jack_sparrow

VOR AUCTION - OPPORTUNITIES LOST & STILL THERE?

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1 hour ago, Sailbydate said:

And wear your undies on the outside, no doubt. ;)

Sail unfortunately no commando/mandatory undies in the club dresscode, otherwise everyone is stepping on each other's balls, well the older ones anyway.

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44 minutes ago, Miffy said:

The most special stop overs are Cape Town and Auckland. Everything else is transient.

So true. Yet Bourke the CEO of VOR at the time thought nothing of NZ getting just a 48 hour pitstop (Wellington) in 2006 and then to support the first tour to China, NZ missing out entirely in the next 2008/09 edition (that Knut inherited).

Some of the problems the race has experienced over the last 10 years can be sheeted home to those brain farts.

Let's hope the new RO is not similiarly inclined to that method of making room upstairs for fresh thoughts.

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KPMG Women's PGA Championship. The Barclays. Quicken Loans National. Deutsche Bank. Kitchenaid Senior PGA Championship.

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^^^^Yes, that's a good one. I do have some favorites: Famous Idaho Potato Bowl; Camping World Bowl; lots of your aforementioned Red Bull sponsored events, including (and it is crazy to watch) the Red Bull Rampage (insane mountain biking);  the Red Bull Air Races (obstacle courses in the air); perhaps my favorite: the Redbull Flugtag, in which contestants compete in home-made human-powered flying machines (a much riskier version of R2AK); and, of course, the Red Bull Crushed Ice, which I need to see to believe it, a combination of hockey, downhill skiing and boarder cross.

We had an event called the [pick a sponsor] Arctic Man races in AK until this year, which included a race, so of like eventually waterskiing except on show) where a downhill skier (a couple of Olympians have competed in it) skies at a high speeds to meet up with someone driving a snow machine with a tow rope which the racer then grabs and both race to the finish.  Mostly it was a drunkathon of spectators in RVs, for days, in the dead of winter in the middle of nowhere. 

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Desperado as you are a Snow Bunny ..when this iconic race is called the "McDonalds Iditarod Mush" then I will admit to being wrong about this "naming rights" versus "cleanskin" race name discussion.

http://iditarod.com

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Cartier Queen's Cup.

www.telegraph.co.uk/polo/2017/03/09/polo-2017-key-dates-events-across-globe/  

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Aviva Premiership Rugby

 https://www.premiershiprugby.com/register-your-interest-in-the-final/

NatWest Six Nations Chanpionship

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On the other hand  the PBA will adamantly always put the fans first and never sully the name of major tournaments or championships with the name  of a sponsor, thus ensuring  global televised coverage and big returns for sponsors.

https://www.pba.com/Television

The  brand names of the major PBA sponsors become household names as a result!

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55 minutes ago, Mambo Kings said:

Cartier Queen's Cup and  Aviva Premiership Rugby

Polo and Rugby... tweed jackets with leather elbow patches and a spot of buggery in the carpark behind the Aston Martin. I really hope offshore sailing is not on this trajectory chaps :-)

 

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10 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Polo and Rugby... tweed jackets with leather elbow patches and a spot of buggery in the carpark behind the Aston Martin. I really hope offshore sailing is not on this trajectory chaps :-)

 

Sailing is already there.

They are even handing out knighthoods

1506403180_knightedforsailing.jpg.43732aec7b6f9d8bc4445af7f5504800.jpg

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2018-2021 IMOCA GLOBE SERIES The new IMOCA World Championship is launched

The Monaco Globe Series will start on Sunday (3rd June). This event is the first in the new IMOCA GLOBE SERIES world championship, which is the result of a shared desire and a lot of work done over the past few months, spearheaded by the IMOCA Class and the organizers, OC Sport and the Saem Vendée. This is in fact the first time that the IMOCA class has joined up with race organizers to manage and jointly run the new class world championship. Six iconic ocean races (solo and double-handed) feature in the 2018-2021 calendar, with the possibility of an additional event being added in the spring of 2019. The cycle will of course come to a climax with the 2020-2021 Vendée Globe, at the end of which the IMOCA GLOBE SERIES world championship title will be awarded.

Joining together to develop synergies
For the IMOCA class, it was vital that race organizers, in particular the SAEM Vendée and OC Sport, came together with the class to manage, develop and promote its championship. “The Vendée Globe is a legendary race, the success of which was confirmed once again with the last edition. But between each Vendée Globe it is important that racers can offer their sponsors a set of top quality races that are clearly understood by the general public. That means allowing skippers racing in the Globe Series events to qualify and be selected for the next Vendée Globe,” explained Yves Auvinet, President of the SAEM Vendée.

“This synergy between the organizers and the IMOCA class is a first in the history of offshore sailing and shows a real desire to offer greater clarity to ocean racing. The IMOCA Globe Series will be an opportunity for the public to follow the skippers from the class over a 4-year cycle with major events each year. With this underlying theme, it should be possible to develop the reputation of both skippers and events,” explained Hervé Favre, joint CEO of OC Sport, the organizer of the Route du Rhum-Destination Guadeloupe and The Transat. Following in the footsteps of the Monaco Yacht Club, other organizers are likely to join in with the IMOCA GLOBE SERIES Championship.

Sharing the same mindset, the same desire and being ready to work together should ensure that they will soon be able to make a very innovative commercial offer to enable this new championship to find a headline partner.

Better promotion of the events and making them more attractive
This new championship aims to create a link between a set of attractive races in order to encourage sailors to race more often. As Antoine Mermod, President of the IMOCA class explains, “For us, it is important to extract more value from the calendar around our headline event, the Vendée Globe. That should help the skippers and their partners get a better return on their investment, while guaranteeing very high quality races for the sportsmen, media and the general public.”

Qualifying races for the Vendée Globe
The events in the IMOCA GLOBE SERIES are presented in the Notice of Race for the Vendée Globe as qualifiers and as a method of selection for the 2020 edition. In practice this means that qualified sailors who clock up the most miles in the races included in this championship will earn their entry ticket for the non-stop solo round the world race.

Two major races scheduled each year
The 18 sailors competing in the Monaco Globe Series, a brand new 1300-mile race around the Mediterranean, will be launching the new IMOCA GLOBE SERIES world championship. Two events sailed solo or double-handed will be counted each year until the 2020-2021 Vendée Globe. On the 2018 calendar, there is the new event in Monaco, then the Route du Rhum-Destination Guadeloupe. The 2019 season will start with a first race in the spring, which will be announced shortly, then the Transat Jacques Vabre in November. Finally, in 2020, the skippers will compete in The Transat and then the New York-Vendée transatlantic race before lining up for the Vendée Globe at the end of which we will discover the name of the IMOCA world champion for the 2018-2021 period. The IMOCA GLOBE SERIES rankings will be based on a points system with races each given a certain weighting.

https://www.imoca.org/en/news/2030-2018-2021-imoca-globe-series-the-new-imoca-world-championship-is-launched.htm

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9 minutes ago, southerncross said:

“For us, it is important to extract more value from the calendar around our headline event, the Vendée Globe. That should help the skippers and their partners get a better return on their investment, while guaranteeing very high quality races for the sportsmen, media and the general public.”

