QBF

The 2018 Golden Globe Race

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1 hour ago, jack_sparrow said:

Jud you omitted the master. Jon Sanders; Just finished his 10th round the orange aged 79.

Also 1986–1988; holds the world record for completing a single-handed, non-stop, triple circumnavigation, in 657 days 21 hours and 18 minutes.

images (66).jpeg

Totally forgot that nutter :-). He probably saw the advert for the GG race a few years back and thought to himself, “Nah, what’s the challenge in that?”

(10th time around...?!  Maybe to see and experience what he missed the previous nine time around...)

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5 hours ago, mad said:

Really?, how do they make it past sea trials if they don’t work?

I saw at least one 914i at the start - these units just do not work on a rolling boat. The weight of the generator is not centered over the mast and centrifugal force and gravity mean that they flop to the low side as the boat rolls, get flicked back to centreline somewhere as the boat rights, then flop to the new low side. For small units they won the PBO great wind generator test but they were mounted on a tripod in a car park. On anchor they will work, if you anchor in very exposed bays. They can be dramatically improved by putting a larger heavier tail on them. But the one that I saw was not modded. 

They will work on a close reach but downwind the will contribute nothing but noise to the well-being, or not, of the crew.

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6 minutes ago, littlechay said:

They will work on a close reach but downwind the will contribute nothing but noise to the well-being, or not, of the crew.

I know a full time cruiser who every year for a decade religiously rebuilt his. Finally it dissapeared into the spume while at anchor in a severe cyclone. Said it was the happiest day of his life.

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Maybe I'm missing something on the tracker but it appears to show the 24 hour runs in single figures, some of them negative.

They're slow boats but it's going to take a while at that speed.

Towing chains?

With anchors attached?

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8 minutes ago, harrygee said:

24 hour runs in single figures, some of them negative.

Calculated DTF (some moving away from the next tracker WP) and also with VMG shown either since start or recent.

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Thanks for that.

I haven't looked at the waypoints but I guess they'd need wheels to straight-line it.

Canary Islands maybe?

There's probably enough time for me to look it up before they get there.

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Tracker: How does the "Corrected elapsed" column work? What is it?

A prediction of how long they will take? Corrected with what? 

 

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1 hour ago, littlechay said:

Tracker: How does the "Corrected elapsed" column work? What is it?

A prediction of how long they will take? Corrected with what? 

 

The tracker page is generic. The handicap used for correction is in the first column. For a scratch fleet this is set to 1.000.For something like the Fastnet the yachts IRC would be used. So yes and estimate is made using the current time  sailed and DTF which is shown in the last but one column then the handicap is then applied to this to give the figure in the last column. (Sorry too many words)

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53 minutes ago, Ease the sheet. said:

This is the perfect race for this place.

The slower the trip, the more shit we can post!

I'm finding the race updates and RO media  upload schedule fit pefectly between therapy sessions.

A rare juxtaposition and equilibrium between the mindset of both contestants and followers in any sporting event to my knowledge.

images (67).jpeg

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Here are two pic of  Loïc Péron at the start of the 2018 Golden Globe Race.

404143691_LocPron2.thumb.jpg.4de12b284288b3b96de72be7e6a91d60.jpg

 

2068039329_LocPron1.thumb.jpg.01c48452b0cef2d92fbf7619a397fdff.jpg

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That looks a lot like Mike Birch's Olympus Photo.  I was a wee nipper on the dock in St. Malo when they set off for the 1st Route du Rhum in 78. Him beating Malinovsky on the last stretch to the finish was epic.

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48 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

920668127_ScreenShot2018-07-04at2_53_38PM.png.0f9f94f129ccd23d3afcf360c6cbe064.png

Gotta like the whimsy and humour of the editors. Audio quotes Ken Allen, CEO DHL Express, who says

 . . . .   "she really embodies all the DHL values." 

DHL should use this as their logo, and the text "We can help you achieve your dreams"

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I checked the tracker this morning but I'm doing this intensely dull online course and I'm in need of distraction. Is it too early to check the tracker again in case anything has changed? Maybe I'll get coffee instead. 

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3 hours ago, Gutterblack said:

give it a week

I suspect it’ll only really get interesting (for us as observers) in the Doldrums and, later on, in the high latitudes - the latter, a large part of the race.  Weeks (and months) away, realistically?  ETA to Good Hope?

