Ishmael

Kicking off the trade wars

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12 minutes ago, jzk said:

 certainly the financial market will provide instruments that will offer stability.

It didn't for 60+ years

futures markets exist because they make money. Full stop. This is why what's available as exchange traded futures contracts varys tremendously over the decades, farmers being able to hedge their position as producer is a side benefit, at best.

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5 minutes ago, Mismoyled Jiblet. said:

It didn't for 60+ years

futures markets exist because they make money. Full stop. farmers being able to hedge a position is a side benefit, at best.

Good fucking answer.  That is true for all business.  Or did you think Steve Job's primary goal was to equip the world with iphones?

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3 hours ago, jzk said:

Just leave it alone.  If demand for milk is sufficient to allow businesses to make a profit, then we will have milk.  If not, then we shouldn't have milk.  Why should non milk drinkers pay for you to have milk below cost?

You still don't get the time dependence.  The effect of money is its mass times its velocity.  When there is such a time difference between the up and down side, the economics just do not work.

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1 minute ago, Laker said:

You still don't get the time dependence.  The effect of money is its mass times its velocity.  When there is such a time difference between the up and down side, the economics just do not work.

Let's put aside the 5th order differential equations for a bit, eh?

Risk will be priced in.  Let it work.  Your way is a disaster.  If it doesn't kill tens of millions of people in a famine, it creates a warehouse with 1.3 Billion pounds of cheese.

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2 hours ago, jzk said:

Good fucking answer.  That is true for all business.  Or did you think Steve Job's primary goal was to equip the world with iphones?

Futures markets are statistically dependent.  They can get very wrong very quickly.

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Just now, Laker said:

Futures markets are statistically dependent.  They can get very wrong very quickly.

Like famines and warehouses with 1.3 billion pounds of cheese?

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1 minute ago, jzk said:

Let's put aside the 5th order differential equations for a bit, eh?

Risk will be priced in.  Let it work.  Your way is a disaster.  If it doesn't kill tens of millions of people in a famine, it creates a warehouse with 1.3 Billion pounds of cheese.

No, you cannot get rid of partial differential equations in futures.  That is how they do it.  Black-Scholes rules!  

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Just now, jzk said:

Like famines and warehouses with 1.3 billion pounds of cheese?

Yes, the futures market does not solve that.  It is not its business

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Just now, Laker said:

Yes, the futures market does not solve that.  It is not its business

Capitalism solves those problems.  The futures market provides hedges against risk.

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Canada has been using supply side management for dairy since the sixties.  The world of dairy in that country has not fallen apart.  Farmers are prosperous.  Consumers pay about a 10% premium on adjusted world price for dairy and the asset of the herd is tremendously over-valued, so it is difficult to enter or leave the business. Good vs Bad. 

Capitalism is not a panacea.  Free markets have failure points.  Free markets cannot deal with poverty or negative economic externalities (such as pollution).  It does what it does.  Sometimes, though, measures have to be taken against the damage it does.  One is not taking money from the chemical plant that is poisoning you in order make up for killing you. Another is to stabilize markets that are vulnerable because of their characteristics and are required by society.  We could have an unstable dairy market.  It is just that the price of milk and milk products would be so high it could only be accessed by a small portion of society.  There are societies that are not milk users. We are not one of them, but would become one without a stable market.

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6 minutes ago, Laker said:

Canada has been using supply side management for dairy since the sixties.  The world of dairy in that country has not fallen apart.  Farmers are prosperous.  Consumers pay about a 10% premium on adjusted world price for dairy and the asset of the herd is tremendously over-valued, so it is difficult to enter or leave the business. Good vs Bad. 

Capitalism is not a panacea.  Free markets have failure points.  Free markets cannot deal with poverty or negative economic externalities (such as pollution).  It does what it does.  Sometimes, though, measures have to be taken against the damage it does.  One is not taking money from the chemical plant that is poisoning you in order make up for killing you. Another is to stabilize markets that are vulnerable because of their characteristics and are required by society.  We could have an unstable dairy market.  It is just that the price of milk and milk products would be so high it could only be accessed by a small portion of society.  There are societies that are not milk users. We are not one of them, but would become one without a stable market.

