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Berti

Rubrail for Opti

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I am looking for rubrail that would be appropriate for optis used to teach beginners as I am getting sick of fixing the rails. I have tried looking for purpose built stuff with no luck. I have tried McMaster Carr as well, but cant seem to find anything I think is right for the job. It seems like someone somewhere must have done this before. Does anyone have any suggestions?

 Thank you 

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15 hours ago, Berti said:

I am looking for rubrail that would be appropriate for optis used to teach beginners as I am getting sick of fixing the rails. I have tried looking for purpose built stuff with no luck. I have tried McMaster Carr as well, but cant seem to find anything I think is right for the job. It seems like someone somewhere must have done this before. Does anyone have any suggestions?

 Thank you 

Bow Bumpers seem to be pretty popular on beginner boats. In my experience thats where all the damage happens. Not sure you should attach permanent rub rails as that would make them slow and might violate class rules, not to mention ruin the hull.

1065-optimist-bow-bumper-optiparts.jpg

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1 hour ago, Mark Set said:

Bow Bumpers seem to be pretty popular on beginner boats. In my experience thats where all the damage happens. Not sure you should attach permanent rub rails as that would make them slow and might violate class rules, not to mention ruin the hull.

1065-optimist-bow-bumper-optiparts.jpg

Agree. Best option we've found is for all boats to have bumpers, they protect the boat you hit (a bit..) rather than the boat they are fitted to...

Where is the rail damage?  Is it from jetty contact or something?  We sail off the beach, use ribs for safety/coaching and don't see much damage apart from the odd bow bump.

Cheers, 

              W.

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Bow bumpers from OptiParts are excellent for protecting the bow. I don't know a specific site ( maybe the big marine outlets or on-line sites ) but the most durable and protective stuff I have ever seen is dense foam core with a covering that is very tough fabric almost like old fire hose. You can get it in 3/4 style so it covers the top of the  rail, the edge and then wraps around to the hull. Happy Bumper Boats!

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Thanks for the thoughts so far guys. Our boats get rigged in the water, sailed from docks, so we get lots of minor banging into each other and the docks as the kids get in and out etc. to rig. The most damage is definitely on the bow from 'real collisions' but we do get a lot of more minor damage on the side rails as well from this banging. We have older boats that are used purely for teaching beginners, and newer boats for more experienced/racers, so the weight and class legality is not an issue for us. We also have whalers, so we get some damage from being up alongside the coaches and instructors as well.

I have looked at the bow bumpers from optiparts and from intensity sails. My worries there where longevity. Does anyone have a lifespan estimate before UV does them in?

I was envisioning a slide over rail all the way around the boat. Something small and simple, akin to what is on most club and collegiate 420/s and FJ's. Perhaps the best solution is a combination

Thanks for the thoughts, please keep them coming.  

 

 

 

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I've seen club optis with a thick white hose, with a longitudinal cut, on the rail. Not sure how it was kept in place... Replaced every year I guess.

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cut some pool noodles open longitudinally and fix them on the rails.

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Optis are Sailboats. They are not bumper cars. The simple solution is to teach the kids that boats are fragile and do not ever touch anything but the hands of people lifting the boats from the water.

Perhaps some of you believe today’s parents are so incompetent they produce nothing but retarded twits.

i disagree. I am constantly amazed by how brilliant kids are compared to my self recollections. 

I tell  the kids the same story every year. I sailed a wood Optimist Pram, starting when I was five, from 1958 to 1964 and one time Mark Thayer  bumped me while taking me up before a start. I was not only thrown out of the race, his blue paint rubbed a two inch long mark on the side of my red boat. 

It was a badge of embarrassment and I wasn’t able to gather. Aterials, sand, and repaint the area for almost two weeks. 

Worse... the brush marks showed and I didn’t get that fixed until my Mother helped me repaint the boat the following winter. 

No other boat EVER touched my boat.  

I remind the kids of the fact they are all way smarter than I ever was. 

I remind the kids how incredibly expensive it is to repair the fragile little boats. 

