QBF

The 2018 Golden Globe Race

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Supposed to be an english version of the start live feed. Anybody found a link? 

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There is a Virtual Golden Globe Race

Sailonline.org is pleased to be partnering with the organizers and sponsors of the Golden Globe Race 2018 to bring the virtual version of this mammoth sailing feat to armchair navigators around the world.

The virtual GGR18 boat will have characteristics close to those of a Rustler 36 of which there are six yachts entered in the passage race and the main event. Participants in the virtual GGR18 will be able to test their navigational skills against the real Rustler 36s as well as the other yachts in the fleet. Also, with the permission of the race organizers and with the cooperation of YB Tracking, Sailonline.org will display the real fleet on the virtual race screen. This adds a sense of ‘reality’, competitiveness and involvement in the race.

http://sailonline.org/blog/2018/jun/28/golden-globe-race-2018-leg-1-storm-bay/

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This is great.  I think I have a new are to follow! Slowly....

18 minutes ago, spyderpig said:

Live start now (in French!)

 

This us

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1 minute ago, littlechay said:

Supposed to be an english version of the start live feed. Anybody found a link? 

No, I haven't.

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5 minutes ago, littlechay said:

Supposed to be an english version of the start live feed. Anybody found a link? 

Chay, I found it  in English on the GGR Facebook page, scroll down past the first live coverage which is in French.

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Those live linkys are geo blocked or something? I will buy the Times tomorrow and see what happened.

 

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Just now, jack_sparrow said:

Those vids are geo blocked or something?

The facebook one posted by slow avenue works for me in ChCh.

 

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Here is a summary of some of the more interesting information the commentators of the race had to say preceding and during the start in case you were not able to find it in English ( I left the race when a long series of advertisements began). It was a gorgeous day.

There were 38 entrants, but only 17 started (one other one may be able to start later. See Race Rules for how that works).  Entrants dropped out due to e.g. family, money matters, boat problems.  150 more people wanted to do the race; the boats are inexpensive. The youngest boat was built in 1982. All have been meticulously refitted.

It was a rolling, downwind start, which is allowed since the race is being run under the COL regs.  It was started with a 157 kilo cannon fired from the start boat which was the Suhilit. 

It is anticipated to take 9-10 months, and 30,000 miles.

One of the commentators thinks 10 will finish; the other said 5.

There are "gates" yeah boat needs to go through at various points along the route, the first being the Canary Islands and the second is Tasmania. The boats don't stop and the skippers cannot physically contact people even though friends and family may be there; they hand over film, letters.

The commentators discussed each skipper as the boats were leaving the harbor to "line up" for the race start.  It is a diverse group including 8 "true corinthian" sailors; 7 pros; 3 adventurers. 3 are "very competitive" and taking it "very seriously"

Though there are no phones, except a locked Sat phone for emergencies, there is a radio and radios "skeds" can be scheduled amongst skippers during the race.

The Russian skipper is so skinny, a lot of food was put on board his boat to fatten him up.

One of the most intriguing entrants rowed fro Falmouth across the Atlantic in a two person rowboat; his partner bailed out at the last minute. He beat all but four boats and they had four person crews. He beat all the two person crewed boats. He rowed 20 hours a day. He "leaked" 12.000 calories a day.  His name is Mark Scales and he has an oar on board his boat which he plans to use when there is no wind.He can row the equivalent of 2 knots per hour.  He can also use it as a spare rudder or as a jury rig if he loses his mast.   He has hidden the oar so its size was a secret until the race start. 

The sole female entrant is Susie Goodall who was described as "a contender" and "not a token entrant." DHL is her sponsor and she is th only one with a yellow sail (DHL color), 

The Indian guy just got married 3 months ago. 

One of the sailors has a 1941 Ship's clock and a 1906 watch that loses 2 seconds a day.

 

 

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That’s an impressive show for an inaugural event. Very promising.  Best of luck to all.

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This very nice drawing of the 18 GGR boats that started today, was created by Jacques Taglang.

1143033742_JacquesTaglang.jpg.b403836b8b90c302ef088e110593fbf4.jpg

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There is a GGR tracker for mobile devices. I downloaded one for my iPad from the Apple store, but there is probably one for Android.

It's pretty good and certainly more convenient than booting up a computer to check the positions of the boats.

Search for YB Races for the app.

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I predict the ed will shut down this thread b/c SA has a hate on for the GG race. (Maybe will do another post on front page once the first competitor has arrived, 8-9 months later, with headline, “It’s Over”.

:-)

(I hope some of the racers send interesting dispatches - it was fantastic following old dude (70s) Jeff Hartjoy’s singlehanded nonstop circumnavigation the year before last, as dispatches he sent were passed along by his wife [on land], and posted here [in Cruising Anarchy] by Bob Perry, designer of the old Baba 40 Jeff was sailing.  He was very entertaining and interesting in his 204-day voyage..which I always found amazing considering what he was going through —gear failure, etc.)  He renamed his Genoa “Patches” en route, so often did it have to be repaired...)