Pollution, as you cite, is a market externality that has to be dealt with some other way.  The reason is exactly why socialism can't work.  We can't own the environment, so we must share it.  When we share it, individuals take crap care of it.  So that must be regulated in some manner.

Let the dairy market go.  It will be fine.  I would wager that prices will stabilize even lower than they are now.  But if not, so be it.

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Trump 2020! Making China great!

 

image.jpeg

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New polls show Democrats with huge leads in the Midwest in 2018 midterms

By Dylan Scott at Vox 

https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2018/7/27/17621608/2018-midterm-elections-polls-michigan-wisconsin-minnesota 



NBC News and Marist released new surveys from Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Michigan on Thursday. They found Democrats leading by double digits in every Senate and governor’s race in those states. If true, Democrats can feel secure that they will retain three crucial Senate seats — including two in states Donald Trump won in 2016 — while also retaking two governor’s mansions currently held by Republicans in the 2018 midterms. 

The key words there are “if true.” The Midwest was supposed to be Hillary Clinton’s “blue wall” in 2016, and polling showed her ahead; then Trump won several shocking victories on his way to the White House. So we have some reason to wonder about polling from the Midwest. 

But first, the results: 

Wisconsin governor: NBC/Marist found state school Superintendent Tony Evers running well ahead in a crowded Democratic primary, with 25 percent of the vote.

And in a head-to-head matchup with Republican Gov. Scott Walker, Evers had a huge 13-point lead: 54 percent to Walker’s 41 percent. 

 

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2 hours ago, Laker said:

Futures markets are statistically dependent.  They can get very wrong very quickly.

Government price controllers just use The Force, not stats.

And since they're with the govt, it's not that nasty DARK SIDE.

Never wrong.

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1 hour ago, Laker said:

There are societies that are not milk users. We are not one of them, but would become one without a stable market.

I'm fine taking my chances with that. So what if we did?

Cows are messy animals. I blame BIG $UGAR a lot but runoff from (mostly beef, not dairy) operations is a mess too. I don't want another subsidized and entrenched mess-maker $peaking to our politicians.

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So we have two middle aged white guys who don't use cream in their coffee who don't want a dairy industry.  Next we ask their grandkids whether they want ice-cream.

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Are you saying that JerkZ has been breeding? :o

The Horror, The Horror!

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3 hours ago, RKoch said:

New polls show Democrats with huge leads in the Midwest in 2018 midterms

By Dylan Scott at Vox 

https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2018/7/27/17621608/2018-midterm-elections-polls-michigan-wisconsin-minnesota 



NBC News and Marist released new surveys from Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Michigan on Thursday. They found Democrats leading by double digits in every Senate and governor’s race in those states. If true, Democrats can feel secure that they will retain three crucial Senate seats — including two in states Donald Trump won in 2016 — while also retaking two governor’s mansions currently held by Republicans in the 2018 midterms. 

The key words there are “if true.” The Midwest was supposed to be Hillary Clinton’s “blue wall” in 2016, and polling showed her ahead; then Trump won several shocking victories on his way to the White House. So we have some reason to wonder about polling from the Midwest. 

But first, the results: 

Wisconsin governor: NBC/Marist found state school Superintendent Tony Evers running well ahead in a crowded Democratic primary, with 25 percent of the vote.

And in a head-to-head matchup with Republican Gov. Scott Walker, Evers had a huge 13-point lead: 54 percent to Walker’s 41 percent. 

 

Primary is August 14.  Then we will know who the D nominee is.

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1 hour ago, Laker said:

So we have two middle aged white guys who don't use cream in their coffee who don't want a dairy industry.  Next we ask their grandkids whether they want ice-cream.

Half and half in the coffee and my butter consumption is off the charts but both are dwarfed by my cheese habit.

I just think the dairy industry can survive the named perils just as any capital and knowledge intensive industry can, and can do it better without cronyism.

We had a lot more family farms before government got so involved in protecting them. Seems to me that the protected ones are the Fanjuls, companies like ADM, etc, because they get the subsidies written in ways that make life hard for those without accounting and legal departments.

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9 hours ago, Mismoyled Jiblet. said:

FYI Tom - futures contracts are older than corporate personhood in the US. Try and keep up. Hedging was a secondary function of futures markets, not primary. Primary for producers was more liquidity injection - sell a future contract to pay for the crop. Farmers can, and did, fail because of this.

