Monkey Butler

SAILBOAT 35' 1983 CHEOY LEE (PERRY) 35

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That's what the Craigslist ad said.

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Four year old pictures and description with no price listed. Not a promising lead.

I was wrong, I bought it!

Current pics along with a bunch of questions to follow. Please stay tuned!

 

 

 

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I should be saying to you, Mr. Perry "Nice looking boat".

She is still under shrink wrap here in New England so no current exterior photos.

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The ad from 4 years ago says Navy Awlgrip which I would have chosen if I were to repaint. Here's an exterior photo from then.

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I think the Navy Blue makes a great looking boat look even better.

Bob, I have to tell you that this boat checks almost all the boxes for me. Perfect size for me to handle. One of the sweetest sheers to my eye. I detest reverse transoms, this on makes me happy. Love how she looks in profile (and from every angle). The cabin/coachroof design is a thing of beauty. The layout is exactly what I would draw. Good size U-shape galley, Pilot birth and a real nav station/chart table. Nice saloon. Usable head. Hanging lockers. Good size forward cabin and vee berth.

I like the cockpit layout but the angle of the seat backs seems a bit much. I guess I'll see once I have her heeled a bit.

And while I was looking for something with a little more of a shoal draft I'll just go back and read some of your writings about the advantages of keel depth and get on with it.

Thanks for the comment. I hope I'll hear from you more on this thread.

Question for everyone... I'm hoping chock that's supposed to be on the port side shows up somewhere onboard. If not am I SOL?

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Congratulations on your CheoyLee 35!  I’ve had mine since 2001 and it has served us well as a family coastal cruiser. Over the years I’ve done a quite a few upgrades and system replacements as one would expect with an older boat but have always been happy with its performance and comfort. It looks like some of those projects ( decks, engine) have already been done for you so hopefully you can get out on the water soon.

If you have any questions, I’m willing to share my experiences.

Shoal

 

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Congratulations. Beautiful boat. Does it have a wood mast? There's two on yacht world right now with wood masts.

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Monkey, good work. That is very handsome boat. Congratulations, and please favor us with more pics! 

"He who reads much and walks sails much, goes far and knows much." Don Q.

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Shoalcove, thanks for the comments and offer to answer questions. I have a bunch but I'm off to the day job. I'll hit you up later.

bmiller Thank You and no on the wood mast. It has a Kenyon spar and boom. I'm thinking added later.

Bull, Thank You and I promise more pics soon. I only have ones from the initial inspection while under cover. Here are a few.

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stern_peek.jpg.ca903442a2096f5832bd8b464001568a.jpg

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I was told that if the hull is painted with Awlgrip, do not shrinkwrap over it.   Awlgrip does not like trapped moisture.  

Pretty boat.  My classic plastic in white is pretty, but in flag blue she is really pretty.

Good luck!

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1 hour ago, Monkey Butler said:

int1.thumb.jpg.a054d3de4c639a6c3f32d3add686370c.jpg

That is a good looking fly-swatter. 

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The Kenyon spars are a plus. I have aluminum spars as well. It’s interesting to see the closeups and notice some differences. My boat has a molded in anchor locker on the foredeck with hatches as opposed to the solid deck you have. Down below my table is fixed rather than folding. I also hang a propane tank over the stern.

 I’ve shrink wrapped my boat for the last 3 winters without any damage to my paint job. It’s Perfection rather than Awlgrip which may be a factor. My boat is remarkably drier with the shrink wrap compared to when I built frames and used heavy duty poly tarps.

 The picture is from a few years ago in Lunenberg NS. It was taken by the late and greatly missed Jon Eisberg.

5316A31F-7268-4CF3-B8C4-60EF94EE790C.jpeg

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4 hours ago, Shoalcove said:

Lunenberg NS

Ah, what a beautiful place. My wife and I stayed there for a few days in late summer 2014.

Not the best arrangement of boats and it includes a big mobo (all fixable), but you get the idea:

lunenburg.thumb.jpg.2bf9159da0f09902eda362feead559b9.jpg

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7 hours ago, sail69 said:

I was told that if the hull is painted with Awlgrip, do not shrinkwrap over it.   Awlgrip does not like trapped moisture.  

Pretty boat.  My classic plastic in white is pretty, but in flag blue she is really pretty.

Good luck!

Well unwrapping this one should be like taking the cap off the petri dish then. She's been wrapped through two cold winters and two hot steamy summers. I'll report what I find. Just a peek at a corner of the transom didn't show any signs of damage.

stern_peek.jpg.47b2a4e429d61c478bf5c05f1c365b83.jpg

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7 hours ago, Bull City said:

That is a good looking fly-swatter. 