IMOCA moving ahead with Global promotion.  Leaving The Round The World Race in the lurch?  How would an IMOCA/RTWR (Round the World Race) partnership fit into this scenario?

The first race in the IMOCA world championship

This new event will count a lot, as it is the first race on the calendar in the new IMOCA world championship, the Globe Series. Leading up to the 2020-2021 Vendée Globe (at the end of which we will discover the name of the IMOCA world champion), two races will take place each year with solo racing and double-handed racing.

For 2018, the second race in the Globe Series will be the prestigious Route du Rhum.

In 2019, there will be one event in the spring (which will be announced shortly) and then the Transat Jacques Vabre.

In 2020, the skippers will take part in The Transat and then in the New York-Vendée.

We should add that these events in the Globe Series will also count as qualifiers for the Vendée Globe, taking into account the number of miles raced by the skippers.

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Will be interesting to see if OC Sport and Atlant work in cooperation or competition. 

 . . .  and Inmarsat might be the deal breaker or maker.

Sheesh. Time to flush the brain of sail organizer politics before I get sucked back into AC and Olympic misery. I'm out.

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37 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Following in the footsteps of the Monaco Yacht Club, other organizers are likely to join in with the IMOCA GLOBE SERIES Championship.

Hint?

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That IMOCA world championship explains why the next VOR would be in 2021, it would slot right in between the route du Rhum (a late race) and the Vendée Globe (an early race) and then be run every 4 years.

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1 minute ago, Panoramix said:

That IMOCA world championship explains why the next VOR would be in 2021, it would slot right in between the route du Rhum (a late race) and the Vendée Globe (an early race) and then be run every 4 years.

It might.  But a collaboration?  Is a deal with IMOCA still possible?  1300 + race with one stop is a lot different than a 40,000 + mile race with several.

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18 minutes ago, southerncross said:

It might.  But a collaboration?  Is a deal with IMOCA still possible?  1300 + race with one stop is a lot different than a 40,000 + mile race with several.

What's wrong with a varied calendar! It will be very hard for a single team to dominate all events which is better for sponsors.

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14 minutes ago, Panoramix said:

What's wrong with a varied calendar! It will be very hard for a single team to dominate all events which is better for sponsors.

I can see the teams competing in the World Series as hinted above.  But what about IMOCA competing in the RTWR?  I guess we still need to understand the IMOCA/RTWR partnership. 

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35 minutes ago, southerncross said:

I can see the teams competing in the World Series as hinted above.  But what about IMOCA competing in the RTWR?  I guess we still need to understand the IMOCA/RTWR partnership. 

I think it would be quite good for IMOCAs, they have races organised by different organisers so they aren't dependent of a single race. For the race organisers it is quite good also as most of these races have multiple class so less chances for the race to die. The one boat for one race VOR model is quite dangerous.

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Hi guys, this is my first post here. Sorry for the faults but I wanted to ask you a question.

I just read on Tip and Shaft that the city of Nice and the skippers of the Ultime class wanted to do a RTW crew race in 2021. And I had also read that Brunel's teammates asked Y.Riou if the Ultime's class intended to do crew races.  If that were done, 2 RTW at the same time, would not that risk doing too much?

In french:

http://www.tipandshaft.com/ultime/nice-ultimed-aso-veut-transformer-lessai/

Y.Riou :

https://www.volvooceanrace.com/fr/news/11128_Paroles-d-Onboard-Reporter-5.html

 

 

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1 hour ago, Ekkki said:

Hi guys, this is my first post here. Sorry for the faults but I wanted to ask you a question.

I just read on Tip and Shaft that the city of Nice and the skippers of the Ultime class wanted to do a RTW crew race in 2021. And I had also read that Brunel's teammates asked Y.Riou if the Ultime's class intended to do crew races.  If that were done, 2 RTW at the same time, would not that risk doing too much?

In french:

http://www.tipandshaft.com/ultime/nice-ultimed-aso-veut-transformer-lessai/

Y.Riou :

https://www.volvooceanrace.com/fr/news/11128_Paroles-d-Onboard-Reporter-5.html

 

 

Can you have too much of a good thing? If there's money and skill enough to go around x 2, I can't see any down side.

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14 minutes ago, Sailbydate said:

Can you have too much of a good thing? If there's money and skill enough to go around x 2, I can't see any down side.

"too many" events only become a problem when you're charging the consumer and they're out of discretionary cash. Since these events are basically free for the public to follow...

Agree with you that if there's enough teams able to participate, it won't hurt. 

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Interview about the Volvo Ocean Race going forward.......but it is dated January 2009. This guy is a pretty good reader of tea leaves, pity Knut wasn't listening instead of sucumbing to a Middle East disease.

Note: Where he talks about connectivity remember this edition in 08/09 was the first year of the OBR and broadband sat as we know it today. Well close to it, they were still short some satelites in the new Inmarsat constellation in early 2009 and this first Asian tour had a black zone, even though a part Chinese entry racing (Green Dragon).

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7 hours ago, Panoramix said:

That IMOCA world championship explains why the next VOR would be in 2021, it would slot right in between the route du Rhum (a late race) and the Vendée Globe (an early race) and then be run every 4 years.

 

7 hours ago, southerncross said:

It might.  But a collaboration?  Is a deal with IMOCA still possible?  1300 + race with one stop is a lot different than a 40,000 + mile race with several.

The automatic assumption seems to be IMOCA joining this crewed RTW with stopovers. The comments made by  Johan Salén in the Tip & Shaft interview upthread confuse and or provide no insight into that aspect.

The reality is probably more a case of crewed RTW race boats joining selected IMOCA events in the down period. This is an attraction to more permanent teams and keeping this RTW race in front of people's minds instead of on a 3/4 year cycle. Having said that I'm not too sure that satisfies IMOCA's desire for more global exposure.

Lots of questions and still not a lot of answers.

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907cb3361d038bc5b880b9bf9804b329.jpg

 

What a great punch by IMOCA.. Fantastic timing of the announcement after the VOR announcement. KAPOW.

The IMOCA championship and the move to become a global event spanning several years will see the current VOR B2B sponsors jumping ship.

RTWR will become irrelevant in the world of yachting if they continue to explore the possibility of a IMOCA styled racer.

