WestCoast

Test Sailing the RS 21

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5 years ago, I went over and tested out the RS Aero on a bitter winter day. 
I wrote a report about it, that was fairly well received as being objective and honest.
We've sold ~130 Aeros so far, and it became a very popular model all up and down the Western US.

3 years ago, I repeated the exercise with the RS Quest (admittedly a very recreational/club boat). 
Liked what I saw, and we've sold 100+ since then.

 

For the RS 21, our store doesn't sell keelboats, and while I've raced them a lot, my heritage is in HS/College Sailing, plus Laser/Tasar/29er stuff.
I'm a pretty middle of the road sailor in many respects, certainly not elite level.  But, I tend to know what customers like and what works here in the States.

 

Anyone want to know anything specific on the boat that I can find out while sailing it?

I'll post my report in this thread in a few weeks

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Is it fun?

How much shin-bruising is involved in rigging/sailing it?

Anything else you want to add

FB- Doug

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^^^

lol, roger! 
It's been a couple years since I've raced a small keelboat, so, I should be approaching it from a fresh point of view.

 

RS did release a big PDF of all the updates they've made as they have finalized the boat for production.
Too big to attach here, but, it's close to final form it seems.

 

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Boat was different than I expected.  Full report coming in 7-10 days.

(this is boat #3, production boat #1 - featuring a revised deck layout compared to the prototypes)

RS 21 - West Coast Sailing test May 2018.jpg

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1 hour ago, WestCoast said:

Boat was different than I expected.  Full report coming in 7-10 days.

(this is boat #3, production boat #1 - featuring a revised deck layout compared to the prototypes)

RS 21 - West Coast Sailing test May 2018.jpg

I hope it's not as slippery inside as it looks.

I'm not a fan of those foot bolsters. You can catch your feet under 'em when tacking. Hilarity does not ensue..... at least, not there person who does it

FB- Doug

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^^^

I sailed it barefoot and had no issues with the footholds or traction.

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Eventually those bensons will need to be molded into the sole. Right now those granny bars look like late additions to the program. 

The lifelines and stanchions look like they need to go before they are removed during a race or at the dock. 

Other than that, it does look like a nice boat from the one pic and pretty well sorted out. I want to see some video!

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On 6/5/2018 at 1:53 PM, WestCoast said:

^^^

I sailed it barefoot and had no issues with the footholds or traction.

You're probably not as clumsy as I am.

Agree w S4B, give us video!

FB- Doug

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Is it designed to be a foot-in boat or a foot-out boat?

How'd you like that stainless super structure for the mainsheet?  Looks kind of large.

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11 hours ago, WCB said:

Is it designed to be a foot-in boat or a foot-out boat?

How'd you like that stainless super structure for the mainsheet?  Looks kind of large.

That thing is for when you wanna tow water skiers...

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Looks like it doubles as lifting point for centreboard/keel 

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1 hour ago, Cazzate said:

Looks like it doubles as lifting point for centreboard/keel 

For the electric propulsion unit

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Well that's even better !  Can't wait for electrics to become mainstream and affordable 

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The report is done, just going through grammar edits by one of our fearless staff here (they have a tough job)....

 

WCB - Foot in hiking.  The metal hoop is very British.  I'm used to it, nice to grab onto something high up during tacks/gybes.  

Cazzate - The electric motor integration is really slick.  It would be hard to go back to a gas powered motor after playing with this thing for some hours out on the Solent.
I'll try to resize some of the photos I took to show what I mean.

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Had to keep these under 1MB, but, hopefully, it shows off the integration pretty well.

RS21 - Motor Down Full.jpg

RS21 - Motor Down.jpg

RS21 - Motor Up.jpg

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That's cool...I didn't realize he was serious that it housed the electric motor.

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On 6/15/2018 at 10:31 PM, WCB said:

That's cool...I didn't realize he was serious that it housed the electric motor.

I agree. If that works as intended, this will be an awesome improvement for small boat auxiliaries.

FB- Doug

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The Europeans and Germany in particular are going hard out with electric propulsion on small race yachts . There is a very good boat test video on YouTube where they compare 7 performance trailer yachts and all of them have electric drives/outboards and some very slick units too .

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^^^

It was silly easy to use.  Just uncleat line, push down till it locks, and go.

I have been told that many European lakes have banned gas outboards.  Not sure if that is the case in the states at all... but gas outboards are certainly not the future.
I really like clever integration like this.  That's why I like that RS is doing a boat this size.