You have a keen eye for the finer things in life. That counter was piled high with crap most of which was pitched. The fly swatter, tape measure, plastic cup with handle, oil filter wrench, three plastic hose fittings, one brass fitting and three various size stainless washers will be counted as booty and used to offset the purchase price and I tell my wife I bought another boat and she inevitably asks, "how much did this one cost?".

Oh, the 1.75L of cheap Scotch should still be by the dumpster, if you hurry.

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49 minutes ago, Monkey Butler said:

Moving from an open boat, any companionway with a hatch is an upgrade!

So long as you understand the perils of an off set companionway. There are heads here, much wiser than mine, who can fill you in.:D

Happy sailing in the Don Q.

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10 minutes ago, Bull City said:

So long as you understand the perils of an off set companionway. There are heads here, much wiser than mine, who can fill you in.:D

Happy sailing in the Don Q.

There was an article in one of the magazines a few years ago about a couple in a Mason 43 who got caught in the Med with a major windstorm, the boat heeled so much that the companionway was underwater and they lost their electronics, books, and much more down below. As I recall, they also had a bunch of damage to topside stainless and paint.

That companionway is particularly far outboard, of course. Regardless, it's a standing joke here with any hatch that is even an inch off center.

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While the companionway is offset, it’s only a matter of a foot or so. It’s one of those compromises that come with boats. It does make for a roomy galley though! 

 

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Hi Ishmael, it’s funny you posted the Mason as an example as I almost referred to it in my posts as well. I used to crew on a Mason43 in the early ‘80’s. Beautiful boat but that hatch wasn’t my thing at all. The CL35 offset is not in the same league.

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7 hours ago, Shoalcove said:

The Kenyon spars are a plus. I have aluminum spars as well. It’s interesting to see the closeups and notice some differences. My boat has a molded in anchor locker on the foredeck with hatches as opposed to the solid deck you have. Down below my table is fixed rather than folding. I also hang a propane tank over the stern.

 I’ve shrink wrapped my boat for the last 3 winters without any damage to my paint job. It’s Perfection rather than Awlgrip which may be a factor. My boat is remarkably drier with the shrink wrap compared to when I built frames and used heavy duty poly tarps.

 The picture is from a few years ago in Lunenberg NS. It was taken by the late and greatly missed Jon Eisberg.

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Shoal, I wondered about the anchor locker hatches. I had seen them in photos of other boats. Below decks there seems to bee a shallow molded "pan" where your hatch is. I need to look at little closer. This was an estate sale and I spent a total of about 5 minutes inspecting before making and offer and only had another 30 minutes to poke around after the offer was accepted.

We'll see on the paint. I do some sewing and I'll likely make a full sunbrella or stamoid winter cover for her.

That picture is a gem, the background is amazing. and what a profile!

Here's a pic of me in my last boat with with a nice backdrop.

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11 minutes ago, Monkey Butler said:

Note to self re: offset companionway. Anything over 10 kts. starboard tack only

That’s kind of funny. At 10 kts. I can set my drink down without a spill. 

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Shoalcove, I have a bunch of things running through my mind, feel free to respond at you leisure (or not at all).

Chainplates?

I have a Universal M40 4 cylinder 23 HP that suposedly ran well and was marina winterized. Thoughts?

Blisters. 2015 survey noted a few. The bottom has been repainted and I don't see many signs of them. Since the boat has been out of the water for two years I'm thinking of writing off this season and doing a complete bottom job. Strip, repairs, barrier coat, etc.

I think the treadmaster decking need to go. To me it looks like glued on bathmat. I suspect I may find a few sins under this "Professional" repair.

Any other problem areas to take a hard look at? How do the rudders hold up?
 

Thanks for your time.

Steve P.

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Hi Monkey Butler,

Thanks! I like your photo as well. It seems that there was a fair bit of variation between different hulls. Mine was built in 1980. It is possible that the hatch got glassed in when the decks had the Treadmaster applied to position the windlass. Not a bad idea really.

I wouldn’t worry about the short inspection. I took an extensive look and hired a surveyor and I still discovered stuff for years lol!

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9 minutes ago, Monkey Butler said:

Shoalcove, I have a bunch of things running through my mind, feel free to respond at you leisure (or not at all).

Chainplates?

I have a Universal M40 4 cylinder 23 HP that suposedly ran well and was marina winterized. Thoughts?

Blisters. 2015 survey noted a few. The bottom has been repainted and I don't see many signs of them. Since the boat has been out of the water for two years I'm thinking of writing off this season and doing a complete bottom job. Strip, repairs, barrier coat, etc.

