southerncross

VOR Leg 9 Newport to Cardiff

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6 minutes ago, DtM said:

I thought she hit one button right on. She was 31 so she didn't cover an under 30 spot.

Also her size.  Too small.  But maybe she could fit as a consultant for the VOR?  She seems to think she has ideas.

Interested to hear Norbowgirl's experience getting rides on Rags for example.  Surprised it was so difficult for a double medalist to get a Hobart ride.

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Norbow did a delivery return from Hobart.  Jo didn't seem to have trouble getting deliveries.

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12 minutes ago, DtM said:

Norbow did a delivery return from Hobart.  Jo didn't seem to have trouble getting deliveries.

I thought she first tried to get a ride?

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Even  being a S2H race veteran and after being on SCA last edition Sophie Ciszek on Mapfre didn't just get a ride at the drop of a hat in 2016. She ended up on Matt Allens Ichi Ban coming second in Div 1.

The girls do get a tough trot whether we like to accept it or not.

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10 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Even being a S2H race veteran and after being on SCA last edition Sophie Ciszek didn't just get a ride at the drop of a hat in 2016. She ended up on Matt Allens Ichi Ban coming second in Div 1.

Wow.

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On 5/13/2018 at 10:00 AM, mad said:

I had to find and reload mine to get it to work. 

There ya go... Thx.

 

Edit: I think they bounce faster than before :huh:

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19 minutes ago, chuso007 said:

There ya go... Thx.

 

Edit: I think they bounce faster than before :huh:

:lol:

They do!!!

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5 hours ago, chuso007 said:

I think they bounce faster than before

Nah, that just one of the facts of life as we get older

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TEAM BRUNEL TAKES OMEGA 24-HOUR SPEED RECORD LEG 8

Team Brunel, skippered by race veteran Bouwe Bekking took the Omega 24-hour speed record in Leg 8 of the Volvo Ocean Race. On the 2nd of May at 17:47 UTC Team Brunel counted 525.45 nm in 24 hours. Team Brunel ended Leg 8 after a nail-biting finish in a second place.

Abby Ehler: “It’s another sort of stripe on your shoulder of what we have achieved. We may not have won the leg but we definitely have shown that we got really good boat speed by winning that award.”

https://brunelsailing.net/us/en/news/Omega-speed-record-leg-8

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Former winner illbruck on start line for Volvo Ocean Legends Race

by Marie Båge 14 May 08:16 PDT14-30 June 2018

illbruck at Volvo Ocean Legends Race © Daniel Forster

yysw202844.jpg

Former race winner, illbruck will join other V.O.60s SEB, Assa Abloy and Amer Sports One on the startline of the Legends Race this summer. All four boats raced together in Volvo Ocean Race 2001-02.

In total the Legends fleet, which will race from Gothenburg to The Hague, will be around 12 yachts. Illbruck is now named 'Glashäger' and owned by SAILUTION company in Germany.

Illbruck was the first German yacht to secure victory in a leg and in the overall race. She finished in first place on four legs, was second twice and fourth on three occasions. Spectator boats on the Kieler Foerde were so tightly packed for the finish, that it would have been possible to cross the water with dry feet.

Nowadays, illbruck is very well maintained and ready to race. She regularly takes part in major German offshore races and nearly always finishes on the podium. She is still one of the most famous German racing yachts. She will race the Legends with a mixed team of German and Polish sailors. "We are proud to bring the boat to the starting line of the 2018 Legends Race and look forward to joining the rest of the legendary fleet", says Oliver Schmidt-Rybandt, technical director of the SAILUTION company, the new owner of the boat.

Today she is the flagship of a fleet of the three Speed sailing Volvo Ocean 60s, together with SEB from the Volvo Ocean Race 2001-02, and also a Legends entry, and Toshiba, from the Whitbread Round the World Race 1997-98.

https://www.sail-world.com/news/205228/illbruck-on-startline-for-Volvo-Ocean-Legends-Race

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Volvo mini-series Pt1: Abby Ehler

In this five-part mini-series, Rob Kothe speaks to the British sailors in the Volvo Ocean Race as they prepare to set off on Sunday 20 May from Newport, to the UK stopover in Cardiff. First up is Team Brunel’s Abby Ehler.

Lymington sailor Abby Ehler is sailing in her third Volvo Ocean Race. She was the boat captain and bowman on Amer Sports Too in 2001-02 under her maiden name of Seager. She sailed aboard SCA in the 2014-15 race and now the 42-year-old is the boat captain in this 2017-18 VOR aboard Team Brunel.

Brunel has surged in the last two legs; the boat was just 62 seconds off back to back leg wins.

“The young Olympic and America’s Cup sailors have brought a very different dynamic to Brunel. There is a level of intensity that is obvious from coming within a Cup campaign where every detail and every percentile is of extreme importance. While the learning curve is huge amongst the youngsters, they are just so eager to learn, to make the boat go faster and you often find they are looking for different ways of doing things which perhaps in the typical world of offshore sailing you wouldn’t
have thought of.

“It definitely brings a very new, very positive dynamic which I think is equally balanced by the experience of Bouwe and Capey and perhaps myself who have been in situations before that these guys haven’t.

“Having two women on each of the Volvo boats is a huge benefit to women in sailing. To be able to balance bringing in young female sailors or indeed sailors that have got previous Volvo experience adding to a make-up of a team, you take Brunel for example sailing with the likes of Bouwe and Capey who have racked up 15 races between them, it has just been an amazing learning experience and something you can’t gain at present by being an all-female team.

“To have that opportunity and that exposure to experience. Sailing is a sport that rewards experience. Having sailed these boats before you obviously know the boat well. You understand the intricacies of things that go wrong and that is important in keeping the boat on the water.”

On the next leg to Cardiff, Ehler says she is excited about the prospect: “I’m really looking forward to sailing back into the UK on the next leg, it’s pretty exciting actually.

“In my early days with Amer Sports 2, the race started out of Southampton and that was a big deal to sail from your home country. I am expecting there will be a huge spectator fleet and a huge welcome into Cardiff. The city is renowned for hosting big events and doing it well, it has revamped itself massively over recent years, so I am sure they will be putting on a great show and I am really looking forward to sailing back into the UK.

“Our family is Lymington based. It has been a little different this race with my six-year-old son Harley at school, so I have been travelling back and forth during stopover time. (This time the commute has dropped from 30 hours to three)

“At the end of any big race like this it takes time to recharge the batteries and just enjoy the life back at home and on land. In 2019 I will certainly be going back to join the team who I worked with for the America’s Cup and then will just see what comes. It will be interesting to see how the next Volvo Ocean Race unfolds and I will be following closely what happens next.”

Check back in tomorrow, Tuesday 15 May for the next in this mini-series.

http://www.yachtsandyachting.co.uk/articles/news-and-events/volvo-mini-series-pt1-abby-ehler/

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On the town.  New York. New York.

Busy trip: @teamAkzoNobel's Chris Nicholson & Martine Grael just wrapped up a visit to NYC. First, a trip to @cnnsport , followed by stop at #TimesSquare, all before heading back to Newport for a busy week of prepping for Leg 9 in the #volvooceanrace

Screen Shot 2018-05-14 at 12.41.29 PM.png

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Scally pressing the flesh..for effectively a private team they seem to more commercial than the commercials.

 

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47 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Scally pressing the flesh..for effectively a private team they seem to more commercial than the commercials.