Full report should be out shortly, hopefully this week (I'm sure you're all waiting with baited breath.....)  :)

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Looks like it wouldn't be hard for a line to catch the throttle and cause some damage to the throttle - is there any way to cover that up while underway?

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Is the keel also a Torqeedo motor with a prop on it? That is a very cool design. The metal hoop kinda reminds me of a 1970s 505 when they did away with travelers using vang only to control twist (Loveday Hoop?).

Looking forward to the review.

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On 6/19/2018 at 7:43 AM, wpbeardsley said:

Looks like it wouldn't be hard for a line to catch the throttle and cause some damage to the throttle - is there any way to cover that up while underway?

With the motor up, you just push the throttle lever forward and it sits down in that cavity so it won't snag anything.
(There is a magnetic kill switch you can disconnect to make triple sure the motor won't run with the throttle tucked away)

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On 6/19/2018 at 4:20 PM, msvphoto said:

Is the keel also a Torqeedo motor with a prop on it? That is a very cool design. The metal hoop kinda reminds me of a 1970s 505 when they did away with travelers using vang only to control twist (Loveday Hoop?).

1

ha, no, no.
Standard lifting keel (they will be installing a kelp cutter).

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A Simple Version of Sailing I Didn’t Know I Missed

 

My name is George Yioulos, and I own a company called West Coast Sailing in the United States. Our company has made its name selling dinghies around the world since 2005. We started in Lasers, added skiffs and catamarans, dabbled in foiling boats, and have worked with all the most popular small sailboats. Our staff has continued to grow, and we now have some serious keelboat sailors on our team of 15. They are pushing hard for us to get into keelboats and sport boats - both the boats themselves, as well as all the products that go along with them.

This is how I found myself in the UK on a glorious spring day in late May. I had been here twice before for the very successful launch of two RS models (the Aero and Quest) and paid my own way once again to see a much different beast.

I spent the afternoon playing around on the new RS 21, a full keelboat unveiled to the public only 2 months prior.

One thing I’ve learned with ‘launches’ of boats is that the internet loves a snazzy new product. Forums and social media buzz right after a launch, asking “is this model going to change the face of sailing forever?” Regardless of whether or not you think sailing needs this change, there are strong opinions out there, in my experience, the internet is often flush with misinformation. The best way to understand a boat is to talk to the designer, understand their vision, and then, you know, sail it.

After rigging, motoring, sailing and packing up the 21, it was very different from what I expected. I’ll go through the why and what this means based on my experience. 

Finally, to get it out of the way, no, I don’t think the 21 is going after boats like the J/70 or Viper. I personally don’t really see it as another competing sportboat in a crowded market.

If not a competitor to established sportboats, what is it?

It’s a small, cutting-edge keelboat that is designed to execute a sailing mission really well. A completely modern boat for teaching sailing, club racing and for individuals who want to go fast, without the same fuss or cost of older, more complex boats. That’s it.

I will attempt to review the RS 21 based on that mission, with an in-depth look at the setup, systems, upwind and downwind performance, comfort, and logistics.


 

Setup & Deck Layout

RS 21 is super simple. That’s crystal clear when you first walk up to it.

A carbon mast with one set of spreaders. Wide open cockpit. Design and sight lines that are ergonomic and open. This boat is the brainchild of a team of designers and technical folks who have built a lot of boats together. You see the attention to detail in how well integrated and simple the systems are.

The rudder is hung on two gudgeons. Our boat had two pintles matching, but I am told the next boats will have a single rudder pin that fits through both gudgeons.

For storage, sails all fit in their bags in the front hatch. They hit a bulkhead when you slide them in, so you have to angle them just right, which is annoying, but I think RS is going to change that slightly to give more room. The spin bag has a bunch of pockets. Not sure if they will hold up to 5 years of abuse, but time will tell. Docklines fit comfortably in the aft hatch

I didn’t time how long it took from the dock to the channel but expect a faster turnaround time due to the lack of engine fuss and a simplistic deck. No winches or handles. The jib tack is fitted to a custom bow piece, and while I wish someone would design a clew attachment that didn’t require outhaul and velcro strap every damn time, here we are. Overall very impressed with the efficiency of getting the boat set up and underway.