Markets always work. Tulips anyone?

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Jzk thinks “rational expections” hasn’t been completely debunked.

a failure of the base assumption. Humans are many things. Rational economic beings is not one of them.

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3 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

Jzk thinks “rational expections” hasn’t been completely debunked.

a failure of the base assumption. Humans are many things. Rational economic beings is not one of them.

Who said they have to be rational?  Where is this requirement?  Did you just make it up? 

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10 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

Markets always work. Tulips anyone?

Or how about a nice famine? 

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21 minutes ago, jzk said:

Or how about a nice famine? 

many famines were intentional policy moves of murder. such as the holodomor. Framing them as a central planning failure - yes, it has massive problems, that can't be argued - showcases both your ignorance and your ideological zealotry.

whats wrong with gas chambers jzk? the market found a more efficient way to murder people that were deemed valuless. Is that bad too you?

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3 minutes ago, Mismoyled Jiblet. said:

 

many famines were intentional policy moves of murder. such as the holodomor. Framing them as a central planning failure - yes, it has massive problems, that can't be argued - showcases both your ignorance and your ideological zealotry.

whats wrong with gas chambers jzk? the market found a more efficient way to murder people that were deemed valuless. Is that bad too you?

Yes, murder is very compatible with capitalism.  Is that the best you can do? 

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The EU official’s description of ‘dumbing things down’ for Mr Trump joins with his critics’ perception that he is not the most academic of presidents interested in nuances of diplomacy or crucial details of domestic policies.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-politics/trump-juncker-trade-us-eu-trade-tariffs-white-house-meeting-flashcards-a8467051.html

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To highjack the thread a bit;  I have a cousin who is a farm economist working out of Geneva, Switzerland.  She is working on the response to the rise of the fastest growing market segment these days.  That is high end ice cream (>18% BF).  We have a fellow in Kenya introducing European cattle to the Highlands area.  Very interesting on monitoring the ecological study of doing so.  An Indonesian producer that finds it cheaper to not buy machinery and instead has a load of workers grinding away with the salt and ice.  The rejection of North American and European sources of milk due to paying for it in US dollars or Euros. The establishment of a dairy industry in Thailand based entirely on export. The realization of the Indians that ice cream comes from a cow. The distribution of the milk that is left after the BF is taken off. A complex process.

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6 hours ago, Laker said:

The realization of the Indians that ice cream comes from a cow.

Huh?

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5 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

Huh?

Hindu peasants.  Cow worship and all that.

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17 minutes ago, Laker said:

Hindu peasants.  Cow worship and all that.

Ice cream.  Can't think of a better reason to worship a cow.

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46 minutes ago, Laker said:

Hindu peasants.  Cow worship and all that.

Milk in all forms is consumed in India and the local ice cream "kulfi" has been popular (documented) since the 16th century. Hindu peasants in the north of the country don't consume beef but do use whatever else comes out of a cow. 

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They will exploit cows but not eat them. :D

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6 hours ago, VhmSays said:

Milk in all forms is consumed in India and the local ice cream "kulfi" has been popular (documented) since the 16th century. Hindu peasants in the north of the country don't consume beef but do use whatever else comes out of a cow. 

India is such a large and diverse country, I am sorry such a generalized comment was made.  

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Why Trump supporters never waver

Rick Newman
Yahoo FinanceJul 26, 2018, 2:52 PM

Different president. But it’s still the economy, stupid.

Critics of President Trump seemed dumbfounded by his steady approval rating, which, while low, also seems impervious to scandal, lying, poor policymaking and outrageous behavior.

Trump’s approval rating stands at 42%, according to Gallup, which tracks Americans’ views of the president weekly. Trump’s high for the year was 45% in mid-June, and the low was 36% in late January. So he has generally drifted upward this year. 

Snip

This shouldn’t be happening, some analysts believe. Trump has enraged critics during the last few months by pandering to Russian dictator Vladimir Putinhurting American farmers with protectionist trade policies, breaking up migrant families at the southern border, and lying on a daily basis. His personal scandals seem to be deepening, as former fixer Michael Cohen turns on him and the Mueller investigation widens.

