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On my 10 metre sloop, I have 30 metres of anchor chair (+ 100 metres of anchor rope spliced in). A couple of sections of the chain are badly rusted while about 16m is still in good condition. Enough for my boat BUT the 16m is in two sections. Thinking about cutting out the rusted section and rejoining the two good pieces of chain with a rope/chain splice... say a metre long nylon between the two pieces of chain. Any problems with this?
Thanks in advance.

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You might be a redneck, brother

 

sure, it’ll work

—if you don’t have a windlass

—if you never need to worry about the line section chafing on shit underwater 

—if you just can’t get to a connecting link, ergo Crosby lokaloy

 

just go buy a fuckin piece of chain. G.Zeus, it ain’t that expensive for boat safety

 

 

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27 minutes ago, Max Rockatansky said:

You might be a redneck, brother

 

sure, it’ll work

—if you don’t have a windlass

—if you never need to worry about the line section chafing on shit underwater 

—if you just can’t get to a connecting link, ergo Crosby lokaloy

 

just go buy a fuckin piece of chain. G.Zeus, it ain’t that expensive for boat safety

 

 

If I knew everything I wouldn't need to post in a forum of other sailors. I was hoping for advice like: "It's not a good idea (or is) for these reasons". Not an earful. Thanks for the helpful advice despite the attitude with which you delivered it.

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3 hours ago, _dinsdale_ said:

On my 10 metre sloop, I have 30 metres of anchor chair (+ 100 metres of anchor rope spliced in). A couple of sections of the chain are badly rusted while about 16m is still in good condition. Enough for my boat BUT the 16m is in two sections. Thinking about cutting out the rusted section and rejoining the two good pieces of chain with a rope/chain splice... say a metre long nylon between the two pieces of chain. Any problems with this?
Thanks in advance.

Put it this way - would you do a brake job on your car with used parts?

Buy some new chain.

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9 hours ago, _dinsdale_ said:

On my 10 metre sloop, I have 30 metres of anchor chair (+ 100 metres of anchor rope spliced in). A couple of sections of the chain are badly rusted while about 16m is still in good condition. Enough for my boat BUT the 16m is in two sections. Thinking about cutting out the rusted section and rejoining the two good pieces of chain with a rope/chain splice... say a metre long nylon between the two pieces of chain. Any problems with this?
Thanks in advance.

 

buy a swivel and connect  the two pieces of chain, wire in the d-rings

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6 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Put it this way - would you do a brake job on your car with used parts?

Buy some new chain.

New chain is SO expensive. Trying to save bucks where I can. This might be a false economy as you suggest, but sure that this analogy stacks up. I'm cutting out the worn parts not putting more back in. But thanks for the thought.

 

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1 hour ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

 

buy a swivel and connect  the two pieces of chain, wire in the d-rings

Thanks for the suggestion but a swivel won't go through the windlass, spliced rope will (and already does).

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43 minutes ago, _dinsdale_ said:

New chain is SO expensive. Trying to save bucks where I can. This might be a false economy as you suggest, but sure that this analogy stacks up. I'm cutting out the worn parts not putting more back in. But thanks for the thought.

 

By "new" I didn't necessarily mean brand new. Most boatyards and consignment shops have miles of good used chain available for pretty cheap.

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12 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

By "new" I didn't necessarily mean brand new. Most boatyards and consignment shops have miles of good used chain available for pretty cheap.

Good idea. I have a "recycled" boat parts place near me, I'll give them a try.

 

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Cheaping out on anchor chain is ok IF  you only ever use it for a lunch stop. 

If you overnight on it you do not want to wake up in the middle of a night time squall when it is pitch black raining stair rods and blowing 50 knots and find that you are wondering about that dodgy join you made. 

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4 hours ago, _dinsdale_ said:

Good idea. I have a "recycled" boat parts place near me, I'll give them a try.

 

Craigslist is also a good place to look. I got 30m of 5/8 bbb and 100m of 3/4 nylon for $150 or so, never used.  I agree, new is shockingly expensive.  

 

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 Yes proper Crosby chain joining links are acceptable for lower strength grades of chain.

Since you are in Oz, check with a chain supplier for the proper connecting links that are as strong as your chain (Grade L is typical yacht chain in Oz)

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Nothing wrong with your concept.  I have something like that setup on my boat but for different reasons.

My boat is a catamaran and I carry 200' of chain.  But then I have 75' rode and then a few links of chain and then another 75' of rode.  In all I have another 150' of rode I can put out after the chain.    Having the chain links spliced in make it easy to attach the bridle. 

 

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Cut a sample of your chain and take it to a chandlers or fishing supplier and ask for a rivetted split link to suit,

They may have to order one in, not a high-turnover item.

No special skill required, just hammer the two halves together and it will fit through your gypsy.

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18 hours ago, TQA said:

Cheaping out on anchor chain is ok IF  you only ever use it for a lunch stop. 

If you overnight on it you do not want to wake up in the middle of a night time squall when it is pitch black raining stair rods and blowing 50 knots and find that you are wondering about that dodgy join you made. 

Yep. I hear you.

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17 hours ago, socalrider said:

Craigslist is also a good place to look. I got 30m of 5/8 bbb and 100m of 3/4 nylon for $150 or so, never used.  I agree, new is shockingly expensive.  

 

Craiglist isn't big in Australia but there are other options.

 

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I would be concerned if you connect the 2 sections of chain with line that the lie would be moving around the bottom.  It if it rocky or coral the line could be abraded quickly.

 

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9 hours ago, Priscilla said:

It is called a chain connecting link.

hMjPEE5.jpg

These things are NOT as strong as the chain - by quite a bit.

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Not to go too far off topic and I am certainly no expert but.....

I always thought the chain provided some holding power and helped keep the anchor set.  The actual tensile load on the chain (unless you really are in extremely bad weather) is going to be a small fraction of its strength. 

My experience is generally fair weather coastal cruising, so maybe that skews my perspective.  

Am I mistaken?  

 

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For coastal cruising I've always regarded the chain as providing catenary for the rode and anti-chafe - it's what slides around on the bottom rather than the rode.

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How bad is the rust? Maybe a sandblast and regalvanize the degraded sections?

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Yes Crosby type connecting links are rated as strong as Grade 30 chain.  Look it up. 

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10mm Chain Crosby Connecting Link

  • Made in USA
  • Meets or exceeds the performance requirements of Federal Specifications RRC-27lD, Type II
  • Forged Steel
  • Quenched and Tempered
  • Integral rivets join the two halves.
  • After making connections, rivets must be peened
  • Once fitted they come off using boltcutters or haksaw. You can not take them on and off whenever you like
  • Designed to go through anchor winches, which they do with no problems
Made by Crosby Group
Made in USA
Finish Hot Dip Galv
Working Load 1250kg
Break Load 5000kg
A 10.4mm
B 28.7mm
C 14.2mm
D 14.2mm
E 52.5mm
F 25.1mm
G 11.9mm
Not to be used in overhead lifting

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The last line in that chart tells the story

"Don't trust these things"

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No. Overhead lifting requires stronger chain (by law). These aren't as strong as that type of chain (Grade 70) so you can't use them for overhead lifting. For normal strength anchor chain they are fine - but you need to see if they will fit a metric chain like an Oz Type L.

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Well, depending on the anchorage and weather the chain could be holding the boat up considering the op is in Oz...so lifting is appropriate.

 

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On 6/2/2018 at 5:10 AM, bugger said:

The actual tensile load on the chain (unless you really are in extremely bad weather) is going to be a small fraction of its strength.

Many people would be surprised how little it takes to deform the links of Grade 30 (when a snubber is not employed) on boats >10 tonne.

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Golden Rule for the Pick > SCOPE .

Ideally the chain should be lying flat on the seabed .

Anchor at one end  & rode the other .

 

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1 hour ago, Gutterblack said:

Anchoring, whats that?

what you do when current is greater than wind :(

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