Alan H

Piper OD .. dayboat

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5 minutes ago, Fleetwood said:

As a result of our recent bushfires (several deaths, 10 million acres burned so far, hundreds of homes lost, and counting) butt tossers can cop fines up to $10K (and lose licence).....

Removing both their index fingers would work better, I think.

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I've been busy making an emergency rudder for the S2 7.9 ... I gave the old one to my buddy George for his Capo 30. It was way oversized for the S2 anyway. That's been taking up my time, so no progress on the Piper in the last little bit.

 

I'll probably cut out the boom in a day or two, though...  11' 6" of tubing and some hard maple turned on the lathe for the forward end, that will hold the eye bolt that connects to the gooseneck.

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Well, the cockpit cover is holding up great.  so much for the WBF nay-sayers, at least so far.

 

I've rough-sanded a bunch of the interior, just to knock off the flaking paint chips.  There was 50 years of dirt stuck on the inside of the hull, including WAY up forward in the pointy end and WAAAY after in the OTHER pointy end. I've gotten in there with a mop and cleaned most of it off.  There's a support below the thwart/traveler beam with a metal strap to it that helps support the traveler beam.   It  also supports the forward edges of the aft floors.  This is glassed to the hull. Part of it is 3/4 inch plywood, that sticks down into the bilge farther than it really needs to. The tabbing is ~gone~..totally pulled off the plywood and the plywood is delaminating.  I got in there with some doorskins and made a pattern for a new piece, that will stay out of the bilge a bit more.  Next time I'm up there, I'll get in there with the rotary tool and cut out the rotten stuff...grind the hull a LITTLE BIT..just to roughen it up, and tab in new pieces. This is not a big job.

 

I discovered that the  diaphrasm on the ancient bilge pump is cracked through.  There's no way I'll ever find another one, so a new gusher is on the "someday-buy" list.  That's a good candidate for a Craigslist find.

 

As you can see form this picture, there is nothing forward of the mast. It's wide-open all the way up to the bow. So....if you tip it over, it's going to the bottom. Not that I know of a single Piper that has sunk, but still.  I took measurements to make a bulkhead that would go about 6 inches forward of the mast and enclose ~maybe~ enough space to keep her afloat, if I also enclosed the aft area behind the cockpit. There's a plywood bulkhead there, which needs rebuilding and I figure...if I have to rebuild it, might as well do it right and make it watertight, with an opening hatch.

 

 

170924-cst-stem-piper-03_132_3143.jpg

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I wonder how to calculate the volume of air needed to float X amount of wood/fiberglass/lead.

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This photo shows you the internal fiberglass liner that is in the Rustler 24...exact same hull.

rustler-24-31361070140648655457485651554

Note the s.s. barney post. I could actually put something similar in my boat, though I like the thwart as it is, and the metal strap I mentioned above serves much the same function.

 

Look up forward. The fiberglass liner encloses a mess of the hull, up forward, with a little "shelf" area for sail storage, the cooler and so on.

 

Here's another view of the aft part of the cockpit. The bulkhead on my boat is actually about 6 inches further forward than the bulkhead on the. Rustler.

 

RUSTLER-24-FRANCE-06.jpg

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4 minutes ago, luminary said:

1 liter of water weights 1 kg. How heavy is the boat in kg? You need that many liters.

Boat weighs 3400 pounds. ...1542 kilograms.

Thus 1542 liters of air space.

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Video of the Rustler 24 cockpit.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=5&v=hcvPA8OlL9I&feature=emb_logo

 

 

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4 minutes ago, Alan H said:

Boat weighs 3400 pounds. ...1542 kilograms.

Thus 1542 liters of air space.

if you want all of it above the water. Sounds like too much. Clearly, I'm no designer. :)

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7 minutes ago, luminary said:

if you want all of it above the water. Sounds like too much. Clearly, I'm no designer. :)

OK for a gross approximation...I went here: https://www.calculator.net/volume-calculator.html?coneradius=2.5&coneradiusunit=feet&coneheight=8&coneheightunit=feet&conecal=Calculate#cone

I looked at the cone calculator.  The front part of the boat of VERY...very roughly half of a cone.  So I put in the cone radius of 2.5 feet and the height of 8 feet. That spit out a volume of....

 

52.3 feet3

OK, my bow is half of that, so let's call it 26 feet, cubed.
Now, convert cubic feet to liters... Well, Google kindly provides such a thing, and this spits out 736 liters .  so if I enclose  the space I'm thinking of doing, with a bulkhead I get very roughly half of the air volume I need to float the boat.

