QBF

The 2018 Golden Globe Race

Recommended Posts

4 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Here is a infrared shot take over the Atlantic ITCZ early this morning from EUMETSAT's Meteosat.

This indicates by cloud activity how very wide the doldrums are at the moment in the east but with a door through SSW of the Verdes. Any route east of that will be very slow, long and usettled at times if this picture remains largely unchanged..

IMG_20180718_153701.jpg

Not much time to mess around with this but. Here is a routing with PWE model (Predict Wind's take on ECMF) and GFS. PWE bold tracks. Forecast on Monday.  GFS has Slats heading straight south from his current postion. Otherwise both models have everybody heading through a narrow channel. I can't see it panning out; too much cloud around and if I was out there I think I would be crossing the ridge as best I could (nowcasting with their barometers should tell them what is happening) then making as much westing as I could .... but who knows :)

PWE.thumb.JPG.c15436f2beba9a44708da7fa1472d466.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Cousot leaving. He must have been reading this forum - He has found somewhere else to store the life-raft and horseshoes. That might let the wind-vane breath a bit. 

Image may contain: ocean, sky, boat, outdoor, water and nature

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is an article on the GGR that just popped up in Outside Online. Likely nothing new here to you followers but well-written and a good summary for those of us not so familiar with the history:

https://www.outsideonline.com/2325796/golden-globe-race-voyage-madmen

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, littlechay said:

but who knows :)

Thanks chay. Your not wrong there.

For the eastern group a couple of days ago all models were pretty consistent indicating a fair degree of reliability. Now they are all over the shop with variences between 0 -12k for the same time stamp through to early next week. Even if they had this info to hand they would be better placed looking out the porthole and staring at their barometer.

Top 3 are now down to 3/4k BS and I would expect them to cross the ridge in the next 12 hours then not a lot of joy on the other side, with maybe that big fella Slatts the exception.

On the other hand Wiig is ploughing along at 6+K and where he is the headed through the middle of the Verdes the models have remained rock solid for days. I don't expect him to slow much and is going to have a grand time between now though to early next week when the others finally find some pressure stability. How west they will be at this point is anyone's guess. Wiig will also get a real boost seeing dirt slide by and getting fixes to fine tune his nav expectations.

With the ridge behind them then the next hurdle will be finding the yellow brick road through the Doldrums next week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Here is a infrared shot take over the Atlantic ITCZ early this morning from EUMETSAT's Meteosat.

This indicates by cloud activity how very wide the doldrums are at the moment in the east but with a door through SSW of the Verdes. Any route east of that will be very slow, long and usettled at times if this picture remains largely unchanged..

IMG_20180718_153701.jpg

Interesting.  Is this something one could download via weather fax on HF, if offshore?   Would you need a modem (or just computer sound card) for this amount of data?  Or would one need sat phone to download something like this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

" Mark Slats… JIHA JUST PULLED IN NICE TUNA THATS SOMEFRESH MEAT AFTER 18D "

 

Ya got to love it.  Even while racing there time to fish.  With some fresh food in the belly (good energy) and a good position heading through the CVs, could position himself up to the top if Peche gets stuck East.   Looks like the second tier is deciding to stay more west though not sure about Uku and Tapio.  Seems like they would need to start to turn more west or fall into a big hole.

Edited by bucc5062
correction

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Interesting.  Is this something one could download via weather fax on HF, if offshore?   Would you need a modem (or just computer sound card) for this amount of data?  Or would one need sat phone to download something like this?

You can add a "cloud" layer to the GRIB files you download which will give you a graphic. Hour zero of the GRIB is the seed values so observed values where available otherwise modeled values. Cloud cover is entered from the satellite photos I believe but I don't know if it is done by machine or man. 

Otherwise some weather services transmit satellite photos on their HF Fax schedule. I use my modem rather than sound card as it is connected up and ready to go. If I leave the radio on the fax software will just grab all the faxes so when I come to do my analysis there will be a stack of data to mostly throw out but some useful stuff :)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone worried about Wiig's speed falling off in the lee of the island Sal, don't as it is as flat as a pancake and going past at night he won't be tempted by the beachside bars.

santa-maria-island-aerial-xxlarge (1).jpg

images (48).jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Interesting.  Is this something one could download via weather fax on HF, if offshore?   Would you need a modem (or just computer sound card) for this amount of data?  Or would one need sat phone to download something like this?

 

3 hours ago, littlechay said:

You can add a "cloud" layer to the GRIB files you download which will give you a graphic. Hour zero of the GRIB is the seed values so observed values where available otherwise modeled values. 

As Chay says "observed cloud cover" either as an overlay or even low res radio fax will give an indication of forecast accuracy, particularly for defined systems on the move.

One of the very useful features of high resolution imagery is in the ICTZ where forecasts are unreliable and weather changes very quickly. For instance this example of doldrums door chasing, traversing poorly charted shallow areas wanting the sun to be out or wanting an anchorage to stay nice and not go to shit. 