If the RTWR want's to remain relevant, they need to race to cutting edge designed fast fully crewed racers that can kick up a storm in all of the major ocean races in their off years.

 

8 hours ago, southerncross said:

How would an IMOCA/RTWR (Round the World Race) partnership fit into this scenario?

there is none and this announcement is all about taking advantage of the RTWR weakness.

 

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1 hour ago, jack_sparrow said:

Interview about the Volvo Ocean Race going forward.......but it is dated January 2009. This guy is a pretty good reader of tea leaves, pity Knut wasn't listening instead of sucumbing to a Middle East disease.

Note: Where he talks about connectivity remember this edition in 08/09 was the first year of the OBR and broadband sat as we know it today. Well close to it, they were still short some satelites in the new Inmarsat constellation in early 2009 and this first Asian tour had a black zone, even though a part Chinese entry racing (Green Dragon).

Nice find--thanks. Accurate about the top 4, and prophetic about the Luzon straits (cf Chisnell's account), and good memory of the best Auckland arrival.

FWIW, this edition of the Volvo has been the best yet for addiction thanks to the coverage. Of the 'top 4', I found I'd lost interest in the Olympics and America Cup because of backroom politics and viewer restrictions, and the last Vendee turned out to be an unexpected treat because the stories by outsider Corinthians like Colman, Nandor Fa, Enda and Rich Wilson became ones that grabbed my time. The racing itself started to get a bit tedious as the fleet stretched out more and more, and the skippers had to spend too many hours hunched over their terminals routing in the dark.

So, the coverage the VOR provided this time was so compelling, the VOR easily became the top race of the four. Will backroom politics kill it going ahead? As you said, too many questions. Haven't given up yet.

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54 minutes ago, hoppy said:

RTWR will become irrelevant in the world of yachting if they continue to explore the possibility of a IMOCA styled racer.

Boy you really are the master of contradicting yourself Hoppy.

54 minutes ago, hoppy said:

there is none (pending partnership) and this announcement (IMOCA) is all about taking advantage of the RTWR weakness.

Maybe you need to dwell on this comment by Johan Salen and one that the vast majority of thinking people agree with; "The Volvo Ocean Race has always had a boat a little 'isolated', it's always been a weakness", and you do that in the context of IMOCA voting to link with a crewed RTW race platform to increase their global exposure.

There is no KAPOW at all in that IMOCA announcement.

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9 hours ago, stief said:

Will be interesting to see if OC Sport and Atlant work in cooperation or competition. 

They are both rights holders and event organisers for their respective client participants who want to partner. If they don't work together then their respective clients will show them the door. Combined interest and survival is a very strong motivator.

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21 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Combined interest and survival is a very strong motivator.

Would like to agree, but had to chuckle here, Jack. You, making idealistic statements? You could probably find many cases where petty jealousies trumped mutual long-term self-interest. 

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^^^If self interest they are then just representing the view of their client(s) and the joint show is already over. I draw a lot of solice in IMOCA vote being nearly 100% so hardly idealistic.

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Well, speaking  of management companies and the Whitbread/Volvo, and keeping the race going  . . . just saw this: Tracy Edwards, MBE, of Maiden fame

 

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1 hour ago, stief said:

Well, speaking  of management companies and the Whitbread/Volvo, and keeping the race going  . . . just saw this: Tracy Edwards, MBE, of Maiden fame

 

Very impressive individual and story. Lots in this piece.  

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17 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Desperado as you are a Snow Bunny ..when this iconic race is called the "McDonalds Iditarod Mush" then I will admit to being wrong about this "naming rights" versus "cleanskin" race name discussion.

http://iditarod.com

Speaking of bunnies, one of the neighbors' huskies ate one of their pet rabbits (as opposed to the wild snowshoe hares that roam around)  the other day; apparent miscommunication on which animals were where when at the time. SC, don't tell this to your kids. 

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11 hours ago, hoppy said:

907cb3361d038bc5b880b9bf9804b329.jpg

 

What a great punch by IMOCA.. Fantastic timing of the announcement after the VOR announcement. KAPOW.

The IMOCA championship and the move to become a global event spanning several years will see the current VOR B2B sponsors jumping ship.

RTWR will become irrelevant in the world of yachting if they continue to explore the possibility of a IMOCA styled racer.

If the RTWR want's to remain relevant, they need to race to cutting edge designed fast fully crewed racers that can kick up a storm in all of the major ocean races in their off years.

 

there is none and this announcement is all about taking advantage of the RTWR weakness.

 

Is this IMOCA's third or fourth attempt at getting a world championship off the ground? 

Keith Mills and Origin could not make it work with the Ocean Masters. IMOCA themselves could not keep it running, before Origin. Maybe OC can, as organisers of the Route du Rhum and The Transat, they have serious interest in the Class. 

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It seems at least 1 VOR-director, Johan Salén, has climbed out of the media black hole, nice. Some tidbits of info to be found over the future, my thoughts between brackets;

  1. more time during stopovers for sailors to rest
  2. two stopovers less than now
  3. get more continuity in stopovers (let them do it 2 or 3 times instead of 1 time => learning curve)
  4. get more continuity in teams (see 9)
  5. find more teams (see 9)
  6. national teams are being considered too like the AC (wonder if that is going to fly)
  7. keep the crew rules on woman - tweak a little bit
  8. adjust crew rules for IMOCA 60 boats
  9. IMOCA would be the leading class, not the VO65 class ( sounds like a reversed take-over by IMOCA, but logical when looking at total boat numbers of the classes)
  10. rethink the route - Cape Horn and South America could go out, do a round around Australia for instance (=> safer for crews and the boats too)
  11. Asia would stay in the route (sponsor alert)
  12. do adjusting of the above in close discussions with current teams and interested teams.
  13. next race in 2021, unsure if that one will be called "Volvo" ocean race or not. Funding is in order.
  14. ownership and sponsorship do not always coincide, major brands could dislike the "Volvo" stamp.
  15. the price for buying the VOR does Johan not want to tell. VOR does not make money, it generates losses and is hard to sell for a big sum. (I think they paid a symbolic EUR 1.00)

All in all it looks like to me VOR is thinking about moving towards the VG, only crewed and with stopovers. That is of course budget-driven, but would solve the goal set above to find more teams, and more continuity in teams. Which is more or less the main problem of this and last edition.