 

So why do Trump’s supporters stick with him? Three basic reasons: They don’t pay close attention to policy issues the way Washington eggheads and media elites do. Trump continues to deliver on key issues they care about, such as immigration. And perhaps most important: the economy is strong.

“Trump has offended immense numbers of people,” says Emily Ekins, director of polling at the libertarian Cato Institute, who has published a detailed analysis of Trump voters. “But most people aren’t paying as close attention as the people in New York and D.C. whose job is to follow these issues. And the economy is hugely important to understanding voter choice.”

There’s good and bad news for Trump in the stability of his support. He does seem to have a core set of voters who will back him even if he shoots somebody on Fifth Avenue. That may provide a floor of 30% or so to his approval rating, meaning he wouldn’t slip below that under any circumstance.

But the additional support—in the range of 12% to 15%—isn’t as solid, and could waver if the economy weakens. It’s also notable that Trump’s approval rating isn’t higher, given strong growth and a very low unemployment rate of 4%. The last time unemployment was that low was in 2000, when Bill Clinton’s approval rating hovered around 60% – and that was after the House of Representatives impeached Clinton for lying about an affair with White House intern Monica Lewinsky.

In a study for the Democracy Fund Voter Study Group, a privately funded research outfit, Ekins identified five types of Trump voters and assessed how important each group was to Trump’s victory. The breakdown helps explain why Trump’s supporters stick with him, no matter how controversial he is. It also reveals Trump’s weaknesses, which are considerable. 

snip

Staunch conservatives and American preservationists are Trump’s true base, representing about half of those who voted for him. They tend to be America-first nativists who are socially conservative and opposed to immigration, and may feel culturally threatened. Trump’s hard-line immigration policy is meant for them, and they’ll probably stick with him no matter what.

The disengaged, a small portion of Trump voters, aren’t very knowledgeable about politics, but they do tend to feel powerless and left behind in the modern economy. Trump’s vilification of immigrants and Muslims may appeal to them and earn their loyalty.

Free marketeers and anti-elites are more moderate. They tend to be traditional Republicans who may have voted for Trump simply out of party loyalty. They support free trade and a light government touch on the economy, which is at odds with Trump’s interventionist trade policy. Some of these people already regret voting for Trump, and he could lose more if his protectionist trade policy backfires or the economy weakens. Since these two groups represent about 45% of Trump voters, his approval rating could fall into the mid or low 30s if the economy begins to struggle, which would weaken Trump’s political power and his leverage over fellow Republicans in Congress. This is his biggest vulnerability.

Bill Clinton’s campaign team realized it’s the economy, stupid, back in 1992, which helped the young governor beat George H. W. Bush in that year’s presidential campaign. Some analysts think that logic doesn’t apply to Trump, as if every Trump supporter today would still be with him if companies were slashing jobs and the stock market were in a free fall. But Trump is just as tied to the economy as any other president, and his relatively weak approval in boom times may make Trump even more vulnerable to a downturn.

“He has underperformed, given the economic fundamentals,” Ekins says. “It shows what being offensive can do to a candidate.” It may show even more if those fundamentals weaken.

Confidential tip line: rickjnewman@yahoo.com. Click here to get Rick’s stories by email

 

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On 7/28/2018 at 1:01 PM, Bluto said:

The EU official’s description of ‘dumbing things down’ for Mr Trump joins with his critics’ perception that he is not the most academic of presidents interested in nuances of diplomacy or crucial details of domestic policies.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-politics/trump-juncker-trade-us-eu-trade-tariffs-white-house-meeting-flashcards-a8467051.html

Liar liar pants on fire

https://www.wsj.com/articles/trump-says-he-opened-up-europe-for-farmers-europeans-disagree-1532714117

of course..silly me

“What you’re seeing and what you’re reading is not what’s happening.”

Trump Says He ‘Opened Up Europe’ for Farmers. Europeans Disagree.

The gap over what was agreed to at the White House on Wednesday indicates the perils of rifts re-emerging

A day after President Trump hailed “a breakthrough agreement” on trade with Europe, European officials said the president and his aides are exaggerating the scope of their new pact.

While Mr. Trump told an Iowa crowd Thursday that “we just opened up Europe for you farmers,” officials in Brussels later said he did no such thing.