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On 7/2/2018 at 5:54 AM, southerncross said:

Did you say French Toast?

 

I really hate this song, and have not been able to blow it out of my head for 3 days. But, the video is just great. I will never react to the words "french toast" the same again. Even the fireworks I can still hear out my window have not helped.

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Twittering - somebody must be posting the text messages to RO.. or what?  

image.png.e2e929bb507fd950afcffbb10f73ee4b.png

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Francesco Cappelletti withdraws from the Golden Globe Race but joins the independent CAROZZO sailors.
 
Entrants in the 2018 Golden Globe Race have set out from Les Sables d’Olonne, France on a solo, non-stop un-assisted circumnavigation without the aid of modern electronic navigation aids including GPS. If any competitors breech one rule of the Race, such as stop-over for assistance, or use the emergency GPS stowed in a sealed case for emergencies, they are moved to the Chichester Class as if, like Sir Francis Chichester in 1966/7, they have made one stop during their solo circumnavigation. Those in the Chichester Class become ineligible for any GGR trophies or rankings, but remain in the event.
 
Should skippers breech the rules for a second time, they are no longer part of the GGR Event and the organisers have no responsibility or obligation to them. They will however continue to be tracked as independent CAROZZO sailors. This is in deference to Alex Carozzo, the Italian entrant in the original Sunday Times Golden Globe Race who left Cowes on 31st October 1968 (the last day allowed within the Rules) and then  sat in isolation on a mooring for a further five days finalising preparations on his boat before setting sail. Alex later suffered an ulcer and was forced to stop in Lisbon to seek medical attention.  
 
Today, fellow Italian Francesco Cappelletti has accepted that his Endurance 35 007 will not be ready before the the closing date for starting the 2018 GGR at 13.30hrs on Saturday 7th July. Instead, he will now sail as a CAROZZO sailor giving GGR sailors the opportunity to continue to follow their own dream of making a solo circumnavigation as a personal challenge with no restrictions on navigation equipment or gear including the use of GPS and their sat phone. Their positions will be maintained on the GGR tracker and occasional reports may be given by the GGR organisers.
 
Cappelletti must set out from Les Sables d’Olonne by 13.30hrs on 21st July and his retirement from the main event reduces the entry list in the 2018 Golden Globe Race to 17  skippers.
 
Don McIntyre, Chairman of the Golden Globe Race said today: “We are very sorry to lose Francesco. He is not now part of the GGR event but remains part of the adventure and will doubtless continue to stay in communication with the other GGR sailors.  We hope he will return to Les Sables d’Olonne in time to attend the GGR prize-giving April 22"

Francesco Cappelletti with Alex Carozzo

32082863_FrancescoCappellettiandAlexCarrozzo.jpg.52bfd89752408b3715beb88c41ad7cc1.jpg

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So much for my estimate that these boats will be flat out making 175 miles in 24 hours.

Several of them beat that handily in the last 24 hours, with Peche covering 196 according to the tracker.

While doing 3.7 knots.

The tracker's broken.

Good to see that Susie Goodall took a flyer and backed herself to come around the outside and is now fifth, though sixty miles back - a long way at 3 knots.

And the Aussies are no longer coming 16th and 17th, now 15th and 17th.

Cmon the Aussies.

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6 minutes ago, harrygee said:

So much for my estimate that these boats will be flat out making 175 miles in 24 hours.

Several of them beat that handily in the last 24 hours, with Peche covering 196 according to the tracker.

While doing 3.7 knots.

The tracker's broken.

Good to see that Susie Goodall took a flyer and backed herself to come around the outside and is now fifth, though sixty miles back - a long way at 3 knots.

And the Aussies are no longer coming 16th and 17th, now 15th and 17th.

Cmon the Aussies.

There is no chance (other than falling off the edge of the world - which historically is just about in sync with their navigation protocol) that any of those boats could hold an 8 knot average for 24 hours in order to do a 196 NM day.  Violates all sorts of Reynolds or Froude numbers or whatever.  Hitting 8 knots even down a wave would be close to terrifying.  

Even doing 175 miles would require them to be at their theoretical hull speed (assuming a 30' waterline) continuously.  Not happening.

I remember talking with a family who had just finish an around the world trip and in 2 years they peaked at a 125 mile day.  Which they thought was fabulous passage making.  These are really slow boats.