When some jack wit installs those asinine canvas bras on the Austin Yacht Club Fleet I remove them and put them in the nearby dumpster. On the occasions when I have failed to find the “bash into shit all you want because these bumpers will protect the boats” bras in time, I have had to rebuild every single bow.

Putting a rubrail around the perimeter of the Optis wouid tell everyone, “These Boats are designed to bash into one another and the docks”

if you install such an announcement device your boats will be unrepairsble garbage in six months.

it is SUPER SIMPLE!! Boats do not touch. Boats do not touch the dock.

if you are not 100% confident you can come into the dock without hitting the boat against the dock STOP!!!!

Yell for help. EVERYBODY WILL ALWAYS HELP YOU LAND SAFELY!!!

These toys are expensive and fragile and,  ESPECIALLY if the boat is not yours, you cannot hurt a boat. 

Do not put padding on any Opti EVER that would give anyone the impression it is OK to bump things. 

Please note:

i have sixty years of experience upon which to base my well founded and 100% correct position.

if you disagree with me, that is fine. It is OK for you to be ignorant and therefore incorrect.

however

it is not OK to act upon your ignorantly based beliefs and cause Boats to be destroyed or children to be improperly instructed about boat care.

Do not teach kids to ruin their toys!!!! 

If the boats are club owned:

Make CERTAIN the kids learn it is important to take extra special super good care of something that is not their own. 

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2 hours ago, Gouvernail said:

it is SUPER SIMPLE!! Boats do not touch. Boats do not touch the dock.

if you are not 100% confident you can come into the dock without hitting the boat against the dock STOP!!!!

Respectable approach. However, for beginners, there's a tradeoff, namely a lot of work and stress for everyone. ALL CAPS KINDA STRESS! :-)

How 'bout a season of rotomolded sailing first? :-) 

One observation I have is that fragile gelcoat dinghies have been the norm for a few decades, but that's not immutable. I've switched to rotomolded boats for opti-aged kids (son + friends), and on occasion I say it's ok to play bumper boats. All the modern opti-sized boats I see are rotomolded. Some small dinghies are now vinylester (over or instead of gelcoat?) and seem pretty scratch resistant.

So teaching strict boat protection from day zero is one good way.

Getting started with sturdier boats, and graduating to gelcoat boats seems to me a nicer slope.

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@martin.langhoff

i suoer appreciate ate ANYBODY who coaches newbies of any age and damn sure wouid not ever wish to let you think otherwise 

I appreciate the concept of “let them

bump while they learn.”

in many ways my concerns come from living too much in the past. 

We had wood toys that wouid rot if the paint seal was compromised.

at home we had drinking glasses that broke and cut the fingers of the careless. 

In even baby bottles were glass.

cell phones and some computers can now be dropped or sat on.. 

aluminum

baseball bats don’t have grain and a wrong way to hold them. 

Cars have seatbelts, air bags, and fantastically strong passenger compartments. 

we can make errors today that used to result in much more serious consequences. 

So... do we start out acting as though mistakes have larger consequences than actually exist? 

Do we fail to develop or lose some of our skills because our margins of error are so generous? 

Would we be unnecessarily restricting creative development if we demand students concern themselves with non-existent consequences?? 

I don’t know any of the answers...

but I do know this.... the most beat up and hard to fix Opti bows are found under those damned bras.  

 

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5 hours ago, Gouvernail said:

Please note:

i have sixty years of experience upon which to base my well founded and 100% correct position.

if you disagree with me, that is fine. It is OK for you to be ignorant and therefore incorrect.

^Every, Boomer. Ever. lol

You.re right about the bumpers tho.

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Wow,  I certainly agree (and our staff emphasizes) the need to not hit things, but nearly every other boat in the world has a rubrail for a reason. To be fair, the advertising of 'yay its ok to hit me now' is why I was looking for a more normal rubrail and not a huge bumper, but they do not seem to exist. Seems to me that the combination of good teaching and good protection would be the best combination.

 

Thanks for the thoughts, always open to more

 

 

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