southerncross

VOR Leg 9 Newport to Cardiff

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23 minutes ago, PIL007 said:

Going to Southport I believe....

Lots of work going on ... rig out... power winches... Should be good

Thanks Pilly. That is great to hear, was worried it might just be a December boat. Powered gear makes a lot of sense.

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Just now, jack_sparrow said:

Thanks Pilly. That is great to hear, was worried it might just be a December boat. Powered gear makes a lot of sense.

X2 on the powered gear . 

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2 hours ago, southerncross said:
Can Martine beat her Dad?
2008 "Ericsson 4" 70ft, Torben Grael BRA, 596.6nm, 24.85kt

 

1 hour ago, jack_sparrow said:

That is one bridge too far but very good association SX.

Might have to rethink that they just stepped up again, albeit speeds have dropped.

Here is another association for you. Salter was on Ericsson 4.

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15 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

 

Might have to rethink that they just stepped up again, albeit speeds have dropped.

Here is another association for you. Salter was on Ericsson 4.

That’s nuts.

 

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I have mentioned up thread about the introduction of those from an AC environment where there is a lot of effort for small gains. Maybe how things are panning out here, particularly the big improver Brunel, indicates there may be something in that.

If they and maybe lesser extent Akzo were not such late starters getting on the water and Akzo didn't have the pre-race drama,  the Leaderboard might look very Dutch up top.

AMERICA’S CUP WINNERS

Crew & Team Members

BRUNEL

Peter Burling

Kyle Langford

Rome Kirby

Sam Newton

Carlo Huisman

AKZO

Simeon Tienpont

Peter van Niekerk

MAPFRE

Joan Vila

Blair Tuke

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The Dutch boats had a match race in Newport apparently.  I wonder who won?

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1 minute ago, southerncross said:

The Dutch boats had a match race in Newport apparently.  I wonder who won?

Didnt know that but would be The Newport Chamber of Commerce. They have one planned for the Hague.

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16 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Exactly ..and envious.. to get Sails number up I would have to have married 30 years before they were born. I don't think that is possible even with technology advancement these days.

Are well.... they say it's the first 45 years that are the toughest, Jack. It'll be a cake walk from here. ;)

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Vestas wind speed instruments have been wacky much of the day, showing 10+knots faster than the rest of the fleet much of the time.

- or they've had their own private breeze much of the day and not taken advantage of it.

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52 minutes ago, terrafirma said:

588.1 miles in 24 hours. Could they catch Comanche's record of 618 miles..? LOL

Some folks were doubting what I said earlier in the day about near Gale/Gale conditions. Not a lot of monohulls can be driven harder in rough condition. 

They're slow on light and medium air. But a bus can ride those conditions all day. 

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11 minutes ago, boomer said:

Vestas wind speed instruments have been wacky much of the day, showing 10+knots faster than the rest of the fleet much of the time.

- or they've had their own private breeze much of the day and not taken advantage of it.

They just slowed down to mid teens for something but now going again. The constant high TWS might also be they are driving it differently and their speed through the water is reading lower hence TWS goes up disproportionately. 

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1 minute ago, Miffy said:

Some folks were doubting what I said earlier in the day about near Gale/Gale conditions. Not a lot of monohulls can be driven harder in rough condition. 

They're slow on light and medium air. But a bus can ride those conditions all day. 

I think is also helps to have a good sea state to minimize submarine action... according to one of the videos. 

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2 minutes ago, sousou said:

I think is also helps to have a good sea state to minimize submarine action... according to one of the videos. 

Plus uno.  Perfect conditions. Loads on the rigs aren’t there as when diving into and hitting a SO swell and cross seas. 

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3 minutes ago, sousou said:

I think is also helps to have a good sea state to minimize submarine action... according to one of the videos. 

Yep. But IMOCAS won't be there at all. 

Ppl like to think of boats in rigid terms. But like cars, diff strengths and compromise. 

The other fast monohull records look for conditions that suits them. None of which are in 30 knot sustained with gusts to 40+. 

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26 minutes ago, boomer said:

Vestas wind speed instruments have been wacky much of the day, showing 10+knots faster than the rest of the fleet much of the time.