“On agriculture, I think we’ve been very clear on that—that agriculture is out of the scope of these discussions,” Mina Andreeva, the European Commission spokeswoman, told reporters in Brussels on Friday. “We are not negotiating about agricultural products,” added Ms. Andreeva, who was part of the European delegation visiting Washington earlier this week.

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8 hours ago, Shortforbob said:

Liar liar pants on fire

https://www.wsj.com/articles/trump-says-he-opened-up-europe-for-farmers-europeans-disagree-1532714117

of course..silly me

“What you’re seeing and what you’re reading is not what’s happening.”

Trump Says He ‘Opened Up Europe’ for Farmers. Europeans Disagree.

The gap over what was agreed to at the White House on Wednesday indicates the perils of rifts re-emerging

A day after President Trump hailed “a breakthrough agreement” on trade with Europe, European officials said the president and his aides are exaggerating the scope of their new pact.

While Mr. Trump told an Iowa crowd Thursday that “we just opened up Europe for you farmers,” officials in Brussels later said he did no such thing.

“On agriculture, I think we’ve been very clear on that—that agriculture is out of the scope of these discussions,” Mina Andreeva, the European Commission spokeswoman, told reporters in Brussels on Friday. “We are not negotiating about agricultural products,” added Ms. Andreeva, who was part of the European delegation visiting Washington earlier this week.

This is a good thing.  Hopefully Trump will now go to China and sign some deal pulling back our tariffs allowing him to claim some kind of victory.  As long as he pulls back the tariffs, I am fine letting him have it.

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10 hours ago, Shortforbob said:

Liar liar pants on fire

https://www.wsj.com/articles/trump-says-he-opened-up-europe-for-farmers-europeans-disagree-1532714117

of course..silly me

“What you’re seeing and what you’re reading is not what’s happening.”

Trump Says He ‘Opened Up Europe’ for Farmers. Europeans Disagree.

The gap over what was agreed to at the White House on Wednesday indicates the perils of rifts re-emerging

A day after President Trump hailed “a breakthrough agreement” on trade with Europe, European officials said the president and his aides are exaggerating the scope of their new pact.

While Mr. Trump told an Iowa crowd Thursday that “we just opened up Europe for you farmers,” officials in Brussels later said he did no such thing.

“On agriculture, I think we’ve been very clear on that—that agriculture is out of the scope of these discussions,” Mina Andreeva, the European Commission spokeswoman, told reporters in Brussels on Friday. “We are not negotiating about agricultural products,” added Ms. Andreeva, who was part of the European delegation visiting Washington earlier this week.

Ms Andreeva needs to keep quiet.   Americans know Trump lies.   If he says the light is green, the smart man hits the brakes.    Let Trump say he’s increased ag exports and made Americans rich.    His base will celebrate, and the trade war doesn’t escalate this month.    

Edit.   I sort of agreed with JZK.   I must exercise, meditate, colonic cleanse and reevaluate my existence.   

Actually, if Trump would concentrate on Chinese intellectual property theft and government mandated partnerships, instead of fighting the whole planet at once while destroying current agreements and targeting the WTO, he might accomplish something,   

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21 minutes ago, Lark said:

Ms Andreeva needs to keep quiet.   Americans know Trump lies.   If he says the light is green, the smart man hits the brakes.    Let Trump say he’s increased ag exports and made Americans rich.    His base will celebrate, and the trade war doesn’t escalate this month.    

Edit.   I sort of agreed with JZK.   I must exercise, meditate, colonic cleanse and reevaluate my existence.   

Actually, if Trump would concentrate on Chinese intellectual property theft and government mandated partnerships, instead of fighting the whole planet at once while destroying current agreements and targeting the WTO, he might accomplish something,   

He might. Little hope of that however.

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1 hour ago, Raz'r said:

He might. Little hope of that however.

Maybe the WH staff can hire the EU to put Trump's PDBs onto flash cards.

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China's four trump cards in the trade war

China is one of several jurisdictions that needed to sign off the complex Qualcomm bid for NXP. Analysts read Beijing's failure to do so as retribution for Trump's tariffs.

 In the same week Facebook's stock tumbled 20% in a single day, Beijing scrapped a filing for Facebook to open a $30 million subsidiary (despite news reports it had been approved). 

Three, playing the Taiwan card.

