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Irresponsible cowboy maneuver, but when it works...

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When it works, it's flat-out wonderful.*

180-degree turn but 10-knot wind on the nose as you check swing and drop the main just as bow enters the slip.   Too much speed?  Too little?  Nope, just right.  And crew picked up the right dock lines at the right time.

Having underestimated the boat's swing rate last time and having to resort to "steeenkin' motor" to rectify things, this one ended up being a thing of beauty (34' Bill Luders-type sloop).

 

 

*And when it doesn't, it's embarrassing.   Been there. 

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27 minutes ago, Hitchhiker said:

Pics or it never happened!

You got me there....     ;-)

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typical , all goes beautiful when there's no one to see BUT introduce an audience and ............................

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When I was a teenager working at a summer camp, the waterfront director liked to motor the open bowrider stinkpot launch into the lake boat lift slings by pointing it at it with a little speed, turn off the engine, step up to the bow, jump about 12" up to grab the crossbar, place his bare feet on the sides of the split windshield to slow the boat and then hop down with the boat in the perfect position to crank the slings and lift the boat out of the water.  One day as I was teaching canoeing near by he came in executing this manuever with a little too much speed.  Rushed to the front, jumped, got a loose grip on the crossbar.  His feet made contact with the windshields but there was too much momentum so the boat pushed thru them, and as they cleared the top of the windshield they swung backwards like a pendulum, heels hit the I/O motor cover, loosening his last bit of grip.  His butt falls onto the gunwale behind the engine cover and he rolls backwards off the back of the boat, hitting his forehead on the top fairing over the prop.  Luckily he was fine and popped right back up, and had indeed shut off the motor prior.  He stopped doing it that way.

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2-3 times a week, year-round for 17 years... you get the hang of it for your particular boat's weight, turn and speed-scrub rate.

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Yeah, it's fun to do.  I was sailing in once, conditions were perfect.  About 4 boat lengths from where I make my final turn, the keel stuck in the mud as it was a super low spring tide.  Had to use the motor to back off, go out to the end of the dock, tie up and wait for the tide to come in.  Fortunately there was a Mexican restaurant across the street from the marina, so the wait time was put to good use.  

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^These guys can handle boats.  Makes a lot of the Socal "Pros" look like amateurs.

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Having taught sailing in boats with no engines, sailing in and out of a slip wasn't cowboy stuff, it was any day ending with Y ;)

One day we ended up with the wind off the stern at about 10 on T-head, so we set the chute and casually untied the lines to a round of applause from the drunks at the bar B)

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1 hour ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

proper boats. 

that explains plenty .

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1 hour ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Having taught sailing in boats with no engines, sailing in and out of a slip wasn't cowboy stuff, it was any day ending with Y ;)

Most competitive one-design keelboat classes go motorless often, NBD. 

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18 hours ago, Great Red Shark said:

2-3 times a week, year-round for 17 years... you get the hang of it for your particular boat's weight, turn and speed-scrub rate.

I think I've seen that...

Cheers, mate!

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Absolutely   super enjoy reading about sailors docking under sail...... I really like it.

Actually most every  person who sails  should be able to dock a sailing vessels under sail   depending on dock location and room to maneuver and and direction.

And they should be able to dock under sail single handed.   If you have crew all the better.

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If a dead end slip,    and the vessels is as long  or longer than the slip.  pre rig the docklines,  bow and stern,   and also rig a breast line.   The breast line is the line you use to stop the boat before the bow would touch the end of the slip.   Secure the breast line first,  and the the bow and stern lines,  and rig springs lines to cleats.   All using proper cleat hitches.

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With the wind blowing  straight out from the slip  docking should be easy.  ( Single handing )

1.   dock lines and fenders rigged ,  looped over the life line so they can be reached from the finger slip. Or coiled by crew and handed to the on dock person.

