southerncross

VOR Leg 9 Newport to Cardiff

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Leg starts on:  20 May 2018

So we are finally headed back to Europe

This is the last of the long legs, 3,300 nautical miles of trans-Atlantic crossing from Newport, Rhode Island in the USA to Cardiff in Wales. This leg is another classic, a status recognized by it being the final double-points leg of the race.

The whole idea of racing yachts across oceans started back in 1905, when hard-driving, three-time America’s Cup winner Charlie Barr, won the Kaiser’s Cup on the schooner Atlantic. They crossed in just over 12 days – not bad for a monohull even now.

So what will the weather throw at them?

The leg starts on 20 May, late spring, and the crossing should be dominated by the Westerly Storm Track (the wave of east-bound low pressure systems circulating around the Arctic and Antarctic). The start lies firmly in the Storm Track and unlike the previous race – when the finish was in Lisbon – so does the finish in Wales. This is the classic trans-Atlantic route, and as a result it should be both quicker and simpler.

Right out of the starting gate, the fleet will be looking for a low pressure system with their name on it, and once they find it, they will hang on as hard as they can. While Atlantic storms and waves don’t (theoretically) build to quite the same ferocity that they can reach in the Southern Ocean – because there is a lot more land mass in the Northern Hemisphere to break them up – it’s still a rough, tough and very cold leg.

What else is in play on this one?

Gulf Stream: The biggest complicating factor is the Gulf Stream, a powerful stream of warm water that originates in the Gulf of Mexico before flowing northwards out around Florida, up the eastern seaboard of the US to Newfoundland before setting out across the Atlantic. 

This is not a uniform river of east-bound current, it swirls and back eddies in endless subtle and changing complexities. The navigators will be devoting a great deal of time and energy to finding and optimizing their route out of Newport and into the right spot on the Gulf Stream. If you do it right it’s worth about an extra four knots of speed – so this one is a race winner or loser.

More Titanic Moments: Ice can be a big factor on this leg, and it’s normal for race officials to set a northern limit for the race course. The idea is to keep the fleet away from the Grand Banks. This is where the cold water of the Labrador Current – which carries the ice down from the Arctic – meets the warm water of the Gulf Stream. It’s notorious for fog and bad storms, as well as icebergs. In fact, The Perfect Storm happened right here.

Azores High: Ok, so I know I said that this whole leg will be in the Westerly Storm Track, and this should be the case. But the Azores High (a Subtropical High Pressure Zone, a stable, semi-static area of High Pressure usually lying between 30 and 38 degrees) can drift a long way north in late May, and there is a chance that it will block the route to the finish in Wales.

A long leg with a long history

All the way back to the Kaiser’s Cup, this leg has seen plenty of drama and on one occasion tragedy. It was on the leg from New York to Portsmouth in 2005-06 that Hans Horrevoets was swept overboard from the deck of ABN AMRO TWO; although he was recovered after 40 minutes, he couldn’t be resuscitated. Just a couple of days after this terrible loss, the keel structure on movistar failed. A storm was inbound and forecast to hit 50 knots and so the crew abandoned ship – picked up by ABN AMRO TWO.

https://www.volvooceanrace.com/en/route/leg-9.html

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Haha. Cheers

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2 minutes ago, stief said:

Haha. Cheers

Cheers Stief.  You going to be around for this one?  It's a biggin'.  

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18 minutes ago, southerncross said:

You going to be around for this one?  It's a biggin'.  

Not as much as I’d like.  Will be launching and sailing I hope, and that means  poor cell coverage. 

Sure relied on you especially to keep up with the last leg, so will try harder this leg to leech less and contribute my share as Jack, Elisa,  Renny and others did. Thread was pretty clear reading, so expectations inflated for this one, especially the new voices. 

Cardiff arrival avoids the landing in France, so that should help with interesting boots on the ground :lol:

Thoughts on a licky-free or other such experiment this thread?

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If they thought the end of this leg was tough, wait until they have a 6kt ebb tide coming out of the Bristol Channel!

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THIS RACE IS FAR FROM OVER - CAUDRELIER

08-05-2018

I'm already focused on the future and I'm not going to dwell on losing this race like that. I am thinking about the next one and I promise Dongfeng Race Team will do a fantastic job next time again," Charles Caudrelier

After suffering a cruel twist of fate at the finish of Leg 8 of the Volvo Ocean Race 2017-18, that saw Dongfeng Race Team drop from first to fourth in the last 20 miles, Charles Caudrelier struck a defiant note with his focus switching to the next leg across the Atlantic.

“The race is far from finished and there are double-points scored on the next one – it is not finished,” said the Frenchman as Dongfeng docked in the early morning fog in Newport, Rhode Island where almost windless conditions and a strong ebb tide turned the ranking inside out.

The drama at the end of Leg 8 saw MAPFRE complete her comeback from sixth place all the way to take an unlikely leg win by one minute and one second from long time leader Team Brunel, while Vestas 11th Hour Racing crept past Dongfeng to round out the podium.

The result means MAPFRE now takes a three-point lead in the overall scores into Leg 9 to Cardiff over Dongfeng Race Team, although the Chinese crew, sponsored by Dongfeng Motor Corporation, is virtually certain to gain one point at the finish as a result of having the shortest overall elapsed time for the race.

Naturally Caudrelier could not hide his disappointment at the end of a 16-day leg which saw Dongfeng disputing the lead for much of it and sailing a confident and polished race amid hopes that it could repeat its leg win here from three years ago.

