pjmsj21

What To Do With This Cabin Sole

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I have a vintage Santana 27 that is overall in excellent condition.  The hull is solid, no deck core issues, the topsides were professionally painted, a complete set of new Neil Pryde sails and a nice new Yamaha 9.9 outboard.  So for a half century old boat she is in great condition and sails better than most.

However one area that has not been addressed is the cabin sole (see pic).  As you can tell the veneer has worn away in many places although the actual floor boards are in relatively sound shape.  Also the boat does not have a hull liner. So the floor boards fit on top of the inside of the hull and were all individually fitted when built and conform to the variations that exist in the contour of the hull.  So replacing the floorboards is not a viable option as it would take a great deal of patience to replicate the hull contour.

I have considered one of the plastic type teak and holly overlays.  However I am concerned that if the sole would look new, the other wooden interior parts would really old......the old house remodel conundrum.  One option that I am considering is to just pain them with an expoxy paint and call it good.

However I thought I would get the input from this esteemed group before making any decisions.  Thoughts on what you would do?

TIA.

Pat Mc

IMG_3351.jpg

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I don't understand your comments about fitting new floorboards.

Why can't you just use the existing ones as templates to create new duplicates?

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What level of woodworking skills and equipment do you have or have access to? If you can get access to a good tablesaw or bandsaw and some healthy boards you can rip thin planks- maybe between 1/8” and 3/16” or so- that can be epoxied down over your existing floorboards- after they get a good sanding and cleaning, that is. It’s not a particularly hard task and should yield great looking results.  If you can give up on the alternating light/ dark teak and holly appearance the job will be a lot easier.  There are plenty of woods that that are not anywhere near as expensive as teak and will be fine if left minimally finished for better traction below. A good hardwood lumber supplier, like Crosscut in Seattle or Edensaw in PT can help.  I’m currently using resawn Cumaru decking to replace some worn cockpit seats, it’s very similar in appearance to teak, but a little less dimensionally stable.  Check out Kris Cringle’s posts #16 and on in this thread

 

Looking for Teak lats - can you help?

Where he built a spectacular new cockpit out of ipe. 

Nothing wrong with paint, but if the boat is otherwise in good shape and you want a wood sole, it should be very doable.

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If you aren't married to wood finish.  Paint it.  If you have any oil soaked areas, start solvent washing them today...

Something around a Seattle Grey bright sides cut 50/50 with Matterhorn white would be a lighter grey than what you have painted on the hull sides and would make the boat look older, and bigger, than she is inside.  A little bit of grey, and a little bit of blue makes it easier to hide a little bit of dirt...  If you use a dash of interdeck, and enough flattening agent that it rolls out as flat, it'll still be slick finished but hide a foot print. 

Bilge Kote grey and white cut 50/50 ends up being about the same color as Herreschoff did on a lot of soles, but it is slick stuff.  A lot of folks use Kirby Paints that are straight oil base, as the color cards are damn near the same as Interlux/Awlgrip.  Sandstone and Prarie Beige look good beside white, but beside grey they'd be a clash. 

White and cream are harder to keep up.  Black works, maroon, and dark dark green work if you have a lot of brass accents...  but you probably don't have enough light for it not to feel like a cave.  It'll also feel a lot smaller inside. 

You can true up some of the chewed up areas with west systems 407.  There isn't anything inherently wrong with some wear that changes the depth of the grooves in places...  That is just character, but chipped out and missing bits you can fill in once just to keep it easy to maintain, in that if there aren't any big low spots you can dance a sander over the area once ever 3 years and roll a fresh coat on.  Once it is painted you can use 3M scotchbrite pads on the grooves before a repaint.  The gist is you can use a 4 inch brush, and put a light coat of paint on that gets into the grooves, then the next coat roll a light coat on and tip along the grooves with the brush.  That keeps stuff looking sharp.   

It takes a little sanding of the grooves clean out your old varnish.  A plastic squeedgee with sticky backed sandpaper over it does a good job.  I use a pencil line to draw where I've sanded.  You can either work one line from end to end, or work a 2x2 foot area sitting on a 1 gallon paint can...  Then move along.  

The easiest way to get a clean edge around the outside, is to put a tape line on and sand down the existing grey that you have and pull a 2-3 inch tape line onto the new painted floor, then repaint the grey around the hull. That way you get a break that isn't on the absolute edge, don't need any corner trim and you have room for tape on a flat surface.  That makes a repaint a very easy thing.  Taping the hull with all the angles and twist and round, is a little harder. 