 

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6 hours ago, despacio avenue said:

Here is a summary of some of the more interesting information the commentators of the race had to say preceding and during the start in case you were not able to find it in English ( I left the race when a long series of advertisements began). It was a gorgeous day.

There were 38 entrants, but only 17 started (one other one may be able to start later. See Race Rules for how that works).  Entrants dropped out due to e.g. family, money matters, boat problems.  150 more people wanted to do the race; the boats are inexpensive. The youngest boat was built in 1982. All have been meticulously refitted.

It was a rolling, downwind start, which is allowed since the race is being run under the COL regs.  It was started with a 157 kilo cannon fired from the start boat which was the Suhilit. 

It is anticipated to take 9-10 months, and 30,000 miles.

One of the commentators thinks 10 will finish; the other said 5.

There are "gates" yeah boat needs to go through at various points along the route, the first being the Canary Islands and the second is Tasmania. The boats don't stop and the skippers cannot physically contact people even though friends and family may be there; they hand over film, letters.

The commentators discussed each skipper as the boats were leaving the harbor to "line up" for the race start.  It is a diverse group including 8 "true corinthian" sailors; 7 pros; 3 adventurers. 3 are "very competitive" and taking it "very seriously"

Though there are no phones, except a locked Sat phone for emergencies, there is a radio and radios "skeds" can be scheduled amongst skippers during the race.

The Russian skipper is so skinny, a lot of food was put on board his boat to fatten him up.

One of the most intriguing entrants rowed fro Falmouth across the Atlantic in a two person rowboat; his partner bailed out at the last minute. He beat all but four boats and they had four person crews. He beat all the two person crewed boats. He rowed 20 hours a day. He "leaked" 12.000 calories a day.  His name is Mark Scales and he has an oar on board his boat which he plans to use when there is no wind.He can row the equivalent of 2 knots per hour.  He can also use it as a spare rudder or as a jury rig if he loses his mast.   He has hidden the oar so its size was a secret until the race start. 

The sole female entrant is Susie Goodall who was described as "a contender" and "not a token entrant." DHL is her sponsor and she is th only one with a yellow sail (DHL color), 

The Indian guy just got married 3 months ago. 

One of the sailors has a 1941 Ship's clock and a 1906 watch that loses 2 seconds a day.

Took a bit to find the names of the English commentators on the GGR site.

Appreciated the commentary by Assistant Director: David Pryce (AUS) and GGR Media distribution ( PPL Media Ltd) manager Barry Pickthall (GBR) 

FWIW, the core management team is listed at http://goldengloberace.com/4-months-start/

  • Race Chairman and founder: Don McIntyre (AUS)
  • Race Director: Patrice Carpentier (FRA)
  • Assistant Director: David Pryce (AUS)
  • French Manager: Celine Trommenschlager (FRA)
  • Admin & Finance Director: Jane Zhou (CHI)
  • Safety Director: Shane Freeman (AUS)
  • Digital Content Director: Nick Jaffe (AUS)
  • Official Photographer: Christophe Favreau (FRA)
  • GGR Media distribution is conducted through PPL Media Ltd and managed by Barry Pickthall (GBR)

Pryce and Pickhall had some interesting audio tidbits that came up after the video switched to  ads/newscast.  Added time remaining from spyderpig's post 207 above (thanks!)

  • the French perception that Moitessier would have won, despite the facts. (-9:40).
  • the Palestinian NABIL AMRA PALESTINE and the Hungarian ISTVAN KOPAR USA are actually American; the two Aussies were actually born in Manchester(-4:18) 
  • two boats are penalized already. Keeners Mark Slatts (NED) and Philippe  Péché (FRA) tried to save weight by inside mods; penalty is to carry an extra battery (-3:46)
  • there's another prize of GBP 5,000 for the fastest around this race too which is a bit like the 5000 Sir Robin donated to Crowhurst's widow so she keep her house (last few seconds)
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8 hours ago, QBF said:

This very nice drawing of the 18 GGR boats that started today, was created by Jacques Taglang.

1143033742_JacquesTaglang.jpg.b403836b8b90c302ef088e110593fbf4.jpg

If you scroll down further, there are details on each boat:

http://chevaliertaglang.blogspot.com/

7 Rustler 36’s!! ... So there will be a race within a race as well....

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12 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

I hope some of the racers send interesting dispatches - it was fantastic following old dude (70s) Jeff Hartjoy’s singlehanded nonstop circumnavigation the year before last, as dispatches he sent were passed along by his wife [on land], and posted here [in Cruising Anarchyby Bob Perry, designer of the old Baba 40 Jeff was sailing. 

Jud I think that may be logistically challenging unless they have carrier pidgeons. They are all carrying DSC enabled HF's but not allowed to carry a modem and computer to allow long email (text only) messages to be sent via HF. I'm assuming their positioning at sched time is done using the very short text message capability of their DSC HF and this position is also simultaneously broadcast to other competitors.

Note: The reason for the restriction on the modem/PC is it then gives them access to weather gribs files and program assisted routing capability.

Their only means of posting a blog is to make a HF voice call to either a private HF reciever or radio land station that still transfers HF calls to the phone network and for that audio to be recorded/transcribed at the other end.