2.  Jib is rolled in,   sailing under main only.

3.  Main sheet is run out and held in one hand,   too much speed  just let it our and luff up,   need more fore reach,  haul in on the main to produce a very slow approach. Do not use the winch, just one hand on the free main sheet.   You can instantly control your forward speed

5.  You should be at a close reach position to the wind,   

5.  You have the docking made,  totally luff up the main,   steer the slow moving vessel into the slip so that you can leave the helm and step off the boat.

6.  Stern line,  if a fairway,   or breast line if a dead end slip.  That line is  ready to run direct to dock cleat.

7 .  Take 1/2 turn around the base of the appropriate cleat,   take slight purchase,   controlling and gently slowing the fore reach as the boat slows to a stops .  Plan on docking the vessel to the downwind finger slip so that the boat will rest gently on the fenders.

8.  Secure dock lines  with proper cleats and flemish out the lines.

9.  Haul in on the main sheet,  lower and flake the sail.

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This is single handing.   If you have crew docking under sail is really pretty easy.

To lower the  approach speed,   you can also scandalize the main,   by having a crew member haul up on the topping lift,  spill the wind our of the sail   Boom is at about a 45 or more degree up angle,   since you have the main sheet totally run out. That stops the main boom from swinging and impacting human heads.     Have the crew person cleat the topping lift  .     Once tied up.   Start slowly taking up  the slack on the mainsheet while crew  member  lowers the boom with the topping lift.    Secure the topping lift,  secure the main sheet,   lower and flake the mainsail.

This was standard procedure by my students at the Newport Sailing Club.   This was not for show,  although they looked good from the Warehouse bar .   It was because engines and electrical failures can occur, and they needed to know how to dock,  pick up moorings or anchor under sail.

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Just one sea story (of course ) .      Sunny afternoon,  Newport Bay,  Ca.     Our docks were at the far closed end of the channel,  3.2 miles from the channel entrance on a summer sunday afternoon.   Major busy with  hundreds of sailing vessels, motor vessels,  yacht club races,  commercial  fishing vessels,  ferry boats,   and bay charter motor tours, etc.

I was teaching an intermediate lesson on a 30 foot sloop,   when I hear on channel 16  our  55 ft Tayana call  the sailing  lub for assistance.   They were returning from Catalina and the engine was inop for docking.  They sailed the 26 miles from Avalon,  and tacked up the channel under sail thru the traffic,  and wanted help docking.   This member had  sailed the 30's and 33's,.    This was his first time taking out one of our larger vessels.     No reply on the sailing club VHF.

He was trained on 30 to 55 foot sailing vessels.  But with  the lager boats we usually had them back and fill and dock stern first to keep the bow anchor and bow itself from hanging over the dock and impailing anyone walk past.   

My lesson boat,    4, people who had passed their three basic lessons  and were now on an intermediate ,   were reefing and doing sail changes, and single handing execrices on the Newport 30.   I told our new to the 55 footer skipper to dock the Tayana 55 undersail.   Well,  he had about 7 people on board who were not sailors and he was concerned about sailing that beast into a dead end slip on his own.    No worries.

I had my students,  start  the engine on the 30 footer,  dowse the jib and the main .   Haul up and tie up several fenders along our starboard rail.  The 55 was to lay out fenders to his port side.  He was now under main alone.   We came along side and I boarded the Tayan.  The 30  footer pealed off to port.

I kept our  Tayana member at the helm.   My 30 foot lesson boat,  although  they had not passed their solo check out as yet,  I had them motor a bit up the channel to give us clear room, and set up for a docking under power once the 55 was totally in the docks.  I made the most senior student the skipper and told them to works as a team to dock the newport.

On the 55,  I wanted the skipper to remain at the helm.   I wanted his family and friends to have confidence in his abilities .   I assigned  people to fix bow,  breast and stern lines.

I put one man at the mainsheet,  and one at the topping lift.   

We came upwind of the dead end slip,  and  came about.  