- or they've had their own private breeze much of the day and not taken advantage of it.

Yes Boomer some wacky numbers even now. TWS +40 TWA 152deg.

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1 hour ago, terrafirma said:

588.1 miles in 24 hours. Could they catch Comanche's record of 618 miles..? LOL

 

23 minutes ago, Miffy said:

Some folks were doubting what I said earlier in the day about near Gale/Gale conditions. Not a lot of monohulls can be driven harder in rough condition. 

They're slow on light and medium air. But a bus can ride those conditions all day. 

That may well be Miff but anyone who said prior to leaving Newport a boat would just fall shy of Ericsons pre Comanche world 24hr record would have been laughed out of town.

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31 minutes ago, Miffy said:

The other fast monohull records look for conditions that suits them. None of which are in 30 knot sustained with gusts to 40+. 

Exactly the conditions Comanche had and in worse sea state. Also had it sustained hence breaking the West East Record by a country mile. I would rather be on these things than Ericsson though waiting for the bow to fall off.

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27 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

They just slowed down to mid teens for something but now going again. The constant high TWS might also be they are driving it differently and their speed through the water is reading lower hence TWS goes up disproportionately. 

Most all the day long the past 16 hours - no way - there's a glitch somewhere.

6 minutes ago, paps49 said:

Yes Boomer some wacky numbers even now. TWS +40 TWA 152deg.

Yup Paps - Been like that for the most part the last 16 hours.

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 Alex Thompson has the single handed on 2017 Boss @ 536 Miles.

Will a crew make that much of a difference?

Discuss.

 

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TTTOP is sending it right now. Go Dee.

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7 hours ago, Potter said:

Not sure why Simeon deserves a speed record. He is literally just the figurehead. 

Nicho and Nicolai are ribbing the show... and a bloody good job they are doing. 

I typed “need” and not “deserved” as in nice for marketing purposes, brand exposure, building a name etc etc. and was not suggesting that Tienpont should get all the credits. Indeed a bloody good job by the crew of AKZO. And of TBRU for that matter.

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So by looks of it, everything cloggy goes high and rest goes low, fingers crossed!

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Since Akzo passed Yellow around 13 hours ago the Painters have squeezed out overnight another 8nm on Yellow,  30nm on Vestas and 20nm on the Dong. In this fleet those are pretty impressive numbers for a drag race.

Whatever they put in the freeze dried I hope there is another box of it.

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2 hours ago, southerncross said:

Will a crew make that much of a difference?

Nah they just take up space and blow out the wet weather gear budget. There are all playing cards now I reakon.

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Both red boats eyeing their first targets Vestas and TTOP...

Herman any chance you’re running that washing machine of yours again soon? :) 

On the happy marriage advice, I can only say it has a lot to do with illusions about who really is in charge; being able to cook a damn good casserole and steak; some nice energy for after hours; allowing for some hobbies to spin out of control.... and so forth and so further. I take courage from what SBD said that after 45 years it will be a cake walk :D

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12 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Since Akzo passed Yellow around 13 hours ago the Painters have squeezed out overnight another 8nm on Yellow,  30nm on Vestas and 20nm on the Dong. In this fleet those are pretty impressive numbers for a drag race.

 Me thinks Bouwe is saving the boat, if you want to win you first need to finish. 

That said, numbers are very impressive and it looks truly awesome. 

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18 minutes ago, Elisa said:

Both red boats eyeing their first targets Vestas and TTOP...

Herman any chance you’re running that washing machine of yours again soon? :) 

On the happy marriage advice, I can only say it has a lot to do with illusions about who really is in charge; being able to cook a damn good casserole and steak; some nice energy for after hours; allowing for some hobbies to spin out of control.... and so forth and so further. I take courage from what SBD said that after 45 years it will be a cake walk :D

Oh, I know who is in charge, and it certainly isn’t me!

 

love that horse head film from Brunel by the way.

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I think Brunel is happy were they are, and Akzo is converging.
Nice gull wing ahead in a day. Straightish dragrace till then.

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1 hour ago, Elisa said:

Me thinks Bouwe is saving the boat, if you want to win you first need to finish.