Pressing the flesh.  Earning that ride.  Does it well thanking the mum's on Mother's Day.

CEO saying the future is bright.

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1 hour ago, southerncross said:

CEO saying the future is bright.

Not unexpected ..I think that is only second time I seen him speak. Certainly low profile guy for what is supposed to be a high profile show.

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Sailflow forecast shows big air from the SW at the start on 5/20 

It could be a very fast trip to Deheubarth  . . . 

(I claim no expertise whatsoever on either weather forecasting or Welsh nationalism) 

What must it feel like on those boats when they are surfing faster than the waves ? 

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'No-stop' week in Newport

05-14-208 |

Seven days after his epic victory in Newport, MAPFRE returns to the fray in a week full of action in the Race Village of the sailing capital of the United States; and on Sunday, the ninth stage begins. This is how the week presents itself.

© Maria Muina I MAPFRE. Newport Race Village.

The spectacular victory of MAPFRE in the last stage is already part of the remarkable history of the race but now it is time to look ahead. Yesterday, Monday began a week full of activity in Newport, the sailing capital of the United States. Seven days in which the Spanish team has a lot to do before crossing the Atlantic back to Europe.

Boat to point (without leaving the water)
One of the peculiarities of the stop in Newport is that it is one of those in which the boats can not leave the water to use to make a complete maintenance of the boat.

A diver watches the bottoms and removes appendages like rudders and jibs for maintenance on land. The stick is not removed either.

Today Tuesday: Return to 'cole'
From day 9, the following one after its arrival in Newport, the crew of MAPFRE has been recovering the sleep and rest lost during the stage. They have all stayed in Newport, some with short trips to Boston or New York, and visit the sporadic Race Village for details and medical check-ups.

Today, the holidays end on Tuesday. It's back to school. And the first training in the water is planned.

Wednesday: Official Training Regatta
In this one they all have to be. The first official test in the same field of regattas and with a route similar to that of the coastal race that will play on Saturday.

It will start at 2:00 pm local time, 8:00 pm in Spain.

Thursday: Pro-Am
Day for 'Pros' and' Amateurs to sail together. In Newport there will be a total of races after which a single winner will emerge.

They do not score in the general classification, nor in the InPort Race Series.

Friday: Acts of the V Centenary
In Newport there will be room for the celebration of the V Centenary of the first round the world initiated by the Portuguese sailor Fernando de Magallanes and completed by the Spaniard Juan Sebastián Elcano. And here we will inform you of it.

On Friday there will also be the traditional meeting of skippers and navigators prior to leaving the stage, the bosses' press conference (at 8:30 p.m.) and at night the official awards ceremony for the eighth stage.

Saturday: Coastal
In this stop the tables change a bit with respect to the previous ones with the dispute of the coastal race one day before the start. It will be a correcalles in Narraganset Bay, in front of the Newport Race Village.

The kick-off will sound at 2:00 pm local time (8:00 pm in Spain) and you can follow it live on our website ( www.desafiomapfre.com ) and official Facebook channel (www.facebook.com/desafiomapfre) .

Sunday: Start the stage to Cardiff! 
The departure of the return to Europe will be on Sunday 20 at 14:00 local time (20:00 Spanish time) and as you can not also follow it live from 15 minutes before the scheduled time of departure.

It is the last long leg of this 2017-18 edition, a 3,300-mile transatlantic crossing from Newport (USA) to Cardiff (Wales). It is another stage of the classics, a status that is recognized as the last one that scores double. 14 points at stake plus the extra point for the winner.

http://desafiomapfre.com/semana-no-stop-en-newport/

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2 hours ago, southerncross said:

A diver watches the bottoms and removes appendages like rudders and jibs for maintenance on land. The stick is not removed either.

What do you think of this?  Haven't looked at the weather but the Atlantic could be a big one.

Such an important and pivotal Leg point - wise not to scrutinize the boats as in previous stop overs, especially the stick.  

Nowhere in Newport Harbour to pull the boats and sticks?  RO negotiating with the city for this particular landing while foregoing thorough maintenance?

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Plenty of marine services available in Newport. 

Just not part of the VOR plan to have the full boatyard in Newport. If teams need services, like Lisbon, Melbourne - supposed non-service legs quickly become service legs. Not like there's any penalties this time around :D

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1 hour ago, southerncross said:

What do you think of this?  Haven't looked at the weather but the Atlantic could be a big one.

Such an important and pivotal Leg point - wise not to scrutinize the boats as in previous stop overs, especially the stick.  

Nowhere in Newport Harbour to pull the boats and sticks?  RO negotiating with the city for this particular landing while foregoing thorough maintenance?

They had a full service and refit in Itajai, then a fairly benign trip north. No serious reported issues.  The two boats that have had collision damage on their keels have been allowed to lift briefly to inspect properly, but no other work allowed, or been necessary.

There are plenty of places for the work to be done, but restricting the teams is the best way of cutting costs. It also keeps the rich from getting all the advantages.

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I was being facetious about there not being a yard. 

I remember some pretty hairy Atlantic crossings.  Shouldn't an Atlantic crossing be treated like an SO crossing?  Just sayin'.

Passing time in the blackout.

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I was at Fort Adams yesterday. MAPFRE was not at the dock. I heard they were at a boatyard. What are they having done? Keel?

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1 hour ago, Rennmaus said:

It's been some time since we've seen something by/about/with Martine, hence...

https://edition.cnn.com/videos/tv/2018/05/14/olympic-medalist-joins-round-the-world-race.cnn

Thanks Ren.  She looked good there.  Interviewer mentioned her Dad and the Olympic medals but not that he had won the race once before.  Salient point I would think.

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18 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Weather gods not liking Newport..rain through to the start except Thursday.

The forecast is TERRIBLE for the in-port race on Sat. I was going to take the (young) kids out on the (exposed) center console boat, but 53 degrees + easterlies + steady rain = the wife might not allow this to happen. Ugh. 

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Seven arrested during bar fracas at Volvo Ocean Race stopover at Rhode Island

Last updated 09:52, May 16 2018

VOLVO OCEAN RACE

The Volvo Ocean Race fleet docked at Newport, Rhode Island in the United States.

United States police arrested seven people linked to the Volvo Ocean Race after a rowdy night in Rhode Island during the current stopover.

The arrested included 55-year-old Australian Andrew Cape who is navigator on Peter Burling's Dutch entry Team Brunel.

Cape was arrested on charges of assaulting a police officer and disorderly conduct, according to a report in the Providence Journal on Wednesday (NZT).

1526422168039.jpg

Team Brunel's Australian navigator Andrew Cape.

Cape appeared in court and pleaded no contest to the disorderly conduct charge.

The charge was filed, meaning it could be removed from court records in a year provided they faced no new charges.

The charge against Cape of assaulting a police officer was dismissed.

He was ordered to pay a US$200 contribution to Boys & Girls Clubs of Newport County.

The clubs benefited to the tune of US$1300 as the court took a measured approach to all involved.

The report said the incident started when police were called to the popular Clarke Cooke House, a bar and restaurant built in 1780 that sits on Bannister's Wharf on Rhode Island, around 1am.

The full watch of nine Newport police was called to get control of the situation. 

They found about 100 people at the scene but, according to police, several people refused to leave the building and move away from fire trucks so firefighters could go inside to reset an alarm.

The report said police alleged Cape, a veteran of six round the world races, pushed patrol officer Bradford Coyle in the chest and swore at him, saying he wasn't going anywhere.

