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Port Phillip Sailor

Lest We Forget

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And for those that were forgotten,  renowned now be thy graves.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-04-25/anzac-day-soldier-daniel-hodgekiss-unmarked-graves/9666738

For almost a century, an unmarked grave lay unidentified in red Mallee soil and dirt, unrecognised for the gallant acts that saved a Victorian battalion during the infamous Battle of Villers-Bretonneux.

lest we forget

 

(and apologies to WS)

 

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The respect seems to go out the window after the dawn service and the march.

Rest of the day is devoted to drinking rum for breakfast, gambling stupidly on the 2-up,  moredrinking, the occasional fight, a lot more drinking, calling everyone a cunt, drinking some more, spewing, falling down etc.  Our local RSL/Pub had an AC/DC tribute band. They also ended up motherless drunk.

 

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54 minutes ago, Happy said:

The respect seems to go out the window after the dawn service and the march.

Rest of the day is devoted to drinking rum for breakfast, gambling stupidly on the 2-up,  moredrinking, the occasional fight, a lot more drinking, calling everyone a cunt, drinking some more, spewing, falling down etc.  Our local RSL/Pub had an AC/DC tribute band. They also ended up motherless drunk.

you cunte!                           :)

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1 hour ago, Happy said:

The respect seems to go out the window after the dawn service and the march.

Rest of the day is devoted to drinking rum for breakfast, gambling stupidly on the 2-up,  moredrinking, the occasional fight, a lot more drinking, calling everyone a cunt, drinking some more, spewing, falling down etc.  Our local RSL/Pub had an AC/DC tribute band. They also ended up motherless drunk.

 

And you have a problem with that?

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2 hours ago, Happy said:

The respect seems to go out the window after the dawn service and the march.

Rest of the day is devoted to drinking rum for breakfast, gambling stupidly on the 2-up,  moredrinking, the occasional fight, a lot more drinking, calling everyone a cunt, drinking some more, spewing, falling down etc.  Our local RSL/Pub had an AC/DC tribute band. They also ended up motherless drunk.

 

Agree. After many years I don't do the Shrine of Rememberance Dawn Service in Melbourne anymore. It has become a social event, far too much see and be seen by the trendy, coffee sipping set intent on recording it all on their phones or iPads  and posting on social media to one-up their friends.

Paid my respects at a smaller suburban ceremony which had a much more reverential feel about it. Then proceeded to follow the above routine, perhaps a little toned down, at a local RSL. Always make it a point to talk to the older diggers about their wartime exploits, they do love a chat.

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On ‎26‎/‎04‎/‎2018 at 7:40 PM, Shortforbob said:

And you have a problem with that?

Yes, but it's only a little problem and it's purely mine. 

I'm wasn't even born here, another bloody immigrant. My only family military history is from WW2:  My Dad was in the Dutch resistance and involved in the Nuremberg trials, my father-in-law was in the SS Leibstandarte, spent time as part of Hitler's home guards, then got sent to Russia......

If I was family to Australians who died in (mostly other people's) war, I'd be really pissed off by the drunk boganfest.

 

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What do you think the original diggers did on their few R&R trips behind the lines?

Got drunk, played 2 up and brawled.

I had an uncle die in a camp in Burma...I'm sure he wouldn't mind.

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On 4/26/2018 at 1:12 AM, Happy said:

The respect seems to go out the window after the dawn service and the march.

Rest of the day is devoted to drinking rum for breakfast, gambling stupidly on the 2-up,  moredrinking, the occasional fight, a lot more drinking, calling everyone a cunt, drinking some more, spewing, falling down etc.  Our local RSL/Pub had an AC/DC tribute band. They also ended up motherless drunk.

 

I understand how you feel. On our Memorial Day (and 9/11 as well) I usually attend a morning remembrance ceremony. For me it’s a time of actual remembrance which always makes me quiet and reflective. I’m not sure if someone does not have some sort of anchor that it’s easy to have a less sobering view. I’m not distressed by that so long as it’s not during the ceremony.  Sometimes it is helpful to have a reminder of the actual immensity of the human experiance to really put it in context.

The Fire Service has a nationwide 9/11 ceremony. There are slight variations but the general theme is the same. For ours all station crews on duty throughout the entire department pull the apparatus out onto the front apron with radio exteternal speakers turned on and gather around the flagpole in dress uniforms at the appointed time. At the moment the first tower collapsed the traditional bell ringing signaling “assignment finished, return to quarters” is rung over the radio. Then it’s done and we go on with the day. Short and meaningful. One September it was unbelievably hot and we were quite uncomfortable in the sun in dress uniforms and hats. The station I was assigned at that day had 13 of us “suffering” in the heat. During the interval about 15 minutes long before the bell ringing intended to be a time of silent respect, a few members started to whine a little about the heat. After a couple minutes of occasional sniveling one of the Engineers (drivers) quite matter of factly said to the group “how hot do you think it was climbing that stairwell that morning”. Silence...........

Sometimes all you need is a reminder.

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Does anyone else here find it strange that this thread was started by someone with a Swastika in his Avatar?

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13 hours ago, Shortforbob said:

What do you think the original diggers did on their few R&R trips behind the lines?

Got drunk, played 2 up and brawled.

I had an uncle die in a camp in Burma...I'm sure he wouldn't mind.

They were barely out of their teens, faced being shot/blown up/burnt to death in a strange foreign land. Of course they got as wiped out as they could when they could.

A bit different from a mob of safe fat suburban idiots who never faced anything more threatening than a tattooist's needle. 

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Just now, Happy said:

They were barely out of their teens, faced being shot/blown up/burnt to death in a strange foreign land. Of course they got as wiped out as they could when they could.

A bit different from a mob of safe fat suburban idiots who never faced anything more threatening than a tattooist's needle. 