No one is having to do that ..if you feel safe you sail fast. They will all be on J0's and triple headers.

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They do look like they are having fun, surprisingly.

I too wonder whats in those bags....

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And who is this Squid bloke ?

How can he possibly know Scally and the Plastics are going to cross the entire fleet, pick up Mapfre along the way and go North for Christs sake?

 

plotter..JPG

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1 hour ago, LeoV said:

I think Brunel is happy were they are, and Akzo is converging.

Lap it up Leo...it has been the day of the Flying Dutchmen.

hqdefault.jpg

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Charlie's sphincter is tightening..the Dong has crawled up another 5nm closer to his underware in the last two hours. The Dong and Yellow are the only ones just staying with the Kaleidoscope Kids.

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Thread drift.

Was having a look at Simeon's profile and saw this....

Who he is: One of the Netherlands' highest profile sailors, Simeon has twice won the America's Cup and first participated in the Volvo Ocean Race in 2005-06 onboard the Dutch boat ABN AMRO TWO. He became hooked on the Volvo Ocean Race at an early age after watching his hero, Dennis Conner, in the Whitbread Round the World Race in 1993-94

It got me thinking. Can you imagine Dennis on one of these?

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1 minute ago, paps49 said:

Thread drift.

Was having a look at Simeon's profile and saw this....

Who he is: One of the Netherlands' highest profile sailors, Simeon has twice won the America's Cup and first participated in the Volvo Ocean Race in 2005-06 onboard the Dutch boat ABN AMRO TWO. He became hooked on the Volvo Ocean Race at an early age after watching his hero, Dennis Conner, in the Whitbread Round the World Race in 1993-94

It got me thinking. Can you imagine Dennis on one of these?

It wasn’t a pretty sight on the W60. 

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When Nico said, "We must win this one", he really meant it. The paint pot is on fire.

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5 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Charlie's sphincter is tightening..the Dong has crawled up another 5nm closer to his underware in the last two hours. The Dong and Yellow are the only ones just staying with the Kaleidoscope Kids.

Yes the Spaniards are sniffing at Dee's lingery as well.

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ace ExpertsGeverifieerd account @RaceExperts 12 min.12 minuten geleden  @volvooceanrace 24-hour Distance record! (PROVISIONAL) @teamAkzoNobel have surpassed the previous record of 596.6 Nm set by Ericcson 4 in 2008. They have sailed 597.03 Nm which could still increase!

yep, flying Dutchman indeed.... Is one knot not the minimal delta for a record ?

24,87625 knots average speed

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1 hour ago, paps49 said:

And who is this Squid bloke ?

How can he possibly know Scally and the Plastics are going to cross the entire fleet, pick up Mapfre along the way and go North for Christs sake?

 

plotter..JPG

The Squid bloke is doing his best, but fortunately for him he lies down on a pillow at night with Barry White doing the romancing for him.

There are 7 Nav's out there gnashing their teeth trying to find the only door marked, "1st In First Out" and not ones all marked "1st In & Wallow".

Then after some layline pencil madness they then have the Tidal Dance of Death to deal with. Once tied up they won't have any teeth left while Mr Squid brushes his with a contented smile on his face.

 

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6 minutes ago, paps49 said:

Yes the Spaniards are sniffing at Dee's lingery as well.

And I'm in so deep 
You know I'm such a fool for you 
You've got me wrapped around your finger 
Do have to let it linger?

Linger (y) :D

Sorry Paps. Couldn't help taking the Michael.

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5 minutes ago, LeoV said:

ace ExpertsGeverifieerd account @RaceExperts 12 min.12 minuten geleden  @volvooceanrace 24-hour Distance record! (PROVISIONAL) @teamAkzoNobel have surpassed the previous record of 596.6 Nm set by Ericcson 4 in 2008. They have sailed 597.03 Nm which could still increase!

yep, flying Dutchman indeed.... Is one knot not the minimal delta for a record ?

Bloody hell, Comanche next!!

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Squid is taking into account the special settings needed for Scallywag, the flyer setting.

Squid projection on VOR tracker more trustworthy in this case.

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2 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

FUCK...and some time still left in the tank to better it.