Gross estimate is that the aft section of the boat is half the volume of the front, so  totally flying by the seat of the pants, here...that would get me up to about 3/4 of the volume I'd need to float the boat.

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Doing what I've mentioned so far is not that  difficult, and I need to rebuild the aft bulkhead anyway.  Hmmm.... Hmmmmm.

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3 hours ago, luminary said:

I guess if you visualize 1 cubic meter (=1000 liters) its not that big. So 1.5 m^3 seems doable split fore and aft...

That's a really, really good point.  The bow of the boat is for sure, at least  a cubic meter.

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I"ve been doing basic stuff like sanding old interior paint and refinishing interior woodwork. I need to cut two new toerails.  There's a possiblity of a no-charge-for-labor paint job coming along.

I'm just posting this pic to keep the dream afloat.

 

Old Skool.   I notice that there's a big variation in mainsheet layouts in the Holy Loch/Gourock fleet.

 

i-c96VfTs-X3.jpg

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Oh, and I scored a spinnaker pole for $10.  Not kidding...ten bucks on craigslist.

 

BTW, most of the fleet doesn't use roller furling.

Think how totally great it will be to sail without one single piece of electronic junk, but for the handheld VHF and the running lights.

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23 hours ago, Alan H said:

Think how totally great it will be to sail without one single piece of electronic junk, but for the handheld VHF and the running lights.

That's how I've always sailed. Of course, it's always been in lakes and protected waters, such as Biscayne Bay.

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I'm getting close to having a boom.  My local metal warehouse is actually open today, though they open late and close early. I'll go down there and get a piece of stainless to work on for a gooseneck toggle, and it'll be done.

IMG_2170.JPG

IMG_2171.JPG

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I'm using stuff I have at the house in my surplus junk box, so those are not really the metal screws I'd like on the boom block. There's a piece of douglas fir inside the boom, shaped to fit the curve. It's about 2 1/2 inches long and fills the "circle" of the booms circumference about halfway.  The mainsheet U-bolt goes through it, so the loads don't point-load on the aluminum.

I wish I  could have some something like that for the outhaul fittings, but at least the eye's pan-head bolts have washers on them, and two of the screws on the  boom block go a half-inch into the wood.

The mainsheet on these boats usually go multi-part to a fixed point behind the tiller, or in the upgraded ones, guys have rigged a traveler back there.  The part you pull on is in the cockpit, either to a crossbeam or a barney post.  So you need a point somewhere in the middle of the boom to hang a block off of.   I have a rivet-on mainsheet fitting in my junk box, but it's really for a big dinghy. I could pick up a boom bail for cheap, but you know, I had this leftover seat-belt and safety-tether stuff lying around so I sewed this up.  Add in an  old bigass shackle and we're stylin.   No holes in the boom!

 

IMG_2168.JPG

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On 7/17/2018 at 4:38 AM, TwoLegged said:

It is a parking brake cum surge brake.

Mode 1: parking. Pull lever and lock it.

Mode 2: normal driving.  Fully release lever, and flip out the pawl over the piston so it is free to move.  Now if the trailer starts pushing the car fwd (e.g. when car brakes are applied), the piston is pushed back and the trailer brakes itself.

Mode 3: reversing.  Fully release lever, and flip in the pawl over the piston, so that the piston cannot move.  Now you can reverse without trailer applying its own brakes.

I thought this was how trailer brakes were set up on all light trailers.  Heavy ones have a plug-in-link to the towing vehicle's hydraulics (e.g. on what you folks call a "semi" and we call an "articulated truck" or "artic") ... but AFAIK this is how all Yurp does it for trailers over the EU 750kg unbraked limit and below whatever the threshold is for fully-linked brakes.

How do Muricans brake light trailers?

Agreed twolegged, great system if properly set up. My Quarter tonner was on a 4 wheel trailer like that. When i brought her to China i towed her all the way from Port Edgar Marina just outside Edinburgh to Felixstowe behind a LWB Land Rover 110 and hardly knew it was there when braking and i had a ton (literally) of shit inside the boat - not the slightest hint of the trailer trying to control the tow vehicle (Landies are rated to 3 ton towing capacity)

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4 hours ago, shanghaisailor said:

Agreed twolegged, great system if properly set up. My Quarter tonner was on a 4 wheel trailer like that. When i brought her to China i towed her all the way from Port Edgar Marina just outside Edinburgh to Felixstowe behind a LWB Land Rover 110 and hardly knew it was there when braking and i had a ton (literally) of shit inside the boat - not the slightest hint of the trailer trying to control the tow vehicle (Landies are rated to 3 ton towing capacity)

Yep I towed a similar trailer with 1/2 ton boat ( empty)  from Port Edgar to the Outer Hebridies ( my parents live in Bo'ness) ,  and then 18months later from there to Norfolk ( with an overnight stop) this was behind a normal 3/4 ton car.  They are perfectly good trailers when set up correctly.. 