All of my commands were confidently given in a mild tone.

We are approaching the slip at about a 45 degree angle.   

" Haul in on the main sheet "      " We need a little more momentum "

NO ONE GETS OFF THE BOAT UNTIL WE ARE TOTALLY TIED UP .

THOSE WITHOUT A JOB,  PLEASE GO BELOW,  OR STAND ON THE COMPANION WAY LADDER.

"approach is looking great, good job "

" Release your main sheet, and let the sail luff,   all the way out. "

Our boat is slowing nicely,   our newbie at the helm is remaining calm.

The heavy brute floats slowly into the slip.   " Hual up the topping lift....good,  cleat it down.   ( No one is going to get a cracked skull.)

I step off from the shrouds  with the breast line,  take a purchase on a midships area dock cleat, and let the line slowly  brake the 55 footer to dead stopped.   I cleat it down.

Walking up to the  bow line man,  I point my arm straight out to my left, and tell him to toss the line over my arm not at my face.    All commands very simple.

I tied down the bow line,    and then the same for the stern line.

I then walk back to the boat and from the docks reach up and shake the new skippers hand.

" Nice Job skipper,  perfect docking.    She is all yours,   Secure all of the running rigging,  flake the sails and recheck the dock lines. "

About that time my lesson boat with the  fairly new students,  come into the fairway and make a very nice precise and slow docking under power.   I walked over to the newport 30, and went back to work.

 

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Problem with the engine on the Tayana 55.....the interior of the l  Taiwan fuel tanks were flaking of pieces of metal,  and super clogging the fuel  lines and injectors.   Bleeding did not help.  

Point being,   some day,  some night, some how,  that Iron Genny is going to quit  working,  and  sailors should be able to dock boats undersail.   

So, you say.....what about a down wind docking undersail

Rig docklines,   and  fenders,   have the lunch hook or stern anchor ready to run with the chain and rode flaked out.

come into the wind,  drop the main.   Under the  jib,  come about, and continue to make way  toward the slip  .   

Judge the wind direction and speed

Roll in the roller snarller.

Bare poles '''let the wind blow you down wind. Hell,  a shoe box will float down wind.

Too fast....lay out your stern anchor and  only take a purchase as you enter your slip.   slow the boat,   Stop. Tie up.

lay the stern anchor and chain out with lots of scope so it sits on the bottom.   No chance of other vessel;s  snagging your anchor line.  Use a dink and retrieve you anchor.

Good plan is to practice all of the above,   so when the time comes,   you can perform as the OP  did.  

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I love seeing people SAIL BOATs..... and  really , really like to see them anchor, moor , or dock under sail.  No engine.   

If your dock or slip is such  that it is to narrow, wind direction will not work,   you can anchor and call Sea Tow,   or if necessary sail into a guest slip, and notify the proper authority.

DO NOT PULL INTO SOME OTHER BOAT OWNER PRIVATE SLIP or DOCK.

 

Yep,  good on the OP.......good thread for all sailors.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Nearly sank Blackfin sailing Transatlantic in 1977, mid Atlantic. Generator, engine, and batteries went under the cold Atlantic ocean, so of course the engine, generator, and the entire electrical system was toast.

Arrived in Falmouth after a 14.5 day crossing, tacked up the harbour, picked up a mooring under sail. By the time we hit the pub, it seemed everyone in town was congratulating us. Free beer, fish'n'chips, and even hotel rooms that night. Did the same in Hamble Marina a few days later (that was much harder, but still perfect).

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30 minutes ago, carcrash said:

Nearly sank Blackfin sailing Transatlantic in 1977, mid Atlantic. Generator, engine, and batteries went under the cold Atlantic ocean, so of course the engine, generator, and the entire electrical system was toast.

Arrived in Falmouth after a 14.5 day crossing, tacked up the harbour, picked up a mooring under sail. By the time we hit the pub, it seemed everyone in town was congratulating us. Free beer, fish'n'chips, and even hotel rooms that night. Did the same in Hamble Marina a few days later (that was much harder, but still perfect).