  You can do polyester and mat tab 2-3 inches wide so it doesn't kill out onto the beaded floor.... or just a fairing pull of epoxy to fill around it.  If you don't try to taper up onto the hull at all, and just fill the grooves 2-3 inches wide around the edge, you get something that is very easy to work with.    That gives you something wide enough to have a crisp edge and somewhere to break the paint, as well as a little bit of a seal on the end grain to keep condensation from dripping down behind the sole. 

Try your best not to epoxy coat the whole thing, as most single part paints have issues curing successfully over epoxy that isn't a month or two old, even if you sand it.

I normally lean towards Awlgrip 545 for primer, just because it damn sure will cure every time no matter what.  Nothing stops you from using porch paint and the like...   But on a cabin sole you need a few box fans to keep the air turning over for it to cure up and 2-3 days before you walk on it if you do a heavy coat.  

If you stick to brightsides or Interdeck type stuff you can always get another quart that is in the ball park of what you have if you want to patch in a bit. 

 

 

 

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Depends on your budget, I like the above paint options.  If you don't want to go that route, Superdeck is a good alternative.  It actually has some gap filling properties, and is designed for worn docks/pathways.  Not slippery but not as textured as something like Kiwigrip.  Easy to clean and tintable as well.  Mask well, roll on done and cheap.

If you want a little more texture, a truck bed liner shot from a schutz gone works well and lasts forever. 

If you redo the teak, just neglect it for a few months or invite some neighbors over for a party before finishing it.  Then you get a patina and some stains to blend in with the old:P

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My deck looked exactly like yours and my boat partner surprised me one spring by laying down Trafficmaster Allure vinyl flooring, in teak color. He bought it at Home Depot and it was inexpensive by any measure. It took him a couple of hours with no previous experience and only a box cutter for tools. I figured it would last a season and fall apart.

That was six or seven years ago and it’s been fantastic with zero maintenance. If it ever needs replacing I’ll likely rip out the old underflooring, which by now must be a real disaster, and put in the exact same stuff.

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Wash, scrape, sand and varnish/paint the top. Coat the undersides with your choice of preservative.

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5 hours ago, voodoochile said:

This stuff works great.  Ours has been down for nearly 10 years.  https://www.yourautotrim.com/nadedotfl.html  easy to install, glues down, trim edges w/razor knife.  

Thanks everyone for some very good options.  I think the most attractive ones are either to paint or to use the above product.  

 

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Whatever you choose to do you need to start by sanding the old cabin sole. Don't commit to any solution before you now exactly what your working with. That holly & teak veneer might look good enough for varnish after all...

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^^^ What he said. I was convinced I would need to replace the cabin sole veneers on my old Aphrodite 101. A good cleaning and sanding revealed a surface that looked pretty good, and served for quite a few years. Of course, if the veneers are actually gone or peeling, that's another story.  

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Unfortunately, most builders  used veneers which are difficult to repair. In the early 70s, Tartan used cork flooring which really held up well. Becoming more popular in kitchens.

 

http://www.worldfloorsdirect.com/product/comfort-cork-flooring/cork-flooring-bliss-mocca-hot-buy/

 

 

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I'd vote against Decko Dot unless you are very clean folks. We had it on our cabin sole and it grubby with full time living aboard. Hard to clean hairs etc because they would get trapped by the little dots. We changed to a more industrial vinyl and were happier.

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Paint with non slip.

Go sailing.

After 2 months you will stop seeing the paint. 

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Many of the suggestions here will work, but I'm with SJB up in post #2.  Best looking answer is to use your old boards to template new ones.  Buy some teak and holly veneered marine ply.  Use old floorboards to template.  A circ saw with adjustable angle base, a jigsaw with adjustable angle base, and a couple of hand planes for final fitting and you'll have a much nicer looking set of floor boards than any other alternative mentioned.  Seal the edges and undersides of the new ply with epoxy, satin varnish the top side and you'll dress up the interior in a huge way...

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buy a cheap carpet cut to fit and go sailing

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14 hours ago, nota said:

buy a cheap carpet cut to fit and go sailing

Because there is nothing like wet carpet sitting on top of unfinished plywood to make a boat smell like...

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