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Awlgrip touch-up

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I need to color some filled gouges in ancient aristo blue Awlgrip. I know it's never going to look perfect (or possibly even good) but something has to go over the filler for UV protection and I'd prefer it to be blue.

 

My original plan was to buy all of the shit and try to spray a little patch with a preval. That comes to $180 or so for just paint, closer to $300 with the primer. Plan B is to find the closest color of model paint (enamel) and just brush it on. Plan C is to put some fucking stickers or something over the scratches.

Thoughts?

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Get a spray can of auto touch up paint. It comes in lotsa colours, you should be able to match the faded colour. Mask then spray.

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Auto touch up brushed on will look decent 

In fact, most any colored paint that comes on tiny bottles will look pretty decent for a while. 

But...

Thought process to consider:

You currently have tiny scratches that bother you

tiny scratches that are colored a lot like the rest of the boat will ALWAYS show a little less than white scratches in your relatively dark blue paint.

You could color the scratchesceith a Sharpie. It might look fine from five feet. 

spraying on  a blotch GUARANTEES the bad area will be larger. 

Odds are you could see that big blotch more easily than your sharpie hidden scratches. 

trying to sand buff and otherwise  blend that blotch risks sanding through and creating a much larger white area in your blue paint job 

that would suck

for ten bucks you can buy five tiny bottles of acrylic paint at a hobby shop. Maybe get some stuff they say is good for painting ceramics. That stuff is usually pretty good.

try wiping over the gouges with a single edge razor blade or a putty knife

you don’t want to enlarge the badness so...

try to clean off the thin, adjacent to the scratch smears... if you accidentally wipe off everything?? You are back where you started but you will have plenty of isint left fir a second try. 

stand back, see how filling the scratches helps. Decide whether you wish to continue messing with it 

remember... you KNOW you CAN  make it worse

so don’t 

 

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+1, its the classic "perfect is the enemy of the good".....

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Well, they aren't all exactly "tiny scratches," there are a few spots over an inch wide.

The auto paint idea sounds like the ticket. Any idea on the best way to match a color?

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Spray cans are cheap, by a few, try them, then zero in on the closest match. (Unless you can get a paint chip from an obscure corner somewhere on the boat.)

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Look at late model cars, pick a close color match, the color code is usually on a sticker on the door jamb. Then google "auto touch up paint" for that make, year and color. It won't be a perfect match but will be better than off the shelf rattle can paint.

 
If your boat isn't a trailer queen it won't be the only time it will need a touch up so you may decide to go with AwlGrip. If you roll , a Wooster Red Feather roller cover will produce results as good a spraying, Just thin the paint out and put on multiple coats.
 
Aristo Blue is pretty dark. I had a boat painted Flag Blue and it didn't fade at all. You may get a perfect color match with AwlGrip.

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Take a pic with a good camera. Visit auto store with camera pic and get the closest match in a rattle can. Get some primer undercoat brushing preferably. 

Fill dings rub down and prime. Spray on a mist coat color and check for imperfections. If none spray on half a dozen light coats with less coverage around the edges. 

White and light colors in general are the easiest to match red and blue are tough metallics fugedaboutit.

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Can you really get good results rolling Awlgrip? Do you tip as well?

When I changed the logo on the transom last year, the paint under the old logo was much shinier than the rest of the transom. I compounded and polished and you can't see it at all now. That leads me to believe that the paint color hasn't really faded at all.

Here's another thing: from everything I've read on the internet, I expected the transom to look like shit by now from the buffing, but it still looks like a million bucks. Is there a chance that I have Awlcraft 2000 and now Awlgrip? Is there any way to tell?

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If you have any part that is removable that you can take in to an auto body supply store and they can match it with auto paint. They use a special camera to take a picture that they can plug into a computer and it tells them what it takes to match it. We use the local Auto Value store and they bring the camera to us and we are often just getting a quart but we do buy a lot of supplies from them.  They only need a sample about the size of a quarter. They can actually match the paint and put it into a rattle can. No idea how they do that considering most car paints are 2 part acrylic urethanes just like awlcraft. We don't use the rattle cans but I have seen the sign advertising this service when I'm at the store so it might be worthwhile for the boatowner. Typically Awlgrip is not repairable(but roll and tips very well) but Awlcraft is repairable but is not brushable so I assume the car paints are also not brushable. I'm sure anything can be applied by roll and tip or brush , just not very successfully.

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Is there any definite way to tell Awlgrip from Awlcraft?

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Some better auto paint shops have a mobile camera.  Granted they usually don't bring it out unless you're buying a whole lotta paint at once, but a case of beer goes a long way :PGet them to bring camera with, scan hull.

