Alan H

Piper OD .. dayboat

Recommended Posts

12 minutes ago, Fleetwood said:

We're here to help!

Speak for yourself. I'm all about impeding.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Ishmael said:

Speak for yourself. I'm all about impeding.

My free advice is worth every penny you paid for it............

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great news! The renovation & re-fit season is upon us. Looking forward to the pics!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finding a welder to put the trailer to rights is becoming problematic... also, it rained up there. The whole thing will sink another half inch into the ground...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, Alan H said:

Finding a welder to put the trailer to rights is becoming problematic... also, it rained up there. The whole thing will sink another half inch into the ground...

Wait for more rain and surf it down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/24/2018 at 9:45 PM, Alan H said:

Finding a welder to put the trailer to rights is becoming problematic... also, it rained up there. The whole thing will sink another half inch into the 

 Is there 220 electric service near the trailer, or within a safe towing distance.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's 110 and 220 at the house, probably 100 feet away +/-.

A welder has been located, can do the job $110 an hour, I provide the materials, but obviously can't do it in the rain or within a few hours after it rains. So I might have to wait a week, it's supposed to pour up there this weekend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trailer is fixed!  See pics for what was left of one of the main trailer beams. As I started cutting with a reciprocating saw, it started shaking all the rust out. Turns out there was more rust than actual metal.... and two guys wanted me to take it on the road like this!  See the pile of rust on the ground?

IMG_0918-small.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I cut all the bad stuff out, it's a little bit dicey up at the hitch end, I wish there was more good metal, but I feel OK about it.  It's 20X better than "I was going to drill a couple of holes and bolt a 2 x 6 to it".... Thanks to whoever told me to get the reciprocating saw!

 

IMG_0921-small.jpg

IMG_0925-small.jpg

IMG_0927-small.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Patience, Ishmael!...First up, I have to get the thing out of there and down nearer to where I live. It's a 3 1/2 - 4 1/2 hour drive up there.

 

I have all the wood stuff for the interior decks, the  barney post and so on.   Immediate project list is..

1.)  plug hole for ancient, missing knotmeter

2.)  make rudder, make lower bronze rudder post

3.)  replace little pieces of deck trim which have screw holes into the deck...just asking for delamination, though it hasn't happened, yet.

4.) refinish and attach tiller

5.) acquire boom, and attach to mast

6.) replace one stranded rigging wire...the others should be replaced sooner rather than later but the one can NOT go back on the boat.

7.) acquire some used sails that will fit

8.)  put the inside wood deck structure back in...this stuff isn't really structural. I'll probably pressure wash it, replce anything that loos nasty, and prettify it.

 

And THEN I can sail the thing!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome! What ever you paid the welder it was worth it. 

Are you going to seal up the top where the new frame meets the old to prevent water intrusion? Leaving the bottom open to act as a weep hole is not a bad thing. And of course keeping it out of salt water will prolong it's life expectancy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As an old MG owner (sills that rusted from the inside to the outside), and seeing all the rust that "fell" out of the beam you cut out, it makes me wonder how much rust is on the inside of the other beam/how much metal is left?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bmiller, The young guy who did the welding was really good. He wanted $150 for that. I gave him $200. The steel for the job was $80.  $280 to resurrect that trailer is a pittance.  It's a steal and I like paying good craftsmen well, when they do a good job. If anybody needs a mobile welder in the central foothills of the Sierra in California, let me know!  He even had an air compressor on his truck so I pumped up the tires with it.  That saved me 1,200 grunts with the bicycle pump.

 

Yes, I'm thinking about dropping some fiberglass cloth over the openings where rainwater is likely to get in.

 

Crash, I've taken a ball peen hammer and tapped over nearly all of the frame and there's good steel everywhere. The other beam is solid. I have no idea why that one just completely disintigrated. That said, there IS corrosion inside parts of the frame that I could get to when I cut out the really bad stuff, but there's good steel left to work with.  Whatever the case, the trailer is massively stronger than it was before I did this.  The advisability of making a boat trailer out of tubular beam steel puzzles me. NOT.

The guys in the class in Scotland never dunk their trailers. The boats are crane-lifted into the water at the beginning of the season and spend the season on moorings, mostly.  At 3500 pounds plus another 800+ for the trailer,  my little 4 cylinder Chevy S-10 is not pulling this thing up any ramp.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alan,

I figured you'd done that, just wanted to make sure it'b been thought of...