Police said Coyle tripped while trying to get control of Cape's arm and fell on top of him onto a curb. According to police, Stefan Coppers, 36, of Amsterdam, Netherlands, then jumped on the officer's back.

When patrol officer Brittany Foster stepped in to help Coyle, Coppers turned and came at her in a threatening manner, police alleged.

Coppers had charges of assaulting a police officer, obstructing police and resisting arrest dismissed.

Police said all seven arrested were linked to the round the world race and records show several were part of the race's administration.

All of them had their disorderly conduct charges filed.

The other five who appeared in court were Simon Botes of Spain, Isabel Hall of Britain, Timothy Newton of Britain, Martin Ostrowski of Poland and Deirdre Waters of Australia.

https://www.stuff.co.nz/sport/other-sports/103939766/seven-arrested-during-bar-fracas-at-volvo-ocean-race-stopover-in-newport-rhode-island

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Nothin' like a fracas.  Cape's rearing to go.

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Police said the following people were also arrested after an investigation:

-Simon M. Botes, 33, of Palma De Mallorca, Spain, on a disorderly conduct charge. He was taken to Newport Hospital and later treated and released. Botes pleaded no contest to the charge, which was filed.

-Isabel Hall, 30, of London on a disorderly conduct charge. Hall pleaded no contest to the charge, which was filed. She was also ordered to make a $100 contribution to the Boys & Girls Club.

-Timothy F. Newton, 55, of Apthorpe, England, on charges of disorderly conduct, resisting arrest and assaulting Patrol Officer Matthew Sardinha. He pleaded no contest to the disorderly conduct charge, which was filed. He was also ordered to make a $300 contribution to the Boys & Girls Club. The resisting arrest and assaulting a police officer charges against Newton were dismissed.

-Martin Ostrowski, 33, of Olsztyn, Poland, on charges of disorderly conduct and resisting arrest. Police said Ostrowski was taken to Newport Hospital and later treated and released. He pleaded no contest to the disorderly conduct charge, which was filed. He was also ordered to make a $200 contribution to the Boys & Girls Club. The resisting arrest charge against Ostrowski was dismissed.

-Deirdre Waters, 31, of Queensland, Australia, on a disorderly conduct charge. She pleaded no contest to the charge, which was filed. She was also ordered to make a $100 contribution to the Boys & Girls Club.

Attorney Craig Hein of Newport, the attorney for all seven who were arrested, told The Daily News on Tuesday he had no comment.

Newport police Lt. Frank Rosa said it was his understanding all the people involved in the incident were connected to the international sailing race, which is in town until May 20. He also said no police officers were injured in connection with the incident. Otherwise, Rosa referred questions to Sail Newport, the host organization for the race stopover here.

“At this point, we’re going to refrain from any comment,” Rosa said.

A call from The Daily News to a Sail Newport spokeswoman Tuesday afternoon was not immediately returned.

http://www.providencejournal.com/news/20180515/newport-police-7-in-town-for-volvo-race-arrested-outside-restaurant

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I didn't see this as one of the stopover attractions?

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Let's start a new thread and see how many are appalled by this behavior unbefitting professional sailors blah blah blah.

Things are slow.  In fact, I think I will.

 

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This is awesome.... bar room brawls and resisting arrest .... It's about time these people acted like sailors... No Witty..?

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1 minute ago, PIL007 said:

This is awesome.... bar room brawls and resisting arrest .... It's about time these people acted like sailors... No Witty..?

Knew something was missing.  Just couldn't put my finger on it.

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2 hours ago, PIL007 said:

This is awesome.... bar room brawls and resisting arrest .... It's about time these people acted like sailors... No Witty..?

He had borrowed a police uniform to help facilitate a getaway but someone accidently decked him. 

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5 hours ago, southerncross said:

Nothin' like a fracas.  Cape's rearing to go.

Sailors will be sailors. So what's new? :)

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"Keeping the team together and willing can make a difference"

05/15/2018 |

Pablo Arrarte is one of MAPFRE's guard chiefs, as well as one of the best rods in the fleet, as peers and rivals in the world of sailing qualify him. He recognizes that he is shy, calm, cold and wants to win the Volvo Ocean Race. 

Pablo Arrarte © Ugo Fonollá / MAPFRE / Volvo Ocean Race

The holidays are over, 'back to school' in Newport ...
Yes, the priority now is that the boat is one hundred percent again. After the break today we sail, check the sails, set the boat ... that is ready to train a little, do the coastal on Saturday and then the stage. That the people put the batteries and we are all in march to face the following stage, that is going to be very decisive.

What do you think will be fundamental in what remains of the Volvo Ocean Race to achieve the final victory? 
They are many things as always, but I think we are now at a point where all the teams and the crew are quite tired physically and psychologically. We have a lot of tute and many intense months, and I think that keeping the team and the crew together and willing can make a difference. In that sense I think we are very well. We work well together, we know each other very well. And then, of course, do not relax and keep pushing the boat to the fullest. Give everything, everything, even if we are tired so that the ship continues to pay a hundred percent. These are our objectives.

It is said fast, but how is that union achieved? 
That's something that started many months ago, when Xabi chose the crew. I think he formed an excellent human team in which we all blend very well. He has covered all the key points and all the areas, and in that sense we have all taken a lot of trust between us and we support each other a lot, so we complement each other very well. Xabi did an excellent job and that is why today we are as we are, so united and so strong.

Do you think that the victory in extremis in the last stage may have touched the morale of the other teams or maybe you can unite them more? 
I think that this last victory of ours, and especially having been so "in extremis", has been a bit of a blow for the rest of the teams. Obviously we are all professionals of this, we have all lived these things and it is something that does not take you down but it can touch you a little bit, that a boat comes so from behind and in the end it ends up happening to you, regardless of why it happened.

So I think it's something that can help us. The other teams are, in quotes, a tad more touched, but they are very strong teams. Brunel has shown throughout the lap that he has never come down, he has even had an uphill curve, and Dongfeng has always been fairly regular without having won any stage. I think that if we get a little confidence in that - Dongfeng for its regularity and Brunel for its good results in the last stages - it can also be something in our favor.

But well, you never know ... They are always things that you imagine or that you always try to think positive and what favors us, which is a bit of what it is, to come out positive.

At the end of the stage from New Zealand to Brazil, Cape Horn, his boss Xabi Fernandez said that the time had come to be more aggressive and less defensive, but now they are again leading and with a fairly short lead ... Is the focus now? 
Although we have not talked about it yet, in my opinion I think we have to go out and do our race. Obviously we can not neglect either Dongfeng or Brunel, which are two teams that are very close, but we have to do our race and maybe one of the mistakes we have made in the last stages is that we have been too defensive at times, I think we have to attack, make our race and trust ourselves.

I think that will be the key, so if we manage to do it that way and get it right, it will be perfect.

http://desafiomapfre.com/mantener-el-equipo-unido-y-con-ganas-puede-marcar-la-diferencia/

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^^^ Typical Spanish...where were they when the Cookhouse/Candy Store Rumble in the Jungle went down? Redoing their Crossovers in Old Latin just to be sure and then lights out at 9.00?

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1 minute ago, jack_sparrow said:

Typical Spanish...where were they

 

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^^^ well obviously not hung over and in jail. Some teams at Stopovers go pear shaped after 6.00 pm...some do crossword puzzles.