I think the treadmaster decking need to go. To me it looks like glued on bathmat. I suspect I may find a few sins under this "Professional" repair.

Any other problem areas to take a hard look at? How do the rudders hold up?
 

Thanks for your time.

Steve P.

Hi, 

 I would definitely pull the chainplates for inspection. I found a couple dodgy ones and replaced them all. I got them made in a local machine shop out of 304SS. 

 I replaced my original Pathfinder VW based motor with a Yanmar 27hp with Bob Perry’s blessing. He was right. It is plenty and I would guess yours will be too.

 My views on the bottom are mixed. I can see the advantages of doing the bottom now but I’d hate to miss sailing the boat. I suppose it depends on your plans for the boat. I’d try to get it done this spring and maybe have a late launch. 

 I had non skid paint on my decks and switched to Kiwigrip a couple seasons ago. I like it but it was a big job. I too, had to repair a “professional “ job. I’ve never dealt with Treadmaster but I’ve heard it can be a challenge to remove. My decks are cored with mahogany or teak planking rather than balsa. It’s not unusual to have some delamination due to the fibreglass not adhering well to the oily wood but I’ve not had any core rot. FYI so you dont panic it you start tapping the decks lol!

 I’ve not had any rudder problems.

Besides the stuff I’ve mentioned most of the stuff I’ve dealt with are common to many old boats or my desire to update/ improve. It seems that someone spent some time/money keeping your boat updated so hopefully you will be able to clean her up and get on the water without too much difficulty.

 Let me know if you have more questions!

 Shoalcove 

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6 hours ago, Monkey Butler said:

.... I'm thinking of writing off this season and doing a complete bottom job. Strip, repairs, barrier coat, etc.

.....

That way doth madness lie....

 Check she's safe, then go sailing this season. Make notes of what you want to change.  Then plan what you will do in this off season and what you'll put off to next...

 If you start trying to make her perfect now you'll be fettling instead of sailing for years...

Cheers, 

               W.

PS is a boat called "Don Quixote" a she? I have this problem with "Kermit", too... :-(

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3 hours ago, WGWarburton said:

That way doth madness lie....

 Check she's safe, then go sailing this season. Make notes of what you want to change.  Then plan what you will do in this off season and what you'll put off to next...

 If you start trying to make her perfect now you'll be fettling instead of sailing for years...

Cheers, 

               W.

PS is a boat called "Don Quixote" a she? I have this problem with "Kermit", too... :-(

 

This has been my approach as well. I found that just going sailing is the best way to produce an accurate, prioritized list of boat projects. I started out with “keep the water out and the rig up” and went from there. We had small kids when we got our boat and most years I’d do boat projects until school ended and then we would splash and enjoy sailing the boat. She didn’t always look pretty but it made it worthwhile for us.

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Thanks for the input guys. I need to be out of the current yard by May 15th. The bottom is two years dry. If I haul her to my home I can do the bottom myself and possibly still go sailing this year. If I just go sailing then I'll have to pay a yard to do the bottom and after she's been wet again hey may tell me she needs months to dry out.

Having her in the back yard makes so much more time available for small projects. Any yard I put her in will be an hour away. See why I'm leaning this way?

And as far as a name, it has been decided that it will be changed. To what is being decided. My son Tyler passed away a little over two years ago. I'd like to honor him in some way. He was a great guitarist but most everything he recorded was lost. In a separate post I'll post a link to a cover that him and his friend Jimmie recorded.

How would "Time of Your Life" look on the transom?

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21 minutes ago, Monkey Butler said:

Thanks for the input guys. I need to be out of the current yard by May 15th. The bottom is two years dry. If I haul her to my home I can do the bottom myself and possibly still go sailing this year. If I just go sailing then I'll have to pay a yard to do the bottom and after she's been wet again hey may tell me she needs months to dry out.

Having her in the back yard makes so much more time available for small projects. Any yard I put her in will be an hour away. See why I'm leaning this way?

And as far as a name, it has been decided that it will be changed. To what is being decided. My son Tyler passed away a little over two years ago. I'd like to honor him in some way. He was a great guitarist but most everything he recorded was lost. In a separate post I'll post a link to a cover that him and his friend Jimmie recorded.

How would "Time of Your Life" look on the transom?

My condolences on the loss of your son.

I have no issues with doing a bottom job before you splash. I agree that it’s well dried out now. I just would not want to miss out on sailing the boat to enjoy the summer and learning about what it really needs. If you have it in your backyard, it certainly would be easier to pull the chainplates and do the bottom. I had a few blisters but they were small. I had a couple that I had to mark at haulout as they were hard to find by spring. The season is short here so blister repairs weren’t my biggest priority. I’ve read conflicting opinions about epoxy on older boat bottoms. I think a lot depends on where you keep your boat and how long between haulouts. I’m sure there are knowledgeable folks here with some more insight on that topic than I can provide.