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We were trailering our S2 7.9 behind our 3/4 ton Suburban on the interstate and had a blowout.  The HD Suburban is such a solid towing vehicle that without hearing the bang, we would have never known of a tire failure.  

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Rigt now, I'm renting a  u-Haul truck when I need to move the Piper. At some point I'll take it back down to the Central Bay and park it, probably on Treasure island, to use the hoist there. I'll need some sort of 6-cylinder or strong hybrid truck to get it around the island and the yard, I expect.

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1 hour ago, Alan H said:

Rigt now, I'm renting a  u-Haul truck when I need to move the Piper. At some point I'll take it back down to the Central Bay and park it, probably on Treasure island, to use the hoist there. I'll need some sort of 6-cylinder or strong hybrid truck to get it around the island and the yard, I expect.

Hmm, a boat like that right in the main bay? Wet and cold says my not-as-young-as-I-once-was body. I might go the Richmond Riviera, Brickyard Cove has lots of storage space and a mule so you don't have to use your own rig to move it around

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Wet and cold and dangerous on a big day. However, they are stiffer than an etchells, as they're a lot heavier. But still.

I figured TI gives me access to the Estuary, the backside of TI, and the south Bay. I'd only venture out past Pier 39 on very nice days...ditto for northwards from TI towards Berkeley or Angel Island.

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1 hour ago, Alan H said:

Wet and cold and dangerous on a big day. However, they are stiffer than an etchells, as they're a lot heavier. But still.

I figured TI gives me access to the Estuary, the backside of TI, and the south Bay. I'd only venture out past Pier 39 on very nice days...ditto for northwards from TI towards Berkeley or Angel Island.

Yes, the Ballpack to the Estuary is pretty nice, flatwater stuff. Friday night races and the like. 

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4 hours ago, Raz'r said:

Yes, the Ballpack to the Estuary is pretty nice, flatwater stuff. Friday night races and the like. 

Also, I live on the SF Peninsula, and T.I. is half the drive it is, to Richmond. 

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While I'm working at home, and with it being light until 8:00 PM now, I'm "making stuff" at a much increased pace.  This project has been obviously needed since Day One. The wood toerails in the bow are split and broken, they have to be replaced. I knew that when I bought the boat. So yesterday, FINALLY, I cut strips for new toerails. The old ones were probably some sort of hardwood, and 1" X 1" originally I would guess. Now, 55 years later, they were more like 1" on the base and 3/4" tall.. These new ones are 1" wide and 1.5" tall. It's remarkable how different they look, with that extra half inch of height. Maybe they'll help with footing, up there, being a little taller.

I need to bend them at least a little bit, to fit the curve of the deck, so here they are, wetted by my hose, suspended on blocks at the end, and weighed down with a lead brick. They'll stay like that for a couple of weeks, probably get rained on a few times and I bet the bend will be permanent.

 

toerails-bending-sm.JPG

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I've been making a self-steering windvane for the Wildcat, based on Jan Alkema's USD vane and RHM pendulum oar, with inspiration from the Mister Vee product. However, today it rained cats and dogs, so I stayed inside and sewed up a tack strap  (not a jock strap, you juvenile dorks!)...to keep the tack of the mainsail down close to the boom.  It's pretty heavily reinforced and stays closed due to about 16 inches of velcro connection.

 

TackStrap.JPG

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I have something like that on the S2 7.9  and it works remarkably well. So what the heck, it's pretty simple, I just made my own with reinforcements where the strap will encounter a hard edge, like the tack grommet....

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I'm working on a windvane for the Wildcat, but I need to get a couple of doorskins, so I can also make the hatchboard scabbard.  I might get one extra so I can lay out a pattern for that bulkhead I want to make.