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35 minutes ago, Tunnel Rat said:

Is it only me, or is anyone else struggling to get the wind overlay to work on the tracker?  Are there any hidden secrets?

Hmmm. Works here in OSX and Safari (even the Windy Currents layer!)

--navionics map doesn't play well with Windy, but works with PredictWind layer; lat/lon very tough to see in all weather layers.

747643139_ScreenShot2018-07-05at7_36_21PM.png.3d14698154c542bde61457e3778bcaea.png

622054433_ScreenShot2018-07-05at7_41_54PM.png.2f412f0a805226cff240bf0cc15a4b96.png

 

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Windy works ok for me.

That 24 hour run is just not right but these boats are from my era and I have every faith that they'll be doing some good runs in the Southern Ocean, or the southern Indian Ocean.

They are unaware that they're doing so well but their old mechanical VDO sumlogs probably don't read beyond 8 knots.

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2 hours ago, Left Shift said:

There is no chance (other than falling off the edge of the world - which historically is just about in sync with their navigation protocol) that any of those boats could hold an 8 knot average for 24 hours in order to do a 196 NM day.  Violates all sorts of Reynolds or Froude numbers or whatever.  Hitting 8 knots even down a wave would be close to terrifying.  

Even doing 175 miles would require them to be at their theoretical hull speed (assuming a 30' waterline) continuously.  Not happening.

I remember talking with a family who had just finish an around the world trip and in 2 years they peaked at a 125 mile day.  Which they thought was fabulous passage making.  These are really slow boats.

I did 175 noon to noon and then 180 the next day once. Fin keels were invented for a reason I guess. These boats can't do that??

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1 hour ago, kent_island_sailor said:

I did 175 noon to noon and then 180 the next day once. Fin keels were invented for a reason I guess. These boats can't do that??

Based on the point of rapidly increased power needed to overcome wave-making by a displacement hull, hull speed is calculated as 1.34 x the square root of the waterline.  A Rustler 36 has a waterline length of 27'.  Ergo, hull speed is 6.96 knots = 167 nm per day.  

They may surge down waves at a faster speed (and slide down the back face at a lower speed), but they really aren't going to exceed 7 knots very often.  Here's what the Sail Magazine had to say, with a bit of enthusiasm:

"On passage she cruises at roughly 6 knots in winds from 10 to 28 knots, with a first reef, depending on sea state, usually required at around 20 knots apparent. Close-hauled she still manages 3 to 4.5 knots in 20 knots of wind and average seas, but put her onto a beam reach with her large genoa fully unfurled and she’ll tramp along comfortably at closer to 7.5 knots"  

This is the fastest boat in this "ocean race".

 

BTW, In the early 70's I did 320nm noon to noon and then 360nm the next day on the Transpac.  Very comfortably.  Speed was achievable even back in the day that this race romanticizes.  

 

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The leading five boats are Rustlers, a type I'm not familiar with but I've delivered a Tradewind and Endurance and others that are similar and i think they'll knock off 175 miles in the right conditions.  Susie Goodal is showing a run of 202 miles, which doesn't seem likely unless they've found a magic current.

The most competitive boats seem to be the Rustlers but I suspect that the current leaders would be there in any of the entries.

Uku Randmaar is going well and Susie Goodal is now 50 miles back, gaining fast on Mark Slats, who is flirting with the edge of a windless hole that he'd be unaware of.

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Ertan is now docked at A Coruna, for personal reasons he has retired. So with Francesco unable to get his boat ready with the time limits we are down to 16. I feel really sorry for these guys as I cannot imagine the effort and expense they must have gone through just to get to Les Sables, unfortunately they will not be the last to retire I fear 

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4 hours ago, spyderpig said:

Ertan is now docked at A Coruna, for personal reasons he has retired. So with Francesco unable to get his boat ready with the time limits we are down to 16. I feel really sorry for these guys as I cannot imagine the effort and expense they must have gone through just to get to Les Sables, unfortunately they will not be the last to retire I fear 

This is a big part of the race. Just getting to the start is a major feat and just finishing AT ALL is a major feat.

* also not going crazy and jumping off the boat is a goal for many :blink:

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On 7/4/2018 at 8:07 AM, mad said:

Any body want to run a book on number of finishers, when and what mental state they’ll be in?

It is already starting to pan out.