THIS transatlantic?

Racing against FLYER? (The article is about the Spice Race but top of third column mentions transatll)

I want to know more...
BTW that is a great issue of Yachting.

https://books.google.com/books?id=mkIxQHI-Rp0C&pg=PA134&lpg=PA134&dq=1977+transatlantic+race&source=bl&ots=KH3L-wVlbz&sig=0VXL2ADhLK1pLhcFFCEFZod8V0Y&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjr6Yq1hPfaAhWOMd8KHZhoAbEQ6AEIgQEwDQ#v=onepage&q=1977 transatlantic race&f=false

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Are we talking about ramming a twin engined jet drive boat to within a quarter inch of the dock, or feathering for speed reduction an engineless sailboat into its slip?

My dad always told me the advantage of a sailboat was that if your engine dies, you've still got a way to get home.

Maybe I absentmindedly listened and became a better sailor than mechanic because I always knew the sailing was way easier in a pinch, to get the boat home.

Ive got a few to tell...but one thing that's worked for me, shorthanded, is to drop the main early, way before spitting distance of the desired slip, keep a small blade of furled jib, feather the helm and bleed speed if necessary by tracking below the slip and coming back.

Once you've hopefully nailed it, the blade of jib vanishes as the lines magically tie themselves.

After that, mirage like Polynesian women will greet you, Gauguin style.

 

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Favorite docking story,  about 20 years ago now:

Following a windy race to Kaneohe bay from town-side of Oahu,  we pull into the KYC and proceed to the bulkhead right up in front of the club.  Jib down,  main-only as we maneuver for the small finger-pier over by the floating dock.  my boat pardner Ned is driving the Sonoma 30.

We pick out our spot and approach as the wind suddenly puffs up and fills from behind,  our boat,  being a ULDB lights off as we are scrambling to haul down the mainsail,  now stuck in place and plastered against the rig.

Doom is impending. 

Club members are noticing our rapid approach rate and some are scrambling to help us. The main gets yanked out of the sky and I shout to Ned to head for OTHER side of the finger pier,  as he is aimed at the near-side and an imminent collision with Oahu.

"I can't make it."

"YES YOU CAN"

Helm snaps HARD right (100+ degree course change) and HARD back 120+ degrees or so,  to parallel the pier.

Boat stops nearly dead in the water,  a foot from the pier.   Crew steps off like it was planned that way all the time.

Relieved club members still not sure how we have averted major damage,  and are now standing around looking for a stern anchor.

Light boats are neat that way.  

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Must be a first for many... Next time try it in reverse.. 

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of course.. 

 

 

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Let me think....  The Marina is at the end cove.... the dug out fairway is about 20 foot wide....  than there is a 180 degree turn .... another 90 degree turn to somewhat line up with my slip ( 27 feet wide ) boat is 25 feet wide ...  

Hmmm   I think I anchor outside if the motor gives me trouble

lol

 

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My best docking story happened 2 years ago. We were coming in after a daysail in my then Hunter 31. Idling down the fairway I was going to hit a dab reverse to take way off before turning into my slip when the shit cable parted at the swage. Luckily it went into neutral before parting.

After a couple of seconds of freaking out I continued up the fairway to the head of the dock 100' away - made S-turns to take the way off. By some miracle the slip at the head of the dock was empty so I turned into it and stopped without even a bump.

We manhandled the boat around and I went below to be the shifter while my friend helmed us back to the berth, shouting shifting instructions down to me.

We turned into the berth and stopped - again without a bump.

Damn I was proud of us! :D

The berth in question was 2/3 of the way in the second fairway from the left.

thunderbird-001.jpg.0699663d9b2ac6b6e3c2d429844aa73f.jpg

My worst docking story was the first time we took my first 20' keelboat out.