I would be dissapeared if the RO doesn't encourage and post these audio blogs as that would be far more interesting than watching spots on a screen do 5/6k for 9 months.

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To get everyone into the mood to follow this race 

 

Nice race idea (the slow old boats) but totally fucked up by the RO denying that this is 2018.

 

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The race is not about us, it's about the competitors.

They're in it for a fair race, which won't be won by the biggest wallet.  When was the last time that happened?

There have already been two boats penalized for disallowed modifications, so Don's pedantic rules are necessary and they're working.

I think it's a brilliant concept.

Be happy

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11 hours ago, stief said:

Took a bit to find the names of the English commentators on the GGR site.

Appreciated the commentary by Assistant Director: David Pryce (AUS) and GGR Media distribution ( PPL Media Ltd) manager Barry Pickthall (GBR) 

FWIW, the core management team is listed at http://goldengloberace.com/4-months-start/

  • Race Chairman and founder: Don McIntyre (AUS)
  • Race Director: Patrice Carpentier (FRA)
  • Assistant Director: David Pryce (AUS)
  • French Manager: Celine Trommenschlager (FRA)
  • Admin & Finance Director: Jane Zhou (CHI)
  • Safety Director: Shane Freeman (AUS)
  • Digital Content Director: Nick Jaffe (AUS)
  • Official Photographer: Christophe Favreau (FRA)
  • GGR Media distribution is conducted through PPL Media Ltd and managed by Barry Pickthall (GBR)

Pryce and Pickhall had some interesting audio tidbits that came up after the video switched to  ads/newscast.  Added time remaining from spyderpig's post 207 above (thanks!)

  • the French perception that Moitessier would have won, despite the facts. (-9:40).
  • the Palestinian NABIL AMRA PALESTINE and the Hungarian ISTVAN KOPAR USA are actually American; the two Aussies were actually born in Manchester(-4:18) 
  • two boats are penalized already. Keeners Mark Slatts (NED) and Philippe  Péché (FRA) tried to save weight by inside mods; penalty is to carry an extra battery (-3:46)
  • there's another prize of GBP 5,000 for the fastest around this race too which is a bit like the 5000 Sir Robin donated to Crowhurst's widow so she keep her house (last few seconds)

The irony that this race has a "digital content director" is rather great.

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Anyone in for a bet of best 24hr run ? I say, 129 miles :)

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175 miles.

Probably under bare poles.

Scarey

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Thats why this coconut is carrying the tried and tested tires as drogue, to not hit hte scary over 150 M a day.
turtles.jpg

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35 minutes ago, harrygee said:

175 miles.

Probably under bare poles.

Scarey

With at least 3 knots of favourable current. ......

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Not much chance of interesting dispatches.

Film will be dropped at a couple (few) locations; is there one around the Azores? Then there is Tasmania (Storm Bay) and off Stanley, Falkland Islands (which may or may not happen for each boat depending on the day they arrive they might not make it upwind into Stanley if the prevailing NWl'y is strong that week).

The irony of the digital content manager has not escaped me. 

I think Don has shot himself if the foot by not allowing digital media (I suspect he doesn't understand it) aboard. I don't mean that digital media should be fed in any kind of real time but that if they sailors had digital media the resulting documentaries would be far superior; without digital media we only get a few decent stories penned by more more literate of the entrants, most like most of us mere mortals couldn't write well enough to hold anybodies attention for 10 seconds let alone write a whole book about a circumnavigation and some photos taken on nice bright days. There will be none of the low light dramatic stuff that is achievable with digital cameras of even screen grabs from GoPros left on in case something cool happens.

I don't think position reports are linked to the HF SSB schedules but simply taken from the satellite trackers which are updating frequently and continuously.

Otherwise it is an interesting race for its oddness. Strange rules and weird interpretation of what GG sailors would have sailed/used if they had the choice. 

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2 hours ago, harrygee said:

175 miles.

Probably under bare poles.

Scarey

Yea up around that, as you say probably with something like storm jib sheeted flat and towing a bunch of shit, or more likely once the seas develop just sailing free in moderately conditions where the windvane can steer nicely. 

In good conditions I can amble along at just under 150 a day in my 35' steel tank and I don't have downwind sails or roller furling/reefing so they'll be able to do much better. A friend did Chatham Is. to Stanley in 30 days dead so that's an average of just under 160 in the 38' version of my tank. I don't think he is a record keeper so probably has no idea what his best day's run was. 

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2 hours ago, littlechay said:

Not much chance of interesting dispatches

The soundtrack checkins might offer some interest, since Digital Content Director Nick Jaffe (AUS) is taking some time to also chat with the skippers. A few reporting problems with YB3 trackers comms, and a few boats are motorsailing because of currents.

 

Looks like http://goldengloberace.com/socialhub/  will be a good place for more daily tidbits, like this one:

Quote

July 2nd 2018 09:07 AM

Antione Cousot tracker

Antione Cousot has a power problem with his primary satellite tracking system and is trying to fix it now. He may have blown a fuse and is trying to find a spare onboard. If he is unable to fix this tracking unit we have two back up trackers that can be brought online. A decision will be made on this later today.