Sources

a) Tips & Shaft has an interview in French; 

https://mailchi.mp/tipandshaft.com/tip-shaft-116-johan-saln-la-volvo-ocean-race-a-un-trs-fort-potentiel-comment-ont-t-cres-les-imoca-globe-series?e=69e9158c79

Transgarbled version in English here;

https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=auto&langpair=auto|en&u=https%3A%2F%2Fus12.campaign-archive.com%2F%3Fu%3D1e692787e2c4cc3370813fca1%26id%3Daf95776c2f%26e%3D69e9158c79

b) A Dutch sailblog, www.zeilhelden.nl, has a 13 minute interview on youtube with Johan in English;

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Herman said:

A Dutch sailblog, www.zeilhelden.nl, has a 13 minute interview on youtube with Johan in English;

Thanks. Hadn't seen this. Some key quotes (paraphrased):

"future decisions easy except the class of boat." IMOCA most likely.

"single-handed? Need to develop IMOCA amendment for crewed racing"

"more teams from more countries"

fewer short legs

"some of the most underestimated athletes in the world" (stamina).

"definitely important to keep (and improve) the gender/ youth rule,"

"feedback process; important to get input quickly."

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On 6/3/2018 at 9:12 PM, Potter said:

Is this IMOCA's third or fourth attempt at getting a world championship off the ground? 

Keith Mills and Origin could not make it work with the Ocean Masters.

It is indeed the the 3rd or 4th go. Having said that the first couple of goes were half hearted with not widespread support amoungst the members of IMOCA.

Keith Mills securing marketing rights to IMOCA  in late 2012 with his vehicle Open Sports Management (OSM) which was created specifically to oversee the commercial interest of IMOCA classes to widen its global audience, notably the Vendée Globe ended up being a complete dud and then some iterations. I believe that OSM vehicle which was  a registered French  corporate entity went into voluntary liquidation some time ago.

So Keith Mills seeing OC Sport step onto his IMOCA shoes and now his supposed interest in taking over the VOR and with zip cred for doing so made me laugh a bit, despite him having the bucks and interest to grab a cheap bride.

Where Turner (ex OCS, ex VOR and as of last week Volvo's agent) ends up after all this shuffling of deck chairs is the really interesting bit to watch in terms of players in the RO/participants admin RTW game.

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On 6/3/2018 at 10:57 PM, Herman said:

It seems at least 1 VOR-director, Johan Salén, has climbed out of the media black hole, nice. Some tidbits of info to be found over the future, my thoughts between brackets;

  1. more time during stopovers for sailors to rest
  2. two stopovers less than now
  3. get more continuity in stopovers (let them do it 2 or 3 times instead of 1 time => learning curve)
  4. get more continuity in teams (see 9)
  5. find more teams (see 9)
  6. national teams are being considered too like the AC (wonder if that is going to fly)
  7. keep the crew rules on woman - tweak a little bit
  8. adjust crew rules for IMOCA 60 boats
  9. IMOCA would be the leading class, not the VO65 class ( sounds like a reversed take-over by IMOCA, but logical when looking at total boat numbers of the classes)
  10. rethink the route - Cape Horn and South America could go out, do a round around Australia for instance (=> safer for crews and the boats too)
  11. Asia would stay in the route (sponsor alert)
  12. do adjusting of the above in close discussions with current teams and interested teams.
  13. next race in 2021, unsure if that one will be called "Volvo" ocean race or not. Funding is in order.
  14. ownership and sponsorship do not always coincide, major brands could dislike the "Volvo" stamp.
  15. the price for buying the VOR does Johan not want to tell. VOR does not make money, it generates losses and is hard to sell for a big sum. (I think they paid a symbolic EUR 1.00)

All in all it looks like to me VOR is thinking about moving towards the VG, only crewed and with stopovers. That is of course budget-driven, but would solve the goal set above to find more teams, and more continuity in teams. Which is more or less the main problem of this and last edition.

Sources

a) Tips & Shaft has an interview in French; 

https://mailchi.mp/tipandshaft.com/tip-shaft-116-johan-saln-la-volvo-ocean-race-a-un-trs-fort-potentiel-comment-ont-t-cres-les-imoca-globe-series?e=69e9158c79

Transgarbled version in English here;

https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=auto&langpair=auto|en&u=https%3A%2F%2Fus12.campaign-archive.com%2F%3Fu%3D1e692787e2c4cc3370813fca1%26id%3Daf95776c2f%26e%3D69e9158c79

b) A Dutch sailblog, www.zeilhelden.nl, has a 13 minute interview on youtube with Johan in English;

 

 

 

 

 

On 6/4/2018 at 1:36 AM, stief said:

Thanks. Hadn't seen this. Some key quotes (paraphrased):

"future decisions easy except the class of boat." IMOCA most likely.

"single-handed? Need to develop IMOCA amendment for crewed racing"

"more teams from more countries"

fewer short legs

"some of the most underestimated athletes in the world" (stamina).

"definitely important to keep (and improve) the gender/ youth rule,"

"feedback process; important to get input quickly."

Two great posts.

Being a lazy sod I will pick just one point and low lying fruit at that as highlighted above, being fewer stopovers and continuity.

First I will preface what I have to say with Johan Salen's comments in the Tip & Shaft interview where in response to a question about how much they payed for it where he  said; 

"A race like the Volvo Ocean Race does not make money , it generates losses, so it's hard to sell for a big sum . Our goal is at least not to lose money! If we can be profitable, it's a bonus, but we do not expect to make much money in the short term. We know it does not work that way. The most important thing is to build a solid structure and expand the existing platform".

1. First, that was a statement coming from a "clean skin" RO just off the back of 6 months negotiation with the vendor entity Volvo. You would not expect any other response to that question from him, particularly in light of those underwriting the new RO's endevours.

2. Second, that comment about losses generally identifies a sum of money that Volvo as the RO treated as a "marketing expense" and have for 20 years being quite willing and able to pay. That willingless gave rise to China stopovers being introduced in 2008/09 and then ramped up with Volvo cars being Chinese owned.

3. Third, in the last 6 months the RO being a public Swedish commercial vehicle entity and a private Chinese domestic vehicle entity being the RO of the VOR said we have now reached a "tipping point".

That "tipping point" is we can no longer collectively entertain that "marketing expense" for underwriting the VOR no matter how good it has been to us for the last 20 years. Actually for a lot of observers it is remarkable it has taken 3 editions of this race for that question to arise since the Chinese bought Volvo cars. Hence the recent Auction.

Note: One explanation for that is from the outset when buying it from Ford (for around a quarter Ford payed for it two decades ago), the new Chinese owner was committed to retaining Swedish management, which is still the case today.

So if you have read this far and saying to yourself what in the fuck has that to do with stopovers Sparrow? The answer is simple and sheets back to Johan Salen's statement being "A race like the Volvo Ocean Race does not make money , it generates losses".

Very simply economics. The most successful models are monopolies. A RTW race is not a monopoly because no one owns the greater ocean.

A point to point race like the VG which is RTW and trans Atlantic races are not encumbered with that. They own the start point and if not the finish line select it at their chosing, no one else's.