Came back in and tied off to the pilings - 15' tidal range here. :rolleyes:

By the time we were ready to leave the boat the mooring lines were bar taut and the boat was starting to hang from them (ebb tide)

Had to cut them to free them and tie off properly to the dock.

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It's three actually - the one at the bottom is Thunderbird, the one in the middle is West Van YC and the skinny little one at the end just got shut down by the city for being too dangerous to allow people on the floats. :D

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My moment to shine was early in our membership at a club in San Diego, coming back from a race when the single cylinder Yanmar shit the bed. The wind was blowing 20 or so right down the fairway with a right turn into our slip about halfway down. Hailed one of the racers coming back in, asked him to have some hands ready to catch us, tied a bucket to a stern cleat, pinched up almost losing way in front of the entrance to the fairway and dropped all the sails, turned downwind under bare poles, kicked the bucket over the side, slid in with a little bit more speed than I like but managed to snub the breast line while about ten guys stood watching, expecting a crash landing. I was a god for about a week. 

(If it'd been really tooting I'd have substituted an anchor for the bucket.)

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When starting the engine after a rough transfer with an X-35 from Helsinki to Kiel the engine ran nicely but no forward or backward thrust. One guy from the crew went swimming and soon confirmed we had no propeller. 

We had to sail into the Schilksee marina, and this was during Kieler Woche. We did not know the marina, so we made one wrong turn and had to make a U-turn.  On the way back we met a fleet of 29ers. Most boats were avoided without drama, but the there was suddenly two coming against us on port, one going between us and a line of pillars. We managed to pass them with 5cm to spare. We found our berth and manhandled the boat into it. The sponsor sign on the side of the boat said “for tough jobs”...

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When ever I slide up to a slip, solo, with just an eyelash of space between hull and dock, step off and tie up, no one is there to see it..

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Grew up sailing an 8 meter with no engine, so sailing 10,000 lbs and 47' in and out of the lagoon and every other place we ever went was par for the course.

One of our more elegant entries was into Youngstown yacht club on the Niagara river. For the big annual whohaaa the 8's always got pole position in front of the club house. Having won the day we lead the fleet up the river with a breeze close to the beam, enough we could carry a kite. With three knots of current on the nose so we were able to slide right up to the wall with the kite on and pop the tack of the kite as our runner girl stepped ashore with a spring in hand. Kite and main dumped simo and we tie up without a thought in the world, no yelling, just a nice drop and dock, proceed to beers. That one garnered applause.

Probably my best entry was after sailing the boat 110 NM across the lake at night with my brother to Rochester NY. I was only just sobering up after 4 weeks in Spain racing FD's and a three day bender in Amsterdam. We sailed up the Genesee river, doublehanded, slid around the corner into RYC's basin and made for the dock we had been advised of. At this point we still had a full main up and Light one doing 6 plus knots. The locals got very hot and bothered as we came booking in and there was much running and shouting on shore. We pulled our final gybe towards the dock, in the last 20 seconds I dumped the jib on the deck (Hanks are awesome) then dropped the main and the two of us even managed a half way decent flake as it came down, good enough that nothing was left resting on the deck and we slid into our position nice and neat with a spring. Despite my brother's prediliction for yelling not a word needed to be uttered between us in those fine moments.

By the time the locals even made it to our dock the jib was in the bag and the top of the beers had been loosed.

These were the things that kept you sharp at the bottom mark of any racecourse. Extreme boat handling was a point of pride for he and I.

Was the same growing up sailing dinghies in and out of the same tight little lagoon. You could develop mastery of light super shifty breeze in the lagoon you could never develop on the course.

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Nice! Sailing 47 feet of keel hung rudder classic into an RCYC slip is a gold medal event. 

 

What’s worse, a honking easterly or westerly?

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18 minutes ago, blunted said:

Grew up sailing an 8 meter with no engine, so sailing 10,000 lbs and 47' in and out of the lagoon and every other place we ever went was par for the course.