“Of course we are disappointed,” he said. “We were dreaming about another victory here. I think we sailed very well until early this morning and then I don’t know what happened. We were quite slow downwind and probably there was a bit of plastic that we caught on the rudder and I imagine we had something on the keel – we should have checked earlier.”

But Caudrelier quickly moved to the next challenge across the Atlantic. “It really is a tough moment for Dongfeng Race Team but it makes me angry and I will be better on the next leg. I’m already focused on the future and I’m not going to dwell on losing this race like that. I am thinking about the next one and I promise Dongfeng Race Team will do a fantastic job next time again,” he said.

Bruno Dubois, the Dongfeng Team Director, watched the agonising last miles in the early hours of the American morning from on shore. He too was looking on the positive side. “We are still in the game – we are a couple of points behind MAPFRE – and we are still looking pretty good in terms of elapsed time. Our objective is to get ready for the next leg – with double points it will be very important,” said Dubois.

Dongfeng crew member Carolijn Brouwer of the Netherlands, also reflected on the final stages. “We have had a really tough leg or a tough finish I should say,” she said. “It was very disappointing for us obviously. Fifteen miles before the finish it looked completely different and then it was a turnaround and unfortunately it did not go our way.”

She revealed that as Dongfeng was creeping up the harbour to the finish line she could hear her young son, Kyle, shouting encouragement from ashore at Fort Adams. “I couldn’t see him at the time because of the fog, but I could hear him and then when I eventually saw him, it is in that moment that you instantly forget about the tough finish and the disappointing results…we will bounce back and be ready for the next leg, but now it is time to enjoy time with Kyle and our families,” she added.

Chinese sailor Chen Jinhao – also known as Horace – knows what it is like to win in Newport and he spoke of the frustration of watching the other boats sail past them at the death.

“Last time when we came into Newport we won the race less than a minute ahead of Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing. This time it is the complete opposite. We stopped and with the current pushing us backwards. We were watching the other boats on AIS and they were trying in other areas and they succeeded and passed us one-by-one,” he said.

“It is a very disappointing moment on board even now,” he added, “but this is part of the race. Sometimes you are facing a win, sometimes you have to deal with mistakes and sometimes there is a bit of luck involved too.

“There are still three legs to go. The next leg will be important and throughout the whole race we have believed in ourselves. Every time when we are racing we are working for a top spot, so we just need to make sure we don’t make any mistakes and believe in ourselves. We will keep pushing and be good,” concluded Horace.

Dongfeng Race Team is making its second consecutive appearance in the Volvo Ocean Race and is aiming to improve on its performance last time round when it finished third overall. The team is also committed to helping the sport of offshore sailing grow in China.

https://www.dongfengraceteam.cn/news/view/this-race-is-far-from-over-caudrelier

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Not the usual Charles, disappointed and bemoaning technical difficulties.  Charles is pissed. 

It might have bode them well to have lost this Leg.  It's the next Leg that will matter most.

Mapfre will not rest on laurels though.  And Brunel can see light.

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Half the remaining points in the next leg. Everything still goes for the red boats.

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We'll see if Annie Lush gets back on the boat. I was thinking when Nina got on the boat whether Jo Aleh regrets mouthing off to whomever who'll listen how Brunel was awful to her blah blah blah. 

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9 hours ago, southerncross said:

Screen Shot 2018-05-08 at 7.54.35 AM.png

Thst hurts!

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6 hours ago, Chasm said:

Half the remaining points in the next leg. Everything still goes for the red boats.

But no doldrums. How come Mapfre does so well in no-air finishes, but suck when crossing the doldrums? Must be a boatspeed navigator thing.

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1 hour ago, Varan said:

But no doldrums. How come Mapfre does so well in no-air finishes, but suck when crossing the doldrums? Must be a boatspeed navigator thing.

more luck in the doldrums .

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11 hours ago, Miffy said:

... whether Jo Aleh regrets mouthing off to whomever who'll listen how Brunel was awful to her blah blah

That was pretty bizzare rebuke of all things VOR from a offshore rookie considering how small the sailing world is and maybe why she got cut with that demeanour. Certainly used equality discussions to air it. 

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59 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

That was pretty bizzare rebuke of all things VOR from a offshore rookie considering how small the sailing world is and maybe why she got cut with that demeanour. Certainly used equality discussions to air it. 

Had she kept focused and took a step back to evaluate the reality that she ain't in competition with Burling Kyle and Carlo - it would have been obvious that Brunel was looking to bring experienced women along that didn't cut into the youth development quota. She's over 30. 

Libby's talk was far more on point re specific development goals often conflict. 

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To be fair to Jo, she was also treated like shit. It is too easy to expect people to put up with it for the opportunity, but personally I think there are too many people doing that in this edition of the race. 

 

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Caudrelier said that the extra point for the total race time will be important. Has someone noted down all the race times for every leg? I was not able to find on the VOR website.

Thanks!!!

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Dongers are about 4 days ahead of Mapfre due to Leg 7.

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3 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

That was pretty bizzare rebuke of all things VOR from a offshore rookie considering how small the sailing world is and maybe why she got cut with that demeanour. Certainly used equality discussions to air it. 

Is there a link or story to this? I’ve missed it. 

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3 minutes ago, mad said:

Is there a link or story to this? I’ve missed it. 

It was last year after she missed out on a Brunel ride I recall. I have no linky.

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If Newport and it's tidal creek and arguably a bit of a fuck up on the RO's selection of the Finish Line by a few mile or so creating such an imbalance in Leg 8 scores and consequently an out pouring of opinion here.. well tide level differentials therefore big current volicities in Cardiff Bay for Leg 9 Finish Line on a 2x points leg, could potentially well and truly eclipse that Newport Finish Line debate in the event of a close finish.

images (11).jpeg

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As Potter described a while back.