Four, calling in Washington's loans

https://asia.nikkei.com/Opinion/China-s-four-trump-cards-in-the-trade-war

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If we didn't buy stuff, we could save money!

Brilliant.
 

Quote

 

"Our trade deficit ballooned to $817 billion," Donald Trump said during a speech to steelworkers in Granite City, Illinois, yesterday. "Think of that. We lost $817 billion a year over the last number of years in trade. In other words, if we didn't trade, we'd save a hell of a lot of money."

...

The president, despite his Wharton degree and business career, frequently seems baffled by this concept, prompting corrective analogies from people with a firmer grasp of economics. "When you're almost 800 Billion Dollars a year down on Trade, you can't lose a Trade War!" Trump asserted on Twitter last month. "I'm way down on trade with restaurants, grocery stores, malls, and movie theaters," Rep. Justin Amash (R-Mich.) replied. "I keep buying from them, but they never buy from me. I must be getting ripped off, right?"

 

My trade deficit with Bass Pro Shops exploded yesterday. So it was a good day.

Edit: apologies again for posting more Koch-$pon$ored propaganda on this issue.

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18 hours ago, Mid said:

China's four trump cards in the trade war

China is one of several jurisdictions that needed to sign off the complex Qualcomm bid for NXP. Analysts read Beijing's failure to do so as retribution for Trump's tariffs.

 In the same week Facebook's stock tumbled 20% in a single day, Beijing scrapped a filing for Facebook to open a $30 million subsidiary (despite news reports it had been approved). 

Three, playing the Taiwan card.

Four, calling in Washington's loans

https://asia.nikkei.com/Opinion/China-s-four-trump-cards-in-the-trade-war

 

That's an excellent article, explaining in commonly understood language, how China is probably going eat Trumps lunch, with these trade wars, to possible serious  detriment to us all, in the US.....

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https://www.npr.org/sections/money/2018/08/01/634737852/episode-857-the-postal-illuminati

Further proof we are collectively morons and Trump is Moron in Chief.  The price is three and a half times more to ship something across town then to ship it from China.   The USPS has been losing money for the last three years, getting worse each year.    That is because by agreement the various postal services write off most of their domestic delivery charges for final delivery of international packages.   The shipper just pays his postal service to get it to the destination country and an old negotiated price to the USPS.   The US doesn’t insist on charging market price for its work,    This used to work in America’s favor, as a net mail exporter, until PDFs replaced documents and Amazon prime replaced stores.   Now it places Americans at a disadvantage when selling to Americans, increases environmental costs, and rips the post office off for 80 million dollars in 2017.   It relaticely cheap to ship a shitload of shitty shinola from a Sozhou factory to America all at once.    Its expensive to separate them, send a couple to sit in Boston traffic, deliver another to Dayton and one to a farm 18 miles from Emporia Kansas on an unpaved road.   Trump picks trade wars when he could just correct a distortion of the free market.   

Yes.  Trump claimed something like this in April.  He’s such a liar nobody even considered he might be telling the truth,   Meanwhile Trump was too busy being stupid to correct the situation.  

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Trade war? What trade war?

Quote

The trade war is creating massive uncertainty for investors, businesses and policy makers in Canada, the United States and the rest of the world. The key question now is whether it will be long-lasting. Is there support for continued U.S. tariffs on Canadian and other countries’ imports? As Americans head into critical midterm elections in November, will they support a continued policy of tariffs on key trade partners?

Since late June, RIWI Corp. has been tracking U.S. support for continued tariffs. In a new study, RIWI data show there is a cognitive dissonance among Americans on trade. Half or more of the U.S. public does not hold strong convictions on trade. Whether asked about NAFTA, tariffs or trade, a consistent 45 per cent to 60 per cent of the almost 10,000 randomly engaged Americans to date do not know enough to say whether these are positive or negative for the U.S. economy. This ambiguity is broad-based across U.S. regions and unchanging despite tariff retaliation by Canada and others.

Nothing like an informed electorate.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/business/commentary/article-canada-should-fear-a-long-trade-war-with-the-united-states/

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59 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

 

And Dolt 45 fiddles, while Rome burns..............

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53 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 

And Dolt 45 tweets, while Rome burns..............

FIFY.