A brief note on the motor. The 21 is available with a Torqueedo electric motor. The drop-down setup is one of the most clever designs I’ve seen. It seamlessly integrates boat and engine. You uncleat a line, push the strut down 2’ till it locks, then you move the throttle. That’s it. It’s child’s play at worst. I still drive a gasoline-powered car, but this sort of simple technology really is impressive. We motored out and back in, a distance of probably 4-5 miles over 4 hours. After that, the battery was still at 78%. It is not completely silent, emitting a bit of a whine which is a bit annoying - but it’s quieter than an outboard, maintenance free and zero work. I can’t imagine going back to a gasoline outboard. Honestly, it’s that good. To ease range anxiety, just bring a second battery pack like you’d bring a jerry can of gas. It’s really simple.

Do note, we didn’t have to put the mast up or down, or raise the keel up to trailer. I can’t imagine either being a showstopper, especially with the carbon mast and integrated keel hoist built in. But, those were things I did not do. Otherwise, setup for sailing is just simple.

 

 

Sail Systems

The mainsheet system is unique and unlike anything I’ve used before. Basically, it’s a continuous sheet, with a mainsheet cleat forward-facing for the crew and one aft-facing for the driver. This allows skipper or crew to trim the main easily, throughout the boat. What seemed like a gimmick actually was really a nice feature. In heavy air, or with additional crew, there are more ways for everyone to engage with the boat. Yet, it can be sailed as every other boat this size too. Interesting and clever.

The jib trims on a 2:1 system. Jib cars are easy to adjust on about a 10” track. We didn’t play with the track much to adjust jib’s shape, but it is a very simple setup by Selden that is easy and one I haven’t seen before. No metal pin to pull up and slide the car around to find the matching holes. The jib cleats swivel to accommodate for crew moving backward in the boat during planing conditions. I like those little details.

There is a jib cunningham, which I think is overkill in a boat this size, no matter what the design brief. That said, it’s integrated well enough where it’s not annoying. Perhaps useful and warranted in heavy breeze, but it was the main ‘extraneous’ piece of hardware I saw.

 

Upwind

We sailed in light breeze and flat water with a knot or so of tidal current. We had the final iteration of the Mylar ‘Race sails’ but the boat is also available with smaller and less expensive dacron.

The helm on the 21 was very light in feel - almost neutral. I am told in medium to heavy breeze, you get more bite out of the blade. As much as I’m used to that, the neutral feel was quite nice here. It makes the boat feel docile, never trying to tell me where to go. It assures confidence for a new driver and/or club racing.

The hull is light and I was surprised it didn’t just bash its way through waves. You need to work it up and down a wave - which I didn’t do at first. It reminded me just a tiny bit of the RS Aero in this regard. You don’t simply beat your way to weather, rather you guide the boat upwind. It is very responsive to the drivers inputs.

Again, in bigger breeze, it’s possible the boat just obliterates waves, especially when heeled and not sailing flat. But, for my time on it, you plan ahead and put the boat in the right spot to get over them best.

 

Downwind

RS continues to offer boats with optional symmetrical spinnakers, which continues to amuse me. We’re a pretty big dealer for their boats and I’ve never once had a customer ask for a symmetrical spinnaker instead of an asymmetrical. But, I guess there are people out there…

In the most common asymmetrical setup, two lines operate the spin. A pole launching line and a halyard. The spinnaker launches from a bag right behind the mast, so all that needs to happen is pole out and hoist. It’s a masthead kite (the first prototype was ¾ or so). It’s, uh... pretty big. The lone puff to 8kts or so came when we hoisted and the boat got going right away. Not quite ‘scalded cat’ but after some easy upwind work, the boat loaded up as the kite filled and I was reminded this isn’t an old heavy keelboat. We only got one or two gybes in before we had to douse (thanks tiny English channels), but it was quickly clear that the 21 has some serious pull. I’d love to sail it with 3 or 4 folks in a blow - I think it’s going to move along more than I expected.

 

Comfort

The deck was redesigned from the first two pre-production boats.  It has built-in kick bars, wider pedestal for feet to push off of and two stainless steel foot holds. I didn’t sail the first two boats, but this seems like a good solution. The hiking pad is thick and well built and the custom stanchions are angled out with spectra running the length. I was sailing in just normal board shorts, no padding, and had no issues with tired thighs or a pained rear afterwards.