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4 hours ago, Potter said:

To be fair to Jo, she was also treated like shit. It is too easy to expect people to put up with it for the opportunity, but personally I think there are too many people doing that in this edition of the race. 

 

You're right, tho she didn't find a spot with TTOP either. Tho I don't think anyone has been strung along and dropped like Annemieke. We'll see after this edition. 

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What changes to Mapfre's batteries/fuses/electrical, if any, would/should be made?

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7 hours ago, DtM said:

Dongers are about 4 days ahead of Mapfre due to Leg 7.

They're well ahead of:

Mapfre due to their stop at Cape Horn

Vestas for their bump in the night and dismasting

Scally for their loss and detour

Akzo for their mast track debacle.

I wouldn't be surprised to see the elapsed time leaderboard be Dongfeng, Brunel, TTOP, Akzo, Mapfre, Scally, Vestas.

Edit: And I think that it's likely the Delta between Brunel and Dongfeng on elapsed time is probably 1 day or so.

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The last Leg reminds me of US Hockey or Basketball playoffs in which one team puts it all out there to win semi finals only to lose it all in the finals because they were spent.

Donfeng has never been as much of a threat to Mapfre as they will be in this Leg.  It's no longer about disappointment, c'est la Yacht Racing.  Both boats are as sharp as a Japanese blade.  This one's for blood.  But did Mapfre play the luck card too soon?

No more match racing, letting another boat slip by.  Too many points up for grabs.  None of the boats can afford technical issues.  The boatyard will be under more pressure than ever.

 

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I'm going to be honest. Mapfre didn't make many crew changes and elected to one light as opposed to replacing Sophie, when the news of the keel issues surfaced and they weren't in a good position I thought they had just lost the race. Flamed out early, peaked to soon, done a Telifonica.

 

I think the most important thing is they will have enough confidence to recharge well in Newport. I would have thought that if you didn't do so well you have to do some training/testing and have lots of angst filled meetings during a stopover. Mapf seem quite well placed to focus on chilling. That has to make a difference.

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On land and on sea, Bristol’s Charlie Enright is happy at home 

BRISTOL — Charlie Enright is home, at last.

Home for the skipper of a boat in the Volvo Ocean Race is more of a concept than a place. When you spend weeks at a time on the open ocean navigating 20 foot swells and 30 knot winds, a few nights at home in your own bed must feel pretty sweet.

On Wednesday morning, the 33-year old Enright sat on the porch of his Colonial-era home just off the Bristol Fourth of July Parade route. His wife, Meris, brewed some coffee and waited for their 11-month old daughter to awaken from a nap. Their 2½-year old son was off at daycare.

A day earlier, Enright’s Vestas 11th Hour Racing crew had rallied late in heavy fog and light winds to nab a third place finish into Newport. It was the end of a 15-day, 18-hour journey from Itajai, Brazil.

“We finished at 6 in the morning and I was full-out Daddy Daycare until about 2 when my son went down for a nap,” Enright said. “Then I turned my phone on and there were 700 emails.”

Besides spending time with his wife and two children, Enright will make sure to see his parents, Tom and Lisa, who live a few miles away in Bristol. His brothers, Matt and Jon, are also nearby.

“When he’s home it’s really, really nice,” said Meris Enright, who met her husband at Brown University. “It’s a mindset thing. You kind of adjust and get used to it.”

This return to normalcy won’t last long. Enright and his crew will work on the boat at its dock off Fort Adams over the weekend and get back on the water next week. An In-Port race around Newport Harbor is set for May 19 and the seven entries in the Volvo are off for Cardiff, Wales, the next day. After 45,000 miles around the planet, the race ends in The Hague in late June.

This globe-trotting is in Enright’s blood. He and his wife were both All-American sailors at Brown. He and another Bear sailor, Mark Towill, led a campaign in the last Volvo Ocean Race in 2015.

“My wife traveled the last race while she was pregnant,” Enright said. “This time she’s traveling with two young kids and a nanny, so I guess it dominates your life for a spell.”

http://www.providencejournal.com/sports/20180509/on-land-and-on-sea-bristols-charlie-enright-is-happy-at-home--videos

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The discussion of accumulated elapsed times caught my interest so I tried to piece it together...  Barring mistakes, I think this is where things currently stand...

  1. Dongfeng: 107:02:31:12
  2. Brunel: 108:22:48:17
  3. Mapfre: 112:15:37:30
  4. Akzo: 113:02:01:49 (after deducting 1:20:00 redress)
  5. TToP: 114:14:24:17
  6. Scally: 7 Legs finished
  7. Vestas: 4 Legs finished
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6 hours ago, southerncross said:

What changes to Mapfre's batteries/fuses/electrical, if any, would/should be made?

They got it all up and running again with the exception of the PLC so it was either the culprit to both main fuses on each battery bank blowing, so had to be bypassed and or it got fried. If they haven't got the means to totally isolate one battery bank from the other on all boats they should.

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11 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

They got it all up and running again with the exception of the PLC so it was either the culprit to both main fuses on each battery bank blowing, so had to be bypassed and or it got fried. If they haven't got the means to totally isolate one battery bank from the other on all boats they should.

Yeah, I'd like to hear more about that. Seems to me the PLC is just a controller and couldn't draw that much juice.

I guess if it went troppo it could let more hungry items off the chain?