Crash

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Alan H said:

Bmiller, The young guy who did the welding was really good. He wanted $150 for that. I gave him $200. 

That is very reasonable for a mobile welder to come out. It would have cost 10 times that at a trailer shop.

So did you end up with a cool new sawzall after the job?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, bmiller said:

That is very reasonable for a mobile welder to come out. It would have cost 10 times that at a trailer shop.

So did you end up with a cool new sawzall after the job?

Orchard Supply has closed down,  and sad as I was to see 'em go, I did buy a new sawzall and grinder at the going out of business sale.

 

Maybe I should have bought one of those 110V 150 amp chatterbox stick welders, while I was at it, but where the hell would I put it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Alan H said:

Orchard Supply has closed down,  and sad as I was to see 'em go, I did buy a new sawzall and grinder at the going out of business sale.

 

Maybe I should have bought one of those 110V 150 amp chatterbox stick welders, while I was at it, but where the hell would I put it?

I think you spent just enough money. A cheap buzzbox is not what you need. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congratulations on getting such a beautiful boat.

 

Going back to why that trailer failed on the one arm. I have an almost Identical trailer only shorter,  the trailer slipped off it's blocks  when I wasn't in attendance (I was working in Saudi for a few years). The trailer tilted down at the nose, that arm filled with rain water and  rusted through.

The trailer was built about 1970, the brakes are no longer available for this trailer, so I'll have to replace the entire suspension system / hubs, there is luckily a bolt on replacement.

I just hope I can find a welder as good as yours..

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/4/2018 at 8:26 AM, Crash said:

Yeah, but be careful about who allows you to tow with it...Pretty sure most rental companies specifically forbid it.  UHaul is one of the few I know that allow it...

Before we got the Beast, we rented an F 150 from UHaul many times~ 3000 lbs boat and trailer with lots of windage, no trouble at all- effortless towing-

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/16/2018 at 9:22 PM, Alan H said:

Patience, Ishmael!...First up, I have to get the thing out of there and down nearer to where I live. It's a 3 1/2 - 4 1/2 hour drive up there.

 

I have all the wood stuff for the interior decks, the  barney post and so on.   Immediate project list is..

1.)  plug hole for ancient, missing knotmeter

2.)  make rudder, make lower bronze rudder post

3.)  replace little pieces of deck trim which have screw holes into the deck...just asking for delamination, though it hasn't happened, yet.

4.) refinish and attach tiller

5.) acquire boom, and attach to mast

6.) replace one stranded rigging wire...the others should be replaced sooner rather than later but the one can NOT go back on the boat.

7.) acquire some used sails that will fit

8.)  put the inside wood deck structure back in...this stuff isn't really structural. I'll probably pressure wash it, replce anything that loos nasty, and prettify it.

 

And THEN I can sail the thing!

Make sure you have an extra tire and wheel, jack, blocks,  lug wrench and stands- have you checked the wheel bearings/ lube- we bought a used boat on a decrepit trailer south of  LA , trailered it up to Spokane, tire blew outside Redding on I5, 105 degrees- I HATE TRAILERS :angry:  Had a spare with thank God, but changing that thing in the shoulder with Semis blowing past 6 feet from my head- ACK!

Then there was the mast raising system that broke while raising the mast, the new mast, rigging, the new daggerboard (Phil’s Foils), no boatyard in the area, the new EZ loader (which is a peach, btw) and the new vehicle that would actually tow the thing, and designing, building and testing :o a mast raising system that won’t break.....

Suppprt groups are important!  :)

A Triak is beginning to look better and better....

That said, that Piper is a Beauty-

 

 

 

(What price beauty?) ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, The Q said:

Congratulations on getting such a beautiful boat.

 

Going back to why that trailer failed on the one arm. I have an almost Identical trailer only shorter,  the trailer slipped off it's blocks  when I wasn't in attendance (I was working in Saudi for a few years). The trailer tilted down at the nose, that arm filled with rain water and  rusted through.

The trailer was built about 1970, the brakes are no longer available for this trailer, so I'll have to replace the entire suspension system / hubs, there is luckily a bolt on replacement.

I just hope I can find a welder as good as yours..

 

Be careful who you buy from. I've bought lots of running gear and components. For the most part it's the same stuff just different retailers.

AVOID at all costs southwest wheel. They lie and generally suck.

If you have a local http://www.redneck-trailer.com use them. 