 

 

Ha. Those V070's are so last year!!!

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2 minutes ago, Sailbydate said:

And I'm in so deep 
You know I'm such a fool for you 
You've got me wrapped around your finger 
Do have to let it linger?

Linger (y) :D

Sorry Paps. Couldn't help taking the Michael.

Ling bloody Gerry  SBD!!

Oh sorry mate, after 40 years you probably don't remember!!! :)

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3 minutes ago, paps49 said:

Ling bloody Gerry  SBD!!

Oh sorry mate, after 40 years you probably don't remember!!! :)

Well Paps, I admit it is hard to find the PERFECT woman. I like Jack's chances with the twins though.

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AkzoNobel - SMOKINNNN!

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highest VMC 28.8 knots spotted a while ago for Akzo... SOG 29.8knts. 14;57 5-24

Damn effective.

Anyone spotted higher VMC ?

 

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15 minutes ago, Sailbydate said:

Well Paps, I admit it is hard to find the PERFECT woman. I like Jack's chances with the twins though.

Depends how long they stay at their mothers.  ;-)

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1 minute ago, paps49 said:

Am I correct to assume they can snip any 24 hr period they choose?

Yes, correct.

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56 minutes ago, Sailbydate said:

Ha. Those V070's are so last year!!!

Sail down the hallway I started a thread during the Newport stopover to talk about the future of the race with Volvo wanting to find the door marked Exit. Some great contributers there and some of the usual suspects drinking at this bar.

Anyway as you can imagine that thread  has naturaly invited opinions thick and thin on OD/65 versus Box Rule/70 platform as being needed to sustain the races future, amongst many subjects including marketing.

Following this extraordinary  development and while tempted to use the Quote button, I have refrained, as I have found God after my Herman  Head Explosion upthread. So I simply said a Baker is now needed to be found to make a large order of Crow Pies :-) 

Anyone is welcome to join in, I'm shouting the bar there for the next 24 hours on account of this most remarkable thing being achieved in what many regard as a shit box, including me at times.

 

 

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Quite an amazing days racing.

In the last 30 hours......

Azco has gone from -10nm to +10 nm on Brunel and broken her very still warm class record.

All have lost ground on the leader.

The Dong has taken 12nm out of Vestas.

Mapfre has taken 8.5 nm out of Ttop.

Dong and Mapfre...... err not much in it advantage Fang.

Leaving just Scally, what can you say? I reccon for a privateer  bunch of scallywags they did well and it was a better race for it.

Pretty bloody exciting really.

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1 hour ago, paps49 said:

Am I correct to assume they can snip any 24 hr period they choose?

 

1 hour ago, LeoV said:

Yes, correct.

Correct as Leo says it is a "rolling 24 hours" on account Race Control recieve on board data virtually continually and predating Ericsson's "Mono Unpowered 24 Hr Record" in 2008. 

While everyone may be scratching their heads about Akzo being just being shy of Commanche, a 100 footers record by 20 mile better in nearly identical conditions, there is a difference, albeit maybe not a lot.

Comanche without the luxury of a constant positional upfeed courtesy of the Yellow Brick long positional updates interval chosen by the RC of that Transatlantic Race, Comanche had to nominate their 24 hour start point, albeit supported roughly by their tracker for record claiming authenticity.

What that all means is Jim Clark (the ex owner of Comanche) and crew would have being glued to VOR's Twitter feed thinking "fuck me, this OD 65 Shit Box is within 20 mile of our World Record".

The only Comanche crew member not doing that Twitter stalk was Tony Mutter on Vestas.

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Race ExpertsGeverifieerd account @RaceExperts 10 min10 minuten geleden

Breaking news!! According to our Race Management System @AkzoNobel just sailed 600.1 nm in 24h. Not bad for a 65 ft monohull!  Results still to be confirmed...

---------------------------------------------

So that is 25 knts average, in the pocket.

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6 minutes ago, LeoV said:

Race ExpertsGeverifieerd account @RaceExperts 10 min10 minuten geleden

Breaking news!! According to our Race Management System @AkzoNobel just sailed 600.1 nm in 24h. Not bad for a 65 ft monohull!  Results still to be confirmed...