The Whitbread/VOR however being a crewed RTW race with stop overs does not have that luxury where they own nothing in between. This has not bothered Volvo as they had a marketing agenda, so put little value in their balance sheet against stopovers prosecuting race longevity and value. All they were interested in doing was selling more Volvo's.

However a RO having no such marketing  ideal and wanting to add value to their balance sheet via more permanent stopovers to try and control the ocean will prosecute that monopolistic approach.

So where are Richard Brisius and Johan Salen today and who are ex RTW racers and who just acquired the RO rights to a RTW race for around $10?

I will draw a comparison with someone who believed in the power of a monopoly and controlling the venue, even though he didn't own it. This guy was initially a seller of spare parts, then a competitor and like Richard and Johan then became a manager and then team owner which then lead to him ultimately controlling the entire sport, first via the sale of television rights in the late 1970's. He eventually sold out and is supposedly worth around USD$3 Billion today. His name, Mr F1.. Bernie Ecclestone.

Bernie is only 5 foot tall, so I hope these two tall Euro guys in Richard and Johan take notice of the small pommy guy when considering a stopover approach. It worked for Bernie.

 

53310110.jpg

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On 6/3/2018 at 4:14 AM, stief said:

Well, speaking  of management companies and the Whitbread/Volvo, and keeping the race going  . . . just saw this: Tracy Edwards, MBE, of Maiden fame

 

Tracy, Richard Brisius, bit of a contrast.

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1 hour ago, staysail said:

Tracy, Richard Brisius, bit of a contrast.

 

Even more contrast. Salén's wife, Christine Guillou  "was, among other things, skipper of EF Education during the VOR 1997-1998" (cred Tip and Shaft).
Would like to hear an interview where Guillou and Edwards discuss their visions for the race. 

 btw, Tracy Edward has interesting retweets. E.g.

 

 

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This seems like a good home for this VG teaser.

The Golden Globe Race starts shortly from Les Sables. There are no images coming from these boats (unless maybe super 8mm via carrier pigeon) and so obviously no major spondorships are involved. Therefore the GGR don't have a teaser like this for the VG.

To make do play this at 1/4 speed to get the required GGR sensation. Some might say play it at 3/4 speed to emulate the VOR, which is a bit tough.

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This Salter/Akzo interview linky courtesy of stief with some bits about the future copied below.

How long the Volvo Ocean Race Record stand?

How long this record might stand depends on the boat to replace or join with the Volvo 65 in the 2021 race.

The Volvo Board rejected then CEO Mark Turner’s plans for a one design IMOCA style foiling 60-footer and the new boat decision was pushed into the future – one of the key reasons he resigned in November 2017.

Now with the transfer of ownership to the management group within the VOR, Atlant Ocean Racing Spain headed by Richard Brisius, Johan Salén and Jan Litborn it is possible that there might be two classes with the race.

The successful and very durable Volvo Ocean 65 and another as yet unnamed class – but very possibly the much-loved foiling IMOCA60 as the VOR has already held discussions with the IMOCA Board, about making the IMOCA 60 the new boat.

Having two classes with up to eight Volvo Ocean 65s and say another 8 IMOCA 60s would certainly reinvigorate the race, although it would put strains on many of the current stopover venues.

So interesting times ahead… but it is worth noting that the current IMOCA 60 24 hour record is a much shorter but still healthy 537 nm set by Alex Thompson in January 2017 – though he did achieve this solo.

Still, in that context, the new record by AkzoNobel is hardly shabby and if two classes come to fruition it would certainly set the scene for interesting inter-class competition.

http://www.yachtsandyachting.co.uk/articles/volvo_ocean_race_record/

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6 hours ago, stief said:
Even more contrast. Salén's wife, Christine Guillou  "was, among other things, skipper of EF Education during the VOR 1997-1998" (cred Tip and Shaft).
Would like to hear an interview where Guillou and Edwards discuss their visions for the race. 

Guillou's comments 20 years ago probably still stand today stief.

Miss Guillou walks her mop on all water levels, navigates on all types of boats and forges, far from the media, a winners and a reputation. "When you're a girl, you have to prove yourself twice," she recalls.

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For a weekend with fine weather the Cardiff Village appears pretty light on in the visitor footfall department.

On the other hand Galway/Ireland 10 years ago were getting around 30,000 bodies through the gate on non race/start days like this.

Stopover importance is one of the essential ingrediants for baking a decent RTW Race Cake that has gone MIA in recent times.

Alt_VOR17718 (1).jpg

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8 hours ago, stief said:

Would like to hear an interview where Guillou and Edwards discuss their visions for the race.

And here is Edwards in late 2016 following announcement current edition new gender rules. Starts at 1:20.

 

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^^^Interesting watching this, particularly now that the mixed-gender crewing requirements for the current edition of the VOR  which is the subject of this discussion has been in place and most of the race has been sailed. Tracy and Dee both stated that as of 2016 women were still not being asked to be on crews of ocean racing boats, which we have heard from other women.  Dee notes that the initial reaction to the VOR rule was a mixed bag, with some skippers unhappy that their crew choice was being dictated to them. She did not name them, but D. Witt and Bouwe Bekking were very vocal with their objections. From what I have deduced, the mixed-sex crews have been a success, with some skippers saying it has improved the camaraderie on board and made them "nicer" places to work.  Nico has said an all-male crew will always be stronger than a mixed crew, but at the same time, there are some things that women are arguably better than some men at. 

 

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Things are slow around here again, obviously.

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9 hours ago, despacio avenue said:

^^^Interesting watching this, particularly now that the mixed-gender crewing requirements for the current edition of the VOR  which is the subject of this discussion has been in place and most of the race has been sailed. Tracy and Dee both stated that as of 2016 women were still not being asked to be on crews of ocean racing boats, which we have heard from other women.  Dee notes that the initial reaction to the VOR rule was a mixed bag, with some skippers unhappy that their crew choice was being dictated to them. She did not name them, but D. Witt and Bouwe Bekking were very vocal with their objections. From what I have deduced, the mixed-sex crews have been a success, with some skippers saying it has improved the camaraderie on board and made them "nicer" places to work.  Nico has said an all-male crew will always be stronger than a mixed crew, but at the same time, there are some things that women are arguably better than some men at. 

 

Again women are being judged not for their sailing ability but for being a presence which helps camaraderie and makes the boat a nicer place! Just how demeaning can you get?

This rule may have given a few girls the opportunity to get some experience but it has set women back light years as proven competitors. The seriously competent female ocean racers who are skipper material sail single handed or in all women crews as that is the only way they can be proven winners on merit in this sport. That is how Tracy organised Maiden and Royal and Sun Alliance and that is why she didn't invite men.