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On 5/9/2018 at 3:53 AM, Miffy said:

We'll see if Annie Lush gets back on the boat. I was thinking when Nina got on the boat whether Jo Aleh regrets mouthing off to whomever who'll listen how Brunel was awful to her blah blah blah. 

Your comment only validates what she said.

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Does anyone have information about exclusion zones or ice belts or whale protection areas for this leg.  I have tried looking for it in the VOR website, but with no search function I cannot find the SI Addendums.

Thanks TR

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35 minutes ago, paps49 said:

Seems to me the PLC is just a controller and couldn't draw that much juice.

Correct but a unprotected short somewhere cooked say 400A main fuses on each battery bank in a jiffy.

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1 hour ago, Tunnel Rat said:

Does anyone have information about exclusion zones or ice belts or whale protection areas for this leg.  I have tried looking for it in the VOR website, but with no search function I cannot find the SI Addendums.

Thanks TR

Tunnel this is the place where the secrets are hidden.

https://www.volvooceanrace.com/en/noticeboard.html

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1 hour ago, jack_sparrow said:

Correct but a unprotected short somewhere cooked say 400A main fuses on each battery bank in a jiffy.

Double correct, but fuck, the PLC line should be protected by a 10 A fast fuse or similar. I do not believe that a short in the PLC could blow a 400 A fuse.

I think we will never know... 

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2 hours ago, ITA602 said:

Double correct, but fuck, the PLC line should be protected by a 10 A fast fuse or similar. I do not believe that a short in the PLC could blow a 400 A fuse.

I think we will never know... 

I agree and we will never hear.

Blowing it out of my arse but having a very intimate knowledge of the electrical systems on VOR boats since Lithium batteries first appeared on the scene 3 editions ago, my guess is the fault lay with Mastervolts BMS digitally controlled latching relays controlling both charge and discharge buses and sitting directly upstream of the two main battery bank fuses and therefore the PLC was not the culprit, just the victim.

That is a doeable work around with shore support as proven, but otherwise not easy unless you carry a lot of redundancy/jury rig shit that race boats can't afford to carry. The guys on board used a bilge pump circuit to quickly get the keel hydraulic pump up and going while they sorted the other shit.

I expect Mastervolt will probably try and sue me by saying that.

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2 hours ago, ITA602 said:

Double correct, but fuck, the PLC line should be protected by a 10 A fast fuse or similar. I do not believe that a short in the PLC could blow a 400 A fuse.

I think we will never know... 

If you leave out the 10A fuse..  At those currents the wire becomes the fuse. (Small wires, like you would use to power a plc, lights, fans etc.) Should(tm) be easy to find the culprit on closer inspection. Just find the molten metal.

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Associated British Ports (ABP) Announced As Host City Partner For Volvo Ocean Race Cardiff

By Cardiff Council On May 10, 2018

Dcw3PjaX4AAYpB1.jpg-large-750x430.jpeg

In just over three weeks, thetoughest and most prestigious sailing series will arrive in Cardiff and ABP South Wales has been named a presenting partner as the global sporting event makes its first visit to Wales.

ABP South Wales, owner and operator of the port of Cardiff, has worked in partnership with Cardiff Council and Welsh Government throughout the project, assisting in the bidding process and helping facilitate the delivery of the event.

The fleet, which are expected to arrive on Monday 28th May following a 2,900 nautical mile voyage from America across the Atlantic, will remain in Cardiff Bay for a two week stopover before moving onto Gothenburg and The Hague for the final legs of the race.

During this time, Cardiff Bay and the newly developed Alexandra Head will be transformed into an impressive race village, hosting a free festival of live entertainment and music, water-sports, Volvo Ocean-Race themed attractions and food, drink and trade stalls. The ABP Educational Classroom will be on site, welcoming school children and engaging them in environmental issues.

The site will also hostThe Boatyard, a comprehensive maintenance facility which provides essential repairs to the yachts. Members of the public will have the opportunity to see the thrashing the vessels encounter during the race and the specialist work that goes into ensuring they are inperfect race condition at each stopover.

Cabinet Member for Culture and Leisure, Councillor Peter Bradbury said:

“ABP have played an integral part in securing and delivering this international sporting event and I am delighted to have them as named sponsor.Partnerships like these are essential so that Cardiff can continue hosting and delivering global sporting events which generate a substantial economic boost for Cardiff and Wales’ economy.

“The race village will be a leading tourist attraction for sailing enthusiasts, families and visitors to the city, offering a fortnight of first-class entertainment. It will also be the first time members of the public will have access to the Port, giving a unique opportunity to see our city’s working dock.

“As the event draws closer,we look forward to welcomingVolvo Ocean Race to Cardiff andthousands of new visitors to Wales, who are set to experience a vibrant capital city and a nation with a rich and diverse cultural heritage.”

Matthew Kennerley, Director, ABP South Wales said:

“We have worked closely with Cardiff Council and Welsh Government over the past couple of years to bring the prestigious Volvo Ocean Race to Cardiff. We are delighted that all the hard work has paid off, and are looking forward to welcoming the racing teams and their yachts to Cardiff later this month.”

” We are also looking forward to welcoming thousands of school children to theABP Educational Classroomfor them to learn all about the Volvo Ocean Race, the maritime environment, and the issue of ocean plastics.”

The Port of Cardiff has expertise in the handling of steel, forest products, and bulk cargoes. It encompasses an area of 852 acres and handles around 1.7 million tonnes of cargo every year, contributing more than £120 million to the UK economy each year and together with customers supporting 2000 jobs.