It's been a one-pony show out there for a while. Awesome result.

Screen Shot 2018-05-25 at 11.29.40 PM.png

Screen Shot 2018-05-25 at 11.35.30 PM.png

Edited by Sailbydate
24Hr record
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39 minutes ago, Sailbydate said:

It's been a one-pony show out there for a while. Awesome result.

For one and a half editions it has been a conga line full of drunks where some fall over and get up again. I may have said that already :-)

This entire race format, those that enter it and what is needed to do well has been turned on its ear since Hong Kong.

A mark to remember for the future noting it is not just the glory stuff like we are seeing now at the top end, leg by leg and points table stuff.

For instance Dee and the Plastics since Itajai are worthy of far more than the Leaderboard shows and a notion Charlie for instance can't honestly subscribe to, but clings to it all the same relying on the first half of this race but where he went MIA for the second half with no penalty.

Score people take note and Charlie the haircut the Dong are giving you now, you deserve after that Skips Presser in Newport. Of any team that deserves the door upahead marked "Your In But Now Wallow" your it.

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Remarkable sledding skills on the old girl.  Who knew she had it in her? 

It's more impressive to see these kind of miles squeezed out of a VO65 than it is from a boat designed to break records and with the luxury of waiting for the perfect weather window.  Well done Team Akzonobel.  And well done Simeon.  A nice reward for all the struggles.

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If they finish in the current order(and alllowing that Dongfeng still holds bonus point for fastest elapsed time):

image.png.138b28f72e5f7bc0fd3ba80ca1eda73c.png

Has anyone won the Whitbread or the Volvo without winning a single leg?

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Volvo Ocean Race-Speed From the Heart

By Dave Reed Yesterday at 10:57am

The boats are (essentially) the same, the sails identical, and the boatspeed differences at the front of the Volvo Ocean Race fleet are now close enough to be compared in decimals and single-digit percentages. Those decimals add up over thousands of miles of a leg, and it is — as any Volvo crew will attest — the incremental gains that will ultimately decide the finish order when the fleet pulls into The Hague in July.

In this age of big data, much is known of the performance of the Volvo 65, its sails and the complex method of moding the boat as conditions change by the hour at sea. Today, the boat is a measurable machine laden with sensors. Performance is now highly predictable. What it is not predictable, however, are the humans that propel it through highs and lows, storms and calms and hours of sleep and caloric deprivation. Consequently, the sailors on AkzoNobel, with support from the analytic wizards at technology giant SAP, have embarked on a game-changing effort to quantify the human X-factor. After eight grueling legs, the team is up to their neck gaiters in biometric data and they’re now grasping how predictive biometric modeling will translate directly to speed on the racecourse.

Ryan West, AkzoNobel’s performance manager, says predictive modeling is the key, and the team is early yet into the field. “We already measure trim, hull speed, angle, wind, and all of that, constantly running it through models,” he says. “We debrief after every leg and try and get faster, but we’re missing a huge component in this fleet — what’s different? The crew.”

West and his counterparts at SAP have implemented a biometric measurement program with the sailors, each of them wearing at all times offshore a Garmin Forerunner watch with an optic heartrate sensor.

“The biggest challenge was finding a device that is wearable the entire time they’re offshore,” say West. They tried chest straps, which provided good data, but was not ideal for the sailors. A wearable wrist device was the solution. A custom app on the Forerunner records heart-rate data every second while on deck and when the sailor goes below the unit automatically uploads the data to an encased Raspberry Pi. The Internet of Things computes sleep, caloric burn and provides athlete-specific, real-time data to the sailors themselves. Think of it as a personal wellness dashboard.

After a leg finish, SAP developers extract the data for a deeper dive, allowing the team to eventually compare and overlay sailor data over yacht data. “We are able to find trends that have never been seen,” says West. “The first couple of legs, simply capturing the data was a huge milestone. As far as we know, no one had gotten as much quality data offshore. The boat is its own environment and the humans act differently to it. Now we can take the environment and better understand how it will affect the sailors — before it happens.”