The cockpit of the 21’ is wide. Well, it’s hard to explain. The boat is fairly narrow at the beam, but the cockpit uses most of that width. The flare from the cockpit sole up to the gunwales just opens the boat up compared to other 20-22’ boats out there. 4 adults is easy. 5 will work and I am pretty confident you could fit 6 adults in this boat.  and there is just more space than you’d expect. When you look at the boat from the dock down, it is immediately obvious what I mean.

Boom height is acceptable. I think some people will wish for 2-3 more inches of height, but it likely wouldn’t change a thing unless it was 1’ higher, so, it seems fine where it is.

There is no cabin, none of that fuss, no attempt to take away from the sailing experience.


 

Other Notes

While I don’t see it swaying the average sailor, I can see clubs, programs, and new customers being happy to know the 21 is probably the greenest sailboat being made. It’s no angel since almost everything is still petroleum based. However, the 21 is the first boat I have heard of that is built partially out of recycled content. The foam core is made of recycled material, which is cool to see.

A couple of people have commented that the bow looks funny in pictures. I guess beauty is subjective, but I liked it. When you walk up to the boat sitting in the water, it looks racy and ready to go.

 

Verdict

I was selfishly hoping that RS would make some killer sport boat, bringing UK design, their heritage and class development to North America. Proving some naysayers wrong while showing others how to do it.

Instead, RS built a boat that is back to basics sailing. Up to date, with the newest technology, but not for the sake of just having technology. They really thought about some details that impact your ability to race, train or just have a lovely day on the water.

You can see people learning to sail on this boat for decades. Comfortably, and not pushing water around like boats designed in the 70s and 80s. Yet also not intimidating like a 2-3 person hiking sportboat that is on the ragged edge of sailing ability in 15+ kts.

I didn’t think I’d like a ‘simple’ boat, and I didn’t think RS was particularly out to develop that. Though that is in fact what they did. A pure, comfortable, open and inviting keelboat that has the sensibilities and innovation they have shown for two decades… without feeling the need to follow the pack.

 

The 21 is a boat that keeps sailing simple.  

And, I think that’s a message no one was expecting.  

I like it. It’s the first keelboat in a while that’s caught our attention from a reliable builder. I’m ordering one for demos and looking forward to sailing it this summer.



 

George Yioulos
West Coast Sailing
June 2018

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Excellent

Sincere thanks. I'm on a trip myself right now, more later

FB.... Doug

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Great report from West Coast Sailing.

I've been speaking to a lot of sailors that sail J70, Viper 640, VX-One, Sonar, Ideal 18, and so on.. from one design to club racing, they all want an exciting boat that can be sailed by anyone and the common theme with all is it just doesn't exist.  Among those sailors, quite a few said "our club purchased the wrong boat" for various reasons but mostly the boats being too high performance and powered up.  The RS21 has many of these features, but with they security of the massive bulb and an incredibly balanced boat from top to bottom. 

 

Many of the questions many of you have above are great. The photos here are from boat #3. #1 and #2 were test beds for the final boat and they modified it based on lessons learned. 

The Torqueedo works very well.. we were able to hit over 6 knots against some strong breeze and current.  I'll post a video interview (from lighter conditions) motoring in a moment.

The stainless steel foot bars are really nice and myself or anyone that has sailed the boat has had no complaints, they add security for the skipper who just as the rest of the crew would be legs in.

The stainless steel hoop is not even remotely in the way, it actually makes a nice place to grab for crossing. It's not a hoist point, but the keel is a single point hoist.  

 

North American Demos will be scheduled soon but expect the following boat arrivals:

Northeast - Mid July

West Coast - Late July

Texas - September

Annapolis - October which will go on to the Southeast for the winter

Possibly a few more in the pipeline too, will keep everyone updated.  

There's been a lot of interest from sailors and clubs throughout North America.. Our goal is to share the boat with everyone this summer and take orders for supply this Fall and Winter... but the demo boats are for sale too if you need one now, contact your local RS Sailing dealer for more info.  

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Using the integrated Torqueedo sail-drive unit... and I promise the phone video is not doing the engine noise any justice, it's not nearly as loud in real life.

 

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Casual raw iphone interview with Alex Newton-Southon RS Sailing director and co-designer of the RS21

 

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15 hours ago, RSsailingNA said:

The Torqueedo works very well.. we were able to hit over 6 knots against some strong breeze and current.  I'll post a video interview (from lighter conditions) motoring in a moment.