 

 

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56 minutes ago, Monkey Butler said:

The bottom is two years dry. If I haul her to my home I can do the bottom myself and possibly still go sailing this year. If I just go sailing then I'll have to pay a yard to do the bottom and after she's been wet again hey may tell me she needs months to dry out.

Monkey, I think you make the case doing a barrier coat now. I was in a similar position when I was renovating my new (to me) H-Boat. The hull was dry, I didn't do the barrier coat, out of stupidity, and soon regretted it.

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TIME OF YOUR LIFE is a bit much for that modest transom..

Monkey:How about YOUR LIFE ?

Sorry for the loss of your son. I understand exactly how you feel.

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2 hours ago, Bull City said:

Monkey, I think you make the case doing a barrier coat now. I was in a similar position when I was renovating my new (to me) H-Boat. The hull was dry, I didn't do the barrier coat, out of stupidity, and soon regretted it.

^^^ this

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Thanks for the sympathy Shoal.

Bob, after Ty's death I found a lot of your older posts about Spike. We all handle things differently but I did find strength and inspiration in them. Thanks, every little bit helps.

When I was really mad I took a chainsaw to a project Allied Seabreeze that I was working on. I'm past a lot of that anger and getting the CL-35 is a big step in getting back in the game.

One other thought was that Ty's favorite guitar was a PRS so maybe do some kind of theme with the birds from the fret board no matter what we decide on a name.cce793b3f50ddd0e58ece9487f37ee76.thumb.jpg.8c16a09ff92faef52a58caf23077dac6.jpg

 

Oh, and can I get special dispensation to call it a Perry 35 instead of a Cheoy Lee 35. This place in town is not so good.

Capture.PNG

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4 hours ago, Bull City said:

Monkey, I think you make the case doing a barrier coat now. I was in a similar position when I was renovating my new (to me) H-Boat. The hull was dry, I didn't do the barrier coat, out of stupidity, and soon regretted it.

This ^

The bottom will never be that dry again - do it now.

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The majority of the time spent on a blister job is waiting for the hull to be dry enough. Believe me, I know. You're there now. Strip the bottom, repair any dry areas, barrier coat, bottom paint, and don't worry about the bottom until it needs more paint. 

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I'm normally a "sail now, fix it later" kind of guy, but I find myself in agreement with everyone else.

Slick did wait a good, long while for his hull to dry. May as well do yours now.

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On 4/30/2018 at 9:52 AM, sail69 said:

I was told that if the hull is painted with Awlgrip, do not shrinkwrap over it.   Awlgrip does not like trapped moisture.  

Pretty boat.  My classic plastic in white is pretty, but in flag blue she is really pretty.

Good luck!

Sail69, I would have to say that you heard correctly. We took off the wrap yesterday and for the most part it looked good. This is the port side.

20180502_085752.jpg.b725a98628c4e88351a59af3753b6adc.jpg

 

On the starboard side you can see a piece of line hanging over the side holding up a piece of the plastic wrap. Notice that the bottom paint in that area looks damp.

s1.jpg.2411302bda3f8d4222d3a077ac96d1f9.jpg

 

Here is a close up of the topside paint in that spot.

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Those are bubbles or blisters in the Awlgrip. There was a fold in the wrap that had a pocket of water in it. It had been that way for a while. The green is from algae growing in the green house like conditions. This side was facing south.

We'll see what it looks like once its had a chance to dry out.

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Shoalcove,

My boat has the "block" on the stern to hold the propane tank too. I had to take the tank off for hauling. I'd like to see your fixed table, I think that would be preferable.

I noticed that my waterline/bootstripe doesn't appear to have any "sheer" to it. Your's looks perfection. Did you lay it out yourself?

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On 5/1/2018 at 8:17 PM, Monkey Butler said:

 

 

On 5/2/2018 at 12:34 AM, Monkey Butler said:

cce793b3f50ddd0e58ece9487f37ee76.thumb.jpg.8c16a09ff92faef52a58caf23077dac6.jpg

Thanks for posting - nice cover by the lads. Love the inlay! 

Remember that to get Poseidon’s pass for her re-christening you’ll need to have a virgin piss on the bow, a drop of good rum for His depths, and the rest of the bottle for yourselves. Avoid asparagus or beetroot canapés.

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9 hours ago, Monkey Butler said:

Sail69, I would have to say that you heard correctly. We took off the wrap yesterday and for the most part it looked good. This is the port side.