ABP South Wales’ encompasses the five ports of, Newport, Cardiff, Barry, Port Talbot and Swansea. It handles over 12 million tonnes of cargo and contributes £1.4 billion to the UK economy every year, supporting 15,000 jobs in the region.

Cardiff is the ninth leg of the45,000 nautical mile race. For more information about Volvo Ocean Race go towww.volvooceanracecardiff.com

Read more: https://wales247.co.uk/associated-british-ports-abp-announced-as-host-city-partner-for-volvo-ocean-race-cardiff/#ixzz5F6bj4Ovf

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Drift:  70's still crushing it.

Volvo70_Carb600-1080x675.jpg

The American turbocharged Volvo 70 Warrior, sailed by Stephen Murray Jr. is expected to be the front-runner and their current estimated elapsed time is inside the record set last year of 3 days, 20 hours, 32 mins, 41 secs.

“Sailors superstition prevents me from predicting elapsed time, but we are optimistic we can shave off quite a bit of time from last year,” Murray said. “Our goals are a repeat of last year’s grand slam; winning CSA, IRC and a new course record, and we would also love to be the first recipient of the new Warrior Trophy for best IRC performance.

http://www.royalgazette.com/sailing/article/20180509/murray-set-to-be-front-runner&template=mobileart

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22 hours ago, jackolantern said:

They're well ahead of:

Mapfre due to their stop at Cape Horn

Vestas for their bump in the night and dismasting

Scally for their loss and detour

Akzo for their mast track debacle.

I wouldn't be surprised to see the elapsed time leaderboard be Dongfeng, Brunel, TTOP, Akzo, Mapfre, Scally, Vestas.

Edit: And I think that it's likely the Delta between Brunel and Dongfeng on elapsed time is probably 1 day or so.

That's about right jackolantern, I think it was around 23 hours before Newport so prob around 21 or so

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34 minutes ago, southerncross said:

In just over three weeks, thetoughest and most prestigious sailing series will arrive in Cardiff 

A lovely place to visit...just not on a RTW racing sailboat.

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22 minutes ago, shanghaisailor said:

That's about right jackolantern, I think it was around 23 hours before Newport so prob around 21 or so

Maybe shang but I do think jacko has a schizophrenia thing happening by his bizzare post on the Leg 8 thread just now about no one knowing what actual positions were closing the finish better than +- 4 mile so everyone is a ninkenpoop. 

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47 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Drift:  70's still crushing it.

The 2011/12 Botin V70 Camper driven by Nico.

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Cardiff - Lovely place. Home of Cardiff Bay Yacht Club and the Shanghai Cup. Purchased in 1876 for 433 Dollars - that was a lot of money back then.

I know it is totally off thread but it certainly is more ornate than this writing namesake.

Saw the comments about the Bristol Channel tides. Ebb screams out, one of the biggest tidal ranges, if not the biggest in the UK and also, upstream in the Severn Estuary where the world record for surfing a river bore was set (7 miles).

The Bristol Channel can be a gnarly place and is the home of the legendary Bristol Channel Pilot Cutters which even to this day are well known for their seakeeping abilities which were most needed while waiting for incoming cargo sailing ships.

Shanghai Cup 1876.jpg

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On 5/8/2018 at 5:27 PM, Potter said:

If they thought the end of this leg was tough, wait until they have a 6kt ebb tide coming out of the Bristol Channel!

I don't think that the Bristol channel is as bad in term of "lottery". They might have to kedge but the wind is quite predictable there. At Cardiff the Bristol channel is wide, it's not like they have to go past Avonmouth where it would be dodgy racing indeed.

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3 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

I agree and we will never hear.

Blowing it out of my arse but having a very intimate knowledge of the electrical systems on VOR boats since Lithium batteries first appeared on the scene 3 editions ago, my guess is the fault lay with Mastervolts BMS digitally controlled latching relays controlling both charge and discharge buses and sitting directly upstream of the two main battery bank fuses and therefore the PLC was not the culprit, just the victim.

That is a doeable work around with shore support as proven, but otherwise not easy unless you carry a lot of redundancy/jury rig shit that race boats can't afford to carry. The guys on board used a bilge pump circuit to quickly get the keel hydraulic pump up and going while they sorted the other shit.

I expect Mastervolt will probably try and sue me by saying that.

I enjoyed reading your theory/guess on this failure in the leg 7 thread, the boat geek in me is hungry for more info on how this happened :) Agree the PLC was likely just a victim, most discreet electronics would melt themselves before they blew a 400A fuse!

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On 5/9/2018 at 6:33 PM, southerncross said:

On land and on sea, Bristol’s Charlie Enright is happy at home 

BRISTOL — Charlie Enright is home, at last.

Home for the skipper of a boat in the Volvo Ocean Race is more of a concept than a place. When you spend weeks at a time on the open ocean navigating 20 foot swells and 30 knot winds, a few nights at home in your own bed must feel pretty sweet.

On Wednesday morning, the 33-year old Enright sat on the porch of his Colonial-era home just off the Bristol Fourth of July Parade route. His wife, Meris, brewed some coffee and waited for their 11-month old daughter to awaken from a nap. Their 2½-year old son was off at daycare.

A day earlier, Enright’s Vestas 11th Hour Racing crew had rallied late in heavy fog and light winds to nab a third place finish into Newport. It was the end of a 15-day, 18-hour journey from Itajai, Brazil.

“We finished at 6 in the morning and I was full-out Daddy Daycare until about 2 when my son went down for a nap,” Enright said. “Then I turned my phone on and there were 700 emails.”