I had good luck with this one also. http://www.dexterpartsonline.com/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI6Knisr6p3wIVRBx9Ch06Hg4EEAAYAiAAEgLeA_D_BwE

Also bought some components from etrailer but never axles. They seem very receptive.

But above all do not use southwest wheel. Did I mention they suck and are lying liars?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And test the lug nuts to make sure they aren’t frozen in place-  better to know that before you make the long coast down the grade....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The previous owner said that he re-packed the bearings a few years ago and the boat has barely moved since then. Hmmm..

The wheels are pretty rusty, but tapping them, they seem OK.  they're FOUR hole wheels.  The tires have been sitting for  ??  years, partially deflated, I'm more worried about them not holding air.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've towed the S2 7.5 several times now, with the U-Haul truck, and it's 1,000 pounds heavier than the Piper.  I will have to get a pair of those magnetic stick-on taillights, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Alan H said:

The previous owner said that he re-packed the bearings a few years ago and the boat has barely moved since then. Hmmm..

The wheels are pretty rusty, but tapping them, they seem OK.  they're FOUR hole wheels.  The tires have been sitting for  ??  years, partially deflated, I'm more worried about them not holding air.

Have you hauled it home yet or is it still sitting at the po's place? I'd replace those rotted tires beforehand.

Is there any suspension on those axles or is it just a spindle welded to the frame? If so you could put a couple torsion spindles to give the ride a little cush.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a spindle, well...four spindles, with the push-braking system integrated, but it's weird. Remember, built in Scotland in 1970, 48 years ago..  I've never seen anything like this before.

 

Having a spare is a REALLY good idea. Hmmm....how to accomplish this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm guessing your suspension unit's are like these.

http://www.indespension.co.uk/214-braked-suspension-units.

There is rubber inside the box section to act as suspension, it's very effective.

Yours, like mine, used push rods, the new ones on that link are cable operated but effectively work the same way. Except IIRC the new cables hold the brakes off, where as the old rods pushed the brakes on. 

Also IIRC the change was safety, if the rod system fails, you have no brakes, if the cable system fails your brakes come on till you do something about it.

Note they have 4 hole wheel and tyre assemblies here

 http://www.indespension.co.uk/218-13-diameter

Though mine are the old 10 inch as on the original mini.

It may give you some help as to what for look for over there...

Oh Indespension are a UK national company, and one of the biggest for trailers, they may have an agent in the USA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Insurance has been obtained, spare tire purchased..  the countdown begins.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Further updates....The Rudder.  Here's a pic of the empty space where the rudder should be.

 



 

IMG_0466-small.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The current rudder is toast... It's pretty obvious from these pictures.  The first is the existing rudder sitting on top of a stack of redwood that I will make into the new rudder.  The emergency rudder that I made from redwood, glue'd up with PL100 and sheathed in triaxial glass works great, and this rudder is quite a bit smaller than that one, so I figure I should be fine.

 

IMG_0993-small-crop.jpg

rudder-endview-small-crop.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...and here we are, gluing up.  I'll shape this one with a power planer and a belt sander, then sheathe with triaxial glass  in epoxy.

 

 

IMG_1002-small.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

humm. Im no boat builder but I have worked with redwood in the past and remember it for the way you could split it perfectly and easily. I hope you'll add some transverse strength

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There will be a number of lag bolts through the first couple of boards, and the whole thing will be sheathed in triaxial fiberglass. I don't think it's gonna come apart!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like your DIY skills have come a long way! Cool project!  Is she on the flats yet?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Alan H said:

I started a little blog to document the restoration.

Piper 24 restoration

Alan,

I like the blog. Looking forward to seeing your progress on the rudder.

B.C.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was encouraged by a couple of folks in the 1-D Association, all of which are in Scotland,  to document it all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After a LOT OF HOURS in my truck or the U-Haul truck, Alpha is at her new digs at Bethel Island.  I spent something like 10-11 hours driving on Sunday. It was overcast but not raining when I picked up the U-Haul at Bethel Island. It poured all the way from Auburn to Nevada City and was dumping hail in Nevada City when I arrived to hook 'er up. Fortunately that stopped and it didn't rain all the way down to her new home.

Here we are, stopped to make sure the straps are OK and all the tires were holding air. I had NO issues driving the 3 hours it took to cover the 142 miles, so getting that trailer fixed was a great investment.  I'll be updating the blog, here shortly.

