shiny and bright in the sun that you can't see it.  Overall I'm happy with the Brightside and Kiwigrip.  

deck2.jpg

deck3.jpg

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Looks good to me!

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