North American Demos will be scheduled soon but expect the following boat arrivals:

Northeast - Mid July

West Coast - Late July

Texas - September

Annapolis - October which will go on to the Southeast for the winter

 

While I appreciate your enthusiasm, I am HIGHLY dubious of your 6 knot claim.  We are lucky to get 4 knots on a J/70.  The RS is 2 feet shorter and only 320 lbs lighter (18%).  Unfortunately the Torqueedo just doesnt have the prop speed necessary to facilitate 6 knots. Please post video of the knotmeter while motoring with the sails flaked and I will be happy to post a retraction.

Oh and you forgot the Midwest!

 MS

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Sorry we didn't have the Racegeek running on this trip, but we've added it to the list to do.  

I'm not a rocket scientist, but our designers felt with the Torqeedo being submerged much further forwards than the transom it was much more effective. That and 350ish pounds is a big difference!

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I should also add that my 350ish pounds is because the all up weight of the RS21 at 1,433 lbs is 100% fully loaded, including the sails, torqeedo, battery, race geek, and etc. I'd guess that gives it nearly 50 lbs on the J70.   

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On 7/7/2018 at 12:24 PM, RSsailingNA said:

I should also add that my 350ish pounds is because the all up weight of the RS21 at 1,433 lbs is 100% fully loaded, including the sails, torqeedo, battery, race geek, and etc. I'd guess that gives it nearly 50 lbs on the J70.   

 

It's great that you guy's are making some good looking affordable sailboats - there were a bunch of your smaller model RS's down in Sarasota earlier this year and they were well received. Look forward to seeing the RS21 in person. 

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On 6/26/2018 at 3:15 PM, WestCoast said:

 

 

A Simple Version of Sailing I Didn’t Know I Missed

 

My name is George Yioulos, and I own a company called West Coast Sailing in the United States. Our company has made its name selling dinghies around the world since 2005. We started in Lasers, added skiffs and catamarans, dabbled in foiling boats, and have worked with all the most popular small sailboats. Our staff has continued to grow, and we now have some serious keelboat sailors on our team of 15. They are pushing hard for us to get into keelboats and sport boats - both the boats themselves, as well as all the products that go along with them.

This is how I found myself in the UK on a glorious spring day in late May. I had been here twice before for the very successful launch of two RS models (the Aero and Quest) and paid my own way once again to see a much different beast.

I spent the afternoon playing around on the new RS 21, a full keelboat unveiled to the public only 2 months prior.

 

 

George......A thoughtful, honest and interesting appraisal.   Thank you.

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On 7/3/2018 at 11:14 AM, RSsailingNA said:

Great report from West Coast Sailing.

I've been speaking to a lot of sailors that sail J70, Viper 640, VX-One, Sonar, Ideal 18, and so on.. from one design to club racing, they all want an exciting boat that can be sailed by anyone and the common theme with all is it just doesn't exist.  Among those sailors, quite a few said "our club purchased the wrong boat" for various reasons but mostly the boats being too high performance and powered up.  The RS21 has many of these features, but with they security of the massive bulb and an incredibly balanced boat from top to bottom. 

 

The Torqueedo works very well.. we were able to hit over 6 knots against some strong breeze and current.  I'll post a video interview (from lighter conditions) motoring in a moment.

 

Todd, Not so much.

Squirrel has already called BS on your claim of 6 knots on the Torqueedo. 

I will call BS on your claim that quite a few clubs say they have bought the wrong boat.  I will start the ball rolling by responding on behalf of my club:. Noroton Yacht Club. We have 4 classes;  The Sonar, the Viper 640 , the Ideal 18 and the JY15. 

You mention 3 of those classes. 

The Ideal 18 fills a niche of being incredibly robust, sitting on a mooring and taking a beating from the weather, our adult learn to sail courses and an active team racing program. I can say with complete confidence that nobody at our club has ever regretted the purchase of the Ideal 18.

The Viper 640 fills the niche of an exciting fun and fast keel boat that is incredibly easy and simple to sail. Our adult sailors who learn to sail on the Ideal 18 step into it with no problem at all.  It is incredibly popular with junior sailors (<17 yrs) who helm and crew the Viper at our club. It pulls in the younger contingent from 25-35 coming from a wide range of prior experience. We have lots of women skippers and crew, including the fleet captain of our neighboring fleet down the sound.  Finally we have a very active Masters contingent. The Masters start at 55 years old and include helms over 70.  The ahem "common theme" of the Viper is that it is simple and easy to sail.  For several Viper owners, it is the first boat they have owned after they learnt to sail.  The Viper class has four pillars and one of them is  "Simple and Easy".   A fundamental mission statement of our class is to demonstrate that fast and fun does not have to be challenging and that a fast boat can also be safe, simple and easy to sail.  I can say with complete confidence that our club members have zero regrets about purchasing Vipers.