20180502_085752.jpg.b725a98628c4e88351a59af3753b6adc.jpg

 

On the starboard side you can see a piece of line hanging over the side holding up a piece of the plastic wrap. Notice that the bottom paint in that area looks damp.

s1.jpg.2411302bda3f8d4222d3a077ac96d1f9.jpg

 

Here is a close up of the topside paint in that spot.

s2.jpg.8e436d569e7a6d1a32b5cbb80e115710.jpg

 

Those are bubbles or blisters in the Awlgrip. There was a fold in the wrap that had a pocket of water in it. It had been that way for a while. The green is from algae growing in the green house like conditions. This side was facing south.

We'll see what it looks like once its had a chance to dry out.

Ah damn.  Wish I was wrong.   When I bought Corsair she was a Dock Queen and had chafing where the fenders lay.  In spite of it being Awlgripped and near impossible to fair in  repairs, the yard did a pretty good job.  Good luck. 

 

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15 hours ago, Monkey Butler said:

Shoalcove,

My boat has the "block" on the stern to hold the propane tank too. I had to take the tank off for hauling. I'd like to see your fixed table, I think that would be preferable.

I noticed that my waterline/bootstripe doesn't appear to have any "sheer" to it. Your's looks perfection. Did you lay it out yourself?

I’ll see if I can find some interior photos or take some new ones. Most are too high resolution to upload.

The waterline was done when I got the boat but I’ve since changed it to a red stripe and used vinyl. It’s help up well and looks good to me.

 It’s too bad about the paint. I’ve had more issues with tarps than shrink wrap over the years. I think anytime you end up with water pooled against the paint you will have problems. Up here, tarps often collect a pool that turns into a rather massive block of ice which has its own issues. The appeal of shrink wrap for me is how it sheds snow. We get a lot here. Hopefully someone can touch it up for you without a complete paint job.

 Nice guitars Bob Perry! What’s the gear on the Target rack. It looks more like stereo gear rather than guitar related.

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Nice guitar. I still have all Ty's guitars although I can't play a lick. I had bought a Fender Squier Strat a long time ago but gave up learning as I would get tendinitis in my hands too easily. At some point Tyler found it and took off from there.

The PRS he has is a Mark Tremonti (Creed, Alter Bridge) edition. Tyler had met him in person and had a few chats with him on facebook. He was a positive influence. After Ty passed I found the old conversations on his computer and on a whim sent a message. To my surprise I got a reply from Mark's manager with some comments from Mark. I thought that was nice.

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On 5/3/2018 at 2:33 PM, Monkey Butler said:

Nice guitar. I still have all Ty's guitars although I can't play a lick. I had bought a Fender Squier Strat a long time ago but gave up learning as I would get tendinitis in my hands too easily. At some point Tyler found it and took off from there.

The PRS he has is a Mark Tremonti (Creed, Alter Bridge) edition. Tyler had met him in person and had a few chats with him on facebook. He was a positive influence. After Ty passed I found the old conversations on his computer and on a whim sent a message. To my surprise I got a reply from Mark's manager with some comments from Mark. I thought that was nice.

Oh crap, I'm so sorry, didn't see the post above about Ty's passing. May he play on forever.

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13 hours ago, rattus32 said:

Oh crap, I'm so sorry, didn't see the post above about Ty's passing. May he play on forever.

I didn't think you were trying to be a dink. Hey, it's music, your still entitled to your opinion anyway. But thanks for the apology even though it wasn't necessary.

 

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Rigging age uncertain. What do you think of this? And should I start new threads in Fix It Anarchy or keep them here?

shroud.jpg.267009140ec53aaef82eb92ab46ee5a0.jpg

Edited by Monkey Butler

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Needs polishing and examining under high magnification or dye testing.

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A bit of phosphoric acid and it will look like new. Seems pretty clean from what I can see.

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On 4/30/2018 at 8:35 PM, Shoalcove said:

I’ve never dealt with Treadmaster but I’ve heard it can be a challenge to remove.

Have treadmaster (factory installed, dunno if they used different sticky stuff). 39 years later it is not showing any inclination to budge.

Got over it. Plus: decks are really really grippy.

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Shoalcove if you are still following, can I ask you about your batteries. Like how big of a bank do you have and where are they located. Mine are at the bottom of the starboard cockpit locker. They're hard to reach and would tend to get buried under stuff. There seems like room for 3 batteries at most.

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Hi! Mine were in the same place. Previous owner bequeathed me a dead 8D that he had stuffed in there as well as a couple Group 27’s poorly secured under the floorboards. I was in better shape then but getting the 8D out was a bitch and I removed the ones from the bilge permanently.