Besides spending time with his wife and two children, Enright will make sure to see his parents, Tom and Lisa, who live a few miles away in Bristol. His brothers, Matt and Jon, are also nearby.

“When he’s home it’s really, really nice,” said Meris Enright, who met her husband at Brown University. “It’s a mindset thing. You kind of adjust and get used to it.”

This return to normalcy won’t last long. Enright and his crew will work on the boat at its dock off Fort Adams over the weekend and get back on the water next week. An In-Port race around Newport Harbor is set for May 19 and the seven entries in the Volvo are off for Cardiff, Wales, the next day. After 45,000 miles around the planet, the race ends in The Hague in late June.

This globe-trotting is in Enright’s blood. He and his wife were both All-American sailors at Brown. He and another Bear sailor, Mark Towill, led a campaign in the last Volvo Ocean Race in 2015.

“My wife traveled the last race while she was pregnant,” Enright said. “This time she’s traveling with two young kids and a nanny, so I guess it dominates your life for a spell.”

http://www.providencejournal.com/sports/20180509/on-land-and-on-sea-bristols-charlie-enright-is-happy-at-home--videos

I respect his sailing CV and credentials, but he really comes across as an entitled, preppy Ivy League prick sometimes. Something a bit sneery and arrogant about him. 

Anyway. This leg is a particularly exciting one - they will be going full out on the last ocean leg, plus double points. With the potential lottery finish up the Bristol Channel. Bring it on.

 

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@horatio_nelson it isn't Charlie's fault. Fundamentally that's the state of US sailing for people under 40. The sport isn't as approachable and accessible to ppl and those that represent US tend to be from a certain SES. 

There's a reason why the US, despite being so large a country with such a large population and high technology focus, isn't really known as a sailing power house. 

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2 hours ago, horatio_nelson said:

I respect his sailing CV and credentials, but he really comes across as an entitled, preppy Ivy League prick sometimes. Something a bit sneery and arrogant about him

Well he did go to an Ivy League University (Brown Rhode Is) so your social class observation is quite understandable. 

It was GB Shaw in a play about social mobility and class who wrote "It is impossible for an Englishman to open his mouth without making some other Englishman hate or despise him"

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My understanding was that Mapfre were resting Sophie for leg 8 after her surgery. Has anyone heard if she's back on for leg 9?

Couldn't help notice Tuke hobbling along during his post-race interview with a damaged knee. Off to the doc he said - lets hope it's not too bad.

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11 hours ago, Tunnel Rat said:
16 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Tunnel this is the place where the secrets are hidden.

https://www.volvooceanrace.com/en/noticeboard.html

Thanks for that JS. 

Why is it hidden from sight?  Even with that URL I can't find how to get there from the main menu.......  Bizarre!

The Leg 9 SI Addendum leads to an error message.  If any VOR people are reading this, please can you get the link working.  Thanks.

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6 hours ago, Miffy said:

The sport isn't as approachable and accessible to ppl and those that represent US tend to be from a certain SES.

I wonder if this Rees Mogg fellow sails? Maybe Ali G could interview Ivy League Charlie.

Vid link court'y savoir

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18 hours ago, southerncross said:

Drift:  70's still crushing it.

Volvo70_Carb600-1080x675.jpg

The American turbocharged Volvo 70 Warrior, sailed by Stephen Murray Jr. is expected to be the front-runner and their current estimated elapsed time is inside the record set last year of 3 days, 20 hours, 32 mins, 41 secs.

“Sailors superstition prevents me from predicting elapsed time, but we are optimistic we can shave off quite a bit of time from last year,” Murray said. “Our goals are a repeat of last year’s grand slam; winning CSA, IRC and a new course record, and we would also love to be the first recipient of the new Warrior Trophy for best IRC performance.

http://www.royalgazette.com/sailing/article/20180509/murray-set-to-be-front-runner&template=mobileart

According to this article, Chuny is on the crew of the German 56 Varuna.

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Sea Breeze 74 said:

My understanding was that Mapfre were resting Sophie for leg 8 after her surgery. Has anyone heard if she's back on for leg 9?

Couldn't help notice Tuke hobbling along during his post-race interview with a damaged knee. Off to the doc he said - lets hope it's not too bad.

In a couple of the interviews posted on the Itajai to Newport thread, 1) Sophie explains her absence, has been resting and rehabbing her elbow, working out to stay in form, and plans to return to this leg; 2) Tuke was injured getting thrown about while at the helm if I recall correctly; I have not seen any info on his status but wb very surprised if he was not on the next leg. 

Edited by despacio avenue
Tuke misspelled.

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10 hours ago, Miffy said:

@horatio_nelson it isn't Charlie's fault. Fundamentally that's the state of US sailing for people under 40. The sport isn't as approachable and accessible to ppl and those that represent US tend to be from a certain SES. 

There's a reason why the US, despite being so large a country with such a large population and high technology focus, isn't really known as a sailing power house. 

That is quite obvious when you see what colleges and universities in the US have competitive sailing teams. The vast majority of them, and there are not that many teams in total, are Ivy League or almost Ivy League. 

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6 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

I wonder if this Rees Mogg fellow sails? Maybe Ali G could interview Ivy League Charlie.

Vid link court'y savoir

Rees-Mogg is a real person, not a parody as he often seems - he's an MP and a good bet for a future leader of the Conservative Party, and potentially Prime Minister of a completely fucked post-Brexit UK. I'm not kidding. We're doomed.

String the pencil-necked entitled posh boy up. I hate him and everything he stands for.