During a 21-day leg they can collect more than 18,000 (averaged) data points, allowing West to extrapolate daily caloric burn and individual sleep patterns. “The sailors can burn as many as 6,000 calories per day, so the more we can do to help them eat more efficiently, we can keep them at their optimum,” says West.

Disruptive sleep patterns take a toll on a sailor’s efficiency too. It’s the mental drain and the fog of four-hour watch rotations that slow maneuvers and inhibit rational decision making. Not surprisingly, West’s biometric analytics has revealed new understandings about off-watch efficiencies and what’s effecting sleep. “A lot of it is environmental,” he says.

Brad Farrand, AkzoNobel’s bowman, oversees the system on board the raceboat, and he too has a better understanding of his own traits. “I’ve learned much more about how many calories I’m actually burning and how environmental things effect sleep. For example, some bunks have more daylight than others and some guys don’t mind the light during the middle of the day, but others do.”

There are six different bunks, he adds, and each is unique when it comes to the movement of the boat. Heel angle, light, and even temperature make a big difference, says Farrand, who finds more restorative sleep from different bunks in different phases of the race. Modeling bunk preference is another tool, says West, that could make a significant impact as the sailors transition through time zones during the course of a leg.

“We’re on the cusp of — by next race — where with predictive modeling in the weather briefing in pre-leg we could be able to apply a human effect side as well,” says West. “Predicting which areas are most stressful on the crew.”

This is where the data modelers at SAP are working their magic, he says. “The more predictive we get the better we can start to look forward down the race track, applying the weather model, what the conditions will be, how they affect the sailors and how can they better adapt.”

What’s next? Perhaps integrating neurological elements to predict fatigue before it sets in, monitoring glucose levels, nutrient timing, hydration, status and many more. “Just like the yachts today have sensors all over the place, and you can see trend lines,” says West, “we could interpret how decisions are made and their outcomes based on diet and sleep.”

https://www.sailingworld.com/volvo-ocean-race-speed-from-heart

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Hope the Live features a father-daughter interview. 

More Martine! I keep hoping this will fire up my daughter to get out sailing more.

And thanks to MAPF for the subtitles

 

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LIFE ONBOARD IS STARTING TO GET EXHAUSTING

Update Thursday May 24th 23.43 UTC

We're still sending it and life onboard is starting to get exhausting. Everything, from brushing your teeth to filling your water bottle is a full contact sport. Currently going 28-30kts of boatspeed in 26kts of TWS. It's been an eventful day.

We broke the VO65 Class speed record first, had mac and cheese for dinner and Peter narrowly missed hitting a whale. He dodged it and broached out the yacht. We hit the crash cam but I can't seem to see anything in the stern cam footage. When I looked behind the boat following the broach I did see what looked like a very pale colored body and a fin coming out of the water. What could it have been?

Pete thinks he saw a bigger whale and a calf. Either way, they're off having a better evening tonight than it could have been. We'll send through the footage and let you try and see them for yourselves. We also deployed our NOAA drifter buoy for science. I asked Capey for a bit of sagely advice earlier today. He said, "Men in ships rot in port." 

Anyway. Off to the rack for a few hours and then back to editing. Adios.

Sam Greenfield

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1 minute ago, stief said:

Hope the Live features a father-daughter interview.

Incredible moment for this family.

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Two key elements to the scoring in the current tracker battle.

1. Akzo vs Brunel.  If Brunel regains the lead then it is all on for 2nd with Brunel only 2 points behind the red boats and 9 points ahead of Akzo. If Akzo maintains the lead over Brunel then it will all be on for 3rd with Brunel only 3 points ahead of Akzo.

 

2. DF vs Vestas.   If DF overhauls Vestas but Mapfre does not, then DF has a 3 point lead going into the last two legs,

image.png.76be26e12c55d590b7312223b13bc8ea.png

Of course everything changes at the high...but fun to speculate.

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Brunel reporting being exhausted (see above).  Maybe Akzo utilizing crew optimization methods is paying off.  It all comes down to which bunk you lay your head down in.

 

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"Our hopes are now in the anticyclone we will have before Ireland"

05/25/2018 |

The boss Xabi Fernández © Maria Muiña I MAPFRE

Another hard stage start for us. At this moment we are fighting to the death again to keep some options open for the future, but we have had a very hard last two days.