So SX you Mapfre fanboy. it now down to Pissed or Puzzles as the difference?

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Back to Europe with Joan Vila

05/16/208 |

Sunday begins in Newport (United States) the ninth stage of the Volvo Ocean Race, which brings the fleet back to Europe after half a year sailing through the waters of Africa, Asia, Oceania and America. It is the last stage that scores double of the remaining three, the last long and one of classics around the world. In Newport, four days after departure, we chatted with the navigator Joan Vila about what is coming and what has come so far.

In Newport it's cold, and it's raining. Today it seems that they have given truce to the umbrellas but not to the double layers. The base of MAPFRE is in the middle of that of Dongfeng and Vestas. On the top floor there is a terrace and a single office, that of the crew. That's where they meet, where they do the office work, where they study the 'meteo'. And that's where we meet Joan Vila, navigator. " Can you? "

3,300 miles. From Newport (Rhode Island, USA) to Cardiff (Wales). A classic.

It has been a competition for more than a century to cross from one side of the Atlantic to the other by boat. Charlie Barr, three-time champion of the America's Cup, won the Kaiser's Cup in 1905 on a schooner. At that time it took a little more than 12 days, a spectacular time considering that nowadays, 113 years later, it is expected that the fleet of the Volvo Ocean Race will take about nine days (day and a half up, day and a half down ) to get to Cardiff.

Joan Vila has been sailing for more than 40 years and more than 30 years as a professional in this sport. In all this time there have been many projects that have worked and there is no doubt that as a good navigator adds a good string of Atlantic crossings. More than 20? " Less surely, I would have to start counting !" Then he begins to enumerate and count on his fingers. Final answer: " Maybe a fortnight ."

Will you remember the first one? " The first time I crossed the Atlantic, I went from Lorient to Saint Pierre et Miquelon with Fortuna Lights. We did it back and forth, and when we left the port of Miquelon it was closed by ice ... ". Moral: heat, heat does not cross the Atlantic ...

MAPFRE_180515_MMuina_1903.jpg?w=2160

In front of him he has two computers and on the right a kind of tablet. Numbers, maps, arrows ... all a sketch of colors that seems to be spinning. Yes, the 'meteo' of the next stage.

" We are limited at the beginning by the traffic zones, of separation of navigation, and there are enough from the exit of Newport until passing Boston. From there the doors are opened and the main limitation is the ice zone, but this year it is very north and that gives more opportunities to different routes. Basically, from there it will be a bit with the wind, "he tells us while looking at infinity.

" The main question at this point is how much North to win, which will depend a bit on the Azorean anticyclone that seems to be quite north in the middle of the Atlantic ." Pim, pam, pum, we have already highlighted: 'The main question is how much North to win'.

"I believe that at this stage there are several long-term options. The information is so good and the parts are so reliable that the Atlantic allows you to lose a bit at the beginning and then earn more at the end. In other stages in which the forecasts are more uncertain you are more conservative, but the Atlantic models are usually much more precise and more reliable ".

The last edition of the Volvo Ocean Race in which Vila participated, in addition to the current one, was that of 2001-2002, more than 15 years ago and the world has changed a lot since then. MAPFRE leads the general but will it be enjoying the race? "Yes, of course, I do not regret having done it although it is hard and tired ."

Oblivion is a mechanism of memory. Maybe that's why I did not remember how demanding, long and tired this race is. " The truth is that no, I did not remember it, but the bad things are always forgotten. What I do remember is that at the end of each round the world you tell yourself that this has been the last and that you will not repeat them again, but then you repeat ". 

It is clear that the Copa America, in which he has been fully involved in the last 10 years of his life, is not the same. "That also tires but at the end there are rest times in which you can relax a bit more, but both are, for different reasons, very tired. Although the races are a sprint, the Copa America is also a marathon for the preparation, you start a few years before and it seems that you will not have time to do things. "

We thank you for your time. Smile and say: " No problem ". And then he returns to his arrows, his maps, his colors, his 'meteo'.

http://desafiomapfre.com/de-vuelta-a-europa-con-joan-vila/

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4 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

So SX you Mapfre fanboy. it now down to Pissed or Puzzles as the difference?

I guess I am a fan boy.  How can you not be?  

4 hours ago, southerncross said:

They are many things as always, but I think we are now at a point where all the teams and the crew are quite tired physically and psychologically.

We'll see how much is in the reserve tanks of the teams.

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1 hour ago, southerncross said:

I guess I am a fan boy.  How can you not be?  

We'll see how much is in the reserve tanks of the teams.

Time to sort the adults from the children. Fuck this woolly, touchy feely PC world! 

What I really mean is, "Time to sort the men from the boys".

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This is just a great video.

 

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3 hours ago, southerncross said:

This is just a great video.

 

In the first scene the driver is tethered to the lower lifeline.  Next scene, somebody has tethered him to a padeye by the wheel.  An improvement.  

The driver is barely moving the helm and the boat isn't apparently not doing any surfing.  Rock solid but loaded up.

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42 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

The driver is barely moving the helm and the boat isn't apparently not doing any surfing.  Rock solid but loaded up.

And we though her doing a 350 mile day in the Southern Ocean was nuts. Times sure have changed.

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4 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Amazing revelation from Kenny saying the Dong should not be counted out.

He said the same exact same thing about Mapfre when they were in 5th place last Leg.

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4 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Amazing revelation from Kenny saying the Dong should not be counted out.

 

Worst video this edition of the race? (Note, I am not a Read hater, but this was just kicking in wide-open doors for a minute).

Can we get this leg underway? I am ready to stare at the tracker again.

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19 minutes ago, Zander said:

Can we get this leg underway? I am ready to stare at the tracker again.

I'm pretty certain Niall said the tracker would go live for the rest of the remaining legs! I've been so productive at work these last 10 days but now I'm fucked again - couldn't they just update once an hour or something?

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2 hours ago, Zander said:

Worst video this edition of the race? (Note, I am not a Read hater, but this was just kicking in wide-open doors for a minute).

Actually you are being super kind. The condescending prick talking them up after his brother was largely responsible for the Finish Line debacle that has helped put them where they are.

Newport is some sort of protected species and gets talked up way out of proportion to reality. Last edition had the worst Race Village traffic of all Stopovers and Pitstops. This edition with the wet weather it will be barely a blip.

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Team crew member announcements due shortly.

I actually look forward to that to also see where OBR's end up. Blake primo OBR this edition and unexpectantly Carlin has been disappointing. Maybe him getting close to Ireland this leg we might see a change?

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49 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

I actually look forward to that to also see where OBR's end up.

Yeah, I can't fucking wait for that!

Fallin-asleep.jpg

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10 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Amazing revelation from Kenny saying the Dong should not be counted out.

 

I like Ken, but he is the ultimate pro, he can present shit to the script and look convincing.

He's just talking shit up.

 

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4 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Team crew member announcements due shortly.

I actually look forward to that to also see where OBR's end up. Blake primo OBR this edition and unexpectantly Carlin has been disappointing. Maybe him getting close to Ireland this leg we might see a change?

Sailing Around the World, in His Father’s Footsteps

By CHRISTOPHER CLAREYMAY 17, 2018

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NEWPORT, R.I. — Long before Peter Blake was killed by a Brazilian pirate in the Amazon in 2001, he talked at the dinner table with his young son James about the privileges that came with successfully sailing around the world.