I will let other clubs speak for themselves.

 

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I am going to add something about RS.   The RS organization has been an incredible FOV (Friend of the Viper Class) over the years.  Martin Wadham strongly supported and advocated the relaunch of the class.   RS helped the Viper Class Association re-establish the boat with a helping hand that included detailed advice on how to set up a builders contract and useful tips on class promotion. Several RS dealers sail in the Viper.  To say that we have warm and good feelings about RS would be an understatement.  We can put our hands on our hearts and share with SA that RS is a company that truly exists because it loves the sport of sailing as a whole and not just the boats that they sell (obviously they would prefer you love sailing and choose one of their boats .....but they would rather you were sailing another boat than not sailing at all).

So I hope that Todd does not mind me pushing back on the sales pitch that suggests that there are some clubs that regret choosing the Viper.   

I wish the RS21 the very best of luck in finding its own unique niche.

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On 7/3/2018 at 11:14 AM, RSsailingNA said:

Great report from West Coast Sailing.

I've been speaking to a lot of sailors that sail J70, Viper 640, VX-One, Sonar, Ideal 18, and so on.. from one design to club racing, they all want an exciting boat that can be sailed by anyone and the common theme with all is it just doesn't exist.  Among those sailors, quite a few said "our club purchased the wrong boat" for various reasons but mostly the boats being too high performance and powered up.  The RS21 has many of these features, but with they security of the massive bulb and an incredibly balanced boat from top to bottom. 

At least at Larchmont, there are almost no regrets about opting for Vipers as a one-design sportboat fleet.  Not trying to knock the RS21, but I don't know clubs in WLIS that feel this way, and the largest Viper fleet in the country definitely does not, and is likely putting in an order for another container of new Vipers this winter.  Todd is right that no boat is the perfect boat for every sailor, but that's why there are different classes.  The Viper accommodates a much broader audience than people give credit, and other classes that claim anything otherwise in their marketing materials are off-base.  We have everything from teenagers to guys who by definition only are senior citizens (in that they are forced to collect Social Security at this point), racing every weekend in all positions, the majority of the teams are coed, some sailing 3-up, some 4-up.  It's proven to be an excellent light air boat (and there's a lot of light air sailing in our area), and a lot of fun in breeze.  Best of luck to the RS21.  Hopefully it sells on its own merits rather than making baseless claims about other classes.  

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Warning to all posters.  The class who shall not be mentioned starts with V.

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http://www.premieresailingleague.com/2018/08/15/premiere-sailing-league-usa-chooses-rs21-as-the-new-boat-for-stadium-sailing/

 

Premiere Sailing League USA Chooses RS21 As The New Boat for Stadium Sailing

Launch Event Scheduled for September at Grosse Pointe Yacht Club

 

Detroit, Mich. (August 15, 2018) – The Premiere Sailing League USA (PSL) has announced its choice of the new RS21 to elevate the dynamic of the sport through its stadium sailing program. RS Sailing, the largest small boat manufacturer in the world, debuted the 21’ keelboat in January 2018 to address the need for a progressive, simple, and affordable solution for keelboat clubs that are seeking solutions to growing fleet ownership, league competition and sail training.

“It is exciting to be one of the first to sail a brand-new boat,” said PSL USA President Benjamin Klatzka who travelled to Southampton, England, in April to test hull number three which the RS Team had fresh out of the factory. “Sailing together with the designer, I saw not only the limits on a windy day but also why this boat is so special and the right choice for stadium sailing, team racing, youth and family sailing.”

RS2 RS21 under sail Photo courtesy RS Sailing

 

Like the PSL USA, RS Sailing was born from a passion for the sport. With a goal to be the brand to increase participation and utilizing the latest design and technology to create high performance boats, the RS Sailing range was created for beginners, families, clubs, programs and schools, all developed by the desire to advance the sport of sailing for everyone. Their approach has earned the company numerous international awards; in early August the RS21 was nominated for the 2019 European Yacht of the Year award.

“We’re proud that RS Sailing designs have built some of the most vibrant class communities, been chosen by leading organization’s globally, and that from our humble beginnings we’ve become the world’s largest small-sailboat manufacturer and America’s fastest growing sailboat line,” said Martin Wadhams, Chairman of RS Sailing.