One of our more elegant entries was into Youngstown yacht club on the Niagara river. For the big annual whohaaa the 8's always got pole position in front of the club house. Having won the day we lead the fleet up the river with a breeze close to the beam, enough we could carry a kite. With three knots of current on the nose so we were able to slide right up to the wall with the kite on and pop the tack of the kite as our runner girl stepped ashore with a spring in hand. Kite and main dumped simo and we tie up without a thought in the world, no yelling, just a nice drop and dock, proceed to beers. That one garnered applause.

Probably my best entry was after sailing the boat 110 NM across the lake at night with my brother to Rochester NY. I was only just sobering up after 4 weeks in Spain racing FD's and a three day bender in Amsterdam. We sailed up the Genesee river, doublehanded, slid around the corner into RYC's basin and made for the dock we had been advised of. At this point we still had a full main up and Light one doing 6 plus knots. The locals got very hot and bothered as we came booking in and there was much running and shouting on shore. We pulled our final gybe towards the dock, in the last 20 seconds I dumped the jib on the deck (Hanks are awesome) then dropped the main and the two of us even managed a half way decent flake as it came down, good enough that nothing was left resting on the deck and we slid into our position nice and neat with a spring. Despite my brother's prediliction for yelling not a word needed to be uttered between us in those fine moments.

By the time the locals even made it to our dock the jib was in the bag and the top of the beers had been loosed.

These were the things that kept you sharp at the bottom mark of any racecourse. Extreme boat handling was a point of pride for he and I.

Was the same growing up sailing dinghies in and out of the same tight little lagoon. You could develop mastery of light super shifty breeze in the lagoon you could never develop on the course.

Blunted I’m surprised you did not touch on the joys of docking an engineless 8 while facing stinkpots in the lagoon, helmed by people who believe they can drive a car and thus can drive a boat  and act as if the highway traffic act applies. I remember watching some remarkable boat handling by the 8s...and an occasional gentle grounding when a motor boat drawing 24 inches would not yield the channel.

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Just now, Big Show said:

Nice! Sailing 47 feet of keel hung rudder classic into an RCYC slip is a gold medal event. 

 

What’s worse, a honking easterly or westerly?

Getting out in a Westerly was the tough one, in is easy like a Saturday night gal in the Annex.

Good job in BDA my man, props.

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KC375.

One must take advantage of the fact that an 8 meter is rather pointy. 

Don't blink

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54 minutes ago, blunted said:

Getting out in a Westerly was the tough one, in is easy like a Saturday night gal in the Annex.

Good job in BDA my man, props.

Tks. BDA was great fun on and off the water. Good to see your bro. Lots of great sailors down there volunteering their time putting on amazing events. 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, blunted said:

One of our more elegant entries was into Youngstown yacht club on the Niagara river. For the big annual whohaaa the 8's always got pole position in front of the club house. Having won the day we lead the fleet up the river with a breeze close to the beam, enough we could carry a kite. With three knots of current on the nose so we were able to slide right up to the wall with the kite on and pop the tack of the kite as our runner girl stepped ashore with a spring in hand. Kite and main dumped simo and we tie up without a thought in the world, no yelling, just a nice drop and dock, proceed to beers. That one garnered applause.

What? you didn't lasso the dock cleats without stepping ashore?

;)

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On 5/14/2018 at 3:48 PM, blunted said:

Grew up sailing an 8 meter with no engine, so sailing 10,000 lbs and 47' in and out of the lagoon and every other place we ever went was par for the course.

 

A 10,000 lb 8m, can I get you to do my weigh ins?

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2 hours ago, Tax Man said:

A 10,000 lb 8m, can I get you to do my weigh ins?

Indeed,probably closer to 20,000 lbs.

At least it makes shooting the mark, or the lagoon easier. Fucking metric @%@#$TGQR

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