Watsila and Matmut have touched each other at the start and Jen Luc VDH may have a bent stanchion. The fleet tracker shows all entrants had an easy night with light winds. Follow the Tracker by clicking the LIVE button at the top!

 

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3 hours ago, littlechay said:

Film will be dropped at a couple (few) locations; is there one around the Azores? Then there is Tasmania (Storm Bay) and off Stanley, Falkland Islands (which may or may not happen for each boat depending on the day they arrive they might not make it upwind into Stanley if the prevailing NWl'y is strong that week).

No luck trying to find info about a Falklands gate/ film drop-off. Linky, or such please?

--could only find mention of a Canary Island drop-off and the Hobart gate in the NOR

Quote

2.5.1 The Race course is around the world east about.

The start of the GGR will be in the general area of the Les Sables d’Olonne harbour. The entrants will sail down the Atlantic from North to South.

Leaving:

●  An inshore Canary Island mark (TBA) to starboard

●  Cape of Good Hope to port

●  44 degrees South latitude to starboard

●  Cape Leuwin to port

●  to a ‘Gate”(TBA) in Storm Bay Tasmania

●  Snares Islands to Starboard.

●  Bounty Islands to Starboard.

●  Waypoint 46 degrees South Latitude and 174 degrees’ west longitude to starboard.

●  46 degrees’ south latitude to starboard until east of 115 degrees’ west longitude.11

●  50 degrees’ south latitude and 90 degrees west longitude to port.

●  Cape Horn to port

Sail up the Atlantic from South to North. Then to the Finish line outside the harbour of Les Sables d’Olonne.

edit: found the Falklands (and an Inshore Cape Verde Island mark (TBA) to starboard- another film drop) mentioned on http://goldengloberace.com/the-route/

Quote

An inshore Falkland Island mark (TBA) to starboard. A final chance to interview the skippers after the gruelling Southern Ocean and Cape Horn as they sail past without stopping before the run for home.

 

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7 hours ago, harrygee said:

Be happy

ci-wormtown-be-hoppy-ipa-07db5c6edcf1992

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6 hours ago, LeoV said:

Thats why this coconut is carrying the tried and tested tires as drogue, to not hit hte scary over 150 M a day.

Dumas and Moitissier discovered that drogues we're not the way to travel in the South.

Quote

It was during the worst one of these gales, with its monstrous seas, that Bernard conceived a bold technique. After a long weary stretch at the helm, while dragging warps to prevent broaching or pitchpoling, it came to Moitessier that Joshua was essentially a trade winds vessel, entirely out of place in these latitudes. He tried to recall what Dumas had said, but could not remember. He called down to Francoise to look it up in the book.(9)The secret was there somewhere. Francoise read aloud to him. Then they came to it. Dumas had followed the Roaring Forties all around the world, not by dragging warps (the Slocum school of thought), but by carrying sail and running with the seas (the Dumas school of thought). His technique was to take the seas at an angle of 15-20 [deg] instead of straight on the stern. That was it!

 

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1 hour ago, stief said:

few boats are motor sailing because of currents

I don't see how motoring fits into the strict code or historical significance of this race?  Huh?

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7 hours ago, LeoV said:

Anyone in for a bet of best 24hr run ? I say, 129 miles :)

Leo if you did that alloy weld right as you promised on my stb fwd corner...that daily run number and these guys are toast.

images (63).jpeg

images (64).jpeg

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12 minutes ago, southerncross said:

I don't see how motoring fits into the strict code or historical significance of this race?  Huh?

Wondered how that was going to play out. Knut Frostad had an interesting vid about the ARC allowance of motors, and oars at least have a long history in sailing. IIRC, there are some interesting rants (Cruising Anarchy?) about 'purists' who refuse to use a motor but rely on others to tow them.

Found the Knut vid at http://www.yachtingworld.com/news/controversy-bubbles-over-at-arc-rally-over-cruising-yachts-engine-hours-and-cheating-101525

KF " the 'get-out-of-jail card, nah, I don't like it" ;) 

 

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Great find as usual, Stief.  Couldn't agree more with Knut.  Is there a time penalty for using the motor in this race?  I guess there is a fuel management cost to it.  

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3 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Couldn't agree more with Knut.  Is there a time penalty for using the motor in this race?  I guess there is a fuel management cost to it.  

Liked Knut's answer to the RO solution (just a few Euros for an RPM meter) 

No penalty--just the 160 litre limit to be factored into strategy. THat's why I was surprised to hear some had motored already, with a few doldrums still to cross.

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8 minutes ago, southerncross said:

  Is there a time penalty for using the motor in this race?

The best penalty in this race is shave a few kilos out of your Rustler above the waterline, get caught but are then penalised by carrying an extra battery below the waterline.

I'm assuming this ruling is so the lads have enough stored energy on board to now go quick and also make French toast. 

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1 minute ago, jack_sparrow said:

I'm assuming this is so the lads have enough stored energy on board to now make French toast.

Did you say French Toast?

