lamorak

Sailing in Kingston ONT Q's

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I've sailed in Quebec City, and there is a substantial amount of current that is tidal driven.  Is this the case in Kingston ONT?  It looks like the St Lawrence river flows out of Lake Ontario pretty close by.  Any other local anomalies or rules of thumb to go by?

 

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You may receive a better response by posting in Dinghy Anarchy.

Given the history of sailing in Kingston (CORK, 1976 Olympics, etc) seems there should be plenty of "local knowledge" available. 

It will also help responses to state the time of year you plan to sail in Kingston.

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No tidal current at all.

There are multiple electrical power dams between Kingston and the lower St. Lawrence. It's also a couple thousand km from the ocean.

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Great sailing in the Kingston area overall. For whatever reason there seems to more wind at the east end of the lake than the west. You only notice the current when you are actually in the river, Kingston is on the lake before the river starts.

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Thanks guys for the info.  I'll be there in July racing Viper 640's at CORK.

-Mike

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2 hours ago, lamorak said:

Thanks guys for the info.  I'll be there in July racing Viper 640's at CORK.

-Mike

Hi Mike

Have raced there many times, (monos, Fboats, F-18's H-16's). 

Pre Ed is spot on. Blow off the pin and tack up Simcoe Is. There may be a slight river current, but only noticable in the light stuff 

I am just on the other side in Clayton, NY maybe we will come and check out the racing!

Good Luck

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Sailed here a couple of times...will also be at the vipers.

Thermal = bang left.  Thermal will be predominant unless a strong front passes through.  Some current on north shore, not usually enough to make a big difference. Some compression on north shore with thermal, but flatter water as you go south.

In North wind, good luck.  Rolling the dice with wind coming from shore.  If the course is set up in front of KYC, the Cataraqui River can help smooth fluctuations out a bit.

Stuart Walker wrote some good stuff about Kingston dynamics.  I am sorry to say I don't remember which book had it, though.

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Sailed in CORK 73 and noticed the compass reading changing and figured there must be a bunch of iron ore (alien spaceship) under the lake bed. Good to still see some of the names I remember from then showing up here and still sailing!

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Does the NOR or SI’s stare which course you will sail on. Over a number of CORK events I have sailed most of the different courses. Out front of the Olympic center, up in the river, and the larger boats would often sail to the west out past Simcoe Island. 

Important to understand the gradient wind forecast for the time period you are there and how the thermal effects will play a part. Obviously this will be different from one area of the sailing venue to another. Could be a little bit of everything, but I mostly remember fantastic conditions over various wind ranges and always enjoyed the CORK events over about a ten year period. 

I do not remember current playing much of a role in the racing. 

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Depending upon where your circle is, watch out for shallows on the way to/from.  We were heading out to our starting area in a Soling, passing by a small island  (Simcoe?) with a couple of trees, doing about 8 knots on a nice reach. Looking down, there were ROCKS jutting up from the sandy bottom visible in the clear water.  We bore off fast to the marked channel.  Another boat was not so lucky and bashed his keel into a rock at full speed, with major damage. We saw his mast snap forward about six feet when he hit and stopped dead. Don't let that happen to you.     

On the other hand, it was also a blast to return to Kingston from the outer circle in the afternoon. We set the spinnaker and planed - in a Soling- for 7 miles back to the harbor. 

 

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As others have said, in a thermal go left. I'm not sure if that point can be overstated at all. North wind is exceptionally difficult as is east (exceedingly rare though). Current is non-existent except for perhaps the lightest days or in a heavy storm when the lake moves to Kingston.

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Water will not be that warm - with a breeze can be rather chilly sailing there...

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Outside Snake and from the SW go all the way left to Simcoe island (gets shallow). As mentioned above, give Snake Island a very wide berth on the way to the racecourse.

North breeze is typical small lake sailing if you're inside Snake island. Lots of tacking/gybing on shifts keeping it pointed at the mark.

Have also sailed inside Snake in an easterly where it was sunny and light and left proved powerful. 

Most of all have fun. Kingston is a great town and you'll enjoy some of the best fresh water sailing available. Particularly 15+ from the SW outside Snake. 

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