 

RS1 RS 21 under sail Photo courtesy RS Sailing

 

The Premiere Sailing League USA will hold a demonstration event in Michigan at Grosse Pointe Yacht Club (GPYC), September 7-8, 2018, to explain in detail why the boat is a perfect tool for the modern and pioneering pathways to sailing that GPYC is developing. An RS21 will be available for up to five crew to sail with Ed Furry from Sail22, from 2:00-6:00 p.m. on Friday, September 7, and from 10:00 a.m. through 4:00 p.m. on Saturday, September 8.

“The RS21 is a competitive, race-ready one-design that nails the desired criteria of a wide range of U.S. owners, clubs and fleets,” said Furry, who helped to fine-tune the layout and mechanics with RS Sailing during the final design stages of the RS21.

For more information about this event, please contact info@premieresailingleague.com or info@rssailing.comwhether to schedule a demo or ask questions about the RS21.

Following the demo event at GPYC, RS21s located in the Mid-West, and on the East and West Coasts, will allow demo opportunities to be accommodated on request. The RS21 will also be on display at the Newport International and Annapolis Boat Shows in, respectively, mid-September and October. For more information about RS Sailing, visit www.RSSailing.com, email info@rssailing.com, or find us on Facebook.

 

More About Premiere Sailing League USA

Premiere Sailing League USA is the first national sailing league for America, designed to increase awareness of the sport with an innovative approach to an annual series of regattas that starts with District Qualifications (for districts North, East, South and West)

The League’s purpose is to provide a platform where sailors from different backgrounds can compete in a fun, dynamic, fast-paced competition that has been conceived and structured to be easily understood by the media and non-sailing audiences. The format calls for short windward/leeward races with as many as 20 races a day on courses close to shore, providing sensational stadium-style entertainment for crowds ashore. For more information about Premiere Sailing League USA, visit www.premieresailingleague.com, email info@premieresailingleague.com, or find us on Facebook. For more information about RS Sailing, visit www.RSSailing.com, email info@rssailing.com, or find us on Facebook.

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Nice video of the RS21 being tested by the Sailing World Magazine boat of the year team. They sailed the boat 3 and 4 up with all big guys, no problem.  

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RS Sailing Managing Director explains why the RS21 was developed at the North American launch at the Newport International Boat Show in Rhode Island this past weekend.

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20 hours ago, RSsailingNA said:

RS Sailing Managing Director explains why the RS21 was developed at the North American launch at the Newport International Boat Show in Rhode Island this past weekend.

How do you get six 21' hulls into a 20' container as claimed in video?

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why didn't they put a furler on the jib?

 

I know its early but have there been enough sales to figure out where fleets might be forming?

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12 hours ago, sailhmb said:

How do you get six 21' hulls into a 20' container as claimed in video?

Make sure the container is 40 feet !

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Will it plane ?  Can the main be reefed for stronger conditions?

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monsters:  planning, assume so, but we'll find shortly.  Sailing ours this weekend here in Portland.

reefing:  yes, with the dacron sails.  Not on the mylars.

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This is in 6-7 knots of wind.  

The One Design sails do not reef but are very depowerable. 

The club sails do reef and have a smaller spinnaker.  

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We finally put ours in the water.


RS 21 Demos in October:
Portland
San Diego
Newport Beach
Long Beach


Winter:
Bay Area 
Seattle
More SoCal


Boat Shows:
TBD:
...likely Seattle, Bay Area and maybe a SoCal one.
 

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^^^

Everything is being driven by big US Sailing / DBW meetings, then filtering out to clubs, then individuals.

Ed Furry will likely be out doing SoCal Demos with us as well, so, his availability drives a bit of it as well.

Which location are you most curious about?  Might be able to give more specific dates to a specific location.

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5 adults in the cockpit?  Unbelievable it can carry that many comfy.  Impressed. What will not be impressive is going to weather in short steep chop on a breezy day.  That low assed bow and little to no buoyancy in the bow  = submarine ride.

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Come say hi to the RS and ZIM Sailing team at the Annapolis Boat Show, the official RS21 US Launch!  

We have a boat on the booth and a boat for demo sails, come by the booth at 2PM sharp any day of the show to arrange a ride.