 

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5 minutes ago, southerncross said:

Haha. Link Tax next, I suppose. "This video contains content from SME, who has blocked it in your country on copyright grounds."  The image though, worked as a teaser :) 

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4 minutes ago, stief said:

The image though, worked as a teaser

It's an old running joke on the SA Forums.

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^^^ SX I'm sure something like that French Toast thing will be appearing in their dreams from around now to month 5/6, however my guess is around  month 7 it will be "let's gybe ladies".5ac15c585ee2d_Screen-Shot-2016-07-13-at-4_06.38-PM(1).thumb.jpg.4973e3247495d3dd6a98f74808e621ef.jpg

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11 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Jud I think that may be logistically challenging unless they have carrier pidgeons. They are all carrying DSC enabled HF's but not allowed to carry a modem and computer to allow long email (text only) messages to be sent via HF. I'm assuming their positioning at sched time is done using the very short text message capability of their DSC HF and this position is also simultaneously broadcast to other competitors.

Note: The reason for the restriction on the modem/PC is it then gives them access to weather gribs files and program assisted routing capability.

Their only means of posting a blog is to make a HF voice call to either a private HF reciever or radio land station that still transfers HF calls to the phone network and for that audio to be recorded/transcribed at the other end.

I would be dissapeared if the RO doesn't encourage and post these audio blogs as that would be far more interesting than watching spots on a screen do 5/6k for 9 months.

Duh.  Totally forgot that, of course, in the spirit of this race, they have limited comms (no computer/modem).

Bit of a side topic, but you say above “I’m assuming their positioning at sched time is done using the very short text message capability of their DSC HF.”

Never heard of HF radio that can do short text message (without at least radio attached to computer’s sound card; no modem required.) Any further info on this?

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Everything you ever wanted to know about shooting Super 8 movies:

https://nofilmschool.com/2015/10/everything-you-ever-wanted-know-shoot-super-8mm

You really couldn't pick a better (i.e. more annoying and in keeping with this event) format for communication from a off-the-grid leadmine.  I sort of understand the urge to do retro "race", but to then hamstring the documentation of the adventure with shit media is really perverse.

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12 hours ago, harrygee said:

The race is not about us, it's about the competitors.

They're in it for a fair race, which won't be won by the biggest wallet.  When was the last time that happened?

There have already been two boats penalized for disallowed modifications, so Don's pedantic rules are necessary and they're working.

I think it's a brilliant concept.

Be happy

Plus 1.  More interested in this than the VOR. 

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31 minutes ago, Wess said:

Plus 1.  More interested in this than the VOR. 

Plus 2.  Holy crap, two things in a row upon which we both agree - this has to stop :D

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27 minutes ago, BeerDidClam said:

Plus 2.  Holy crap, two things in a row upon which we both agree - this has to stop :D

It is too easy for me to agree this.  Its got an OD aspect to it and really no meaningful professional/sponsorship component to it (yes before others start yacking I know technically there is... but what I mean is none of the sailors will make a living out of doing this).  Why do you like it, LOL?

And what else did we agree on... I may have to go back and edit!!  Did you finally conceded that Lasers rule and that landlocked pile of rotting wood and glue ain't making it to a pile of screws? :P

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17 minutes ago, BeerDidClam said:

Plus 2.  Holy crap, two things in a row upon which we both agree - this has to stop :D

Plus 3.

Is there any rule about talking to them on SSB? Like to give them a call and say hi :D

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6 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Plus 3.

Is there any rule about talking to them on SSB? Like to give them a call and say hi :D

yes

Quote

3.7 Commitment of the participants

In entering the GGR, the participants undertake to:

  • ●  Conform to all rules and directives of the GGR Director.

  • ●  At the request of the GGR Director and/or the GGR Committee or the Jury,

    provide any information on: The navigation of the skipper, his/her route and route choice, used weather information, Voyage incidents or any other voyage-related issues. A list of all contacts the skipper communicated with, including identity, date, time method of contact and nature of discussion, including with shore crew or any other person (except other Entrants) or vessel during the voyage. The summary content of these communications. Whether such information and/or communications have been given or established in the form of HF or VHF radio exchanges, telephone calls, or any other form of communication between the skipper and one or several correspondents ashore or at sea. Failure to accurately provide this information may result in disqualification.

FAQ has more, but you know where to find that.

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Go Go Go Jean-Luc!

1709-Vandeheede-boat.jpg

And this is no 4ktSB (4 knots Snail Box)!

rustler36-cutaway.jpg

At least not from the outside...

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1 hour ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Plus 3.

Is there any rule about talking to them on SSB? Like to give them a call and say hi :D

KIS, I see above where someone has replied re: rules regarding radio communication with the racers, but BTW, if you want to be a high seas weather report reader (on some pre-selected race frequencies, I think, depending on location/time, I imagine), let me know and I can put you in touch with someone at a ham/offshore sailor organization in France that has organized this and was looking for volunteers.  (Alas, my antenna system isn’t set up yet...been too busy with other stuff...but perhaps in the next month or so, since these folks will be at sea for a long while!!!)

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2 hours ago, Wess said:

And what else did we agree on... 

It had to do with a certain Offshore coach at a certain service academy located nearby, I think....

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16 hours ago, hoppy said:

To get everyone into the mood to follow this race 

 

Thanks for the clarification, for a moment their I thought I'd stumbled into your thread about which boat you aren't going to be buying this week.

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8 hours ago, southerncross said:

Dumas and Moitissier discovered that drogues we're not the way to travel in the South.

 

Dumas was a one trick pony, but yes and no. Moitissier recommends using a drogue in the building sea but cutting it and running once the wave train is established.

 

I agree with this on smaller boats such as the GGR boats, on 50+' boats I have never even considered a drogue. On my own boat I have once towed a warp with some chain on the end to stabilise the boat and assist the wind vane self steering in a building sea (peaking at 50 knots). I ran it for about six hours as the waves built and then hauled it in. 

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6 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Never heard of HF radio that can do short text message (without at least radio attached to computer’s sound card; no modem required.) Any further info on this?

 

3 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Is there any rule about talking to them on SSB? Like to give them a call and say hi :D

Jud this video should tell you all. Voice only HF's are now doorstops for distress calling purposes as there is no human listening anymore on those channels. Google ICOM m801e or 802 (Euro and US certification) and Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (GMDSS) .

Kent they wont be listening. However if you have a DSC HF, search for their MMSI number on their national marine  communications authority web site then you could page them. Whether they pick up and talk or not in light of the rules maybe not. If you weren't providing outside assistance and logged any calls (just to assist logisticaly) they might. However I suspect conserving battery power will be a concern though.

 

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14 minutes ago, littlechay said:

I ran it for about six hours as the waves built and then hauled it in. 

The bit that discourages deployment :-)

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1 minute ago, jack_sparrow said:

The bit that discourages deployment :-)

Right! Which is why I only used a warp and some chain; which is easily hauled in using the primary winches (Baron 40 in my case). The warp is stored on a drum in the cockpit under the tiller (polypropylene when it is being used for a shore line, nylon with the chain ready attached when in seagoing mode for use as kedge or drogue).

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17 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

 

Jud this video should tell you all.

 

I didn't watch the whole thing there so not sure if he covered it or not but using DSC you can also poll the position of another vessel (position request) if you know their MMSI

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9 hours ago, southerncross said:

I don't see how motoring fits into the strict code or historical significance of this race?  Huh?

Nor freeze-dried food for that matter, but needs must, eh? ;)

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2 hours ago, littlechay said:

I didn't watch the whole thing there so not sure if he covered it or not but using DSC you can also poll the position of another vessel (position request) if you know their MMSI

You can also turn that feature off if you don't want your position known.

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19 hours ago, hoppy said:

To get everyone into the mood to follow this race 

 

Nice race idea (the slow old boats) but totally fucked up by the RO denying that this is 2018.

 

Or it is no different than the VOR. Both take 9 months to produce a result.

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It appears some, maybe all competitors weekly sat phone calls are recorded by the RO and put up on GGR Facebook page or a link to same which may require a audio app like SoundCloud etc.

This is a vid of Peche's start and seems to be leading albeit tracker says it is Slats being further south closer to the WP. No one is doing more than 5k :-)

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=2063542670565787&id=1751709878415736

 

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5 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

It appears some, maybe all competitors weekly sat phone calls are recorded by the RO and put up on GGR Facebook page or a link to same which maybe a studio app like SoundCloud etc.

This is a vid of Peche's start and seems to be leading albeit tracker says it is Slats being further south closer to the WP. No one is doing more than 5k :-)

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=2063542670565787&id=1751709878415736

 

Nice. The French sure enjoy doing a send-off.

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23 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

They are all carrying DSC enabled HF's but not allowed to carry a modem and computer to allow long email (text only) messages to be sent via HF.

If anyone was wondering what that meant and or you want to be transported back 25 years....buckle up. 

Note Pactor 4 standard is the current speed demon. That is 1000's the speed of the fastest satelite platform as seen on the VOR (Inmarsat FB500)

And if you think current day sailors with satelite links laugh at this stuff, Stan Honey the nav guru still runs the world wide HF Radio (& Sat) email support platform SailMail, which he set up in the mid/late 90's.

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3 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

If anyone was wondering what that meant and or you want to be transported back 25 years....buckle up. 

Note Pactor 4 standard is the current speed demon. That is 1000's the speed of the fastest satelite platform as seen on the VOR (Inmarsat FB500)

And if you think current day sailors with satelite links laugh at this stuff, Stan Honey the nav guru still runs the world wide HF Radio (& Sat) email support platform SailMail, which he set up in the mid/late 90's.

Yep I run sailmail, and Winlink2K. The current Sailmail subscription is 270 USD per annum. A SSB set gives me all I need at sea and is cheaper to run (though not to install) than a sat phone. The HF ssb radio is also entertainment, a source of information there are still pretty useful weather faxes and satellite photos transmitted in many parts of the world and some of the radio nets can be useful and entertaining. We had an Iridium but haven't bothered to renew the subscription in years. I even send tiny photos up to my blog page via sailmail and the pactor modem. Next time we head out I'll get an InReach. 