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5 hours ago, Ishmael said:

And it is nothing like an informed electorate. 

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On 7/1/2018 at 9:39 AM, Lark said:

Your thinking with your brain,   You will never understand the Republican base that way.   They were raised on Disney where the good kid always wins in the last seconds despite terrible odds and last minute preperation, because of his great ‘virtue’.    Combine that with a faith based reasoning system.   The result is a certainty the predicted bad thing (lay off, climate change, insurance company cancelling your policy, whatever) won’t happen to you.   It’s always the “red shirt” that gets nailed.    Christianity is all about denying things that tempt you away from your beliefs.   That includes science and data in modern America.    

Birds don’t die of West Nile and drought doesn’t turn the land to desert in this world I guess.

“Look at the birds of the air; they do not sow or reap or store away in barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not much more valuable than they?”           
 

It’s nice to know I am not alone seeing American dynastic meltdown as Disney Style. The atavistic entropy of fake happy- become one with Steam Boat Willie, whistling while we circle the drain!  Heh heh!  Where’s Minnie?

BTW, the Harley 125 was a great bike, and Night on Bald Mountain scared the crap out of me.

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38 minutes ago, Amati said:

It’s nice to know I am not alone seeing American dynastic meltdown as Disney Style. The atavistic entropy of fake happy- become one with Steam Boat Willie, whistling while we circle the drain!  Heh heh!  Where’s Minnie?

BTW, the Harley 125 was a great bike, and Night on Bald Mountain scared the crap out of me.

I started seeing Disney with a new eye when I was married and saw my stepson following the Disney lesson plan, but without the pixie dust ending,   Hard work the night before after finding yourself in the third act just doesn’t cut it when others have been working hard and steady.   Walt taught two generations not to plan for their needs.

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There is no political necessity to keep Canada in the new NAFTA deal. If we don’t make a fair deal for the U.S. after decades of abuse, Canada will be out. Congress should not interfere w/ these negotiations or I will simply terminate NAFTA entirely & we will be far better off...

 

 
 

....Remember, NAFTA was one of the WORST Trade Deals ever made. The U.S. lost thousands of businesses and millions of jobs. We were far better off before NAFTA - should never have been signed. Even the Vat Tax was not accounted for. We make new deal or go back to pre-NAFTA!

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30 minutes ago, Shortforbob said:

 

 

There is no political necessity to keep Canada in the new NAFTA deal. If we don’t make a fair deal for the U.S. after decades of abuse, Canada will be out. Congress should not interfere w/ these negotiations or I will simply terminate NAFTA entirely & we will be far better off...

 

 
 

....Remember, NAFTA was one of the WORST Trade Deals ever made. The U.S. lost thousands of businesses and millions of jobs. We were far better off before NAFTA - should never have been signed. Even the Vat Tax was not accounted for. We make new deal or go back to pre-NAFTA!

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Trump warning Congress about interfering with the fall of the Fourth Reich? Classic, and very disturbing. He really does see himself as a dictator.

Come on, Congress! Is there nobody there with balls to stop this madness?

Edit: No need for Canada in NAFTA? WTF does he think "North America" encompasses?

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2 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

Trump warning Congress about interfering with the fall of the Fourth Reich? Classic, and very disturbing. He really does see himself as a dictator.

Come on, Congress! Is there nobody there with balls to stop this madness?

Edit: No need for Canada in NAFTA? WTF does he think "North America" encompasses?

Well he's running out of foreign govs to fight with, he'll start eating his own

image.png.a7730ba7074176ad2ccb5d30e3759a41.png

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12 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

...    ...    ...

Edit: No need for Canada in NAFTA? WTF does he think "North America" encompasses?

 

He probably thinks NAFTA is some kind of Yiddish word

-DSK

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24 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

Trump warning Congress about interfering with the fall of the Fourth Reich? Classic, and very disturbing. He really does see himself as a dictator.

Come on, Congress! Is there nobody there with balls to stop this madness?

Edit: No need for Canada in NAFTA? WTF does he think "North America" encompasses?

He's too fucking ignorant to even know that NAFTA was a Republican agreement.

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4 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

He's too fucking ignorant to even know that NAFTA was a Republican agreement.

 

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And so are you I see.