/drift

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1 minute ago, horatio_nelson said:

Rees-Mogg is a real person, not a parody as he often seems - he's an MP and a good bet for a future leader of the Conservative Party, and potentially Prime Minister of a completely fucked post-Brexit UK. I'm not kidding. We're doomed.

String the pencil-necked entitled posh boy up. I hate him and everything he stands for.

/drift

He might...just might become leader of the party, but there's no way the general public will vote for him in great numbers.

Then again, the general public were stupid enough to vote for Brexit!!!

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5 hours ago, despacio avenue said:

That is quite obvious when you see what colleges and universities in the US have competitive sailing teams. The vast majority of them, and there are not that many teams in total, are Ivy League or almost Ivy League. 

Collegiate sailing in the US began at MIT in 1935. MIT is not an Ivy League school. Last fall's collegiate rankings contain only 4 Ivy League schools for men and 5 for women in their respective top 20 teams:

 

Sailing World’s College Rankings, presented by Gill, are determined by an open coaches poll. For more information on the poll, or on how your team’s coach can become a part of it, click here. The number of first place votes a team received is in brackets.

COED

Rank Team Total Points
1. College of Charleston (SC) 274
2. Yale University (CT) 268
3. Georgetown University (DC) 246
4. Boston College (MA) 239
5. Dartmouth College (NH) 206
6. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MA) 203
7. Stanford University (CA) 183
8. Hobart and William Smith Colleges (NY) 182
9. U.S. Naval Academy (MD) 177
10. George Washington University (DC) 146
10. Roger Williams University (RI) 146
12. Boston University (MA) 128
13. Tufts University (MA) 127
14. St. Mary's College of Maryland (MD) 116
15. Harvard University (MA) 111
16. U.S. Coast Guard Academy (CT) 88
17. Bowdoin College (ME) 60
18. Hampton University (VA) 52
19. Brown University (RI) 48
20. Old Dominion University (VA) 37

Also receiving votes: Connecticut College (CT), U.S. Merchant Marine Academy (NY), Fordham University (NY), University of Rhode Island (RI), Cornell University (NY), University of Pennsylvania (PA), SUNY Maritime College (NY), Jacksonville University (FL), University of South Florida (FL).

 

WOMENS

Rank Team Total Points
1. Yale University (CT) 289
2. U.S. Coast Guard Academy (CT) 261
3. Boston College (MA) 250
4. University of Rhode Island (RI) 220
5. College of Charleston (SC) 208
6. Georgetown University (DC) 207
7. Dartmouth College (NH) 200
8. Stanford University (CA) 172
9. Brown University (RI) 170
10. Boston University (MA) 169
10. George Washington University (DC) 153
12. Connecticut College (CT) 116
13. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MA) 108
14. Hobart and William Smith Colleges (NY) 100
15. Harvard University (MA) 93
16. Tufts University (MA) 88
17. Cornell University (NY) 74
18. University of Pennsylvania (PA) 70
19. University of Vermont (VT) 69
20. U.S. Naval Academy (MD) 38

Also receiving votes: St. Mary's College of Maryland (MD), Bowdoin College (ME), Northeastern University (MA), Old Dominion University (VA), University of South Florida (FL), Roger Williams University (RI), Eckerd College (FL), Fordham University (NY).

 

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19 hours ago, horatio_nelson said:

I respect his sailing CV and credentials, but he really comes across as an entitled, preppy Ivy League prick sometimes. Something a bit sneery and arrogant about him.   

im-projecting.jpg

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1 hour ago, jackolantern said:

im-projecting.jpg

You need to up your game a bit

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14 hours ago, Grey Dawn said:

Collegiate sailing in the US began at MIT in 1935. MIT is not an Ivy League school. Last fall's collegiate rankings contain only 4 Ivy League schools for men and 5 for women in their respective top 20 teams:

 

Sailing World’s College Rankings, presented by Gill, are determined by an open coaches poll. For more information on the poll, or on how your team’s coach can become a part of it, click here. The number of first place votes a team received is in brackets.

COED

Rank Team Total Points
1. College of Charleston (SC) 274
2. Yale University (CT) 268
3. Georgetown University (DC) 246
4. Boston College (MA) 239
5. Dartmouth College (NH) 206
6. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MA) 203
7. Stanford University (CA) 183
8. Hobart and William Smith Colleges (NY) 182
9. U.S. Naval Academy (MD) 177
10. George Washington University (DC) 146
10. Roger Williams University (RI) 146
12. Boston University (MA) 128
13. Tufts University (MA) 127
14. St. Mary's College of Maryland (MD) 116
15. Harvard University (MA) 111
16. U.S. Coast Guard Academy (CT) 88
17. Bowdoin College (ME) 60
18. Hampton University (VA) 52
19. Brown University (RI) 48
20. Old Dominion University (VA) 37

Also receiving votes: Connecticut College (CT), U.S. Merchant Marine Academy (NY), Fordham University (NY), University of Rhode Island (RI), Cornell University (NY), University of Pennsylvania (PA), SUNY Maritime College (NY), Jacksonville University (FL), University of South Florida (FL).