It is a pity these guys don't have modems because a weekly 500 words from them would be very insightful.

Back to the race it is a pity they put this media gate north of the equator. I think it would have been better routing to have put it off one of the Brazilian islands or even in Table Bay. 

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So if they have no solar, no wind, and only 160 liters of fuel, it would seem like electricity will be a HUGE problem. Did I read that right?

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Just now, kent_island_sailor said:

So if they have no solar, no wind, and only 160 liters of fuel, it would seem like electricity will be a HUGE problem. Did I read that right?

They have solar (can be seen in Leo's pic about drogues)

Quote

N) Solar panels totalling min 160 watt @ 15v must be permanently installed. Battery Systems shall only be AGM or Gel batteries with minimum of 300 Amp hour at 12v, for house battery, securely installed to face a roll over. When an electric starter is the only method for starting the engine, the yacht shall have a separate battery, the primary purpose of which is to start the engine. Wind and water generators are allowed. Yachts who fit a wind or water generating device are not required to permanently install, but must still carry the required solar panels for mobile secure installation.

 

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4 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

So if they have no solar, no wind, and only 160 liters of fuel, it would seem like electricity will be a HUGE problem. Did I read that right?

As stief says ^^^ they have the full complement of renewables...not sure where they sourced all that other stuff made out of bakelite though.

 

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8 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

If anyone was wondering what that meant and or you want to be transported back 25 years....buckle up. 

Note Pactor 4 standard is the current speed demon. That is 1000's the speed of the fastest satelite platform as seen on the VOR (Inmarsat FB500)

And if you think current day sailors with satelite links laugh at this stuff, Stan Honey the nav guru still runs the world wide HF Radio (& Sat) email support platform SailMail, which he set up in the mid/late 90's.

 

5 hours ago, littlechay said:

Yep I run sailmail, and Winlink2K. The current Sailmail subscription is 270 USD per annum. A SSB set gives me all I need at sea and is cheaper to run (though not to install) than a sat phone. The HF ssb radio is also entertainment, a source of information there are still pretty useful weather faxes and satellite photos transmitted in many parts of the world and some of the radio nets can be useful and entertaining. We had an Iridium but haven't bothered to renew the subscription in years. I even send tiny photos up to my blog page via sailmail and the pactor modem. Next time we head out I'll get an InReach. 

It is a pity these guys don't have modems because a weekly 500 words from them would be very insightful...

Chay HF is the new black. The RO I fear didn't understand that on many fronts.

Then again he is not sitting on a 35 footer between three capes for a couple of months wondering when and where from that next LP will come rolling through from behind to take one out. Particularly as the leaders will be down there far earlier than they should.

That lack of nous will produce a problem me thinks. Hope the French, Australian & Chilean Navy lads are fuelled up.

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I see they are allowed AIS transponders provided there is no access to the GPS. I assume they actually mean no access by the skipper to GPS data. No sure who makes these and how any information would be displayed unless the transponder has its own display?

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23 minutes ago, spyderpig said:

I see they are allowed AIS transponders provided there is no access to the GPS. I assume they actually mean no access by the skipper to GPS data. No sure who makes these and how any information would be displayed unless the transponder has its own display?

They actually have a truck load of data coming off the boat which is GPS location specific. However they have nothing on board to view that data. We know more  about their SOG, COG and position than they do. They will find the reality out only when they land in 9 months.

For any idiot doing a Mottiesier we will know he is doing it before he knows he is doing it. BTW I reakon there might be one or two nutters out there with that plan, if not now, come 6 months??

 

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A couple of years ago the following was in this item on the GGR site. http://goldengloberace.com/fr/the-clock-is-running/

In an effort to increase safety we have been working with a French manufacture to develop a modified AIS unit that will not show entrants GPS co-ordinates, but relative positions of targets only and broadcast the entrants position. 

I was interested to know if this had actually happened as I can find no other mention of it even though such a device is allowed withing the rules.

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Mark Slats calling in to GGR headquarters for his very first weekly satellite phone call

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5 hours ago, littlechay said:

It is a pity these guys don't have modems because a weekly 500 words from them would be very insightful.

Bit puzzled here. They are supposed to send 100 character text reports  twice daily. That's about 50 words each day, 350/week, plus whatever insights can be gleaned from the HF and the weekly sat phone check-in.  (As QBF just posted above)

Quote

Each entrant will be supplied a standard Race Pack by the event organisers. The technology may change, but it will include, but not be limited to:

  • A stand-alone satellite tracking system (the skippers cannot see) for web tracking updates.
  • A two-way satellite short text paging unit. (to race headquarters only) for twice daily 100-character text reports.
  • Two hand held satellite phones (for important calls to Race headquarters only) for one a week safety check in only.
  • A sealed box with a portable GPS chart plotter (for emergency use only)

All Entrants will be tracked 24/7 by satellite, but competitors will not be able to interrogate this information unless an emergency arises and they break open their sealed safety box containing a GPS and satellite phone. Doing this however, has consequences. By breaking the seal, competitors will be deemed to have retired from the Golden Globe Race, and instead will be relegated to the Chichester Class as if they had made a stop.