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24 minutes ago, Alan H said:

I'm working on a windvane for the Wildcat, but I need to get a couple of doorskins, so I can also make the hatchboard scabbard.  I might get one extra so I can lay out a pattern for that bulkhead I want to make.

working on a windvane? please tell us more

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On 4/14/2020 at 12:50 PM, chester said:

working on a windvane? please tell us more

I'm making a windvane, based on Jan Alkema's USD vane, combined with his RHM (rudder head mount) pendulum oar system. The RHM system is for transom mounted rudders, particularly like mine...example boats that could use this system are  Westerly Konsort (what Jan has)..J-30, J-29, S2 7.9, S2 9.0, though it also works for transom-hung "full keel" rudders like the Contessa 26.

Pic of the wind-vane part, as currently assembled...
VaneAeembly-firstlook.jpg

 

The green pole at the bottom is the "mast" on which the vane swivels. It's a former Highland Games weight-over-bar crossbar, which is actually a high-jump crossbar. It is incredibly strong and stiff, tightly wound hollow fiberglass.  The grey-green stuff above the black wrapped gorilla tape, is a fiberglass tube I made around the lime green stuff, with kitchen plastic wrap and wax paper as a release. It fits tightly, but will rotate on the lime green pole for course-setting.  The air blade itself is made from 1/8th doorskins, painted. Most of the rest of the assembly is aluminum stock, cut, JB-Weld'ed together and drilled as needed. The axis on which the blade rotates is a 3/8ths inch aluminum rod, drilled at the ends for cotter pins. The main paddle carrier is laminated redwood....the arms to which the linkage cables will be attached are aluminum stock, as is the upright part that holds the counterweight.  The counterweight itself is a 3 inch piece of steel contractors rod that I found sitting by the road during one of my recent long walks around the neighborhood.

 

There's a whole thread about building the windvane over on the Wooden Boat Forum, if you want to read it. I figured that this was low-tech, garage-tech...no carbon fiber, no 3-D printing, just stuff assembled on the cheap on my garage floor and that wouldn't interest most SA'ers.  As it stands right now, I've spent about $70 on this project, which kind of was the point. You can see it here:

http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?264380-I-am-making-a-windvane

 

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The doorskins, I had left over from I don't know what project...

The pendulum oar is made from  2 x 3 redwood, as there's a stack of it, sort-of knot-free....not really....down the street. I made my emergency rudder from the stuff. I took a 6 foot, 2 x 3 piece and ripped it into 1-inch thick stuff. I used a leftover tube of PL Premium to edge-glue half of one of those pieces to the other one, so the oar is 6 feet long and has a chord of 4 11/2 inches.


The epoxy, that I bought a while ago for the emergency rudder project I did to prep for the 2022 Singlehanded TransPac. That rudder is done, so this is what's left over.  That's document on the Singlehanded Sailing Society forum if you want to see it...so is this windvane project.

The fiberglass cloth I'm using, I don't know where I got it. IT's been in a plastic bag on my workbench for years.

Most of the aluminum you see is leftover stock from various projects, but I did spend $14 on some heavy-ass aluminum angle extrusions that aren't pictured, yet, and the aluminum rods for the two "hinges" that this system needs to have. One of those is pictured, above..


The low-friction bearings/bushings  are made from plastic from busted-out bottoms of the bicycle baskets my wife uses. She lives on  her bike so we got her some new HDPE "bottoms" for her fabric baskets and I took the busted out plastic, cut out some bits, JB-Welded them together and drilled them for the 3/8ths rod. JB-Weld is a steel-reinforced epoxy. It's stupid-strong stuff.

The JB Weld I bought for the e-rudder project.

The big expense so far has been about  $60 for a zillion little s.s. nuts and bolts and washers...as well as a little stack of nylon washers for low friction.

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The pendulum oar will sit on the rudder-head-mount oar carrier by using dinghy rudder fittings, which is what Jan Alkema used. I have a box of random sailing bits and bobs that someone gave me years and years ago. It happened to have two rudder gudgeon/pintle pairs in it, which will fit a 1-inch thick rudder. Voila! Free.

The linkage between windvane and pendulum oar will be done with cables. I'll either used teflon-lined mountain bike brake cable housing, with teflon-coated wire cables, or maybe I'll use PTFE (that's teflon plastic, just not made by DuPont, so they can't call it "teflon") tubing with heavy-duty  monofilament for the cables. The "monofilament" is actually weed-whacker filament, which I got for an utterly unrelated project that has nothing to do with sailing.

 

The PTFE tubing, which will function just like how bicycle brake cable housing works, is available in the appropriate size for, like...$10 for ten feet of it, which is about right. It's utterly corrosion-proof, and chemical proof so it the Teflon isn't slick enough for me, I can squirt Tri-Flow in there and make it even slipperier.