 After a few years of dealing with the original location, I moved the battery bank to under the galley sinks. I made wood epoxy battery boxes, well secured, to hold 4 6V golf cart batteries and a G27 12V starting battery. I have the battery switch mounted above the shallow cabinet at the end of that cabinetry. I can lower the GC batteries from above if I remove the false bottom of the countertop locker beside the sinks. 

 I prefer the new location for a few reasons. I find it easier to service the batteries and I have shorter cable runs .The batteries are lower and closer to the  centerline now so I no longer list to starboard. I added proper fusing when I moved things around. 

 As a bonus, I found that two 5 gallon Jerry cans of diesel fit snugly in the old battery box in the cockpit locker and I’ve not had a drop of leakage with them stored there. 

 Best regards,

 Shoalcove 

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Thanks for the detailed reply Shoalcove. I definitely want to get them out of the cockpit locker. Under the sink sounds like a good spot. I'll take a look at that space. Currently there is a water heater installed there way outboard that may be directly under the locker you mention. Is your distribution panel original?

Originally I was considering under the quarter berth where the fuel tank is located but your plan sounds better. I took a quick look at the tank and it is painted, appears to be metal, and looks original. Wondering if your's is original and if you know the material (aluminum, iron)?

The boat gets delivered to my home tomorrow so I'll hopefully going through the systems more thoroughly this weekend.

Again, thanks for your response.

Steve P.

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Hi Steve,

My  water tank is between the engine and the rudder stock. Seems to work well there.

 I replaced my panel a few years ago. The old one was a mess with extra circuits added and completely disorganized and somewhat unsafe. I now have a separate panel for AC and DC. DC panel is behind the stairs and the new AC panel is in a new box above the icebox.

All my tanks are GRP.

I'm sure you’ll find it much easier to have the boat in your yard to work on. I’m envious! 

Best regards,

 Shoalcove 

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11 minutes ago, Shoalcove said:

My  water tank is between the engine and the rudder stock. Seems to work well there.

Shoal,

Huh? Do you really mean water tank? Don't you have the two water tanks, one under each settee?

Did you mean your fuel tank is behind the engine? If so what is the capacity and what's under the quarter berth? If that was open storage under there it would be great.

Thanks.

Steve P.

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Sorry to confuse you! The hot water tank is behind the engine. Not under the sink.

My fuel tank is under the quarter berth and about 27 gal.

Water tanks are under each settee. 40 gal. each.

Good luck with the boat move today!

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On 4/30/2018 at 9:52 AM, sail69 said:

I was told that if the hull is painted with Awlgrip, do not shrinkwrap over it.   Awlgrip does not like trapped moisture.  

Pretty boat.  My classic plastic in white is pretty, but in flag blue she is really pretty.

Good luck!

Yes and no.  What most yards (who know about it) do is shrink wrap, then slide 2x2 styrofoam blocks between the shrink and hull so it doesn't touch the hull.  That's the problem going to a yard who just shinks 'em all up and doesn't know anything about maintenance.  You may end up with a major issue.  Awelgrip also doesn't like being submerged for long periods of time.  The solution to that is that many boat raise their waterline an inch or two when redoing the boat.  It usually ends up making the boat more sleek looking and it reduces the amount of staining you get on lighter colored hulls from water splashing up.

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3 hours ago, Grrr... said:

What most yards (who know about it) do is shrink wrap, then slide 2x2 styrofoam blocks between the shrink and hull so it doesn't touch the hull.

What most yards (who know about it) do is shrink wrap, then slide 2x2 styrofoam blocks between the shrink and hull so it doesn't touch the hull.

There you go. This yard did not really cater to sailboat although there were half a dozen in the "mast down/powerboat" storage yard. I did notice a big sign announcing that the yard would no longer be doing shrink wrap and was farming it out to a contractor. Wonder if they wrecked a few paint jobs? My mast was next to the boat balanced on boat stands with a huge tuna pulpit and a set of 4 spreader down riggers piled against it. The outriggers had the tips in the gravel (one tip carp missing) and several spreader arms broken, The bases were set up on a pile of blocking to keep the spreaders off the ground. When I went to move them I noticed one had a slight, maybe 10 degree bend but the other on had around a 30 degree bend in it! this likely happened over the winter when they would have been buried in snow. I felt sorry as I know these are expensive but I didn't think this expensive:

https://www.tackledirect.com/rupp-a4-0014br-bigg-rigg-outriggers.html

Funny thing was there was a mast rack there that was mostly empty, probably because they had blocked a big powerboat about a foot away from it. Even so one of the masts on the rack had a bent furler foil. They put a ding in one of my furler sections but I think I can roll it out. Also, the blocking under my keel had noticeably settled and was causing one of the jack stands to oil can the hull a bit. I saw other boats in the same or worse situation. I pointed this out to a yard worker but he just gave me the "not my job" shrug and walked away. At $45 a foot for outdoor winter storage what do you expect? I'm glad to have her home in my own back yard so I can do the work myself and avoid the "professional".