 

UHaul-Piper.JPG

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Alan H said:

After a LOT OF HOURS in my truck or the U-Haul truck, Alpha is at her new digs at Bethel Island.  I spent something like 10-11 hours driving on Sunday. It was overcast but not raining when I picked up the U-Haul at Bethel Island. It poured all the way from Auburn to Nevada City and was dumping hail in Nevada City when I arrived to hook 'er up. Fortunately that stopped and it didn't rain all the way down to her new home.

Here we are, stopped to make sure the straps are OK and all the tires were holding air. I had NO issues driving the 3 hours it took to cover the 142 miles, so getting that trailer fixed was a great investment.  I'll be updating the blog, here shortly.

 

UHaul-Piper.JPG

pretty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Turns out there's a eucalyptus tree about 150 feet away from where she's stored, with a conveniently placed branch that will make stepping the mast really easy when the time comes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I updated the blog.... It's just an account of the road trip, and shoveling out about 30 pounds of pine needles from the inside of the boat!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Alan H said:

I updated the blog.... It's just an account of the road trip, and shoveling out about 30 pounds of pine needles from the inside of the boat!

At least they would keep it smelling nice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Fleetwood said:

Pine tar, isn't that a good preservative?

For wood, yes. For people, only after they shuffle off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The bottom 5 pounds had fermented in the water in the bilge.  BLECCH.  If I die this week, you'll all know why, I didn't have gloves.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This photograph should give you an idea regarding the state of the running rigging.... I removed the  -*cough*- "rope formerly known as spinnaker halyard" the other day.

 

Piper-Knots.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Should have left it in the bilge for a bit - would probably have cleaned it up nicely......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

washing machine, inside a pillow cover, bit of detergent, as new :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, LeoV said:

washing machine, inside a pillow cover, bit of detergent, as new :)

Soak it overnight in Oxi Clean first, the difference is amazing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those are the rope ends to the wire-rope halyards. The wire parts are full of meathooks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have acquired a gooseneck slide.  This sounds like a WTF moment, but I found an appropriate slide on Rig-Rite's website, only to ask them about it and discover that they wanted $299 for the part. Put together the rest of the gooseneck assembly and they wanted $500 for the whole shebang.

After I recovered consciousness and the twitching stopped I went and looked at EBAY.  Ta-Daa.... $24.  It's beatup and ugly, but I didn't buy it 'cause it's pretty.  A 5/15th inch bolt, a piece of s.s. with a 5/16th inch hole in it for a tang and a 6-pack of beer to my buddy Len for welding the tang to the bolt head and I'm stylin'.

 

I believe I have a lead on some sails which are adaptable to the piper as soon as the sewing machine shop fixes my Pfaff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/24/2019 at 1:20 PM, LeoV said:

washing machine, inside a pillow cover, bit of detergent, as new :)

Of course your washing machine will look like a hippo swam in it. :P

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bull City said:

Of course your washing machine will look like a hippo swam in it. :P

Hey my underwear gets washed in that machine.

TMI, I know, I know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rudder has been shaped, holes drilled in each end for the pin and post and has a layer of 16 ounce roving epoxied on it. 95% of the  glassing job is quite good, it kind of suck on the trailing edge, there will be grinding in my near future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been busy with other things, but I've found some used sails for cheap... $165 got me  a mainsail that fits and a genoa that's within 2-3 inches of the class genoa.  One was found on Craigslist Los Angeles, the other on Bellingham Craigslist.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have GOT to finish that rudder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I dry-fit the rudder on Sunday.  It still needs finishing, but I thought I'd make sure that I hadn't screwed it up beyond ever fitting before I actually made it smooth.

 

Rudder-Dryfit.JPG

Rudder-dryfit-rudder.JPG

Rudder-dryfit-top.JPG

Rudder-dryfit-bottom.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pffft...sideways. Oy, ve.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hurray! 

Or is it hooray?

Either way good work and keep on keeping on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I'm going to be wild and crazy and replace the stranded starboard upper shroud with 5 mm dyneema. It doesn't cost a lot, I can re-use the perfectly good turnbuckle,  and that will force me to learn how to make a brummel splice.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In light of the coming rebuild and reboot of the class website, I renamed my blog.