 

Annapolis, MD, USA – October 4th, 2018

RS Sailing, a British company and currently the World’s largest manufacturer of small sailboats has designed the RS21, a new 21 foot keelboat. The official North American launch of this exciting new boat will be at the U.S. Sailboat Show in Annapolis, MD October 4th-8th, 2018.

The design goal of the RS21 aligns with the overall mission of RS Sailing, to design boats for all levels of sailors in order to get more people on the water, and increase participation in the sport of sailing.

The RS21 appears to be another sportboat, it is actually an entire new category of small keelboats.  The progressive design allows for exciting sailing features in a well-balanced and user-friendly platform that someone can learn to sail in and professional sailors would be enjoy sailing.    

The progressive features include a 650 pound retractable keel which is nearly half the weight of the 1,400 pound boat, chined hull for easy planning, a custom built in Torqeedo electric sail-drive motor, and Carbon Fiber mast.

RS Sailing is committed to sustainability, therefore the RS21 is produced with “Eco-Construction” including core materials made near entirely of recyclable materials and sustainable building techniques. Further reducing the carbon footprint is the electric engine and 6 boats will fit in a shipping container.   

The RS21 is ideal for Yacht Club and institutional fleets, One Design racing, Learn to sail programs, and any sailor looking for an accessible, affordable, and modern boat. 

The RS21 comes in two models, One Design with mylar main, jib, and asymmetrical spinnaker and Club model with a Dacron main and jib.  The starting price is $34,950 landed at one of five North American distributors.

Contact RS21NA@RSSAILING.COM or visit WWW.RSAILING.COM for more information.

 

IMG_6355.jpg

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RS21 Southern California Demos:

October 15 - 19 - San Diego Area (Mission Bay)
October 20 - 24  -  Newport Beach (Bahia Corinthian YC)
October 25 - 28 - Long Beach (ABYC/LBYC)

We are planning Ed Furry to be on site for the Long Beach demo days.

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Where I sail, the RS 21 would look like this going to weather in our typical 22kt breeze on the bow:

article7heading.jpg

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NorCal Demos....stand by. We're likely to have a boat here for a few weeks sometime in the next month or so.  Stoked to give this a try. This will be the first small boat I've ever sailed with an integral motor solution. Will report back once things firm up.

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Looks like we'll have the boat available for Demo pretty quick. Likely to sail Thanksgiving week with her...I'll post up availability here. Hopefully we'll have her out for 3BF :-)

If anyone has any questions, just ring me at the Spinnaker Sailing shop 415-543-7333.

 

 

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Sweat this thing looks like a cross between a 210 and Melges 20.  Wonder how that submarine shaped bow will do in rough water pouring over the bow beating upwind in anything other than the flattest of water.  One thing about the destroyer-like profile of the Melges 24 is the bow is always above waterline even with 200+ lbs sitting on the bow.

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UPDATE:

RS21 should be landing at our shop (Spinnaker Sailing - SF) on Monday.  We'll likely be sailing her on T-Giving Weekend.  If you want to check her out, call us at 415-543-7333 for email staff@spinnaker-sailing.com

RS-21_109_1.jpg

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There are a lot of bodies sitting on the windward spinnaker sheet. They would all have to stand up to prior to the gybe. It is key to take the slack out of the lazy sheet before the gybe. The layout of the lines might need a little refinement there.

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On 10/20/2018 at 4:54 PM, JimBowie said:

Where I sail, the RS 21 would look like this going to weather in our typical 22kt breeze on the bow:

article7heading.jpg

7 knots in Lymington

F77EFCBE-4481-49DF-8664-30F2B3F5880F.png

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The only video I've seen so far of the 21 going kinda quick doesn't show much spray being thrown.
I guess when you look at the bow, you're thinking because it tapers off downwards that it's going to collect a ton of water?
From the one guy I know who has sailed in 20+, that wasn't something that came up at all.

The 21 just did the Hot Rum series in San Diego, don't think it was nuclear there either:)

We'll be testing it out in the Bay Area this week, so we'll find out.

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Storm going in Weds....might try to get her out in the breeze...working on GoPro availability now :-)

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On 11/16/2018 at 5:34 PM, IPLore said:

There are a lot of bodies sitting on the windward spinnaker sheet. They would all have to stand up to prior to the gybe. It is key to take the slack out of the lazy sheet before the gybe. The layout of the lines might need a little refinement there.

I agree...from the pic the kite sheet looks a bit goofy...will sail and report back.

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