However that high res stuff for a selected area (to reduce file size) is only available from commercial weather providers where you pick the area and email your request via your HF email provider. The choke point however is the return file limit size imposed by your HF Email provider. That limit is on account they are largely not for profits and don't have huge banks of transmitters and modems to be spinning out multiple large file requests.

It is actually possible to cut out the middleman and intercept some weather satelite download image data direct using radio and with some low cost hardware/software decode it. I have no experience with that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^^^^ I think Peche has a Beaufort?? 

"The CASTOR and POLLUX models (and also CASTOR+ and POLLUX+) are characterised by their unobtrusiveness, their elegance and their light weight"

If so should he be worried now that Nabil's, (though modified, different model??),  has shit itself??

http://www.beau-fort.com/website/regulateur-dallure-beaufort/

FB_IMG_1531955933642.jpg

FB_IMG_1531956987807.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking at the pictures of the two wind-vanes, the big weakness I see in Nabil's installation is the minimal footprint on the transom. 

I don't know where his system broke but I'd be concerned about the loads on a round-world trip.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, jack_sparrow said:

 

It is actually possible to cut out the middleman and intercept some weather satelite download image data direct using radio and with some low cost hardware/software decode it. I have no experience with that.

I have a receiver aboard (although the new satellites will need a new one there are still enough of the old ones in service). I wrote a blog entry about my one ages ago http://www.tweedsworld.com/2014/05/weather-satellite-reception/ 

It is a useful accessory high latitudes where you can see the low pressure systems coming. In equatorial regions it can help spot the convergences but in mid latitudes as a weather layman I can't get much use out of it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On a totally different note, does anyone know the background on the GGR not having/allowing multihulls? (Which, I know, are anathema to some sailors :-) )

(I just happened now to read that Outside magazine article posted above on the original GG Race — which mentions Nigel Tetley, who I hadn’t known/remembered was the first person to circumnavigate in a trimaran - which then led me to the Wikipedia page about him, whereupon I learned of his tragic and very bizarre lingerie-laden (yes) end —I won’t spoil it for you with details.  And I wondered if multihullers are all so strange and thus banned :-)  But seriously, wonder why the RO disallowed multihulls in this race - sure, Tetley beat his plywood one to death, literally —it sank shortly after he crossed his outbound track— since he believed, falsely of course, that the mad Crowhurst was hot on his tail and he was pushing it very hard.  If a 1968-era plywood trimaran/multihull can make it nearly around the world nonstop via the great capes, haven’t they “proven” themselves, so to speak?

As for cats - a British woman, Rosie Swale-Pope, circumnavigated and also rounded Cape Horn with her husband in the early 1970s - first catamaran to round the Horn.  

RO Don is not a multi guy? :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did the original GGR contestants have windvane steering type gear, or did they use sheet to tiller?  I'd imagine sheet to tiller would be the fallback, along with redundant gear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

If a 1968-era plywood trimaran/multihull can make it nearly around the world nonstop via the great capes, haven’t they “proven” themselves, so to speak?

RO Don is not a multi guy? :-)

Maybe starting with the list of celebrated multi designers who cast off to prove exactly that and never returned. The RO probably thought having his race being headlined as the Killing Field was not a great look.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, littlechay said:

I wrote a blog entry about my one ages ago ..

Self outed..Now mate which one are you? :-)

 

images (49).jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Maybe starting with the list of celebrated multi designers who cast off to prove exactly that and never returned. The RO probably thought having his race being headlined as the Killing Field was not a great look.

Are you saying Tetley and Swale-Pope, etc. were flukes?  I know nothing of multihull history, really, beyond those two early examples - but surely lots of multis have gone around via the “le Grand Sud”, as the French call it? I’d be curious to know.  Disallowing multis is certainly not in the spirit of ‘68.

A Tetley class for 2022? :-). Or are they too tainted with Crowhurst: that’s my theory.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Self outed..Now mate which one are you? :-)

 

images (49).jpeg

The one on the left

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, BrickTopHarry said:

Did the original GGR contestants have windvane steering type gear, or did they use sheet to tiller?  I'd imagine sheet to tiller would be the fallback, along with redundant gear.

Blondie Hasler is credited with invention of the modern geared vane in the 1950's. 1st two pics is of his boat Jester in 1960 Transatlantic and his vane. Race was won by Chichester in Gypsy Moth III that had a self-steer replica of Slocums Spray using a block and sails/sheets system via a Yawl or small aft steering sail. 

In GGR Moitessier had a very rudimentary direct arrangement using a vane. I think everyone else had the old blocks and sails/sheets arrangement.

I suspect why 8 years later no-one had embraced Haslers arrangement was Jester was a light displacement boat and they mistakenly believed it wouldn't work on their long keeled heavy displacement boats. That or maybe their budget couldn't afford a silent crewman who didn't eat or sleep?

images (50).jpeg

images (51).jpeg

methode%2Fsundaytimes%2Fprodmigration%2Fweb%2Fbin%2Fffbfa45a-af2f-480a-9a52-7c1fbaaf4105.jpg

spray3a.gif

images (3).png

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don is not a multi guy for the purposes of this excersize.  He's a bloke who goes looking for ways to hurt himself so he'd probably love to be out there now, wallowing around.