 

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1 hour ago, stief said:

Interesting that he hasn't had to "use the sextant yet", thanks to VHF positions from other boats around him.

In any normal race, that is an instant DSQ.

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This race is already so much more interesting than anything out of recent years of corporate ocean racing. No weather routing so no pre-ordained all doing the same thing - its actually a race because no one has any idea what is going to happen next. I expect that there is going to be huge interest in this race as the story develops, though maybe not so much from our SA regulars.

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3 hours ago, Guvacine said:

This race is already so much more interesting than anything out of recent years of corporate ocean racing. No weather routing so no pre-ordained all doing the same thing - its actually a race because no one has any idea what is going to happen next. I expect that there is going to be huge interest in this race as the story develops, though maybe not so much from our SA regulars.

Why does that make it a "race".  It makes it a crap shoot.  In the actual race (VOR), they used the best available information, from multiple sources that often disagreed, and made their own informed choices.  And you may have noticed, they did not all do the same thing - to their disappointment or joy.

This thing is sending a bunch of sea-slugs stumbling blind across the southern ocean, getting run down by gales every 5-7 days.

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8 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

As stief says ^^^ they have the full complement of renewables...not sure where they sourced all that other stuff made out of bakelite though.

 

Some of them have wind generators that are proven not to work at sea though so they may have to make some modifications as they go, they'll have plenty of time to realise what is wrong and make the mods. 

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8 hours ago, stief said:

Bit puzzled here. They are supposed to send 100 character text reports  twice daily. That's about 50 words each day, 350/week, plus whatever insights can be gleaned from the HF and the weekly sat phone check-in.  (As QBF just posted above)

 

Well it's pretty simple, you been on the pop? It wont be a coherent 350 word paragraph and it will be pretty hard to read with single or two letter words assuming they use spaces! In reality 100 characters is closer to 10 - 12 words. Even if they sent the 100 characters twice a day as a sentence planned to make a paragraph by the end of the week it would be pretty short and that is not going to happen. 

It may be that they read some kind of planned statement on the radio schedule but it seems that is going to be lead by the RO so it will be difficult to read much out of that.

The letter drops will be much more informative. But other than the Atlantic islands coming up soon we wont here any transcriptions of that until Tassie. 

With less HF radio operators and shore stations around these days there may well be times in the southern ocean where there is not any radio contact, especially early in the season (Spring) before propagation builds up in the Summer months. 

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17 minutes ago, littlechay said:

Well it's pretty simple, you been on the pop? It wont be a coherent 350 word paragraph and it will be pretty hard to read with single or two letter words assuming they use spaces! In reality 100 characters is closer to 10 - 12 words. Even if they sent the 100 characters twice a day as a sentence planned to make a paragraph by the end of the week it would be pretty short and that is not going to happen. 

It may be that they read some kind of planned statement on the radio schedule but it seems that is going to be lead by the RO so it will be difficult to read much out of that.

The letter drops will be much more informative. But other than the Atlantic islands coming up soon we wont here any transcriptions of that until Tassie. 

With less HF radio operators and shore stations around these days there may well be times in the southern ocean where there is not any radio contact, especially early in the season (Spring) before propagation builds up in the Summer months. 

Haha--no pop. Was just doing the old standard typesetter conversion of 5 characters = 1 word, and thinking of tweets that have a 140 character limit.

Point taken, though. 

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9 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

They actually have a truck load of data coming off the boat which is GPS location specific. However they have nothing on board to view that data. We know more  about their SOG, COG and position than they do. They will find the reality out only when they land in 9 months.

For any idiot doing a Mottiesier we will know he is doing it before he knows he is doing it. BTW I reakon there might be one or two nutters out there with that plan, if not now, come 6 months??

 

Any body want to run a book on number of finishers, when and what mental state they’ll be in?

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52 minutes ago, littlechay said:

Some of them have wind generators that are proven not to work at sea though so they may have to make some modifications as they go, they'll have plenty of time to realise what is wrong and make the mods. 

Really?, how do they make it past sea trials if they don’t work?

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2 hours ago, Left Shift said:

In the actual race (VOR), they used the best available information, from multiple sources that often disagreed, and made their own informed choices.

Actually they didnt. RO supplied the weather from one source.

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3 hours ago, Left Shift said:

Why does that make it a "race".  It makes it a crap shoot. ..

..This thing is sending a bunch of sea-slugs stumbling blind across the southern ocean, getting run down by gales every 5-7 days.

It is a race for some, for others more like a non-stop cruise in company I suspect.

Slow yes, but I'm not sure blind is fair. They will know where they are, some better than others. While weather information is not optimal they will hopefully have enough to be in the right spot and prepared for what is coming, albeit they are not heading south chasing speed.

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3 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

It is a race for some, for others more like a non-stop cruise in company I suspect.

Slow yes, but I'm not sure blind is fair. They will know where they are, some better than others. While weather information is not optimal they will hopefully have enough to b