Peche and van Den Heede wrestling to the finish. Next in line are the inexperienced but tough Slats and Suzie Q types. That's four finishers. So add one or two or even double that and mission accomplished is my guess for the RO.. 

Afterall only only one man left standing in 68 and was knighted. Spain, South Africa and Australia will shortly get a few self assisted immigrants.

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2 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

This is a big part of the race. Just getting to the start is a major feat and just finishing AT ALL is a major feat.

* also not going crazy and jumping off the boat is a goal for many :blink:

I applaud everyone of the skippers engaged in this endeavor.  It takes a little getting use to watching this event since the dearth of digital reporting outside the tracker makes it hard to stay engaged, but I have found the race within the race to make it interesting.

Unlike the first race 50 years ago, the skippers going into this have much more skill, overall knowledge, and frankly much better prepared boats so other then losing it at sea or equipment issues, many should finish.  The race inside the race are the Rustlers which seem to be the favored boat.  Eventually they'll get spread out, but I would feel most of those sailors will do well.

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46 minutes ago, bucc5062 said:

Unlike the first race 50 years ago, the skippers going into this have much more skill, overall knowledge, and frankly much better prepared boats so other then losing it at sea or equipment issues, many should finish.

You sure about that.. 10% attrition already in less than a week. I think you may be understating how tough the 68 brigade were as a group and overstate knowledge/preparedness over that attribute for this crowd.

The experienced and or tough ones have already surfaced here and so far it is only a handful or around one-third in number. My guess is you are not a betting man and don't see more temporary visas will be requested than bottles of finish champagne.

This is a tough gig, particularly in the head department.

 

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PRB seems to be maintaining 6K and moving ahead. The cynic in me says he is expending some of his fuel but if so he needs to be well on the lookout for fishing buoys by the score all the way down the Portugese coast many a long way off the coast. I was looking for a suitable pic to show them but I am not Jack who seems to have images for every possible occasion.

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10 hours ago, spyderpig said:

Ertan is now docked at A Coruna, for personal reasons he has retired. So with Francesco unable to get his boat ready with the time limits we are down to 16. I feel really sorry for these guys as I cannot imagine the effort and expense they must have gone through just to get to Les Sables, unfortunately they will not be the last to retire I fear 

It’s the skipper’s decision, of course, but to cite only vague “personal reasons” for retiring after such a Herculean effort is sorta puzzling.  Perhaps more details will be forthcoming.  

There’s always 2022...

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3 hours ago, bucc5062 said:

I applaud everyone of the skippers engaged in this endeavor.  It takes a little getting use to watching this event since the dearth of digital reporting outside the tracker makes it hard to stay engaged, but I have found the race within the race to make it interesting.

Unlike the first race 50 years ago, the skippers going into this have much more skill, overall knowledge, and frankly much better prepared boats so other then losing it at sea or equipment issues, many should finish.  The race inside the race are the Rustlers which seem to be the favored boat.  Eventually they'll get spread out, but I would feel most of those sailors will do well.

They - schizophrenically - have chosen to deny themselves the last 50 years of increased  knowledge yet avail themselves of much of the last 50 years of sailhandling improvements.  So the mental pressures are still as great (maybe greater, because they know what they could be aware of regarding weather, etc. but have denied themselves) but the physical challenge is less.  

So I suspect around 10 finishers, days, perhaps weeks and maybe months apart and more than a few Cape Town or Tasmanian holidays where a few sailors decide to make some "voluntary adjustments" to the electronics rules prior to taking on the Indian or southern oceans. 

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Social Hub: “Briton Ertan Beskardes has confirmed to me that he's dropped out of the @ggr2018official round world retro race after 5 days because he underestimated the loneliness of severely restricted communication. Brave call to stop after such a build up.”

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10 hours ago, bucc5062 said:

Unlike the first race 50 years ago, the skippers going into this have much more skill, overall knowledge, and frankly much better prepared boats 

"have much more skill" - explain and justify - I doubt it.. well if you compare everybody to Crowhurst.. then yes.

"frankly much better prepared boats" - You also need to justify this, some have virtually no experience of preparing for sea and this is obvious from the start photos. 

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37 minutes ago, littlechay said:

"have much more skill" - explain and justify - I doubt it.. well if you compare everybody to Crowhurst.. then yes.