“He always told me that you couldn’t put your elbows on the table until you’ve gone around Cape Horn,” James Blake said.

Blake, now 31, has joined the club at last: rounding “the Horn” this year during the Volvo Ocean Race, the grueling round-the-world event that his father competed in five times — and won once — when it was called the Whitbread.

The Volvo started Oct. 22 with seven teams sailing from Alicante, Spain, to Lisbon. The race has 11 legs total with the ninth starting Sunday and the teams sailing from Newport to Cardiff, Wales. The race is scheduled to finish in The Hague in late June.

Blake is in the midst of his first participation, and he is playing a very different role than his father, who was a skipper and central figure worldwide in yachting until his death at age 53.

Blake is an onboard reporter, or OBR — one of 10 men and women hired by the race to deliver video, photography and written material from the boats. The OBRs are, by job definition, fly-on-the-deck observers and are not permitted to help with the performance of the yachts (although they can do lots of cooking).

But impartiality can prove elusive when you share very cramped quarters and the perils of ocean racing during legs that can stretch to 7,600 nautical miles and last more than 20 days.

“The most important thing is telling the story, but it’s a fine line we all have to dance between telling the good, the bad and the ugly,” Corinna Halloran, a former onboard reporter, once said.

That dance, never straightforward since embedded reporting became part of the Volvo in 2008, has been particularly challenging during this edition of the race, which has twice turned tragic.

In January, a fisherman was killed after the Danish-American team, Vestas 11th Hour Racing, collided with a Chinese fishing boat. Then in March, John Fisher, a British sailor with the Hong Kong-based team Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag, was lost at sea and presumed dead after being swept overboard about 1,400 nautical miles west of Cape Horn.

James Blake is one of 10 men and women hired to deliver video, photography and written material from the boats. CreditJesus Renedo/Volvo Ocean Race

Largely for legal reasons, the race released little detailed information from on board Vestas after the January incident. Konrad Frost, the OBR on Scallywag during the fatal leg in March, stopped reporting after it became clear that Fisher had been lost.

“Konrad is a very experienced cameraman, and it was his judgment on what should and should not be captured,” said Brian Carlin, the OBR team leader. “Konrad stood down and did not continue, and I think that was only right.”

Fisher’s loss was an emotional blow.

“It’s definitely been a big shock to everyone,” Blake said. “My initial thoughts were just with his family, because I have a little bit of experience with what they are going through.”

Blake was 14 when his father was killed during an environmental research mission.

The society’s yacht, Seamaster, was anchored in Macapa near the mouth of the Amazon delta when a small band of masked river pirates came aboard with guns drawn and balaclavas in place. Peter Blake, in an attempt to protect his crew, fired a rifle and was shot twice in the back by Ricardo Colares Tavares, who was later sentenced to 36 years in prison in Brazil for the murder.

Peter Blake became an icon in New Zealand, where sailing is an intermittent national obsession. He was imposing with a bushy mustache, and though plenty of Kiwi sailors won more regattas, he had a rumpled charisma and persistence. He finally won the Whitbread on his fifth attempt, sweeping all six legs during the 1989-90 edition as skipper of Steinlager 2.

After managing an unsuccessful challenge for the 1992 America’s Cup, he was the syndicate head in 1995 when Team New Zealand won yachting’s most prestigious trophy for the first time. He played the same role off the water again in 2000 when the team successfully defended the Cup at home in Auckland.

During those campaigns, his lucky red socks became a national symbol (and fund-raising vehicle), worn by Prime Minister Jim Bolger and other New Zealanders in honor of a small nation’s ability to punch above its weight.

James’ older sister, Sarah-Jane, is an artist who is married to Alistair Moore, one of Peter Blake’s former crew members on Seamaster. James and Sarah-Jane grew up sailing with their father and British mother, Pippa, on family cruises in places like New Zealand’s Bay of Islands and Scotland’s west coast.

He holds dual British-New Zealand citizenship but was raised and educated mainly in the United Kingdom, where he remains based when he is not being buffeted by winds and doused by seawater with a camera or drone control in hand.

“These boats are very, very wet,” James said. “Sometimes it just feels like you are underwater.”

Blake might not be an offshore racer, but he shares his father’s adventurous streak. In 2012 he rowed from Australia to New Zealand with three companions, losing about 40 pounds during the 51 days it took to complete the crossing. He and a friend are attempting to develop a foiling kite boat to make a trans-Atlantic crossing.

Peter Blake at the 1990 Whitbread Round the World race, which would become the Volvo Ocean Race.CreditSimon Bruty/Allsport, via Getty Images

A cameraman by trade, he has focused, until now, on wildlife and historical documentaries, including work on the British polar explorer Ernest Shackleton.

“I’ve never really covered sport before,” Blake said. “Lots of sharks and whales, but this popped up, and it’s a bit of a challenge really. I like filming expeditions and people going through a bit of hardship, so for me this has been a chance to look into that basically, and it’s also been quite nice from a personal point of view seeing what Dad went through.”

He was encouraged to apply for the Volvo OBR role by Leon Sefton, head of television and video for the race. Sefton is the son of Alan Sefton, a former journalist who became Peter Blake’s biographer and aide-de-camp.

The family connection surely did not hurt in making the final cut among the 140 candidates who made it through the initial vetting process.

“The Blake family is always an important part of this race, but James got here on his merits as a cameraman,” Carlin said. “It’s just an added bonus that he happens to be Sir Peter Blake’s son.”

The OBRs rotate from crew to crew in this edition, and Blake has sailed with three different teams during the first eight legs of this race.

He was aboard Dutch entrant Team AkzoNobel for the third leg from Cape Town to Melbourne, Australia, when the boat’s mast track broke in December amid 50-knot squalls.

“We’re in the middle of absolutely nowhere and you see this dip in how everyone is feeling, like we’re screwed basically,” Blake said. “And I’d say within five minutes everyone was back up and running. There was a game plan, the humor was back and everyone got on with it, so that will really stick with me.”

But the highlight so far for Blake was rounding the Horn: documenting the huge seas and seeing the albatrosses his father spoke about so often.

“You see these birds that put no apparent effort into being down there, and we’re 10 men and women in a boat struggling just to stay afloat,” Blake said. “And you see them flying around up there, and you wonder what they’re thinking of you. It’s quite amusing.”

Blake and the rest of the crew did manage to stay afloat, and when they arrived in Itajai, Brazil, in March they made their way to a restaurant to celebrate the return to terra firma.

“It was a nice meal out,” Blake said. “And everyone was putting their elbows on the table.”

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/17/sports/sailing/blake-volvo-ocean-race.html

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Volvo Ocean Race mascot has a special meaning, message

By Laura Damon The Newport Daily News

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NEWPORT, R.I. — The albatross is a large and powerful seabird steeped in nautical lore. That, coupled with its unfortunate tendency to consume plastics in the ocean, made it the perfect mascot for the Volvo Ocean Race.

“Using an iconic species like the albatross that is threatened raises a lot of awareness” about the current state of plastic ocean pollution, said Lucy Hunt, sustainability education program manager for the race.

Wisdom the albatross is the official mascot for the race. Whoever dons the feathery costume, which changes hands among volunteers at every stopover village, represents a real female Laysan albatross from Midway Atoll in the Pacific Ocean. Wisdom was tagged in the 1950s and is believed to have mothered 35 chicks. She’s at least 60 years old — above the average lifespan of the species — and she’s remarkable also because she seems to understand not to eat plastic, Hunt said.