 

https://swtartan.wixsite.com/piperonedesign

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My buddy, George McK. has offered a section of his old Hobie 18 mast for a boom. Sweet....  he's also offered some old, leftover rigging from his Moore 24. I wonder if the upper shroud from the Moore is long enough.  Thanks, George!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went by my local bulk metal shop this morning....no bronze. Dammit.  I'd rather give him the business, but no such luck.  So I used the card, will pay for shipping and ordered the bronze rod out of which I'll get the lower rudder post machined.  It'll be a braindead easy machining job.... just turn about half an inch of one end of the 1" rod to 1/2" diameter and drill two 3/8 inch holes for lag bolts to pin it inside the rudder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been gifted with two Moore 24 upper shrouds. they're early 90's stuff but sound. Gotta be better than the 1970's wires I'm replacing, including the starboard upper that's stranded. They're about a foot too long so I'll be off to the rigger shortly to have the right size aircraft eyes put on the top and get them cut to length.

 

Just a note to the world....a s.s. bolt and nut that has been sunk into aluminum for 40 years and never moved just laughs at attempts to dislodge it, including heat,  hammer-and-punch,  liquid wrench, WD-40 and a buttload of cussing.  I might have to give up, get a new aluminum tube for a spreader and have a buddy machine a piece of delrin or aluminum for the spreader end.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was lucky I've got given 2 old masts (23ft) the better one I'm refurbishing, they are of a similar age to yours, my spreaders were riveted on so I drilled the heads off. Drilling off a Stainless head would be somewhat more difficult but possible. Or possibly a carefully used angle grinder with a blade for Stainless.. 

My shrouds were 6 inches too long,  so I bought some copper crimps, rescued the old Stainless eyes,  I have a 10 ton hydraulic press for electric crimps so used that.. 

Right I'm off to create a thread for my boat rebuild,  quite where to put it I'm not sure,  it's built for racing,  an open keelboat,  but small enough to race in a handicap dinghy class.. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kudos to my buddy Len, who took a solid rod of bronze and turned it into a lower pintle for me, last night....in about an hour. Between the lathe and the CNC drill, this is pretty.

 

The bronze lag bolts are en route from Jamestown Suppliers, along with a box of 5/8ths nylon washers for a bearing surface.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Alan H said:

Kudos to my buddy Len, who took a solid rod of bronze and turned it into a lower pintle for me, last night....in about an hour. Between the lathe and the CNC drill, this is pretty.

 

The bronze lag bolts are en route from Jamestown Suppliers, along with a box of 5/8ths nylon washers for a bearing surface.

Definately need photos of that!

Keep up the good, really anxious to see your boat in the water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There will be a plastic sleeve around the pin for a bushing.  Gudgeon is 7/8...pin is 5/8. The flat part of this rod above the pin will ride on a nylon washer that will sit between it and the flat surface of the top of the gudgeon.

piper-pintle.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've filled and sanded, filled and sanded twice on each side now, paying special attention to the trailing edge.  The leading edge hides behind the back of the keel so it's a little bit lumpy, not terrible. I'd never leave an exposed-leading-edge rudder like this, but I can't see how it's going to make any difference.    I worked a lot harder making the S2 7.9's rudder more fair than this, but this is gonna do.  I'll never race another Piper in this boat, and it's a full-keel, 3600 pound 24-footer for daysailing and looking like a gentleman-sailor in.  Good enough.   I'll sand the last bits I filled this morning, tonight, and get two coats of polyurethane on it.  It will live on a trailer, so no bottom paint, at least not for now.  With luck, it goes on the boat this weekend.  Hot Damn!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cause for celebration! If it wasn't so far I'd bring a bottle of some sort of spirit. For drinking, not smashing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, bmiller said:

Cause for celebration! If it wasn't so far I'd bring a bottle of some sort of spirit. For drinking, not smashing.

Once I get the  "new" upper shrouds sorted, and maybe replace the destroyed toe rails...put in the floorboards, she's sail-able. Not gorgeous yet,  and some of the partial bulkheads need epoxy-injection or replacement,  but sail-able on a light day, probably for the first time in 30 years.  We're getting there.  It's slow, but there's no rush.

 

BTW, I was given a spinnaker pole.  I wonder if the totally porous, but free Flying 15 spinny I have is anywhere even vaguely close to the right size.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ALPHA has her rudder!  I skipped church, drove up to Bethel Island and installed it today!     Th eSix-Month-Project

 

DONE

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just ordered the Ottertex. for the cockpit cover.  It's a heavy 11 ounce canvas with a PVC backing....doesn't breathe but totally waterproof, and supposed to be sew-able on a home machine.  I measured it and then added about 5 inches to each side. It will overlap the sheer and hang down a bit now, but when the mast is up and the boom is on, it should be reasonably close to jut covering the cockpit with a few inches of overlap.