I did run into a snag with the final 30 feet of the delivery though.

1.jpg.cd54ed7bc571f84567bd36db4d99717f.jpg

2.jpg.c1220f9fe8850b4cb00581dd08db0fe0.jpg

 

We're aiming for the green bottom dinghy in the background.

3.jpg.95767e56e9e90343e528f960f0eeb7d4.jpg

 

 

Straight back now.

4.jpg.344761f64c904269c8d292331bae2301.jpg

 

Ever get that sinking feeling?

5.jpg.84215ef86d5b17baef127b6747b66115.jpg

 

This is far as the truck could go before being mired in the soft water soaked turf.

6.jpg.9c8150ee0a7cff01782ab3280a102a0f.jpg

 

About 30 feet short of where I wanted it to go. Oh well, a little rut filling and maybe lay down some plywood and try again in a few weeks.

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Looks good! I’m glad it went well for you. 

 It looks like you have chocks amidships for spring/dock lines. Sometime when you have a chance could you post a photo? I don’t have that and I’d like to see what they did.

Also, what size halyard winches do you have? I have Lewmar 16 ST and my wife finds it a bit tough sometimes. I’m thinking of going up a size. Maybe Andersen 28’s 2 speed self tailing. Happy wife, happy life situation...

Good luck with the bottom job!

Shoalcove

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So, perhaps on the topic, late yesterday afternoon, this boat came limping in to the shipyard-- two guys from Anchorage had bought the boat in NY and were headed to Canada to stage their trip through the NW passage. They had a broken gooseneck fitting and the upper swivel on their furler was hanging up on the foil (at the joints). So, several of us helped out--- but I'm curious if the crowd here can verify the boat-- Bob, are you there?--  (I think) they said it was a Cheoy Lee 36. SailboatData says that is a Luders design but then the 35 under discussion here is Perry and I'm curious-- is this a 35 or a 36? 

 

CheoyLee1.JPG

CheoyLee2.JPG

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41 minutes ago, Anomaly2 said:

is this a 35 or a 36? 

Not a 35'  Perry. Some features stick out.. Perry has two fixed and two opening ports per side, 36 one fixed, three opening. Perry cockpit is tee shaped and goes completely to the stern, that boat has an act deck with lazarette hatch. That boat has a spoon in the bow Sperry is straight. Underwater Perry has a large din keel and separate skeg hung rudder, luders has full keel with attached rudder. It does look like a Luders but Cheoy Lee built other designs in that size (Robb, Offshore, Clipper, Pedrick, etc.) Although none of them look like a match to me.

Northwest Passage on a newly acquired 50+ year old boat, epic.

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I'm always here Anom.

I'd say it was the Luders 36. I was essentially channeling that type of look when I drew the 35. Good looking boat. Those later Luders boats were drawn by Ted Brewer.

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On 5/18/2018 at 8:02 PM, Shoalcove said:

Looks good! I’m glad it went well for you. 

 It looks like you have chocks amidships for spring/dock lines. Sometime when you have a chance could you post a photo? I don’t have that and I’d like to see what they did.

Also, what size halyard winches do you have? I have Lewmar 16 ST and my wife finds it a bit tough sometimes. I’m thinking of going up a size. Maybe Andersen 28’s 2 speed self tailing. Happy wife, happy life situation...

Good luck with the bottom job!

Shoalcove

I have Maxwell 18 non self tailing winches on the mast. Don't tell my wife or daughter if you get the 28 self tailers, they will want electric!

Here are some pis of the midships chocks

cloutside.jpg.840fca18904b3ef1b1d4798a29c88481.jpg

 

clinside.jpg.3f10e967c601138a0beb6ffaeffee91f.jpg

 

cltop.jpg.c1e0decad79e8712f3acc6b2768aca93.jpg

Hope that helps.