Albatrosses can weigh up to 22 pounds and they have the largest wingspan of any bird, reaching up to 11 feet. With their long wings, albatrosses ride ocean winds and can glide for hours without a single flap. They are known to follow ships at sea, waiting for scraps to pluck, but some say albatrosses trail sailors because they embody the souls of people lost at sea; they are signs of good luck.

But albatrosses don’t have the greatest luck themselves. Since they feed on surface-dwelling creatures in the sea, plastic materials frequently make their way into their stomachs. Wisdom, presumably wise beyond her many years, avoids the plastics, but she’s an exception.

On a brilliantly sunny afternoon May 9 in the Race Village media tent, Hunt whipped out her laptop computer and pointed to a photo of the contents of an albatross stomach. It was filled with lighters and plastic bottle caps. The image is part of an online, interactive learning program for children that Hunt designed as part of the Volvo Ocean Race Sustainability Education Programme. The online educational resources are a new component of the race this year.

Anyone can access and download the educational materials, free of charge, Hunt said. The materials can be accessed at volvooceanrace.com/en/sustainability/education.html. They’ll be available throughout the duration of the race — which will span until late June — and probably for some time after, Hunt said.

Designed for children ages 6 to 12, but also suitable for adults who want a crash course in marine-related history, geography or scientific curricula, the learning program includes colorful infographics and worksheets that Hunt created.

The resources are available in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Dutch and Chinese. So far, individuals in 37 countries, from Ghana to Great Britain, and more than 65,000 students have accessed the materials, Hunt said.

Sporting events like the Volvo Ocean Race serve as excellent platforms to raise awareness about issues like plastics in the ocean and educate people, Hunt said — especially young people.

“The animals really draw in the kids,” Hunt said. Wisdom the Mascot serves as a fun, feathery and vibrant character for children and she encourages them to learn more about how plastics in the ocean affect animals like albatrosses.

Wisdom can be spotted on any day at the Race Village, but she’s a significant symbol for the One Ocean Exploration Zone, which is open through May 20.

One of the goals of the One Ocean Exploration Zone — which features more than 20 exhibitors, including Clean Ocean Access and the University of Rhode Island — is to broaden awareness of stressors affecting the marine environment. An estimated 3,750 students are expected to check out the Exploration Zone, Hunt said.

Nicole Herget, 20, an upcoming junior at the University of Rhode Island, donned the Wisdom costume May 9 and made the rounds at the stopover village. “I think Wisdom brings a lot of energy,” Herget said as she flapped her wings and took pictures with a few gleeful patrons.

http://www.independentri.com/independents/arts_and_living/article_dfba20b4-5db5-5f5e-b647-8f45bfbe1b3f.html

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Wales cleans up with 47 Blue Flag beaches

In annual awards reflecting high-quality beaches, Wales has received 47 Blue Flags and 83 Seaside Awards

Will Coldwell

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Llangrannog in Ceredigion has received both a Blue Flag and Seaside Award. Photograph: Alamy Stock Photo

The Welsh coastline continues to shine when it comes to clean beaches, boasting more Blue Flags than any other stretch of UK coast.

Forty-seven Welsh beaches were awarded Blue Flag status in this year’s awards, which are given to beaches that comply with a number of criteria, including water quality, environmental management, safety and services. Wales has also received 83 Seaside Awards, which recognise beaches that achieve the highest standard of beach management and, for bathing beaches, also meet the required standards for water quality.

The announcement comes as Wales celebrates 2018 as its “Year of the Sea”. Next month the Volvo Ocean Race will come to Cardiff, while this year also marks 30 years of the Blue Flag programme in Wales.

In England, 65 Blue Flags and 125 Seaside Awards were awarded with the south-west receiving 26 flags plus 50 Seaside Awards, with Great Western beach in Newquay was awarded a Blue Flag for the first time.

Feeling inspired? Then plan your next beach break with the help of our guides to the UK coast, from Pembrokeshire’s secret seascapes to an art adventure in Southend-on-Sea and a foodie tour of Whitby. We’ve also got selections of the best beaches chosen by readers, and the best of the UK seaside chosen by authors, writers and locals.

https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2018/may/17/wales-cleans-up-with-47-blue-flag-beaches

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At the Volvo Ocean Race, Teammates Turn Into Rivals, for Now

New York Times By Christopher Clarey

May 17, 2018

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NEWPORT, R.I. — Fast friends and sailing stars, Peter Burling and Blair Tuke have won Olympic gold and the America’s Cup together in the last two years, but their career paths are diverging for the moment in their first attempt at the Volvo Ocean Race.

They are on different teams and in a race not only to finish first in this round-the-planet contest but in a race to complete what could be considered the ultimate sailing triple.

Rivalry, not usually their thing, has become part of the equation.

“They are giving each other stick all the time but they’re also best mates,” said Bouwe Bekking, the skipper of Team Brunel, the Dutch syndicate that employs Burling.

Last week, while Burling shuffled around downtown Newport in his flip-flops on a cool and overcast afternoon, Tuke was in a Newport hospital recovering from a knee infection that had turned serious during the last leg of the Volvo.

“I think he’s about as bored as he’s ever been, sitting in a hospital bed, not being able to do anything,” Burling said before paying him another visit. “He’s pretty lucky the infection only happened a couple of days before the end of the leg. Otherwise, probably he would have had to be air lifted off the boat, because it starts getting pretty risky with your health.”

Tuke, when reached by telephone shortly before he was due to be discharged, confirmed his predicament. “Forced rest, but I’m pretty good, thank you,” he said. “Just a cut that got infected, and it was pretty painful, but other than that I’m good for next weekend.”

Good for the next and ninth leg of the Volvo that is set to begin here Sunday and finish in Cardiff, Wales. The trans-Atlantic leg is the last long phase of the race, which is scheduled to finish in The Hague in late June.

Despite his injury, Tuke — not Burling — is in the best position to become the first sailor to win Olympic gold, the America’s Cup and the Volvo.

With three legs remaining, his syndicate, the Spanish team Mapfre, has a three-point lead in the standings over Dongfeng Race Team of China. Team Brunel is in third place, 11 points back of Mapfre: still technically in contention but with no room for any more mistakes after a shaky start to the race and after allowing Mapfre to slip past them late to win the leg between Itajai, Brazil, and Newport.

The final margin was 61 seconds: a blink of the eye after a 5,700 nautical mile trek.

“They took the opportunity we gave them, but we shouldn’t have given them the opportunity,” Burling said.

Burling, 27, and Tuke, 28, have not had many true setbacks in their sailing careers. After winning silver at the 2012 London Olympics in the 49er, they dominated the class for years and carried the flag for New Zealand at the 2016 Rio Olympics before winning gold.

They then played leading roles in their first America’s Cup with Emirates Team New Zealand in Bermuda on a foiling catamaran last year: outwitting and outperforming Oracle Team USA.

Burling had the higher profile, becoming the youngest helmsman in the Cup’s 167-year history to win it. But Tuke had the more diverse sailing portfolio, helping to produce hydraulic power as an onboard cyclist while trimming the foils that allowed the catamaran’s hulls to rise completely out of the water at the right speed.

Sailing the Volvo Ocean 65, a design class intended to cut costs and prove durable over the long haul, is not quite such a thrill.