 

Once the floorboards were in, I went and sat IN the boat, on the floorboards for the first time. Truth is, if I stick with camping accomadations...sleeping pad, sleeping bag, backpacking stove for dinner, and coffee I can weekend-cruise the boat. There's plenty of room,  WAY more than my backpacking tent.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Score.  Some number of years ago someone from my church that I never knew, passed away. He gave the church an 1850 watt portable generator. The maintenance guy/member who does all the gardening and building stuff shrugged when I asked if I could borrow it, said that in the ten years it had been here, he'd never turned it on.  It's too small to actually power the church office if the electricity went down for a couple days,  and if it went away so that he didn't have to move it around all the damn time, he'd be happy.

 

Well, I won't take it, but I'll get it out and change the spark plug and see if it works...put some new gas in it. If it does, I'll take it in my truck to the next couple of boat visits, and  I can run some power tools...vacuum out the bilge to suck up all the scraped-off-shed paint bits and so on. This is a big help, as there is no electricity at my parking site.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I added one of these to the toolshed last year... and have been pretty pleased:
https://www.dewalt.com/products/power-tools/dust-management/dust-extractors-and-vacs/1820v-max-cordlesscorded-wetdry-vacuum/dcv581h

I have both 18V XRP and 20V Max batteries... this little vac can use either or plug in to 110V and is incredibly handy on the boat or in the shop. I have a genny and larger corded tools and shopvacs, but for working on a boat or a car, this thing has been a perfect fit. I still run my larger shop vac in the shop... but this little guy has been following along increasingly often.

On-topic... sleeping on the boat (any boat with an enclosure) has get-away value that's tough to quantify, but is definitely REAL. Even if it feels more like a campsite, there's value in choosing to getaway, and choosing to go home afterwards.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, randii said:

I added one of these to the toolshed last year... and have been pretty pleased:
https://www.dewalt.com/products/power-tools/dust-management/dust-extractors-and-vacs/1820v-max-cordlesscorded-wetdry-vacuum/dcv581h

I have both 18V XRP and 20V Max batteries... this little vac can use either or plug in to 110V and is incredibly handy on the boat or in the shop. I have a genny and larger corded tools and shopvacs, but for working on a boat or a car, this thing has been a perfect fit. I still run my larger shop vac in the shop... but this little guy has been following along increasingly often.

On-topic... sleeping on the boat (any boat with an enclosure) has get-away value that's tough to quantify, but is definitely REAL. Even if it feels more like a campsite, there's value in choosing to getaway, and choosing to go home afterwards.

Yeah, something like that, and a cordless drill and a cordless grinder are all on the "gee, I wish I had" list.

 

The next project is sewing the cockpit cover. Well...that's not quite true, I'm painting and varnishing some shelves that will go back in, and glue'ing up the aft seat and the athwarships seat, which is also where the mainsheet ends.  Those two items, after gluing and sanding, will get paint and 3 coats of exterior polyurethan.  Between those, and the cockpit cover, the next few weeks are filled.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bull, there are a mess 'o pics on the blog!

 

The ottertex arrived. Ottertex is a PVC-infused, completely waterproof polyester canvas.  It isn't breathable, like Sunbrella, but it costs $6 - $7 a yard instead of $24 a yard, like Sunbrella.  I'm making a cockpit cover out of it. The ends will be open, as the boom overhangs the cockpit in the back of the boat by almost 3 feet. With that much open, I'm not worried about condensation.  I've stitched up the main pieces of fabric that will go into the boom cover. This stuff is a dream to sew on.

AND I bought a "fair". (means -"trashed"-) condition used mainsail from Second Wind sails for $100.  I don't care if it's blown-out and slow, I'm not racing.  $100 is cheap, it will make the boat go in a forward direction when the wind blows with the craigslist genoa I have now. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I ought to tot up how much I've spent.

$600 for the boat

$150 to rent the U-Haul to move it

$80 for the steel to repair the trailer.

$200 for the welder to fix the trailer.
$55 for the genoa off of craigslist

$47 for the sail that will get cut down to "100% jib"-size off of craigslist.