As for the quote of "Nico", it is ocean racing we are talking about, not weight lifting!

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Without getting into bigtime thread drift, like it or hate it the VOR gender rule has accelerated the acceptance of women and importantly in two editions has provided a pool of experienced women now going forward. Easilly forgotten about these boats is the argument about size also applies to both men and women where many men are similiarly excluded unless they have a particular extra over specialist talent to make that factor less significant towards their appointment.

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2 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Without getting into bigtime thread drift, like it or hate it the VOR gender rule has accelerated the acceptance of women and importantly in two editions has provided a pool of experienced women now going forward. Easilly forgotten about these boats is the argument about size also applies to both men and women where many men are similiarly excluded unless they have a particular extra over specialist talent to make that factor less significant towards their appointment.

So name me a woman skipper who has won a leg and been recognized for it without any men "doing the strong work" in this edition. No? Not very likely now with this rule in place!

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2 hours ago, staysail said:

Again women are being judged not for their sailing ability but for being a presence which helps camaraderie and makes the boat a nicer place! Just how demeaning can you get?

This rule may have given a few girls the opportunity to get some experience but it has set women back light years as proven competitors. The seriously competent female ocean racers who are skipper material sail single handed or in all women crews as that is the only way they can be proven winners on merit in this sport. That is how Tracy organised Maiden and Royal and Sun Alliance and that is why she didn't invite men.

As for the quote of "Nico", it is ocean racing we are talking about, not weight lifting!

I get that it sounds a bit like Nico's dabbling in tokenism, but think again; given the limited crew numbers on these boats and the intesity of the competition there is no way that the women on board aren't making serious contributions.  That's just a given, there is zero room for passengers in this fleet.  The camaraderie thing is a bonus - and there's quite a lot to it, better decision making and a more motivated crew overall for a couple of important aspects.

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Comments on AC, Volvo and Vendee.

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Don't feed the troll. There's only one female skipper. On any given leg there's a 1/7 chance that boat wins. 

That boat is also the development team with the most number of ppl rotating thru, most nationalities and probably the most to learn. 

Must credit to Dee for what she has accomplished, but she was never known to be a rocket ship skipper. A good reliable one who can carry a campaign thru. 

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7 hours ago, staysail said:

Again women are being judged not for their sailing ability but for being a presence which helps camaraderie and makes the boat a nicer place! Just how demeaning can you get?

This rule may have given a few girls the opportunity to get some experience but it has set women back light years as proven competitors. The seriously competent female ocean racers who are skipper material sail single handed or in all women crews as that is the only way they can be proven winners on merit in this sport. That is how Tracy organised Maiden and Royal and Sun Alliance and that is why she didn't invite men.

As for the quote of "Nico", it is ocean racing we are talking about, not weight lifting!

My comments were in no way meant to be demeaning. Jack and DickD got it right (their comments above). While I am personally generally opposed to "quotas" and requirements like the VOR gender rule in all contexts, there are situations where they can perhaps be the only option to provide opportunity, and I believe that was the purpose of the VOR rule. Just as Team SCA, and subsequently the Magenta Project,  brought new interest to the VOR, and offshore racing,  by women and young girls around the world, so hopefully the VOR gender rule may help to encourage owners or skippers to hire women who have shown their abilities to crew a boat in an offshore ocean race. The videos from this race showed women doing everything from driving, trimming to heavy lifting. 

I believe there are women, who are both in and not in this race, who could skipper a winning boat. I agree with what Miffy said about Dee above; I don't know for sure if the largely "development" team of rotating crew members, with some obvious exceptions such as Liz Wardley and Brian Thompson, was the goal from the outset for this team or if it was the best she could recruit, but it was never a crew likely to win legs or the race. I don't think it had to do with Dee being female.  Carolijn Brouwer, Liz Wardley, Tracy Edwards, I see them as having the qualities to win as skipper. 

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4 hours ago, southerncross said:

Comments on AC, Volvo and Vendee.

Informative interview about present and future Australian sailing; articulate guy.  I have read elsewhere in SA about Aus' (lack of) participation in the next AC, and Allen discussed the Olympics at some length. What i am curious about is why Aus has not had more presence in the VOR (other than as a stopover or a few sailors on various teams) or in the Vendee,  both of which he mentioned as events his organization hoped to encourage actual participation in. 

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4 hours ago, despacio avenue said:

My comments were in no way meant to be demeaning. Jack and DickD got it right (their comments above). While I am personally generally opposed to "quotas" and requirements like the VOR gender rule in all contexts, there are situations where they can perhaps be the only option to provide opportunity, and I believe that was the purpose of the VOR rule. Just as Team SCA, and subsequently the Magenta Project,  brought new interest to the VOR, and offshore racing,  by women and young girls around the world, so hopefully the VOR gender rule may help to encourage owners or skippers to hire women who have shown their abilities to crew a boat in an offshore ocean race. The videos from this race showed women doing everything from driving, trimming to heavy lifting. 

I believe there are women, who are both in and not in this race, who could skipper a winning boat. I agree with what Miffy said about Dee above; I don't know for sure if the largely "development" team of rotating crew members, with some obvious exceptions such as Liz Wardley and Brian Thompson, was the goal from the outset for this team or if it was the best she could recruit, but it was never a crew likely to win legs or the race. I don't think it had to do with Dee being female.  Carolijn Brouwer, Liz Wardley, Tracy Edwards, I see them as having the qualities to win as skipper. 

I am not suggesting Jack and DickD's comments are not valid, even Miffi says nothing unreasonable, but my comments are valid too. What the guys here are saying is not wrong. (Apart from where Jack attributes the pool of women sailors to the quota rule, when actually the "pool" is mostly the result of Magnus Olsen's initiative in creating the SCA women's crew). It is just that some find it uncomfortable to face up to the fact that what I am saying is true and more significant   Dick calls the Nico quote tokenism; others might call it plain old male chauvinism.

In the last edition of the race there was massive support for women in the general public and a big number of women followed the race who would not otherwise have, simply because SCA was an all female crew. Women sailors names came to the fore as sailing experts on SCA and it was impossible to disconnect that boat's performance and its progression, with the personalities which were driving it. That is why women in the general public became interested. This time nothing even vaguely comparable is happening and for those prepared to face up to it, the reason is obvious. With this quota system sure the race is forced to give experience to a few women (good thing) but they have zero chance to prove anything which the general public will notice, and that is a big step backwards, both for women in sailing and for the event itself.

 

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1 hour ago, staysail said:

What the guys here are saying is not wrong. (Apart from where Jack attributes the pool of women sailors to the quota rule, when actually the "pool" is mostly the result of Magnus Olsen's initiative in creating the SCA women's crew). 