“It’s fast but it’s not fast,” said Burling, arching an eyebrow as he plowed through his calamari in a Newport restaurant. “You’d probably get beaten by a single-handed Imoca 60 right now with a guy that’s asleep sitting on autopilot.”

The race still provides plenty of adrenaline rushes: The Southern Ocean at any speed is a bucket list challenge. But Burling’s reaction helps explain why the Volvo organizers are considering a switch to the Imoca class, used in the single-handed Vendee Globe race and now often capable of foiling.

“The Volvo shouldn’t go with these boats anymore because they are getting outdated,” said Bekking, the Dutch skipper competing in his eighth edition of the race. “The new generation of sailors, they want to have something fast and flying, so I think it will go in that direction or at least I hope it will.”

Whatever the choice, the risk-reward ratio will remain different in this event than the America’s Cup or Olympics.

“Peter’s whole background is in the details, like when he talks about the Cup, it’s about sailing on that red line all the time,” Bekking said. “And that of course is the big difference with us because if you are on that red line and you snap something out in the open ocean, you lose out terrible. So that balance, I think we had to show him a couple of times, ‘O.K., take the pedal off the metal now. We have to survive.’”

The learning curve has been relatively steep for Burling and Tuke. But though both are looking ahead to a possible defense of their Olympic title in Tokyo in 2020 and to an America’s Cup defense in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2021, they are interested in nipping their Volvo rivalry in the bud.

“After the America’s Cup, with the time frame, it was hard to pull a team together,” Tuke said. “But it’s something we want do together in the future, and we’re already talking about a campaign for the next time around.”

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/17/sports/sailing/peter-burling-blair-tuke-volvo-ocean-race.html

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7 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Newport is some sort of protected species and gets talked up way out of proportion to reality. Last edition had the worst Race Village traffic of all Stopovers and Pitstops. This edition with the wet weather it will be barely a blip.

Inshore racing still on tap before Volvo fleet departs

Attendance at the race village at Fort Adams so far has lagged the numbers from 2015, but officials hope a good final few days of weather and some racing events will help pick things up.Despite the poor weather, more than 40,000 people visited Fort Adams during the first week of the Volvo Ocean Race stopover, the only North American port during the 2017-18 global circumnavigation.

In the final four days, organizers are crossing their fingers for clear skies so they can approach the 130,000 fans who visited the race village during the 2015 edition. The busiest two days, highlighted by inshore racing Saturday in the East Passage and Sunday’s departure from Narragansett Bay, still lie ahead.

“Newport is a special stopover for the sailors because it is such a sailing-oriented town,” said Jamestown resident Susan Maffei Plowden, stopover director. “Three years ago, the number of race fans floored the sailors with attention and knowledge of the sport. We’re off to a similar start this year.”

The village is open from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily through Sunday. Visitors can cruise aboard a J/22 sailboat or experiment with underwater robotics in the interactive One Ocean Exploration Zone. They also can experience the fleet’s spartan living conditions by exploring a full-size hull of a Volvo Ocean 65 boat or watch 15-minute movies about ocean conservation in the globe theater.

The 2017-18 Volvo Ocean Race officially resumes Sunday with the start of the ninth leg, a 3,300-nautical-mile passage across the North Atlantic Ocean to Cardiff, Wales. The leg is estimated to last 10 days. It will be a fierce battle as the top two boats are only separated by three points. Even boats below MAPFRE and Dongfeng Race Team in the standings, including the American team, Vestas 11th Hour Racing, are relying on the transatlantic leg because it is worth double points.

http://www.jamestownpress.com/news/2018-05-17/News/Inshore_racing_still_on_tap_before_Volvo_fleet_dep.html

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Mastervolt introduces the Charge Mate Pro 90

The new Charge Mate Pro 90 works differently. It always prioritises the primary battery whilst still charging the secondary. This reduces the risk of a slat cranking battery significantly.

http://www.boatadvice.com.au/mastervolt-introduces-charge-mate-pro-90/

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When fried food is good for the sport

Published on May 16th, 2018

While the sport of sailing may seem “green” on the surface, the carbon footprint extends far within the infrastructure of race management and the logistics of each team. And whereas some regatta venues seek to combat their impact by sorting trash and offering water fill stations, the USA stopover for the Volvo Ocean Race is going deeper into the problem.

A blend of 20 percent biodiesel (B20) is being used in vessels, generators and diesel-powered land vehicles throughout the Newport event. The biodiesel for the event is supplied by Newport Biodiesel, a local biodiesel producer, which uses recycled cooking grease from restaurant “galleys” throughout New England to produce biodiesel for more than a decade.

“During the 2015 stopover, we saved more than 12,000 pounds of carbon dioxide from entering the atmosphere and we hope to reach a similar or greater amount this year,” said Dr. Robert Morton, chairman of the board for Newport Biodiesel. “Biodiesel is an excellent, low carbon alternative to petroleum diesel and a great fit for environmentally-conscience boaters.”

Biodiesel is a domestically-produced, clean-burning diesel replacement made from an increasingly diverse mix of resources, including agricultural oils, recycled cooking oil and animal fats. Compatible with all diesel engines without modification, biodiesel blends can be used in many types of marine vessels.

“Biodiesel use in marine vessels is a growing market,” says Donnell Rehagen, National Biodiesel Board (NBB) CEO. “Biodiesel not only provides similar performance characteristics to diesel but also reduces engine wear and is non-toxic, low carbon and biodegradable, making it less polluting to the ocean and the air.”

Biodiesel’s sustainability is well-documented, helping users and event organizers to quantify their environmental impact. From reductions in greenhouse gas and hydrocarbon emissions to wastewater and hazardous waste, biodiesel is delivering measurable results wherever it is used.

So when the restaurant staff asks,” Do you want fries with that?” know that you may just be doing something good for the environment.

https://www.sailingscuttlebutt.com/2018/05/16/fried-food-good-sport/

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Ken Read, President of North Sails, speaks about the Volvo Ocean Race

by North Sails 16 May 09:00 PDT

What's been the highlight of this edition of the race so far?

Well, first of all, I think before we get into any highlights, we have to talk briefly about the tragedy that happened in the Southern Ocean with the loss of John Fisher. I can say that it is the greatest fear of any sailor in the race to hear the words "Man overboard" and I can't fathom what that team went through with that whole situation. It makes everything we're talking about just a little less important. Let's put it that way.

With that said, the closeness of the racing and the ability for these teams to push these boats hard, especially in windy running conditions, has been incredible. I think the on the water footage with drones has completely changed the race and really has the potential to change the sport. To see the views that we did in the Southern Ocean from the drones - I don't think anybody ever expected to see anything like that. Many of us have lived it, but it looks a little scarier when you're seeing it from a drone!

What's been the biggest surprise so far in this race?

I think the consistency of Dongfeng Racing Team so far has been nothing short of spectacular (of course leading up to the final 10 miles of the Newport Leg when it changed a lot!). Could they go all the way and win the race without ever actually winning a leg? Time will only tell, but it's been pretty amazing so far.

Do you miss not sailing in the Volvo?

There are times I miss it - I miss the camaraderie. I miss the boats. I miss the development that we had with the Volvo 70s, pushing the limits in different ways from what is happening with these one design boats. But I can say, at the age of 55 (or whatever I am!) I think my final Volvo as a sailor is probably behind me, and I'm having fun being a spectator and second guessing everything that everybody does on the water like they used to do to us all the time.