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Come to discover, in a box under the workbench...a bag full of Tuff Luff stainless steel bits.  I could put a Tuff Luff on the Piper. I already have a sail that's close enough to working jib size as makes no difference.  I'm not sure this is a great idea, though, for just daysailing.

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1 hour ago, Alan H said:

Come to discover, in a box under the workbench...a bag full of Tuff Luff stainless steel bits.  I could put a Tuff Luff on the Piper. I already have a sail that's close enough to working jib size as makes no difference.  I'm not sure this is a great idea, though, for just daysailing.

Wouldn’t Hanks be a better deal, assuming you shorthand a bunch

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8 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

Wouldn’t Hanks be a better deal, assuming you shorthand a bunch

He's pretty busy now that he's over Ebola, or whatever he had.

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11 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

Wouldn’t Hanks be a better deal, assuming you shorthand a bunch

I think so.  The Piper has no lifelines so  I'm afraid headsails would go *splash* when released. It's just that I have, right now, a headsail that will work just great, but it has a #6 tape.

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18 hours ago, Alan H said:

I think so.  The Piper has no lifelines so  I'm afraid headsails would go *splash* when released. It's just that I have, right now, a headsail that will work just great, but it has a #6 tape.

Add piston-hanks? or I wonder if these bad boys could handle the load: https://www.velasailingsupply.com/ronstan-jib-hank-5mm-wire/?sku=RONPNP14B&gclid=CjwKCAjwkPX0BRBKEiwA7THxiIzcZFPNnfeXHFF4averJXmsIt8IH-NSxlowE9wtWSSYX2WwhZXxihoCwN0QAvD_BwE

 

 

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I banged grommets into the tape and tied soft hanks for the jib when I ditched the tuff-luff on my Laser 28.  Pretty slow to change sails with soft hanks but otherwise it worked fine.  

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18 hours ago, Raz'r said:

Add piston-hanks? or I wonder if these bad boys could handle the load: https://www.velasailingsupply.com/ronstan-jib-hank-5mm-wire/?sku=RONPNP14B&gclid=CjwKCAjwkPX0BRBKEiwA7THxiIzcZFPNnfeXHFF4averJXmsIt8IH-NSxlowE9wtWSSYX2WwhZXxihoCwN0QAvD_BwE

Hmmm.... maybe. 3/16th wire is close.

 

 

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17 hours ago, breezetrees said:

I banged grommets into the tape and tied soft hanks for the jib when I ditched the tuff-luff on my Laser 28.  Pretty slow to change sails with soft hanks but otherwise it worked fine.  

Soft hanks?  Elucidate me!

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50 minutes ago, Alan H said:

Soft hanks?  Elucidate me!

This is another use for dyneema soft shackles. Colligo and many others sell them..  or more likely, you'll build them yourself! ;)

SoftHank(1).jpg?format=1500w

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1 hour ago, Alan H said:

Soft hanks?  Elucidate me!

I think I used this design for the shackles, it was from this website anyway:  https://l-36.com/soft_shackle_9.php

It's hard to tie them all the same exact length.  I sorted them by length and used that to alter the jib luff a little- I put more hollow into it to flatten the old sail out with short  ones at the top and bottom and longer ones in the middle (I think?  Can't really remember).  Grommets set into the tape like a regular hank jib, behind the luff rope on the tuff-luff tape.

I used soft shackles on the "cruising" jib and had Pineapple put brass hanks on the "nice" jibs (although we agreed none were nice enough to warrant a new luff tape).  I made a deck bag to store the jib so I didn't have to mess with the shackles every time we went sailing.  I spent a pleasant hour looking through old photos for one that shows that jib (sold the boat last year), the best I could find is here and the picture from randii is really good too. 

2020-04-21_13-21-07.jpg

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52 minutes ago, randii said:

This is another use for dyneema soft shackles. Colligo and many others sell them..  or more likely, you'll build them yourself! ;)

SoftHank(1).jpg?format=1500w

That was my first thought, but he's got a wire forestay.

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8 minutes ago, Priscilla said:

images.jpeg.0e6e49e240dc5b5af79a276e6f0584c8.jpeg

Alan's running a budget program, DIY sorta stuff. 

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2 hours ago, Raz'r said:

That was my first thought, but he's got a wire forestay.

I used them on wire.  None wore through.  Not sailing to Hawaii or anything though. 

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I'm not sailing the Piper to Hawaii!!