Phone pictures are crap.  The only way to get close doing a photo is to take a known sample card(or a gray card) and include that in the photo, then use the sample card to adjust the tint accordingly, pain in the butt and still not consistent.

The rattle cans are injected at the shop as far as I know, they mix up the pigment and then load, if you ask they will usually do a little touch up bottle with a brush for only a couple dollars extra since they are already mixing the pigment anyways, so making an extra little bit doesn't add much cost.  Many shops no longer do this due to workplace safety regs(1 out of 2 got told they needed a 30, 000$ ventilation system to continue and stopped this year in town).  Some of the cans are catalysed, once you hit the button you've only got a short window to use it all, so mask and prep well ahead of time.

If they are really linear scratches, and not missing areas of paint, try these:

https://duplicolor.com/product/scratch-fix-all-in-1-exact-match-automotive-touch-up-paint

They have base and clear available, work nicely and don't create a big noticeable area like a spray can will.  I have used these for touching up vinyl decals on the cheap too when an owner just wants it a little nicer for a little longer.  Only lasts a few years, but that's usually long enough to get to the time to replace the decal entirely. 

 

Metallic especially dark metallics, get a pro.  Preferably an old retired one, they are much more used to eyeballing things than the painters who use computers today.  I have photos somewhere of a ski boat where the owner had the boat painted a few years ago, when we masked to seal around the windshield to hide the old colour where the painter had masked (using low tack masking tape too!) the tape pulled up inches of paint all over.   No primer and bad prep by whoever did the paint job, owner was furious.  I found an old hot-rod painter and he was able to take the original paint used, adjust it by eye for fading, and blend in a perfect repair all around, cost me 500$ worth every penny.  It was unreal. 

 

 

 

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With Awlcraft, you can repair, fill, prep, (wet) sand, spray (or brush), fair, wet sand again, buff, polish, etc. and you have a perfect patch/repair job.

You'll never (hardly) do the above with (Linear Poly) Awlgrip.  The cured paint is too hard.

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On 4/26/2018 at 10:22 AM, sailorman44 said:

Look at late model cars, pick a close color match, the color code is usually on a sticker on the door jamb. Then google "auto touch up paint" for that make, year and color. It won't be a perfect match but will be better than off the shelf rattle can paint.

 
If your boat isn't a trailer queen it won't be the only time it will need a touch up so you may decide to go with AwlGrip. If you roll , a Wooster Red Feather roller cover will produce results as good a spraying, Just thin the paint out and put on multiple coats.
 
Aristo Blue is pretty dark. I had a boat painted Flag Blue and it didn't fade at all. You may get a perfect color match with AwlGrip.

Do you know of anyone that keeps those roller covers in stock? Everywhere seems to get them drop shipped and the delivery times are pretty rough with my launch schedule.

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Some local hardware/builder stores in CT carry Wooster products but not the Red Feather cover. The best place I have found is Amazon, usually 2 or 3 day delivery without doing overnight. They are 2 to a pack and I buy 6 packs at a time to be sure to have enough. They are a little pricey at $6 a pack but if you wrap the cover in cling wrap an put it in the freezer overnight you can use it indefinitely. Same for any left over catalyzed paint. It does has a strong odor so your wife may yell at you for stinking up her refrigerator.

 
No need to tip. Tipping is to get rid of the bubbles that the roller leaves behind. The trick is to thin out the paint, more than you would if you were spraying, and put on multiple coats. On a warm day you can do 2-3 coats in a day. Also with multiple coats, if you screw up, just wet sand it and do another coat.
 
Some AwlGrip colors do fade, red is especially bad but dark blue doesn't seem to. My old Flag Blue boat is still in the area. 12 years later I touched it up for the current owner with no problem. The touch up was shinier than the surrounding area but a 3M product called Finessse brought back the shine. If the paint is really dull you may want to use 3Ms Perfect It rubbing compound.
 
I have never used AwlCraft but have never had a problem touching up a ding on my boat. Then again I have never had a red boat. The blue boat had a red boottop which faded after a couple of years and I replaced it with white. My current boat is Whisper Gray and that has not faded.

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Final tape off today. Pretty happy with how it came out. Ended up with high-density foam hot dog rollers and tipping vertically with a china bristle brush.

 

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On 4/24/2018 at 11:31 PM, Fleetwood said:

+1, its the classic "perfect is the enemy of the good".....

Perfection is the mortal enemy of the adequate.

I did a similar repair/repaint where I had damage on the lower bow,  you can see it close up with the tape lines etc,  but from a distance looks fine.  It's  the nature of the beast with Awlgrip it seems.  

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