After the turn of the first night, we never found the wind that we expected according to the part and the truth is that the southern group did a much better job sailing with wind for a longer time and then probably waiting for what happened, and it worked for them very good as we can see now.

We were glad when we turned, since it was the plan we had before the departure, hoping to catch the north winds before a transition, but what happened was that we had a very slow transition to reach the northern winds and then the four boats in the south had gone down a lot to the ESE.

Now little by little we are able to make good speeds and our hopes are now placed in the wedge we will have before Ireland waiting for a big compression there again. 

I guess the only thing we can do now is to push the boat as much as possible and then wait for compression to occur.

The conditions are now perfect: from 25 to 30 knots of real stern wind with an average of 24 knots of boat speed, so there is not much more we can ask for. The temperature of the water has improved a lot, around 14º C. Last night when we were going through the ice limit we had 0º for a while and we spent most of the night with the water temperature between 3º and 6º C.

On board all well and pushing hard.

Regards,

Xabi

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Can't find the item in the design brief for the VO65 that the VO65 be capable of beating the VO70 24 hr record

Did find this, so maybe the champagne moment is at hand

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We spoke with company President Patrick Shaughnessy about the Volvo Ocean 65.

WindCheck: Having watched this race transpire since last October, what are your impressions of the new one-design rule?

Pat Shaughnessy: To be honest I’m really pleased with the way the project turned out. The design brief for the boat was so broad, and so often conflicting, that the project as a whole was one of the most demanding jobs I think we have ever worked on. There are of course many things that we could have done differently or better, but on the whole I think the VO65 has been an enormous success. Everyone involved in the project should be really proud of what we achieved.

WC: As the designers of the boat, what have you been looking at most closely during the first eight months of the race?

PS: It would be really hard to pick anything out and say that it was our primary focus. We spend so much time during the race second guessing solutions, reviewing engineering work, helping teams with performance review, being onsite and talking with the sailors, that we still feel quite immersed in the now. I don’t think we’ve really given ourselves an opportunity for a good review just yet.

WC: Are you happy with how the boats have held up, specifically on Leg 5 (the Southern Ocean), when five of six VO70s had to come in for repairs during the last edition of the race in 2011-12?

PS: We are very happy, so far. There is still plenty of racing to do, but the boats have been very reliable. All of the failures to date have been either self-inflicted or explainable. Certainly your biggest fear in a project like this would be a large-scale systematic failure. That’s what keeps us up at night. Fingers crossed still, but we are getting closer to the champagne at the end of this thing.

http://www.windcheckmagazine.com/designed_for_success_the_volvo_ocean_65

 

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Conrad just called Akzo "Paintwagon." Wonder where he picked that up?

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Rich Masons comments about sailing in all conditions as being 'part of the whole race' were refreshing to hear, especially referring to the AC.:P

 

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Reminder from Chisnell that Ericsson 4’s run needed the RO's backup (and had been ended by rudder damage). 

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And eventually, the World Speed Sailing Record Council (WSSRC) pronounced on Ericsson 4’s run, ratifying a new 24-hour monohull world record at a distance of 596.6 nautical miles, concluding at 18.55 on 29 October – after Endean had completed the repair to the back of the boat. The magical 600-mile barrier remained officially unbroken, but the rudder damage and subsequent instrument failure had come just when they were poised to break the 600 miles – both slowing them and forcing the Race Office to rely on back-up positioning systems to measure their progress. There was no question that 600 miles was now possible, but would they get another chance to put it in the record books?

Naysayers wanting to nitpick this moment should appreciate Ian walker pointing out that in ADOR's case, they made their record without boost from current and in worse wave conditions. 

Bah. Well done AKZO

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1 hour ago, southerncross said:

Volvo Ocean Race-Speed From the Heart

By Dave Reed Yesterday at 10:57am

The boats are (essentially) the same, the sails identical, and the boatspeed differences at the front of the Volvo Ocean Race fleet are now close enough to be compared in decimals and single-digit percentages. Those decimals add up over thousands of miles of a leg, and it is — as any Volvo crew will attest — the incremental gains that will ultimately decide the finish order when the fleet pulls into The Hague in July.