 

So it turns out that the Pipers rigging wire is 5 mm. That's the same as 3/16ths.  Those Ronstan twist-on jib hanks go up to 5 mm wire. Looks like that's the plan!

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As y'all can tell from this photo...

170924-cst-stem-piper-03_132_3143.jpg

 

The Piper is wide open, fore and aft.  The Rustler folks have developed a fiberglass liner which makes the boat unsinkable, though it for sure will turn into a ginormous bathtub if you ever tip the boat over enough.  It occurred to me that making a  3/8th plywood bulkhead that would enclose the boat forward of the bow would provide an awful lot of flotation, should the #$%^&*( hit the fan. So the other day I got myself a 4 x 8 panel of 1/8th plywood, transferred the measurements I took from the boat the last time I was there, and laid out a bulkhead panel template.

It's about 59 inches across the top of the deck and 32 inches deep. I'll take it out to the boat the next time I go, and dry fit it.  I'll take notes..."add half an inch here.."  and so on and  then cut out the "real" bulkhead from 3/8's ply. I'll cut a hatch opening, bit enough that I can crawl through it, on one side, so I can access stuff that I stash up there. Some epoxy, some 4-inch glass tape and I should be good to go. 

I might put in a little shelf for a 24 ah, 12V rechargeable battery to run some lights.

bulkhead-layout.JPG

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48 minutes ago, Alan H said:

As y'all can tell from this photo...

170924-cst-stem-piper-03_132_3143.jpg

 

The Piper is wide open, fore and aft.  The Rustler folks have developed a fiberglass liner which makes the boat unsinkable, though it for sure will turn into a ginormous bathtub if you ever tip the boat over enough.  It occurred to me that making a  3/8th plywood bulkhead that would enclose the boat forward of the bow would provide an awful lot of flotation, should the #$%^&*( hit the fan. So the other day I got myself a 4 x 8 panel of 1/8th plywood, transferred the measurements I took from the boat the last time I was there, and laid out a bulkhead panel template.

It's about 59 inches across the top of the deck and 32 inches deep. I'll take it out to the boat the next time I go, and dry fit it.  I'll take notes..."add half an inch here.."  and so on and  then cut out the "real" bulkhead from 3/8's ply. I'll cut a hatch opening, bit enough that I can crawl through it, on one side, so I can access stuff that I stash up there. Some epoxy, some 4-inch glass tape and I should be good to go. 

I might put in a little shelf for a 24 ah, 12V rechargeable battery to run some lights.

bulkhead-layout.JPG

In his 23' daysailor Joel White speced inflatable whitewater bags fore and aft

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1 hour ago, Little Wood Boats said:

In his 23' daysailor Joel White speced inflatable whitewater bags fore and aft

Yeah, I could go that route. Have you priced those, recently?  LOL.  I actually have one, left over from the skerry. It'll go into the caravelle 144 that I'll build after the SHTP and after I get the Piper going.  It probably provides about 50-60 pounds of buoyancy.  Which is enough for a 14 1/2 foot wood dinghy.

 

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1 hour ago, Alan H said:

Yeah, I could go that route. Have you priced those, recently?  LOL.  I actually have one, left over from the skerry. It'll go into the caravelle 144 that I'll build after the SHTP and after I get the Piper going.  It probably provides about 50-60 pounds of buoyancy.  Which is enough for a 14 1/2 foot wood dinghy.

 

How much do they cost compared to building a tub?  I have six or seven laying around I bought cheap years ago.  I will make you a deal

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Well, let's see....I'm not actually making a tub!  I'm just partitioning off the bow, and will do the same thing behind the cockpit to the stern area.

So, to make the template I bought a sheet of 1/8th inch plywood. Half of that went to the hatch scabbard and another windvane blade, so of the $20 I spent on the plywood, $10 goes to the bulkhead.

I'll need about 30 feet of 4-inch glass tape. Ten yards @. $1.20 per yard...that's $12.
I'll need a new 60 grit pad on my drill sanding wheel. That's about  $1.25

I'll need half a bottle of marine epoxy.  A full bottle is $29.  Hardener is  $17

I'll need a full sheet of 3/8 in A grade plywood, which is $26.   The leftovers from all this will enclose the aft sections of the boat as well, with a nice big hatch to get into it.  Add it up....  $95.  Add in 8.5% tax = $103.35

 

Will you sell me all your buoyancy bags for $103.35?  LOL. Do you have enough to float a 3800 pound, 24-foot. keelboat?
 