How do you see the final part of this race unfolding? Do you think it will end up being a procession, or do you think there'll be a lot of potential changes and opportunities for teams who aren't up at the top?

Well, if I remember correctly, the Transatlantic leg is double points, so there's still a lot to be had there. The last few miles of the Newport leg shows that there is no such thing as a procession. That kind of thing still keeps several of the teams in the game. Clearly, Brunel has found the gear that they were searching for desperately at the beginning of the race. I don't think you count any of the top three or four teams out at this stage as they're all sailing really well, and the speeds seem to be getting more even by the day.

How are the sails performing?

I think this is the greatest test that North 3Di products can go through, which is why it's so important for us to be a part of this race. Just watching the fury that these boats are being sailed at is incredible, and the sails are taking it. I'd say five years ago, 10 years ago, nobody would've thought sails could last through what they're being pushed at right now. 3Di is passing with flying colors.

It was unfortunate the Mapfre mainsail broke at Cape Horn, but that is really the only major break to date - everything comes with consequences and this breakage was the result of a series of events and some extreme weather. The fact is that the sail lasted for 10 days of horrendous conditions after the mast track broke and they had to take several of the luff slides off the sail, including batten end slides, so they could reef the sail around the broken track. As they were heading up on the wind around the Horn with a ton of cunningham on the sail finally paid the price. I think, in retrospect, that sail actually lasted way longer than anybody ever would've thought it would've under those conditions. And the fix and then thousands of miles of sailing after the fix also shows that the sails are unbelievably tough.

Have there been any things that have surprised you about the sails in this edition, including the sails that they've used the most, when teams have changed out sails, and any sails that you thought would be used more than they have been?

There have been a couple changes in this race, first of all, the tweaks to the rules and the sail sizing in the front of the boat has led to triple head sailing, that is an incredibly common occurrence it seems. What that has also then done is put up enough sail area to make the boats go fast enough VMG sailing that the apparent wind stays far enough forward and the actual downwind sail, the A3, isn't being used very much, because the boats are going fast enough with this triple head rig using the huge Masthead Code 0's. They're really using a masthead genoa / code zero as the downwind sail as well as the light air up wind sail. It's kind of thrown an amazing wrench into what people considered to be the sail plan and the sail usage chart before the race started.

Then, finally, the masthead blade (J0), which is the new sail for this edition, was really meant to fill a wind range upwind that was basically lacking in the last race - the kind of nine to 13 knots range. The fact is, they haven't had a whole lot of upwind work in this race so far with the new route. That masthead blade has become an incredible 120 degree wind angle blast reaching sail. Really twisty high aspect sail, supposedly very, very fast. There's always lots of development and lots of opportunity for the people who figure things out quicker than everybody else and that sail has really led to some interesting development.

Does the Newport stopover have special significance for you?

Well, the Newport stopover has special significance for me because, yes, it's my hometown, but secondly, it's very sad that, in my two editions of the race, we didn't stop in Newport. That would've been really fun.

Newport opens its arms wide to the Volvo race and really show off the area well. For the only North American stopover, it really should be something to behold. Hopefully we get the same weather as we got during the last edition when it came to town because that weather just turned out fantastically for not only all the spectators but for the boats themselves.

So we need a little luck with the weather, but all in all Newport will show its best. I guarantee that.

Any thoughts on the future of the race?

Well, the future of the race is interesting. Obviously, there were some leadership changes within the Race made right at the beginning of this edition. With any leadership change comes question marks, so I really look forward to sitting down with the current Volvo leadership (and hopefully the sponsors too) and seeing how we can help to ensure this great race carries on. There's a lot of us that have a lot of time invested not just in the sailing part of this but in the race itself. There is no doubt that it's a race that you grow to love, and we need this race to continue because it's really still considered the premier offshore race with stops, and we need it for the sport of sailing and for the development that happens because of it.

https://www.sail-world.com/news/205314/Ken-Reads-thoughts-on-the-Volvo-Ocean-Race

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1 hour ago, southerncross said:

News Courtesy of SX

Attendance at the race village at Fort Adams so far has lagged the numbers from 2015, but officials hope a good final few days of weather and some racing events will help pick things up.

The 2014/15 edition traffic figures were pathetic despite all we have been told. This year's numbers were looking no different rain or shine before the race started. They will now be courtesy of weather the worst for any stopover possibly on record.

Newport attendances and therefore perceived penetration into the Nth American market for any sponsor of this race is a disaster by any objective assessment.

The only exception is the RO selling cars into their second highest market (behind China) and most valuable in terms of growth in recent years and ironically far better than when Ford a US Co, owned the brand.

The RO therefore enjoys the luxury of others funding that US marketing campaign and yet those underwriting it  get scant benefit from doing so. 

The RO's marketing/financial model borders on having elements of a Ponzi scheme where others pick up the tab providing the music doesn't stop.

I'm pretty puzzeled as to why this doesn't get any airplay? Reluctance to upset the apple cart and the only cart in town I suppose?

The reality is the barriers imposed by the RO to a wider and more retail sponsorship base (by branding it as their own) being subservient to their own marketing asperarations is effectively murdering this race by a thousand cuts. 

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I sorta hope Tuke gets the Triple - he's a good sport, as is Burling. 

And it's appropriate to remember John Kostecki too - he came sooo close. 

Almost all the great Kiwi sailors are good sports 

They'll give you a hand up after they beat the crap out of you. 

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Kind of great interviews when you let the press in and don’t try to control the media output.

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Don't miss the Witty interview Jack ^^^.  It's got everything and more.

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23 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Don't miss the Witty interview Jack ^^^.  It's got everything and more.

Shit what didn't he cover...nearly every fuckwit statement about the MOB, (some poeple here should really give themselves an uppercut), the go forward and stealing Volvo's "we are out' thunder. The last one is a killer. Looks as though I get my wish ;-)

 

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On 5/16/2018 at 9:53 AM, PIL007 said:

This is awesome.... bar room brawls and resisting arrest .... It's about time these people acted like sailors... No Witty..?

Even he was surprised.

 

 

18 hours ago, southerncross said:

Volvo Ocean Race mascot has a special meaning, message

By Laura Damon The Newport Daily News

5afc8c9d0396d.image.jpg?crop=1107,774,59

NEWPORT, R.I. — The albatross is a large and powerful seabird steeped in nautical lore. That, coupled with its unfortunate tendency to consume plastics in the ocean, made it the perfect mascot for the Volvo Ocean Race.

“Using an iconic species like the albatross that is threatened raises a lot of awareness” about the current state of plastic ocean pollution, said Lucy Hunt, sustainability education program manager for the race.

 

 

That is the most pathetic fucking Albatross I have ever seen.

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27 minutes ago, paps49 said:

That is the most pathetic fucking Albatross I have ever seen.

Well lucky they didn't pick this as their environmental mascot.

It is the wax worm .....when it eats plastic bags it leaves behind antifreeze.

Could be very useful for credit management in the marine trade. Some prick doesnt pay his bill, you leave behind a few in his bilge.

wax-worm-911591_1920-e1493056041304.jpg

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11 hours ago, southerncross said:

Kind of great interviews when you let the press in and don’t try to control the media output.

Blah blah fucking blah. 

Boring as bat shit.

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3 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

It is the wax worm .....when it eats plastic bags it leaves behind antifreeze.

I'll never get the image of an Aboriginal boy eating a live widgety grub in an old 8MM film we watched at school out of my head.

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