$134 for the mainsail from. Second Wind Sails

NO dollars...for "new" lines...thank you so very much to SSS members and friends for passing along spare bits and old halyards.
NO dollars for the new upper shroud...thanks to George McKay for a pair of uppers from his Moore 24. What this will cost is  $15 for the aircraft eye that will go at the upper end, and the labor to get it swaged on, which will probably be about $30.  Call if $45

$40. for the bronze rod that got made into the  rudder pintle
$18. for the preposterously expensive silicon bronze lagbolts that hold the rudder to that bronze rod.
$10.  for assorted bits of stainless steel hardware...mostly lag bolts from West Marine and a box of 5/8ths nylon washers from Defender.
$25. for the gooseneck fitting off of ebay

$50   for the Ottertex for the cockpit cover and exterior thread

-------------------

$1454.  so far. plus or minus something.

The interior woodwork has cost nothing so far, I had glue, soap, paint and exterior satin polyurethane already.  I'll have to but another quart of the exterior poly to finish the brightwork, that'll be $15  plus another $18 in disposable brushes. The rudder cost me nothing except the bronze rod and the lag bolts and the s.s. lag bolts that connect it to the rudder post. I made it from scrounged redwood, already had the fiberglass roving and the TAP plastics epoxy.

I'll need about $20 more in hardware to mount the mainsheet and the center seat.  I have aluminum tubing for the boom, have a slab of aluminum for the boom ends.  I have beaucoup blocks for whatever.  I bet anything I can get the Piper sail-able before Spring for less than $1500.  This is with the old, ugly long-useless bottom paint still on the bottom, but that's CHA-CHINGG and will have to wait.  I'm currently saving my boat pennies for a haulout for the S2 7.9.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's to get her sailing, such that when the wind blows and I point the boat in some direction approximately 45 degrees from the wind direction, or further, the boat moves in a forward direction and the people on board are smiling while they eat lunch and look for seals.  Oh and the owner is sitting in the back wiggling the tiller and looking distinguished.

That IS the point, after all.

To make her gorgeous, she'll need a bottom job, which will be $1,100

And a topsides paint job which I can't even estimate

and someday, when I retire and she's my Old Man Boat, new sails, which will probably be $1800 by then.  And considering that the standing rigging is probably about 1972 vintage, probably new standing rigging as well. $1,000

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Alan H said:

Bull, there are a mess 'o pics on the blog!

The link you gave in #139 doesn't work. Is there a new one?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Several knowledgeable guys on the Wooden Boat Forum do not like Ottertex, and are convinced it will expire from UV exposure, very quickly.  They say that it's rated for 500 hours of UV resistance, which is fact is what the manufacturers website says.  However, what *exactly*   does  "UV resistance". mean?   Does it mean 500 hours of direct sunlight?  Does it mean 500 hours of exposure to a high intensity UV lamp?     It would be very strange to market a fabric specifically for outdoor use, if it's going to disintigrate in the sun in 20 days, which is what the Wooden Boat forum guys seem to believe will happen.   The manufacturers website  specifically says the stuff is appropriate for boat covers.

 

So hell if I know.  I've got the stuff, and I'm halfway through making the cover, so I'll finish it and we'll just see.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/1/2019 at 7:31 PM, Alan H said:

Several knowledgeable guys on the Wooden Boat Forum do not like Ottertex, and are convinced it will expire from UV exposure, very quickly.  They say that it's rated for 500 hours of UV resistance, which is fact is what the manufacturers website says.  However, what *exactly*   does  "UV resistance". mean?   Does it mean 500 hours of direct sunlight?  Does it mean 500 hours of exposure to a high intensity UV lamp?     It would be very strange to market a fabric specifically for outdoor use, if it's going to disintigrate in the sun in 20 days, which is what the Wooden Boat forum guys seem to believe will happen.   The manufacturers website  specifically says the stuff is appropriate for boat covers.

 

So hell if I know.  I've got the stuff, and I'm halfway through making the cover, so I'll finish it and we'll just see.

The 500 hours is the life under an accelerated aging test (i.e. high intensity UV light). As with all tests of this trope type, it would be impractical to test under 'real' conditions, as it just takes too long. Also, what are 'real' conditions? UV varies a lot depending on latitude, but also longitude location (e.g. very different for west coast UK, with all the clouds coming of the Atlantic, than it would be for acentral location in north America at the same latitude, a long way from the coast). Also affected by your altitude. There are ways of converting the test life to a real world predicted life at different locations, but for most of us the best we can do is compare the 'test' life of different products to get an idea of how they behave. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites