Herman

VOR Leg 10 Cardiff to Gothenburg

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Are you kidding me?

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Congrats AKZO. (sorry you were overshadowed by the matches going on fore and aft)

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3 minutes ago, stief said:

Hmmm. nonetheless . . . 

even if . . . mucho admiration for finishing within 2 minutes of TBRU. 

Good seamanship prevails- keeping the material in good shape 

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Wow, TBRU I'm proud to be a Dutchie. Grinding down Mapre in that heinous North Sea - wow. The finale to Scheveningen is going to be an unbelievable one-design fest - probably the last one too with the Imoca's coming in next. Bouwe, get that last win!

finish.png

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2 minutes ago, yl75 said:

wtf is DF doing ? 

Going round the outside - Malcolm Mclaren made a song on that :rolleyes:

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2 hours ago, Admirals said:

Yeah.... you know of another method how to convert let me know.......

Ik moet dat ezelsbruggetje nog vinden :(

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32 minutes ago, Miffy said:

Next leg - we see if Witty will pull some start shenanigans to spoil the race for one of the top three. You know he wants to.

Actually I don’t. And I don’t understand why you imply such evil in anyone. 

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3 minutes ago, silvestert said:

Charles just talking about backing up... and how the speed increased after than... wondering why they haven't tried it before...

And Coleman explaining the risks as well as the rewards in doing so, the thought process Charles likely went through...

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2 minutes ago, silvestert said:

how do they calculate total elapsed time for teams which did not finish some legs (i.e. Vestas & Scallywag)?

Time of last boat + 24 hrs. More here https://www.volvooceanrace.com/en/total-elapsed-time.html 

NOR has the details about DNF and RET scoring, and jury decisions on redress here

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From Brunel OBR few hours ago ( apologies if this has already been posted)

Update 1700 UTC - 14/09/2018 

Flight of Nina


I just watched the most buck-wild terrifying heavy metal situation unfold. Kyle, Nina and I were in the galley area. Nina by the snack bag/sink, Kyle in the middle and me standing behind the nav desk holding onto a bulkhead.

Kyle and I were trying to convince Nina to pass some snacks when the yacht, at 25kts +, accelerated and crashed off a wave, sending Kyle crashing into the engine block and Nina absolutely rag-dolling like a car crash dummy to the bilge. It was horrifying. She was moaning like someone who had just been seriously injured or broken a leg and Kyle jumped into action.

I had a GoPro in my hand but couldn't film. The sight of her flying was too f*cked up and I went looking for the medical bag instead. Sorry VOR. About a minute later Kyle had Nina in the bunk, and I saw that she was painfully laughing. I asked her where it hurt. "All over," she laughed, "but that one wasn't as bad as the Southern Ocean." Started filming at that point. Kyle went to the snack bag and grabbed a slice of cured salami, and was last seen handing Nina slices. She's ok. How far to the finish?

OBR Sam Greenfield 

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Colman talking about sails, and rightly points out the mainsail changes. Good.

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The incredible happened. A THREE WAY TIE FOR FIRST going into the last leg.

This will be the first and last time we see this in the Volvo Ocean Race. History in the making!

 

image.png.be8299fa06a54b05848a329a976196ce.png

Scoring:

 The In Port Races can now only matter to TTOP and SHKS. TTOP really have to stop coming last on the in-ports and get closer in points to SHKS.

For the winner overall, it will be whoever beats the other two. Its going to be that simple. We will either see:

1. Bouwe's first victory after 8 attempts.  More circuits round the planet by any other skipper in the histroy of the race before finally winning or

2. The first Spanish victory in the history of the race after countless entries.

3.  The first winner in the history of the race who did not win a single leg until the last leg.

As I said, its history in the making any which way that you slice it.

 

 

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2 minutes ago, Mambo Kings said:

For the winner overall, it will be whoever beats the other two. Its going to be that simple. We will either see:

1. Bouwe's first victory after 8 attempts.  More circuits round the planet by any other skipper in the histroy of the race before finally winning or

2. The first Spanish victory in the history of the race after countless entries [10]

3.  The first winner in the history of the race who did not win a single leg until the last leg.

As I said, its history in the making any which way that you slice it.

Right. Great edition.

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Woke up just in time to catch the finish live, what a leg, what a race.

They can shove their IMOCAs where the sun don't shine.

Brunel have their mojo going, one more leg, go you good thing!!

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Niall...:wacko:...too much hyperbole, and just flat out wrong conclusions and stupid statements: fortunately Conrad and, this time, Richard there to provide clarification. And chill, Niall. Enthusiasm is good, but yeesh!

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I know there are a lot of haters of these 65's but they have pushed the boats bloody hard in nasty conditions with no actual damage in this leg that I'm aware of.

Impressive.

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And another safely finished. Congrats VS11--only a couple of hours between 1st and 6th.

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12 minutes ago, Mambo Kings said:

3.  The first winner in the history of the race who did not win a single leg until the last leg.

And maybe not even that if a boat out of the group Akzo, TtToP, Vestas or Scally wins the final leg and DF "simply" finishes best among the three.

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5 minutes ago, despacio avenue said:

Niall...:wacko:...too much hyperbole, and just flat out wrong conclusions and stupid statements: fortunately Conrad and, this time, Richard there to provide clarification. And chill, Niall. Enthusiasm is good, but yeesh!

Especially the question to the skippers "how hard they will go in leg 11". For sure one of them is going to answer "we are going for leisure trip and not go full out". :wacko:

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7 minutes ago, stief said:

Right. Great edition.

And yet I read somewhere :

The world has moved on. It’s a pointless charade of a format and it’s time to admit that it’s “Game Over.”

its glory days are way in the distant past and the cool, relevant ones desperately want it to go home, tuck itself quietly to bed,

the boats themselves are boring dinosaurs, and there are no characters among the sailors that can bring the race to life with their charisma.

who can get excited about boats named Mapfre, Brunel or Dongfeng?

Perhaps its time for Wheatley and Hancock to acknowledge that their glory days are in the distant past and they should go home and tuck themselves quietly to bed?

1806695608_WheatleyandHancock.thumb.JPG.e1a9a6adf2e9e059d6b5167c21cc4ffc.JPG

 

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1 minute ago, Mambo Kings said:

And yet I read somewhere :

The world has moved on. It’s a pointless charade of a format and it’s time to admit that it’s “Game Over.”

its glory days are way in the distant past and the cool, relevant ones desperately want it to go home, tuck itself quietly to bed,

the boats themselves are boring dinosaurs, and there are no characters among the sailors that can bring the race to life with their charisma.

who can get excited about boats named Mapfre, Brunel or Dongfeng?

Perhaps its time for Wheatley and Hancock to acknowledge that their glory days are in the distant past and they should go home and tuck themselves quietly to bed?

1806695608_WheatleyandHancock.thumb.JPG.e1a9a6adf2e9e059d6b5167c21cc4ffc.JPG

 

And stay there.

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1 minute ago, Mambo Kings said:

And yet I read somewhere :

The world has moved on. It’s a pointless charade of a format and it’s time to admit that it’s “Game Over.”

its glory days are way in the distant past and the cool, relevant ones desperately want it to go home, tuck itself quietly to bed,

the boats themselves are boring dinosaurs, and there are no characters among the sailors that can bring the race to life with their charisma.

who can get excited about boats named Mapfre, Brunel or Dongfeng?

Perhaps its time for Wheatley and Hancock to acknowledge that their glory days are in the distant past and they should go home and tuck themselves quietly to bed?

1806695608_WheatleyandHancock.thumb.JPG.e1a9a6adf2e9e059d6b5167c21cc4ffc.JPG

 

Funny, but I'm one of those ready to gum my way through the mashed potatoes (need gravy).

Keep waiting for someone in Jack's thread to mention that the VOR is perfect for those of us 1%ers who are retired and stuck inside northern northern hemisphere weather for months, with nothing really demanding our mad money.

C'mon and hurry up to the finish SHKS--only 53 minutes until happy hour here,

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7 minutes ago, Marty6 said:

Especially the question to the skippers "how hard they will go in leg 11". For sure one of them is going to answer "we are going for leisure trip and not go full out". :wacko:

Yes! But his truly most embarrassing and cringeworthy question in my opinion was when he commented to Simeon how Azko's 3rd place  finish had affected the points standing and asked how he felt about that? Why would Simeon care about that? He'd rather win, or at least podium place, in the race for god's sake. 

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7 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Charles has put too many new bodies on board (3) chasing a small boat short course navigation advantage in preference to max boat speed set up...Dee (and others) have shown same hands/know max boat speed setup is the upper hand for this leg.

Big mistake from the Dong. Will Charles change that approach for the final leg or persevere and put the experience gained his leg in the bank?

Cracker leg by Dee.

You’ve gotta miss Stu’s driving in those big conditions....

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18 minutes ago, Mambo Kings said:

who can get excited about boats named Mapfre, Brunel or Dongfeng?

Have to agree that MAPFRE is about the most stupid name ever, be it insurance company or boat... How many consonants can you put next to each other?

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I think that the standard in this race is so high now that if any of these teams were transported back in time to compete in the last edition in V65s, then they'd easily win it.

Perhaps the youth and gender policies have helped bring in a wider talent pool with more diverse skills so that the standard can be so high and so consistent? It certainly has not hindered!

 

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1 minute ago, Murph said:

You’ve gotta miss Stu’s driving in those big conditions....

Yes for sure. It was not clear to me when Charles was interviewed about the crew changes why Stu was off this leg. He went on to say that "Jeremy was not available" and then praised Fabien's experience in the Figaro, etc. Marie "needed a rest". (second leg she's done that) and Black, who I think has only sailed one leg in this race,  had missed a number of legs due to injury. I assume he has the final decision in all crew decisions and but don't know if some were agreed to in advance, preordained, etc. 

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Just now, despacio avenue said:

Yes for sure. It was not clear to me when Charles was interviewed about the crew changes why Stu was off this leg. He went on to say that "Jeremy was not available" and then praised Fabien's experience in the Figaro, etc. Marie "needed a rest". (second leg she's done that) and Black, who I think has only sailed one leg in this race,  had missed a number of legs due to injury. I assume he has the final decision in all crew decisions and but don't know if some were agreed to in advance, preordained, etc. 

Stu previously raced in the Med and Mexico I think.  Maybe he had another gig again.

Also, wasn’t it on the Newport Leg that Charles said they had a plastic bag on the keel and that they waited too long to remove it?

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16 minutes ago, stief said:

 

C'mon and hurry up to the finish SHKS--only 53 minutes until happy hour here,

True fact; "happy hours" in bars are not allowed in Anchorage!

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Did I hear on the Live that the Inport is tomorrow morning and the next Leg the following day?

Sorry on the phone and in the move.

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1 minute ago, southerncross said:

Stu previously raced in the Med and Mexico I think.  Maybe he had another gig again.

Also, wasn’t it on the Newport Leg that Charles said they had a plastic bag on the keel and that they waited too long to remove it?

Re Stu: that's what I was thinking as well.

And yes, re Newport, Charles and plastic bags issue/delayed decision/

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2 minutes ago, despacio avenue said:

True fact; "happy hours" in bars are not allowed in Anchorage!

But once in a while a moose will wander down Main Street. :D

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1 minute ago, southerncross said:

Did I hear on the Live that the Inport is tomorrow morning and the next Leg the following day?

Sorry on the phone and in the move.

I thought I heard that too but I think The in port is the 17th.

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9 minutes ago, DLT said:

Have to agree that MAPFRE is about the most stupid name ever, be it insurance company or boat... How many consonants can you put next to each other?

Thanks goodness  aspartyltryptophan is not a company.

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1 minute ago, southerncross said:

But once in a while a moose will wander down Main Street. :D

That's true; and Yesterday, seriously, a bear was running around downtown, which is not that common. In Neighborhoods, yes. He appeared confused and in a hurry to get out of town.

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6 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Did I hear on the Live that the Inport is tomorrow morning and the next Leg the following day?

Sorry on the phone and in the move.

Missed it, but checked the VOR stopover page and  . .  

Race Village opening: 14 June 2018
In-Port Race: 17 June 2018, 12:00 UTC  (14:00 Gothenburg)
Leg Start: 21 June 2018, 12:00 UTC  (14:00 Gothenburg)

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Amy grabbed a good quick interview with Martine . . . "fantastic leg".

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4 minutes ago, stief said:

Conrad just mentioned Shanghai

As in his SA monicker?

What did he say?

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12 minutes ago, stief said:

Thanks goodness  aspartyltryptophan is not a company.

Branding, at a minimum, should accomplish not making a name sound stupid. Yet they couldn't do it...They should just cut it to PRF...

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21 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Did I hear on the Live that the Inport is tomorrow morning and the next Leg the following day?

Sorry on the phone and in the move.

You heard correct but it was more figure of speech to highlight the stress of the upcoming week.

Thanks @stief for clearifing the times.

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9 minutes ago, southerncross said:

As in his SA monicker?

What did he say?

My being bad. Conrad was talking how the DFRT sailors were "shanghaied on their own boat" (had to wait for interviews until they untied the dyneeema lifelines)

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Oh, for the good old days where the boats were in different time zones at the finish.  You could miss a day or three and not feel left out.  This OD stuff obviously has no place in ocean racing. 

Especially in boats that can bang out 600-mile days and not break on an hourly basis.  Where's the fun in that?

The amount of learning new boat speed tricks, even evident from off the boat drone shots, has been eye-opening.  

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Live just showed Sophie having a burger - -  don't see Tamara's, so maybe she took hers to Bouwe :D

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26 minutes ago, stief said:

Thanks goodness  aspartyltryptophan is not a company.

Or any of these:

Archchronicler, catchphrase, eschscholtzia, latchstring, lengthsman, and postphthisic each have six consonants in a row. HIRSCHSPRUNG'S (DISEASE) has seven consecutive consonants, as does SCHTSCHUROWSKIA. The shortest such word is TSKTSKS. All of these words can be found in major English dictionaries.”

.....very confronting!

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13 minutes ago, stief said:

That could be fun. 

This thread drift could really blossom....

Maybe it got its name after someone tried to smoke some.....

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Dee's greetings and interview on the dock is just fine. Her honest comment that "we were competitive" is a pretty good summary.

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22 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

Oh, for the good old days where the boats were in different time zones at the finish.  You could miss a day or three and not feel left out.  This OD stuff obviously has no place in ocean racing. 

Especially in boats that can bang out 600-mile days and not break on an hourly basis.  Where's the fun in that?

The amount of learning new boat speed tricks, even evident from off the boat drone shots, has been eye-opening.  

Quick question re the durability of the boats: Including all the Leg 0's Fastnets, and training over two editions, think these boats are getting close to 100,000 sea miles?

(caveat: I don't know enough about the longevity of serious race boats to know how important that number may be)

That's significant too, no?

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8 minutes ago, stief said:

Quick question re the durability of the boats: Including all the Leg 0's Fastnets, and training over two editions, think these boats are getting close to 100,000 sea miles?

(caveat: I don't know enough about the longevity of serious race boats to know how important that number may be)

That's significant too, no?

Having owned a couple of serious, very well-built, custom off-shore raceboats over the years my experience is that they age out by design before they really soften up.  I've put 20K to 40K n.m. on these boats, including a fair number of ocean miles without any structural/build issues.    

However, none of those were taken on jaunts across the Southern Ocean. 

But you can build boats too light, or poorly engineered and too quickly.  I've stressed a production boat or two beyond its design limits on just inshore races. The VOR70s were another example of letting performance out-weigh durability.  The ACC boats were so wound tight that they could only be loaded up in very specific directions.  Now it turns out that with these VOR65s durability may be a better way to achieve ocean racing performance.  100K n.m. is a heck of a work load.  

What always goes first of course is the deck gear and the strings and anything that the sun can get to.  

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1 minute ago, Left Shift said:

Having owned a couple of serious, very well-built, custom off-shore raceboats over the years my experience is that they age out by design before they really soften up.  I've put 20K to 40K n.m. on these boats, including a fair number of ocean miles without any structural/build issues.    

However, none of those were taken on jaunts across the Southern Ocean. 

But you can build boats too light, or poorly engineered and too quickly.  I've stressed a production boat or two beyond its design limits on just inshore races. The VOR70s were another example of letting performance out-weigh durability.  The ACC boats were so wound tight that they could only be loaded up in very specific directions.  Now it turns out that with these VOR65s durability may be a better way to achieve ocean racing performance.  100K n.m. is a heck of a work load.  

What always goes first of course is the deck gear and the strings and anything that the sun can get to.  

Thanks. Confirms the direction I was thinking. Some of 2012 VO70s are still getting some miles (PUMA, Telefonica, Groupama), but wasn't sure if they were a fair comparison or had anywhere near 100k by now.

And quite agree with the decks stuff--especially when they have to go into the deep freeze for months. Hidden water that becomes ice is a curse ;)

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1 hour ago, southerncross said:

But once in a while a moose will wander down Main Street. :D

Thread drift contd: a few years ago a moose was seen literally staggering around downtown for several days. Fish and Wildlife determined that it was "drunk" from eating a lot of fermented sour crab apples. 

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48 minutes ago, stief said:

Quick question re the durability of the boats: Including all the Leg 0's Fastnets, and training over two editions, think these boats are getting close to 100,000 sea miles?

(caveat: I don't know enough about the longevity of serious race boats to know how important that number may be)

That's significant too, no?

IIRC the whole fleet had a top to tail makeover before this edition including complete rig and deck gear overhauls, maybe upgrades, extensive NDT on the hull shells, and I think I do recall seeing some bits of hull skin and core being replaced on some boats.  Cheaper than buying new and no doubt life-extending.  

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2 minutes ago, despacio avenue said:

Thread drift contd: a few years ago a moose was seen literally staggering around downtown for several days. Fish and Wildlife determined that it was "drunk" from eating a lot of fermented sour crab apples. 

They're big fuckers too, aren't they?  Sounds well scary.

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Just now, DickDastardly said:

IIRC te whole fleet had a top to tail makeover before this edition including complete rig an ddeck gear overhauls, maybe upgrades, extensive NDT on the hull shells, and I think I do recall seeing some bits of hull skin and core being replaced on some boats.  Cheaper than buying new and no doubt life-extending.  

True, and figured that would be the same for any boat that lasts (and helps evolve the design and still be OD)

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And let happy hour begin--SHKS is in, safe and sound. Their momentary lapse on the first hour was far more expensive than MAPF's hole-finding, but like all, they never gave up.

A leg and teams worth the celebration. Cheers indeed.

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3 minutes ago, stief said:

They are. Deaths by moose meets vehicle is high.

Yes, big and fast, reasons why as Stief said so many are hit by cars. They quickly appear on the road and the results are dire.

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6 minutes ago, despacio avenue said:

Yes, big and fast, reasons why as Stief said so many are hit by cars. They quickly appear on the road and the results are dire.

Could be worse.  They could drop from trees and eat you.  Drop Bears do that.

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Re DFRT and what happened; Kevin Escoffier admitted in an interview that they made a couple of bad sail choice decisions. Talked about the speed issues and the back down, and that they will be inspecting the keel (diving etc).

Typical sanguine upbeat Kevin. 

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Just coming up for air after a marathon at work, couldn't even peek, just now reviewing updates. Damn. Booked the wrong week off.

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Well that was a good leg.... 65's produced a 3 way tie at the end so regardless of the the design talk, it has worked better than any finish I can remember.... pretty bloody good..... 

I do feel for Witty. I just hope he can end it on a high....

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Drift, kinda.

In the Live arrivals, Conrad and Mason talked/ didn't talk about hitting rocks.

Here's Mark Chisnell's write-up of the moment, from his book about the 2008 edition Spanish Castle to White Night 

Quote

The short stopover in Marstrand was deemed a ‘pit-stop’ by Race HQ, meaning that shore crews were not allowed to work on the boats. David Endean had found neither the conditions nor a quiet moment on the leg, and now had both the wheel and the leak to repair on Ericsson 4. It took the best part of two days, and they only finished the afternoon before the start of leg nine. Their first place into Marstrand had left Endean and the rest of her crew desperately close to winning the race overall, but in the words of skipper Torben Grael they were ‘not there yet’. And behind them, the leader board had tightened. Delta Lloyd and Green Dragon had closed on Telefónica Black and Ericsson 3 respectively, while PUMA now held a single point advantage over Telefónica Blue. Leg nine, 525 miles around the coast of Sweden from Marstrand to Stockholm, promised to be a classic.

In a teasing wind and a difficult swell, the fleet did an opening lap in front of another enormous crowd. PUMA led away from the line and then, as the wind died and filled from a new direction, Bouwe Bekking picked a way through to the front for Telefónica Blue. But by the final mark of the lap, PUMA was right on her heels with Ericsson 3 and Green Dragon overlapped on either side. It was spectacular stuff; “Here we go, this is the match race, it’s started already,” was Jonathan Swain’s reaction.

With PUMA just three lengths behind, Bouwe Bekking was rattling out the instructions to the crew of Telefónica Blue. They needed to set up the code zero sail for the new leg, hoist the staysail, pull up the daggerboard and get the rest of the sails stacked up on the windward side. The whole crew was in motion. Jordi Calafat was trimming the code zero and turned to reach for his jacket. A moment later he was sprawling across the deck as the boat stopped with a sickening, violent crunch.

A few seconds’ silence, just a single curse in Spanish, and people picked themselves up. Then Jonathan Swain called for the big code zero to be furled, and other urgent voices joined in as three crewmen dashed up on deck. Down below, water was pouring in through the hole torn in the hull as their daggerboard struck an isolated rock. The boat spun uncontrollably into a tack and the wind now pushed her further on, the boat forced high out of the water as it sat on the keel.

Dead astern of Blue when it happened, the stress levels on PUMA went off the gauge as the crew sought reassurance from Andrew Cape that the same wasn’t about to happen to them. They dodged around the stricken boat; Read voicing his horrified reaction to the fate of Bouwe Bekking’s team. With a little more time to react, third-placed Green Dragon was calmer, with skipper Ian Walker expressing a widespread concern: “I hope those guys are all right. Rocks, it’s all rocks here, this whole country’s made of rock.”

Back on Telefónica Blue, the crew frantically tried to control the flow into the hull. The water reached the top of the generator before the emergency pumps and a desperate chain of men with buckets got it under control. And it soon became clear that they were never going to be able to free the boat on their own. The navigator was Simon Fisher, who had replaced Tom Addis for the final two sprint legs because of his greater inshore racing experience. Now, he sat down at the navigation station and picked up the satellite phone. “Oh f***, what have I done?” he whispered to himself as he dialled. He called the duty officer back at Race HQ to tell them that they were suspending racing. Free to seek help, they tried to have the boat towed backwards off the rock. The first attempt tore the tow post out of the powerboat. The second attempt tore a main winch off the deck of the yacht.

More boats arrived to watch or offer assistance, their wakes bouncing Blue on to the rock. A rudder snapped off – a blessing, otherwise it might have been pushed up through the hull and ripped another hole. Then PUMA’s support boat joined them, with Neil Cox, Sean Healey, Will Oxley and Kimo Worthington aboard. Now the crew of Telefónica Blue had people who understood the boat, spoke the language and had the equipment. And eventually, with one tow rope attached to the base of the mast and another heeling the yacht over by pulling from the top of the rig, they got her off. Those four PUMA men later won the Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics Seamanship Award, for both the leg and overall.

It was a long quiet tow back to Marstrand. As the reality struck home, Jonathan Swain described mixed emotions: anger, disappointment, and a part of him that simply didn’t care any more. At one point he wondered where his passport was, determined just to walk off when they got to the dock. He didn’t, and later, in a more reflective mood, he said, “If we were one metre to the right we would have missed the rock. Or, had we decided to pull the daggerboard up before we put the staysail up, or pulled the daggerboard up before we decided to finish the stack, we wouldn’t have even known that rock was there.”

Dockside back in Marstrand, Bekking was as blunt as ever: “It is clearly our own mistake, of course; we thought we were to leeward [of the rock] and clear of it and we smacked it right on the head.” But Bekking knew who was taking it hardest. “The saddest person is SiFi [Simon Fisher],” he said. “I don’t know how many thousand times he has said sorry.”

Fisher explained that he had given Bekking a course to steer past the rock, and then turned to helping with the sails. He said:

“I thought I had given the right numbers to be clear of the rock, but I hadn’t. I thought we would be clear by a few metres, but we weren’t. I’ve been over what happened in my head so many times, over the mistake. It’s just the most awful feeling, devastating. It was just horrible.”

 

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1 minute ago, PIL66 said:

Well that was a good leg.... 65's produced a 3 way tie at the end so regardless of the the design talk, it has worked better than any finish I can remember.... pretty bloody good..... 

I do feel for Witty. I just hope he can end it on a racing high....

Agree--with one minor FIFY.

And (the question was to have been for Norbowgirl, but figure you'd know too), think Witty's campaigns in a 100'er will benefit or have suffered for his experience in the VOR? Seems to me to have compacted years and years of S-H experience, and spending a year here might put him years ahead in his non-VOR campaigns. Or maybe he will be behind and future Scallywag campaigns will have lost a year's development.

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14 minutes ago, PIL66 said:

Well that was a good leg.... 65's produced a 3 way tie at the end so regardless of the the design talk, it has worked better than any finish I can remember.... pretty bloody good..... 

I do feel for Witty. I just hope he can end it on a high....

I'd imagine they're pretty demotivated for a range of reasons, but to be fair they haven't ever really been on the pace.  Their leg win was a Hail Mary effort IIRC.

Witty's been schooled IMHO

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If I had $5 for every time BB has said "of course" in this edition, I could retire.

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27 minutes ago, DickDastardly said:

I'd imagine they're pretty demotivated for a range of reasons, but to be fair they haven't ever really been on the pace.  Their leg win was a Hail Mary effort IIRC.

Witty's been schooled IMHO

Sorry mate but that's complete crap. As I posted earlier their Hail Mary moment got them in front thousands of miles from the finish, they won it from there. Sure they have struggled at times but it pisses me off when people show them total disrespect. As one of the least funded and prepared programs I think they can look the others in the eye over a beverage or 5.

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Massive last leg. Who would have thought Brunel would be in this position? They are possibly the fastest boat now? Were Mapfre able to establish where their speed advantage came from? If Brunel can win this I would put their comeback up with Jimmy's IMO. 

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