My experience pool reference was post this edition in terms of the future. Many women participating now have had no involvement or connection with MO/SCA, important as it is but just as many other component parts are towards encouraging inclusion.

A cake requires many ingrediants.

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Good reading. As for the future, noticed Biana Cook speaks about past and present issues with her take on what's to come:

Quote

Around the world in 11 questions

Updated 11 HOURS AGO

Sailing

Bianca Cook, the only Kiwi yachtswoman in the Volvo Ocean Race, can now celebrate having sailed around the world. On land in Cardiff, she tells Suzanne McFadden what it's meant to be part of a new wave of inclusivity in yachting. 

Even though there are still two legs until the end of the race, you’ve now officially circumnavigated the globe for the first time. How does that feel?

It’s crazy. It feels like this race has gone so fast [it started in Alicante last October]. We’ve only got seven more days of offshore sailing together. But there were times when it felt like the longest thing in the world. I’d definitely do it again, though.

The Volvo Ocean Race has new owners - Atlant Ocean Racing Spain. Have they talked about retaining the crew rule incentivising teams to include women crew members in the 2021-22 race?

Unfortunately they haven’t mentioned that yet. But Richard Brisius, the current CEO of the race, is one of the new owners and he is very much for it. He’s been a great supporter of women sailing in the race, and he put together the all-female crew Team SCA in the 2014-15 race.

How critical has it been to have women in every crew in this race?

It’s so important, not just for the race but for women in yachting in general. Before the race started, a couple of skippers didn’t know if it was such a good idea. But we’ve proven we can be just as strong as the guys and having those extra pairs of hands on board has been a great thing. It also means this will be the first time in the history of the event that a woman will win the race. It’s still a very much male-dominated sport, but I think we are starting to change minds.

What’s it like living and working in a mixed crew?

I think the mixed team has worked well. All of my sailing, other than a little women’s match-racing, has been with mixed crews. I don’t see myself ever sailing around the world with an all-female crew. I’d much rather sail in a mixed team – it’s easier. If you feel like you need to say something, it won’t be misinterpreted. We all chip in, there is no hierarchy. It would be nice further down the track if we don’t have to have the rule at all, and we're just seen as sailors, not women sailors.

Do you feel you’re able to inspire other young women to take part in the round-the-world race?

It’s been incredible the number of young girls who come up to me when we're in port, asking how they can get into it. All of us have serious sailing backgrounds – there are Olympians, America’s Cup and offshore sailors. My best piece of advice for young women is to get your qualifications and plenty of sea time. Throw yourself at it.

Your young crew on Turn the Tide on Plastic has had a frustrating race - you’ve yet to make the podium in a leg, although you’re often battling it out with the leaders during the race. How tough has it been?

Painful to be honest. The scoreboard doesn’t reflect the race we’re having. We are finishing just hours and minutes behind the winners, not days. Dee [skipper Dee Caffari] is frustrated - in her last race onboard Team SCA they were finishing days behind the leaders. Now we’re finishing minutes behind, but it’s the same result on the scoreboard. But I can say I’ve sailed around the world, so I’m pretty happy right now.

Has this experience exceeded your expectations?

Absolutely. I came into this thinking I knew what the race was all about, but you don’t understand it until you’re in it. I have pushed myself harder than I thought. But more than anything, it’s been the massive mental challenge that has surprised me. But I love it. A couple of times before the legs have started, Dee has had to say to me ‘Calm down Bianca, we’re leaving soon’. I just get so excited by the thought of going back out to sea.

Even at the thought of diving into the Southern Ocean?

I hopped off the Southern Ocean leg [Auckland to Itajai] and realised it was the most incredible experience in my life. You go down there and you are completely detached from the rest of the world. You’re constantly pushing the boats hard, surfing down massive waves. I remember approaching Cape Horn, seeing it from a distance, and thinking ‘Is that it? We’ve risked our lives to go around that?’ As we got closer, I thought it was really quite stunning. And as we passed the lighthouse I thought ‘I can’t believe I’ve gone around Cape Horn!’

How hard has it been physically?

It’s extremely physical. Right now, my cardio fitness is so low compared to when I started this race. You don’t get that kind of fitness offshore. I tell you what though, my arms are massive! You’re constantly moving the stack of sails backwards and forwards. It’s so demanding. As the race goes on, you get more tired. You’re energy is so low, you’re completely putting your body on the line in really trying conditions.

What will you miss most?

I was quite late to join the team, and when we started off I felt I was a little on the outside. But now we are a family – the sailors, the shore team, the tech guys. It’s so easy to forget you have another real family. Sure you have your moments - when you’re tired and grumpy, sleep deprived and sick of freeze dried food. But the hardest thing will be saying goodbye. I certainly won’t miss the food, or sleeping in my wet weather gear.

Once you’ve finished this race, what’s next?

I’ll have a few things on the go. I’m doing some women’s match-racing in Sweden with the Magenta Project straight after the race. Then I want to finish my Officer of Watch certificate to sail super yachts. I’m also looking at putting together a mixed team in the World Sailing offshore double-handed series. Eventually I’ll come home. We have a family-run business [Yachting Developments] that I want to be involved in. And I’d like to go sailing with my sister, Paige, and maybe do the Round North Island double-handed race together. First, we’ve got to make sure we can stand each other for more than a couple of hours!

https://www.newsroom.co.nz/2018/06/05/113366/around-the-world-in-11-questions#

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2 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

My experience pool reference was post this edition in terms of the future. Many women participating now have had no involvement or connection with MO/SCA, important as it is but just as many other component parts are towards encouraging inclusion.

A cake requires many ingrediants.

We can each have our own views about that, after all the entire Magenta project evolved from unemployed ex SCA girls, and without SCA that project wouldn't exist, and with the quota rule, with 7 boats sailing and a bit of crew rotation this has to introduce a few new non-SCA women. (Is that "acceptance of women" or imposition of women?), but at least you aren't disagreeing vocally with my conclusions. None of this event's females have had much of an impact, profile and publicity-wise, as far as I can see, compared with what happened with the all-female SCA.

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6 hours ago, staysail said:

We can each have our own views about that, after all the entire Magenta project evolved from unemployed ex SCA girls, and without SCA that project wouldn't exist, and with the quota rule, with 7 boats sailing and a bit of crew rotation this has to introduce a few new non-SCA women. (Is that "acceptance of women" or imposition of women?), but at least you aren't disagreeing vocally with my conclusions. None of this event's females have had much of an impact, profile and publicity-wise, as far as I can see, compared with what happened with the all-female SCA.