In this age of big data, much is known of the performance of the Volvo 65, its sails and the complex method of moding the boat as conditions change by the hour at sea. Today, the boat is a measurable machine laden with sensors. Performance is now highly predictable. What it is not predictable, however, are the humans that propel it through highs and lows, storms and calms and hours of sleep and caloric deprivation. Consequently, the sailors on AkzoNobel, with support from the analytic wizards at technology giant SAP, have embarked on a game-changing effort to quantify the human X-factor. After eight grueling legs, the team is up to their neck gaiters in biometric data and they’re now grasping how predictive biometric modeling will translate directly to speed on the racecourse.

Ryan West, AkzoNobel’s performance manager, says predictive modeling is the key, and the team is early yet into the field. “We already measure trim, hull speed, angle, wind, and all of that, constantly running it through models,” he says. “We debrief after every leg and try and get faster, but we’re missing a huge component in this fleet — what’s different? The crew.”

West and his counterparts at SAP have implemented a biometric measurement program with the sailors, each of them wearing at all times offshore a Garmin Forerunner watch with an optic heartrate sensor.

“The biggest challenge was finding a device that is wearable the entire time they’re offshore,” say West. They tried chest straps, which provided good data, but was not ideal for the sailors. A wearable wrist device was the solution. A custom app on the Forerunner records heart-rate data every second while on deck and when the sailor goes below the unit automatically uploads the data to an encased Raspberry Pi. The Internet of Things computes sleep, caloric burn and provides athlete-specific, real-time data to the sailors themselves. Think of it as a personal wellness dashboard.

After a leg finish, SAP developers extract the data for a deeper dive, allowing the team to eventually compare and overlay sailor data over yacht data. “We are able to find trends that have never been seen,” says West. “The first couple of legs, simply capturing the data was a huge milestone. As far as we know, no one had gotten as much quality data offshore. The boat is its own environment and the humans act differently to it. Now we can take the environment and better understand how it will affect the sailors — before it happens.”

During a 21-day leg they can collect more than 18,000 (averaged) data points, allowing West to extrapolate daily caloric burn and individual sleep patterns. “The sailors can burn as many as 6,000 calories per day, so the more we can do to help them eat more efficiently, we can keep them at their optimum,” says West.

Disruptive sleep patterns take a toll on a sailor’s efficiency too. It’s the mental drain and the fog of four-hour watch rotations that slow maneuvers and inhibit rational decision making. Not surprisingly, West’s biometric analytics has revealed new understandings about off-watch efficiencies and what’s effecting sleep. “A lot of it is environmental,” he says.

Brad Farrand, AkzoNobel’s bowman, oversees the system on board the raceboat, and he too has a better understanding of his own traits. “I’ve learned much more about how many calories I’m actually burning and how environmental things effect sleep. For example, some bunks have more daylight than others and some guys don’t mind the light during the middle of the day, but others do.”

There are six different bunks, he adds, and each is unique when it comes to the movement of the boat. Heel angle, light, and even temperature make a big difference, says Farrand, who finds more restorative sleep from different bunks in different phases of the race. Modeling bunk preference is another tool, says West, that could make a significant impact as the sailors transition through time zones during the course of a leg.

“We’re on the cusp of — by next race — where with predictive modeling in the weather briefing in pre-leg we could be able to apply a human effect side as well,” says West. “Predicting which areas are most stressful on the crew.”

This is where the data modelers at SAP are working their magic, he says. “The more predictive we get the better we can start to look forward down the race track, applying the weather model, what the conditions will be, how they affect the sailors and how can they better adapt.”

What’s next? Perhaps integrating neurological elements to predict fatigue before it sets in, monitoring glucose levels, nutrient timing, hydration, status and many more. “Just like the yachts today have sensors all over the place, and you can see trend lines,” says West, “we could interpret how decisions are made and their outcomes based on diet and sleep.”

https://www.sailingworld.com/volvo-ocean-race-speed-from-heart

The Volvo 65s only have six bunks,  so the crew members are hot bunking? 

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6 bunks per side. But since stack weight management in key, yah basically you are hot bunking. 

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