 

From the second floor window...

eyelv.jpg.493d4073344170c856aa0d201b30242d.jpg

 

As you can see I'm missing a piece of toerail and a Cheoy Lee custom bow chock. A reward to anyone who finds me one. I need this. It's what I'll call a left hand, it would fit on the port bow or starboard aft. BOLO!

chock_lh.jpg.a84574c96502083931fc4c85f0a6076c.jpg

 

Here's a right hand, starboard bow or port stern.

chock_rh.jpg.9c388d171ce6acbaabcad02699f016ec.jpg

 

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4 minutes ago, Monkey Butler said:

I have Maxwell 18 non self tailing winches on the mast. Don't tell my wife or daughter if you get the 28 self tailers, they will want electric!

Here are some pis of the midships chocks

cloutside.jpg.840fca18904b3ef1b1d4798a29c88481.jpg

 

clinside.jpg.3f10e967c601138a0beb6ffaeffee91f.jpg

 

cltop.jpg.c1e0decad79e8712f3acc6b2768aca93.jpg

Hope that helps.

 

From the second floor window...

eyelv.jpg.493d4073344170c856aa0d201b30242d.jpg

 

As you can see I'm missing a piece of toerail and a Cheoy Lee custom bow chock. A reward to anyone who finds me one. I need this. It's what I'll call a left hand, it would fit on the port bow or starboard aft. BOLO!

chock_lh.jpg.a84574c96502083931fc4c85f0a6076c.jpg

 

Here's a right hand, starboard bow or port stern.

chock_rh.jpg.9c388d171ce6acbaabcad02699f016ec.jpg

 

If you take the matching chock to a good caster, I'm sure they could make a duplicate. I have talked quite a bit to a fellow in a local foundry and the stuff they can do is quite mind-blowing.

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For the price of casting... Why not just take the other one off and put in a new pair of non-unobtanium fairlewds from a catalogue?

edit: fairleads 

Edited by HFC Hunter
Less rude

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5 hours ago, Monkey Butler said:

Just noticed none of the slots are indexed. I'll put that at the top of my punch list.

Not with wood screws. Replace them with Philips heads and nobody will be able to tell if they are indexed or not.

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On the chocks, my H-Boat has SS spreader and some aluminum spreader tips that were shot. I took them to a yard that had a metal shop, and they machined a pair of shiny, new SS ones for less money that I expected. The new tips are so pretty, and I'm the only one who knows they're up there. Sad.

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40 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

Not with wood screws. Replace them with Philips heads and nobody will be able to tell if they are indexed or not.

Still might be able to tell. How about torx or even better triple square.

images.jpg.50333c8b7af6adf4da02e8d7a4c85e38.jpg

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4 minutes ago, Bull City said:

On the chocks, my H-Boat has SS spreader and some aluminum spreader tips that were shot. I took them to a yard that had a metal shop, and they machined a pair of shiny, new SS ones for less money that I expected. The new tips are so pretty, and I'm the only one who knows they're up there. Sad.

At my daytime job we sell cutting tools to machine shops. I'll ask the salesmen if they have any place that they call on who might be able to quote one. I wasn't looking forward to taking on the aft one off. Did you check out the both screw heads?

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40 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

Not with wood screws. Replace them with Philips heads and nobody will be able to tell if they are indexed or not.

Of course you can - the cross has to be square to whatever is being screwed down. ;)

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Thanks for the photos Monkey Butler. I wish that my boat had come with a set of mid ships chocks like that. They look good and seem useful.

 Good luck with the bow fairleads. It may be easier to get two made and replace the other rather than try for a replica. You could always email the CheoyLee yard and ask them although I’m not sure they are still in business. You may get lucky!

 

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42 minutes ago, Shoalcove said:

Thanks for the photos Monkey Butler. I wish that my boat had come with a set of mid ships chocks like that. They look good and seem useful.

 Good luck with the bow fairleads. It may be easier to get two made and replace the other rather than try for a replica. You could always email the CheoyLee yard and ask them although I’m not sure they are still in business. You may get lucky!

 

My daughter works right next door to them in Florida! I think all the offer now are big power yachts, like 100'+.

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10 hours ago, Monkey Butler said:

My daughter works right next door to them in Florida! I think all the offer now are big power yachts, like 100'+.

I knew they only dealt in luxury motor yachts for a while. I’m not their target market lol! You might as well ask though as you never know what’s sitting on a shelf somewhere.

 I took a look at the Spartan Marine site to see if they had something that would work and found a midship cleat/fairlead very similar to yours. Perhaps they could make a fitting for you. 

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Just a thought, but could you make a 3D digital image of the one you have and then, using electro wizardry, make a mirror image of that original 3D image.

Then using the new Mirror 3D image shove all the noughts and ones into a 3D printer and produce a plastic model of the one you want.

Then take your plastic model, or pattern if you like, to a foundry and get them to cast one for you.

I have absolutely no idea how this would be done but surely someone here would.

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