"frankly much better prepared boats" - You also need to justify this, some have virtually no experience of preparing for sea and this is obvious from the start photos. 

How hard could this race be, even a sixteen year old girl did a solo RTW in an old school boat... True she had the luxury of satcoms, but that was probably for the duck face selfies that teens like to post on social media.

 

:D

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She's an exceptional 16 year old girl.

When I see an ex-naval officer finish, I might begin to think it's not hard.

Still, he's out there and I'm not.

Aussies now 15th and 16th, we're on a roll.

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11 minutes ago, hoppy said:

How hard could this race be, even a sixteen year old girl did a solo RTW in an old school boat... True she had the luxury of satcoms, but that was probably for the duck face selfies that teens like to post on social media.

 

:D

Watching Jessica Watson go through a video tour of her electronics and gear prior to departure, she was truly exceptional.  I was a doubter, but she knew her shit. Wonder what she's doing now?

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On 7/5/2018 at 6:21 AM, Rasputin22 said:

 

What's the deal with whoever actually finishes this will be the only other person ever to have soloed rtw nonstop without GPS? Surely chat Blythe ('71ish?) and a few others shortly after, including some Japanese guy in a smallish boat. Jon Sander's multiple trips were in early 80's, so maybe they are equating satnav with gos? Did he even have satnav?? Then there was that old Yankee guy who circumnavigated nonstop with no Navy instruments whatsoever (not even a sextant...). What sort of a dumbass record category is that anyway?

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4 hours ago, vesa said:

Social Hub: “Briton Ertan Beskardes has confirmed to me that he's dropped out of the @ggr2018official round world retro race after 5 days because he underestimated the loneliness of severely restricted communication. Brave call to stop after such a build up.”

I get that singlehanding is definitely not for everyone, but interesting to make the decision to bail so close to the start —perhaps the enormity of the coming many months really sank in. Who knows.

Re: singlehanding, and the 2,000 mile solo qualifier required by the GG (in addition to 8,000 not required to be solo) - the GG site doesn’t doesn’t specifically say those 2K solo miles have to be *nonstop*.  So, can it be inferred from this that a skipper may never have been at sea alone for more than a few days (but still have completed the 2,000 mile solo requirement)?  (I.e., solo harbour hopping down N., C., S. America coast, etc.)  

See: http://goldengloberace.com/the-rules/

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19 minutes ago, mightyhartley said:

Then there was that old Yankee guy who circumnavigated nonstop with no Navy instruments whatsoever (not even a sextant...). What sort of a dumbass record category is that anyway?

You mean that fella that had a school atlas? 

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20 minutes ago, littlechay said:

You mean that fella that had a school atlas? 

Perhaps referring to Marvin Creamer.  Obscure (not well known; I’ve heard of him since I’m intrigued by non-instrument nav skills).  Retired professor of geography, evidently pretty well versed in “barefoot navigation”, I.e., without instruments - not even compass.  Incredible!  Not solo, though.  

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marvin_Creamer

http://www.oceannavigator.com/Web-Exclusives-2016/Impressive-circumnavigation-remembered/

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2 hours ago, Left Shift said:

Watching Jessica Watson go through a video tour of her electronics and gear prior to departure, she was truly exceptional.  I was a doubter, but she knew her shit. Wonder what she's doing now?

Quote

Jessica’s role as a Youth Representative for The United Nations World Food Programme has taken her to remote Laos and refugee camps in Jordan and Lebanon. Now aged 24, Jessica is the co-founder of a marine start-up, Deckee.com, is currently undertaking an MBA and her second book, a middle-grade novel, is scheduled to be published in early 2018.

https://www.jessicawatson.com.au/

 

and she was at the GGR village

 

Quote

During a far too brief visit to France last week I had the chance to stop into the Golden Globe Race village. For those not already following the GGR is a ‘retro’ solo nonstop race around the world - founded by one of my biggest supporters Don McIntyre. Events like this have a way of attracting interesting characters including Jesse Martin, Dilip Donde (India’s first solo circumnavigator who’s path I nearly crossed during my voyage) and Sir Robin Knox-Johnston’s iconic yacht Suhaili. Good luck to the fleets only female entry Susie Goodall Racing!

https://www.facebook.com/jessicawatsonofficial/

 

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3 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Perhaps referring to Marvin Creamer.  Obscure (not well known; I’ve heard of him since I’m intrigued by non-instrument nav skills).  Retired professor of geography, evidently pretty well versed in “barefoot navigation”, I.e., without instruments - not even compass.  Incredible!  Not solo, though.  