Clinton signed the fucking thing almost as soon as he took office - it was Bush the First and Mulroney (Conservative leader) who created it.

It was a done deal before Clinton took office.

Jeezuss - no wonder the USA is so fucked up.

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2 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

And so are you I see.

Clinton signed the fucking thing almost as soon as he took office - it was Bush the First and Mulroney (Conservative leader) who created it.

It was a done deal before Clinton took office.

Jeezuss - no wonder the USA is so fucked up.

horse-blinders.jpg

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12 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

And so are you I see.

Clinton signed the fucking thing almost as soon as he took office - it was Bush the First and Mulroney (Conservative leader) who created it.

It was a done deal before Clinton took office.

Jeezuss - no wonder the USA is so fucked up.

Old joke- wearing a baseball hat lowers your IQ by 10 points, but a cowboy hat takes it down 20.

So now you all can intuit my haberdashery by my posts (I do own a Shady Brady, after all)- it’s kind of like being able to look around corners and see through walls...

https://www.nature.com/articles/nphoton.2012.150

kind of :lol:

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1 hour ago, Mickey Rat said:

 

NAFTA was a replican free trade agreement they couldn't get through Dem Congress. Clinton was a corporatist with Wall St backing, and he lobbied the Dems heavily to approve it so he could sign it. As I recall, he didn't indicate during his campaign he was going to do so. Only Ross Perot was making a big stink about NAFTA being a bad deal at the time. Perot was proven right...NAFTA was a poor deal for US workers. However, fixing it would be a better course than trashing it. TPP was even worse, and Trump was correct to abandon it. It had nothing to do with free trade, as the US already traded freely with the other countries. TPP was about weakening environmental and worker safety regulations, and increasing corporate legal powers. 

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On 7/27/2018 at 10:39 AM, jzk said:

Good fucking answer.  That is true for all business.  Or did you think Steve Job's primary goal was to equip the world with iphones?

Yes, he did.

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On 7/27/2018 at 1:04 PM, Laker said:

No, you cannot get rid of partial differential equations in futures.  That is how they do it.  Black-Scholes rules!  

Black Scholes failed a long time ago, when irrationality was expunged from the equation.

When irrationality reared it’s inevitable head ( think Indonesia) it crumpled.

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7 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Jeezuss - no wonder the USA is so fucked up.

That's where the extrodinariest kicks in.

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5 minutes ago, Shortforbob said:

WTF is he on about now?

Donald J. TrumpVerified account @realDonaldTrump 1h1 hour ago

 
 

We shouldn’t have to buy our friends with bad Trade Deals and Free Military Protection!

I'm guessing he's going to start charging Canada protection money. It's a popular thing in New York, I hear.

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And..who DID leak the off the record comments.

Not Bloomberg.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/onpolitics/2018/09/01/bloomberg-not-source-donald-trump-canada-remarks-reporter-says/1175212002/

The Canadian journalist who published President Donald Trump's disparaging, off-the-record remarks about trade talks with Canada flatly rejected the president's charge that the Bloomberg journalists who had conducted the Oval Office interview had leaked the material.

"I’d said I wasn’t going to say anything about my source for the quotes Trump made off the record to Bloomberg," Daniel Dale, the Washington correspondent for the Toronto Star, wrote on Twitter Saturday. "However, I don’t want to be party to the president’s smearing of excellent, ethical journalists. So I can say this: none of the Bloomberg interviewers was my source."

The Bloomberg News journalists included editor-in-chief John Micklethwait and reporters Jennifer Jacobs and Margaret Talev. 

Also present were White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders and presidential assistant Dan Scavino

The Caddie looking for kick backs?

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28 minutes ago, Mickey Rat said:

That sounds horrible. 

and he just retweeted it..followed by MAGA :(

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3 hours ago, Shortforbob said:

and he just retweeted it..followed by MAGA :(

We're fucked, I guess we're going to have to stock up on Spam and select local wines.

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Wouldn't it be a hoot if the leaker was Sanders.

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41 minutes ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

Wouldn't it be a hoot if the leaker was Sanders.

Oh please God, make it so!

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43 minutes ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

Wouldn't it be a hoot if the leaker was Sanders.

Nah, it'll be the caddy.  Sanders is too embedded in the RW establishment to rock the boat.

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