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Just a thought, but are you sure the bow and stern areas you are enclosing are airtight?:huh:

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4 hours ago, Crash said:

Just a thought, but are you sure the bow and stern areas you are enclosing are airtight?:huh:

That's a good question...probably not, though I'm 99.8% sure it's watertight.  There is no forward hatch.The possible holes are bolt holes where the cored deck is bolted/gooped down on the hull flange....about 8 small screw holes for the toerails on each side....6 bolt holes for the forestay fitting, and some number of small screw holes for the splashguard in front of the mast. The boat doesn't even have running lights.

(I'll probably install some at some point....)

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The Class chairwoman, Rowena sent out an email blast today. Scotland is as locked down as California, so "Spring Prep" didn't happen. The first big Clyde-wide race weekend didn't happen and no change is in sight.

That plus the fact that Mrs. Alan wouldn't get on a transAtlantic plane flight in August for any money, means I won't be going over there, this year. Sights are set on 2022.

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In a fit of boredom, I finish-sanded the new foredeck toerails this afternoon and got three coats of satin, outdoor polyurethane on them. They're ready to install, now.  Hell, I might go out there tomorrow and do it, if the rental joint a few blocks away is closed, and I can't rent a pressure washer.

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I need to pressure wash the  Wildcat, my S2 7.9.  There's a little Mirage 24 quarter-tonner about 4 boats away on my dock. It's still floating, it's a good little boat but the last reg sticker on it is 2001. The polypro cover that was over the hatch distintigrated years ago. The roller-furled headsail is surely dead meat, the halyards are covered with grim and you know what the deck looks like. I have to look at this boat every time I walk by. WHY the owner keeps paying the $203 every month is beyond me. 

I'm tempted to take the pressure washer, and when I'm done with my boat, give the Mirage a once-over just so I don't have to look at the filth every time I walk by it. It'd take maybe 20 minutes.

 

I've thought about offering to buy it. Mirage 24's are good little boats. She'd need all new standing and running rigging, and a haulout. The outboard might be toast. Assuming there's a mainsail, it's stored down below so it's probably not ~gone~. I actually have a headsail that would fit it,  close enough, that I got off of craigslist.  It's a little short on the hoist, but what the heck...

but no.....

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The Mirage 24 has been surrendered to the marina. I finally met the owner.  He's had the boat there for almost 20 years, paying that $200 a month all that time. He finally realized, gosh...this isn't working.   20 years of $200 a month, that's like.. $40,000....to keep a falling apart Mirage 24 in the water and never sail it.

And in other news...
I put the Pipers new foredeck toerails on yesterday, and they look good. 
And on the way home, on Vasco Road, going uphill to the crest, was rear-ended..HARD.. by a woman  when I was in the "slow" lane.  she didn't bother to stop, but apparently didn't make it more than a mile before she either lost control of the car or had to pull over.  Looks like I'll be car shopping shortly. I'm fine...truck is not fine.

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That's a bummer...hopefully you got her license plate, etc, and can forward that to insurance and authorities...she should have stopped...

I know you were looking at replacing your pickup, but still, not being able to do it on your time is a major PITA.  Glad your ok though!

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Yeah, I'm completely fine.  Truck was a '99 with 190,000 miles on it. I'll miss it, but it was time to get something newer. I got my moneys worth, or actually my dad's moneys worth as he gave it to me a few months before he died, in  '99.  That's just not how I'd prefer to come to that decision, though.

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The suuper-cheap Ensign mainsail I picked up has no battens, but as I was going through some areas in the S2 7.9 that I hadn't poked into yet, lo and behold I came across battens. So I think I'm set for a scrounge-around sailplan now.

The yard STILL has not billed me a storage fee.  I filled in all the paperwork, provided them with insurance, and let them know, twice that they weren't billing me. I figure, I did my duty. If they want to give me free storage, I won't complain.  It's Zero security, no fence, no gate, so....

On the way up there this weekend I went by the Martinez marina, which is on the Sacramento/San Joaquin rivers. Nice location, but  I think outside of the main channel into the launch ramp, the birds I was seeing were standing on the bottom, even 200 yards out from shore.

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Word has it that the August Class Season Championships have been killed off by COVID-19 precautions, which sucks. So plans have shifted to going over there in 2022, now.  Did I write this, already?
 

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A long-time class aficionado has sent me photos of his deck layout.  Interesting....as to be expected, while the hull, rig and sails are proscribed by the class rules, the deck layout apparently is not.  What to do, what to do?  Go simple, or tweakable?