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marvin_Creamer

http://www.oceannavigator.com/Web-Exclusives-2016/Impressive-circumnavigation-remembered/

Yep, that's him. Obscure voyager yes, only heard of him via this old podcast: http://www.furledsails.com/article.php3?article=774   Quite a fascinating listen, intelligent and well thought out preparation for a trip with weird self-imposed arbitrary handicapping...just like this race. (But, yes it was not solo).

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10 minutes ago, mightyhartley said:

Yep, that's him. Obscure voyager yes, only heard of him via this old podcast: http://www.furledsails.com/article.php3?article=774   Quite a fascinating listen, intelligent and well thought out preparation for a trip with weird self-imposed arbitrary handicapping...just like this race. (But, yes it was not solo).

No not him. I was thinking of Paddy Macklin, but he made a stop in New Zealand it seems https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-13382555/falmouth-yachtsman-paddy-macklin-back-from-world-trip

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On 7/5/2018 at 9:38 PM, stief said:

Hmmm. Works here in OSX and Safari (even the Windy Currents layer!)

--navionics map doesn't play well with Windy, but works with PredictWind layer; lat/lon very tough to see in all weather layers.

747643139_ScreenShot2018-07-05at7_36_21PM.png.3d14698154c542bde61457e3778bcaea.png

622054433_ScreenShot2018-07-05at7_41_54PM.png.2f412f0a805226cff240bf0cc15a4b96.png

 

FYI, there is a wind layer available in the Navionics app. Info here: https://www.navionics.com/usa/blog/post/new-weather-tides-in-the-boating-app/

How to enable wind layer: From inside the Navionics app click menu, click weather and tides, click wind. This will enable wind vectors on top of the chart and give you a play by play forecast.

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23 hours ago, vesa said:

Social Hub: “Briton Ertan Beskardes has confirmed to me that he's dropped out of the @ggr2018official round world retro race after 5 days because he underestimated the loneliness of severely restricted communication. Brave call to stop after such a build up.”

A whole 5 days :unsure:

Extreme twitter withdrawal :rolleyes:

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19 hours ago, harrygee said:

Aussies now 15th and 16th, we're on a roll.

Technically you can also claim #1 ..Peche. He has lived in Perth since around 2000. Has a business importing high end sailboat hardware.

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1 hour ago, kent_island_sailor said:

A whole 5 days :unsure:

Extreme twitter withdrawal :rolleyes:

More likely came to the realization of how stupid this race is and did the smart thing.

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I am sort of confused about the equipment. If you told me to get rid of my furling gear or the GPS, the GPS would be overboard in about 2 seconds. I can and have found my way around without a GPS, but I would so hate to go back to endless sail changes. I could use all the energy saved for navigation!

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8 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

I'm confused

He will be more confused when a bunch of people, many more nutty than he pass him while asking directions.

This pic was under his list of boats he didn't get very far on. Its him reading about his own rescue, the headlines in the background.

 

file-765574.jpg

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3 hours ago, Gorn FRANTIC!! said:

More likely came to the realization of how stupid this race is and did the smart thing.

I see that they are steadily improving on their 3.5 knot average boat speed.  I think the typical R2AK boat (a sailing kayak) averaged better speed over 700 miles than these guys in the open ocean.  

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Latest Sat Text all seem pretty happy except Peche who says his HF/SSB is not working. He needs that like a hole in the head. Out of VHF range he won't be able to get any weather from others.

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2 hours ago, Left Shift said:

I see that they are steadily improving on their 3.5 knot average boat speed.  I think the typical R2AK boat (a sailing kayak) averaged better speed over 700 miles than these guys in the open ocean.  

Left that 3.5k average is VMG to tracker WP since the start not BS or SOG and where leaders are closer to 5k VMG since the start. The RO has no means of capturing their BS. Most stitting around 6k or more SOG now.

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37 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Left that 3.5k average is VMG to tracker WP since the start not BS or SOG and where leaders are closer to 5k VMG since the start. The RO has no means of capturing their BS. Most stitting around 6k or more SOG now.

Data from that tracker is pretty slim, so errors in my calculations are likely.  I will check back next week when I expect they will have gone another 700 miles or so.  