Perhaps it depends on what you deem "impact".  Are there dozens of women and young girls at each port stop in this edition wearing t-shirts and waving towels with the colors of an all female-crewed boat on them? No, because there isn't one.The women crew members have been fully integrated into the boat crews.   There are regular interviews by the respective OBRs with the female crew members, and/but not because they are female. Some have been featured, for the right reasons, in on board videos, for particular skills: Liz Wardley limbing the mast, Libby Greenlagh as navigator discussing her strategies - good and unsuccessful - while navigating; others just doing their job as usual. They are interviewed at the stopovers. They don't "stand out" because they are part of the crew, which is what they have wanted. They have in all respects performed as they should have, and that's the point. All of this in and of itself is good for female participation in offshore ocean racing. 

 

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I haven't put up any IMOCA Monaco Globe vids here as not really relevant, however this one just launched touched a B to B marketing vein I have never seen come out of the VOR Marketing Shop ever.

The more I think about how Volvo stole the Whitbread to prosecute their own marketing platform to the detriment of the Race makes my blood boil.

 

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Interesting news grab this morning, our Lord Mayor being interviewed about how the council is applying for a stopover in the next Volvo, (or whatever it will be named)..

Newcastle also holds the last round of the Australian Supercar championships, and a round of the off-shore powerboats.

Big feather in the cap if they are successful, and not too far for me to travel either. Also nearest offshore port for Kyle Langford, Lucas Chapman, and Chris Nicholson.

Newcastle.thumb.JPG.61d5370651a1e9456ff457d39ac88091.JPG.

 

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^^^^^ Newcastle (Aust) with a lot of shipping traffic might have something in common (less the fog) with some USA stopovers like this one in Boston in 2008/09 Edition. Sydney (Darling Harbour) would be my pick for an Australian Pitstop (no haul out).

Newcastle hasn't got a great history either of commercial shipping understanding the leads into the harbour there and taking a quick short cut, so god knows what they would do to a fleet of RTW Race Boats :-)

 

7908287.jpg

images (26).jpeg

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On 6/6/2018 at 9:08 AM, southerncross said:

Comments on AC, Volvo and Vendee.

Blah blah fucking blah.  He looks stressed and uncomfortable.  Politician speak while adding no real value.

It must be stressful having to speak while saying nothing really.  You can see it in his eyes.

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7 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

^^^^^ Newcastle (Aust) with a lot of shipping traffic might have something in common (less the fog) with some USA stopovers like this one in Boston in 2008/09 Edition. Sydney (Darling Harbour) would be my pick for an Australian Pitstop (no haul out).

Newcastle hasn't got a great history either of commercial shipping understanding the leads into the harbour there and taking a quick short cut, so god knows what they would do to a fleet of RTW Race Boats :-)

 

I am not sure what so wrong about this video, the tanker is the give way vessel (overtaking) and is just slowing down to avoid hitting them.

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47 minutes ago, Panoramix said:

I am not sure what so wrong about this video, the tanker is the give way vessel (overtaking) and is just slowing down to avoid hitting them.

How can you tell that the tanker is the give way vessel? This was in Boston - TSS schemes outside of the harbour area, within the harbour area tankers have to stick to a narrow dredged channel. 

It was a overall cluster of an organized event - false start gun fired by the RC, a tanker under tow that went thru the fleet (didn't coordinate with harbor master appropriately). 

As I recall, the tanker wasn't cited by the coast guard - which definitely looked at the event.

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4 minutes ago, Miffy said:

How can you tell that the tanker is the give way vessel? This was in Boston - TSS schemes outside of the harbour area, within the harbour area tankers have to stick to a narrow dredged channel. 

It was a overall cluster of an organized event - false start gun fired by the RC, a tanker under tow that went thru the fleet (didn't coordinate with harbor master appropriately). 

As I recall, the tanker wasn't cited by the coast guard - which definitely looked at the event.

I am not local, it looked "open water" to me but one can't say just from the video. If it was open water the tanker would definitely be give way, once you start overtaking 95 times out of 100 you become give way (100% of statistics are invented ;-) ). But yes if they were in a narrow dredged channel and not impeded by their draft that would be different.

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16 hours ago, Panoramix said:

If it was open water the tanker would definitely be give way, 

Aren't Tankers always in the right regardless?

Like those terrestrial dudes who know shit all about COLREGS and mid hole on the golf course or walking their dogs above, stopped and waved that ship through.

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On 6/8/2018 at 11:18 AM, random said:

Blah blah fucking blah.  He looks stressed and uncomfortable.  Politician speak while adding no real value.

It must be stressful having to speak while saying nothing really.  You can see it in his eyes.

Well your're the expert on that ....

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I was just watching the Live feed on FB from the dock--out.
There was an aerial shot of the venue.... damn there are not many people there...
The race formerly known as VOR has surely become a B2B event, but can it keep finding sponsors?
I am afraid that this was the last race :unsure:

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image.png.8e0f0f23965576f045e4420816b9c70f.png

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4 hours ago, ModernViking said:

The race formerly known as VOR has surely become a B2B event, but can it keep finding sponsors?

B2B's require foot traffic. Cardiff will go close to taking the prize from Newport for the smallest turnout. With English Channel  finish last edition I can understand why Galway missed out, but this time? Nuts. When flogging cars are put in front of the event.

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This thing visited the Race Village and might be Cardiff's secret weapon to avoid taking the wooden spoon off Newport. Interestingly It also happens to be powered by some Volvo gear.

 

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2 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

This thing visited the Race Village and might be Cardiff's secret weapon to avoid taking the wooden spoon off Newport. Interestingly It also happens to be powered by some Volvo gear.

 

No wooden spoon for Cardiff. Brilliant race village, beat all targets before the final weekend. Probably the best race village for the public of the whole race. 

Financial report for the week looks better than hosting the Champions League for the City. Not joking. They are happy stakeholders. 

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1 hour ago, Potter said:

No wooden spoon for Cardiff.

I think something around 190,000 through and abt 60,000 more than Newport. These two and Hong Kong have the lowest traffic numbers for haulout stopovers and by a significant margin. It is reasonable to say on last attendances in 2009 (stop) and 2012 (finish) that Galway would have blitzed Cardiff.

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On 5/29/2018 at 9:47 AM, DickDastardly said:

Akzonobel isn't a consumer brand as such, Dulux is.  So why isn't the boat branded Dulux if Chinese consumer market impact was the plan?  Ditto some of the other sponsors.

Dick interestingly at the Cardiff Dock Out Jules Salter was hanging onto this critter and the poor bugger looking like a spare prick at a wedding. He must have drawn the short straw.

images (28).jpeg

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^^AkzoNobel has been waving its "International" brand to a global boating segment. Makes more sense to me than "Dulux" to otherwise disinterested consumers.

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15 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

^^^ Sail they might have also fucked up by not using the Welsh version of the Dulux doggie.

catalan-sheepdog-1.jpg

Nailed it...

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