 

WOMENS

Rank Team Total Points
1. Yale University (CT) 289
2. U.S. Coast Guard Academy (CT) 261
3. Boston College (MA) 250
4. University of Rhode Island (RI) 220
5. College of Charleston (SC) 208
6. Georgetown University (DC) 207
7. Dartmouth College (NH) 200
8. Stanford University (CA) 172
9. Brown University (RI) 170
10. Boston University (MA) 169
10. George Washington University (DC) 153
12. Connecticut College (CT) 116
13. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MA) 108
14. Hobart and William Smith Colleges (NY) 100
15. Harvard University (MA) 93
16. Tufts University (MA) 88
17. Cornell University (NY) 74
18. University of Pennsylvania (PA) 70
19. University of Vermont (VT) 69
20. U.S. Naval Academy (MD) 38

Also receiving votes: St. Mary's College of Maryland (MD), Bowdoin College (ME), Northeastern University (MA), Old Dominion University (VA), University of South Florida (FL), Roger Williams University (RI), Eckerd College (FL), Fordham University (NY).

 

Yes, this is what I looked at when I made my post. The vast majority of these schools are if not "Ivy", then what I would call "elite", which is in some cases "almost Ivy. MIT, , Conneticut, Tufts, Georgetown, Bowdoin, Tufts, BC, etc. and/or amongst the most competitive, difficult schools to get into and definitely amongst the most expensive in the US. The Naval Academy would be included in the "highly competitive/difficult to get into" category.
Exceptions would  be (some of which are "also receiving votes" on one of the lists) Vermont,Hampton, Roger Williams, RI, USCG, Old Dominion, USF, Eckerd (which frankly I had never heard of).  

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18 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

I see what you mean

 

Yes, he's a special kind of stupid that one.

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23 hours ago, despacio avenue said:

That is quite obvious when you see what colleges and universities in the US have competitive sailing teams. The vast majority of them, and there are not that many teams in total, are Ivy League or almost Ivy League. 

Exactly, poor people can get into college to play ball but sailing.........not so much.

Seriously though the Collegiate system does seem to undermine the local club based competition in the US. Most other places most of the young sailors have to fight their way up pretty much.

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On 5/11/2018 at 1:45 AM, southerncross said:

No stone left unturned for SEB in Volvo Ocean Race Legends Race.

Drift:  Good read.  A recount of SEB and the 01 - 02 Edition.

Just wondering how many so called "Legends" will actually race in that "Legends Race" ? Or will it be just the boats crewed by whoever likes to pay to pretend to be one?

Also noticed in the article: "The leg was also notable for the absence of Dutch navigator Marcel van Trieste, who on hearing news of his mother's death, had jumped overboard to be picked up by a RIB as the boat rounded Eclipse Island, near to the coast of Australia." 

Always thought that if you go on a RTW Race, that you do the Race, and forget about family matters, however "triest" (sad) that may be...

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Eclipse Is near the coast of Australia??

 

 

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2 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

What is this college and school thing you speak of?

Dunno either, what has sailing to do with all that.

All I heard in Newport was that Brown Uni was for the Mafia kids, and thinking of it, those two have something Italian in them, isn't it?

Full disclosure: I myself went to both MIT and then Harvard, honestly! 

All in one afternoon, on my bicycle, from Boston Harbor. :lol:

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57 minutes ago, Fiji Bitter said:

Full disclosure: I myself went to both MIT and then Harvard, honestly! 

You have two prisons named MIT and Harvard on that island? Weird coincidence. I didn't think Ivy grew in the tropics?

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Did I read comments above that the North Atlantic never, ever gets as wild as the Southern Ocean? 

Really? 

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3 hours ago, AJ Oliver said:

Did I read comments above that the North Atlantic never, ever gets as wild as the Southern Ocean? 

Well, did you? (grin) To be sure, the recent reports of that "monster wave" being the largest ever wave recorded are qualified "in the southern hemisphere" so one would have to assume larger ones have been recorded in another hemisphere...

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42 minutes ago, thengling said:

Well, did you? (grin) To be sure, the recent reports of that "monster wave" being the largest ever wave recorded are qualified "in the southern hemisphere" so one would have to assume larger ones have been recorded in another hemisphere...

A bouy about 70 miles from here recorded 27.81 meters in  2014, just saying.

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29 minutes ago, chuso007 said:

just saying

nice hemispheres, btw chuso.

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12 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

You have two prisons named MIT and Harvard on that island? Weird coincidence. I didn't think Ivy grew in the tropics?

Reminds me of an Eccles joke. (Eccles was a character in a BBC Radio comedy from way back with Peter Sellers, Harry Seacombe and Spike Milligan)

There was an advert for a new Editor of the Sunday Times "Must have been to Cambridge (Univ)."

So Eccles is in an ante room wearing a hessian sack, both feet in the same army boot and a smart Cambridge TIe.

The 'toff' opposite asks "Are you hear for the position of editor?"

Eccles replies "Yuh"

Toff "I see from your tie that you've been to Cambridge"

Eccles replies "Yuh".

Toff "And what were you doing in Cambridge?"

Eccles "Buying a tie!"

Stupid really but it still cracks me up

SS

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13 hours ago, Fiji Bitter said:

Just wondering how many so called "Legends" will actually race in that "Legends Race" ? Or will it be just the boats crewed by whoever likes to pay to pretend to be one?

Also noticed in the article: "The leg was also notable for the absence of Dutch navigator Marcel van Trieste, who on hearing news of his mother's death, had jumped overboard to be picked up by a RIB as the boat rounded Eclipse Island, near to the coast of Australia." 

Always thought that if you go on a RTW Race, that you do the Race, and forget about family matters, however "triest" (sad) that may be...

Obviously not visited or read the site.

The "Legends" are boats that have done the race before. The likes of Rothmans, Ericsson, Flyer 2 will be there. 12 entries so far I understand, some still to be announced. Looking forward to seeing them in Gothenburg.

Just sayin'