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41 minutes ago, Alan H said:

A long-time class aficionado has sent me photos of his deck layout.  Interesting....as to be expected, while the hull, rig and sails are proscribed by the class rules, the deck layout apparently is not.  What to do, what to do?  Go simple, or tweakable?

Start simple...

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Have a look at the deck layouts of similar-sized one-design raceboats. Try to understand what and why they did things, then chuck out anything you don't understand or can't see the need for.

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Euans mainsheet and traveler system is pretty darned simple, as there is no traveler, just port-starboard adjustable horse-line. I like it.  I really like how he re-did his vang, aka "kicking strap" too and I'm going to shamelessly copy it. Now, how he did the jib sheet turning blocks...that I have to think about.

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Just caught up with your thread,...

You've probably thought of this but..

Buoyancy tanks

I sail a 20ft open all glass fibre boat in the winter.. It has side tanks under the seats and in the bow. it was built that way.. It still gets water into the tanks, even if it's just condensation, make sure you have a drain Bung at the lowest point in each tank. The bungs on our tanks are similar to those fitted to the transom of a laser..

If you have hatches you can  fill the chamber with Polystyrene, block foam, get it for free as packaging, no worry about the tanks not keeping the water out should you get a hull full, and you can remove it for any necessary work.

I'm lucky the company I work for uses closed cell Polyurethane foam packaging which is even better, there are push outs for where the instrumentation is put and that normally goes in the recycling bin.. I stuck a 3 inch square block under a brick  in a bucket of water for a week, took the brick off and it floated with less than a 1/8 inch in the water . I'll be bagging up 1ft ish squares by 3 inch thick slabs of the stuff, and packing the bows and sides of my boat with it.. 

 PS could we see the pictures of the boat  that were sent to you? it would be interesting to see..

 

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Here are three pictures of the boat, looking gorgeous.

 

Ailsa1.jpeg

Ailsa2.jpeg

Ailsa3.jpeg

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FINALLY I am getting new upper shrouds. I took the stranded one to Rogue Rigging on Saturday.   Once those are made, I can get the mast up. That's just a mental victory, as where the boat is stored now, is pretty close to a launch ramp, but there's an overhead power line about 25 feet off the ground right behind the ramp. So the boat isn't going "splash" there.  It would just be nice, after all this time to see the mast be vertical.

 

We have a new-to-us Subaru Outback. I like the car but there  are two huge problems with it.  1.) It's a  PITFA to move a full piece of plywood with the car. It won't fit in the back, so I have to lash it on top..  I wanted a truck but the Mrs. whined and didn't like it and I gave in.  2.)  It's new-ish. And nice. And the Mrs. pitches a fit at the idea of me putting the generator in the back. So I have to get a hitch put on it and get one of those cheapo chinese  Harbor Freight trailers.

 

There's a reason I wanted a truck.

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I was alerted to an "issue" with the Piper when a buddy went out to the boat and took photos of the boat showing the mast shoved way back on deck and the cockpit cover in shreds.  So I went out there today.

 

Upshot...there were two pieces of broken glass on deck. The cockpit cover was in fact shredded, but none of the edges are frayed. These are clean rips, the entire fore-and-aft length of the cover.  The mast is pushed back about 6 feet on the boat, it was still in the plywood braces I made for it.    The starboard spreader is broken...the other one was out, I wrote about that earlier in the thread.  The spreader wasn't broken the last time I was there. AND, worst of all, the riveted-on s.s. spreader base is bent.  I will have to drill out the rivets and take it home and try to bend it back. At least the mast isn't bent.

What happened?  Pretty sure someone came down the driveway into the parking lot, made the left turn to go into the lot and clipped the end of my mast.  We were going to step the mast today. Oops. So much for that idea.  So instead we took out the rotted out plywood semi-bulkhead that supports the strap that transfers mainsheet loads to the hulls.  That meants a lot of grinding, so my forearms are itchy tonight.   The piece I made to go in there fits a treat, I got it exactly right, It needs one bit trimmed back and then I can glass it in the next time I go.

 

 

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Well that sucks. People can be assholes. Hopefully you can fix it without too much effort or expense.

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JUST in case someone on the US West Coast has decided that they want one of these....I have a line on a "free" one in Oxnard. This is a "Project" but unlike boats with interiors, everything is right out where you can get to it. Most of the work will be woodwork...making floorboards, rub rails, cockpit trim and so on.  It will probably need rigging wire. The current owner has the mast, is pretty sure he has a boom and has the rudder.

 

Project for sure. But not impossible project.  PM me.

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