I thought you were referring to those who attended the dawn services who later get drunk, play two up and brawl 

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16 minutes ago, Shortforbob said:

I thought you were referring to those who attended the dawn services who later get drunk, play two up and brawl 

The mob that pissed me off weren't at the dawn service or the march. Much too early in the morning for them. Just an excuse for a day off (for those that actually work) and a pissup and some very stupid behaviour.

They stimulated my grumpy old man reflex.

 

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46 minutes ago, Happy said:

The mob that pissed me off weren't at the dawn service or the march. Much too early in the morning for them. Just an excuse for a day off (for those that actually work) and a pissup and some very stupid behaviour.

They stimulated my grumpy old man reflex.

 

lets face it, almost all of our public holidays are not celebrated as intended...abolish the lot and just give us 10 dats extra leave to be celebrated as the individual sees fit...much better for the economy and those that don't follow the christian calendar 

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I thought getting pissed and playing two up outside Y&J's was a time honoured tradition?

You wouldn't be trying to confer sainthood on these blokes would you?

Mind you, it's a long time since I worked with them :)

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10 minutes ago, Dunyazad said:

I spoke of the brawling that you brought up. I’ve seen the drinking & two up. I’ve never seen the brawling that you claimed. 

I think Mel was being flippant, but Gumpy is just being a cunt. 

 

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On 26 April 2018 at 9:07 PM, Last Post said:

Paid my respects at a smaller suburban ceremony which had a much more reverential feel about it. Then proceeded to follow the above routine, perhaps a little toned down, at a local RSL.

I did similar with bro in law and family in Glen Waverley

Bro in law has some serious PTSD issues after a couple of tours overseas.  The "help" being offered is lacking and he has a long way to go.

The silence of the crowd was impressive, not a noise for the entire service.

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1 hour ago, Dunyazad said:

IMG_0236 (1).jpg

Same old gumpy, can’t man up and admit he may of over reached again. Just because you haven’t seen a brawl doesn’t mean they don’t happen. I think you owe the lady an apology. 

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I love it......  A bunch of aussies come to a thread to remember and memorialize their war dead and they instead end up fighting with each other.  Brilliant.

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anzaclest.jpg

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Mustafa Ataturk, as an army General led the Turkish forces to defeat the British allied invasion during WW1, and subsequently became the first president of the Turkish republic after the collapse of the Ottoman Empire, is quoted on the memorial at ANZAC cove, Galipoli in Turkey:

"Those heroes that shed their blood and lost their lives…
You are now lying in the soil of a friendly country. Therefore rest in peace. There is no difference between the Johnnies and the Mehmets to us where they lie side by side here in this country of ours…
You, the mothers, who sent their sons from faraway countries wipe away your tears; your sons are now lying in our bosom and are in peace, after having lost their lives on this land they have become our sons as well."
Ataturk, 1934

 

Background, in case ANZAC is not familiar:

Despite having just gained a large (albeit incomplete) measure of independence from Britain, Australians and New Zealanders did not necessarily identify themselves as distinct until the horrors of Gallipoli (Feb 1915 - Jan 1916) awakened their national consciousness. Since 1916, the two countries have held an Anzac Day every April 25, named for the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) that fought in the campaign. The holiday, somewhat akin to Memorial Day in the United States, commemorates those who have died in war and is celebrated, among other things, with a dawn service, veterans’ marches, the wearing of red poppies and the gambling game two-up. A heightened sense of nationalism also emerged among the victors at Gallipoli, which Atatürk and his cohorts used to great effect in founding the independent Republic of Turkey out of the ashes of the Ottoman Empire. Australians, New Zealanders and Turks all commonly make pilgrimages to the battlefield, now a protected national park with numerous gravesites and memorials.

 

information copied from various websites.

 

Lest we forget.

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Before going to the local march this morning, I showed my 7 year old daughter her Great grandfather’s medals. He was captured in Malaysia and spent the end of the war in Japan as a  POW. He was one of only 60 odd prisoners out of 600+ to survive that ordeal. He never war his medals, he never marched.  He told me that he always felt ashamed that he survived while so many brave men die. Right or wrong I will always respected his decision. I won’t ever wear them or put them on display. They just remain stored safely in the original box they were sent to him in.

Lest we forget


The ANZAC Day march was over - the old Digger had done his best.

His body ached from marching - it was time to sit and rest.

He made his way to a park bench and sat with lowered head.

A young boy passing saw him - approached and politely said,

"Please sir do you mind if I ask you what the medals you wear are for? Did you get them for being a hero, when fighting in a war?"

Startled, the old Digger moved over and beckoned the boy to sit.

Eagerly the lad accepted - he had not expected this!

"First of all I was not a hero," said the old Digger in solemn tone, "But I served with many heroes, the ones that never came home.

So when you talk of heroes, it's important to understand, The greatest of all heroes gave their lives defending this land.


"The medals are worn in their honour, as a symbol of respect. All diggers wear them on ANZAC Day - it shows they don't forget."

The old digger then climbed to his feet and asked the boy to stand.

Carefully he removed the medals and placed them in his hand.

He told him he could keep them - to treasure throughout his life, A legacy of a kind - left behind - paid for in sacrifice.

Overwhelmed the young boy was speechless - he couldn’t find words to say.

It was there the old Digger left him - going quietly on his way.
In the distance the young boy glimpsed him - saw him turn and wave goodbye.

Saddened he sat alone on the bench - tears welled in his eyes.
He never again saw him ever - but still remembers with pride,

When the old Digger told him of Heroes and a young boy sat and cried.

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1 hour ago, dreadom said:

He told me that he always felt ashamed that he survived while so many brave men die.

His shame was misplaced .

May you Rest in Peace Sir .

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