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Ignoring any westing (because my brain can't cope with the complication), in the last 21 hours 0600 to 0300 UTC, the leading five boats have gone ;

Peche 118 miles south (tracker shows 188 mls last 24 hours)

Van den Heede 118 mls (tracker 190)

Uku 105 mls (tracker 202)

Slats 117 mls (tracker 209)

Susie Goodal 117 mls (tracker 130)

OD racing at its best.

Average speed 5.6 knots, or 134 mls per 24 hours.

The relative positions on the tracker haven't changed much so the reported positions are probably correct but the 24 hour runs, as shown, are all over the place.

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3 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Latest Sat Text all seem pretty happy except Peche who says his HF/SSB is not working. He needs that like a hole in the head. Out of VHF range he won't be able to get any weather from others.

WTF? Brave, brave sir Robin built one out of packing tape and some empty bully beef tins in the original race.

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51 minutes ago, LB 15 said:

WTF? Brave, brave sir Robin built one out of packing tape and some empty bully beef tins in the original race.

Knox-Johnston's didn't have a radio for half the race so he must have left the instructions behind.  Maybe the SI's are not only based on what Knox-Johnston carried on board but also what he experienced. This mob too then will all be lining up to run aground off Dunedin. They probably got instructions from his Clipper crowd on how to implement that.

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1 hour ago, jack_sparrow said:

^^^^ Found this. The Otago Daily News

images (71).jpeg

I think there is fair chance that something similar will happen on this lap as they try to hit the mail/film drop gates... 

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15 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

I am sort of confused about the equipment. If you told me to get rid of my furling gear or the GPS, the GPS would be overboard in about 2 seconds. I can and have found my way around without a GPS, but I would so hate to go back to endless sail changes. I could use all the energy saved for navigation!

Hang on a sec - the GG boats have roller furling?!  I haven’t been following that closely.  I thought they were all as much as possible “period” gear - HF radio, no GPS, no furlers...

I thought maybe Crowhurst’s fast tri (in contrast to RKJ’s stout little mono Suhaili, with kerosene lamps?) loaded as it was with then very modern gear —electronics (and he had even planned an electronically activated anti-turtling capsize device/sensors, never installed had an an early version of furling headsails, hence the justification to have them in this race.

I just googled it.  Doesn’t look like it: https://keatsghost.wordpress.com/connections/people/donald-crowhurst-the-teignmouth-electron-and-the-round-the-world-race/

A9D9C61A-E2AE-4969-AA30-D5FC035DE21F.jpeg

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52 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Hang on a sec - the GG boats have roller furling?!  I haven’t been following that closely.  I thought they were all as much as possible “period” gear - HF radio, no GPS, no furlers...

I thought maybe Crowhurst’s fast tri (in contrast to RKJ’s stout little mono Suhaili, with kerosene lamps?) loaded as it was with then very modern gear —electronics (and he had even planned an electronically activated anti-turtling capsize device/sensors, never installed had an an early version of furling headsails, hence the justification to have them in this race.

I just googled it.  Doesn’t look like it: https://keatsghost.wordpress.com/connections/people/donald-crowhurst-the-teignmouth-electron-and-the-round-the-world-race/

A9D9C61A-E2AE-4969-AA30-D5FC035DE21F.jpeg

Looks like Crowhurst had twin forestays, which was briefly popular as a sail changing technique, before the double groove rotating headstay foils became popular.  I sailed on a boat that had twin headstays on rockers, so when you hoisted one sail the halyard tensioned that headstay and the other headstay sagged off.  Wasn't a world beater.

But the rules for this thing are about as consistent as US foreign policy lately.

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21 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

A whole 5 days :unsure:

Extreme twitter withdrawal :rolleyes:

image.png.e23317e261ad3736de3782666c75df9e.png

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On 7/6/2018 at 2:56 PM, jack_sparrow said:

You sure about that.. 10% attrition already in less than a week. I think you may be understating how tough the 68 brigade were as a group and overstate knowledge/preparedness over that attribute for this crowd.

And already there seems to be problems with a couple of the self-steering systems. Antoine says he will stop in the Canaries and Istvan is also reporting problems with his, both using Windpilot systems from the report -I can see a nice thread drift discussing the merits of the various self-steering systems. Hopefully both can sort their problems out without outside assistance.

 

 

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