I'm sure he's enjoying the spectacle of others doing just that.

There are plenty of multis that could do this stuff in far more comfort and ease but they'd require a higher level of seamanship than the clunkers.

But it wouldn't be much of a race.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Are you saying Tetley and Swale-Pope, etc. were flukes?  I know nothing of multihull history, really, beyond those two early examples - but surely lots of multis have gone around via the “le Grand Sud”, as the French call it? I’d be curious to know.  Disallowing multis is certainly not in the spirit of ‘68.

A Tetley class for 2022? :-). Or are they too tainted with Crowhurst: that’s my theory.

I think in those early days that those two examples survived could be considered flukes. :)

To me the big advantage of the modern maxi multi-hulls is that they are so fast that they can be positioned to avoid or take advantage of weather systems. Multis of the GGR era were faster than monos but not an order of magnitude faster like the modern ones. 

You can't position yourself to avoid to take advantage of weather when you don't have access to weather forecasts :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, littlechay said:

You can't position yourself to avoid to take advantage of weather when you don't have access to weather forecasts :) 

That makes a lot of sense —had never occurred to me.  A good multi as a racing “tool” is dependent on taking advantage of good weather info to really shine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Are you saying Tetley and Swale-Pope, etc. were flukes?  I know nothing of multihull history, really, beyond those two early examples - but surely lots of multis have gone around via the “le Grand Sud”, as the French call it? I’d be curious to know.  Disallowing multis is certainly not in the spirit of ‘68.

A Tetley class for 2022? :-). Or are they too tainted with Crowhurst: that’s my theory.

Well I did give you a hint.

Arthur Piver was the father of plywood Tri design in the 50/60's. Piver set out in his 25' to qualify for the 1968 OSTAR Transatlantic, and was never seen again.

Later that year two 40-foot Piver Victress trimarans set out in a RTW race. One was a chap called Nigel Tetley the other, a Donald Crowhurst. 

I believe at last count the yacht design record for those to go offshore and never to return rest with Piver Tri designs. There are a few multi designers that have sought to take that record. I don't think anyone really wants to revisit that multi era.

Who said I had dementia.

PS. I have been offshore in a 25' Piver, exactly the same design that became Piver's coffin. It took many years to be aboard something that both thrilled and made you shit your pants at the same time. When opposing corners of a multi get out of line on the Y axis despite a cabin to in the middle you know it is time to find a tree and lie under it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, BrickTopHarry said:

Did the original GGR contestants have windvane steering type gear, or did they use sheet to tiller?  I'd imagine sheet to tiller would be the fallback, along with redundant gear.

They pretty well all had vanes, I don't think anyone used sheet to Tiller initially. Ridgeway, Blyth (and Bill King I think) all had Aries. Moitessior was too much of a tight arse to have a commercial one so his was fabricated from galvanised piping, even both the trimarans had vanes based on Ares versions. Can't remember details of the others except for knox-johnston: his was a twin Vane model- one poked out on big ugly gantries from each quarter to avoid the boom or his mizzen. Both good individually operate a trim tab on transom rudder. Vanes ended up being smashed in rolls or capsizes in Southern Ocean and he continued the rest of the way with sail balance and sheeted to tiller.

Wind vanes were pretty well standard well before this time, Haslar's inovation was the servo pendulum in the water, which was a big advance, but it was not till after Golden Globe that horizontal or inclined axis wind sensors were made commonly. Although I think Taberly had one on his trimaran for the 68 solo transatlantic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, mightyhartley said:

Ridgeway, Blyth (and Bill King I think) all had Aries.

Mighty I thought Aries along with Windpilot only came to market same year but just after they left. Hassler had been selling his for 6 years by then. Maybe some Aries prototypes or marketing specials?

Crowhurst had something I see.

011696.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Mighty I thought Aries only came to market after they left. Maybe some prototypes or marketing specials?

I'd say your right about preproduction models, don't think any of them ever used the name Aries at all. Think they all did some talking with Blondie Hasler in their prep- there devices were all vertical axis vanes with servo pendulum in the water operating lines to tiller. 

Seems that wind vanes were a French area of innovation until Hasler, started with article (Marin Maree sp?), who had them on a motor sailer when made a solo Atlantic circuit in 1930s- an unusual thing and his book spread the ideas, post war French single handers like  Marcel Bardiaux sp? had vanes in the 1950s, whereas Chichester was still mucking around with that redundant mizzen scaled up model yacht contraption in the first ostar. Got a servo pendulum type from Hasler for his rtw effort a couple of years before golden globe race. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, mightyhartley said:

I'd say your right about preproduction models, don't think any of them ever used the name Aries at all. .....

Seems that wind vanes were a French area of innovation until Hasler, 

Mighty thanks for that history...I get the impression Hasler was a "open source" sort of guy and made no attempt to patent his work. In OSTAR races his was the preferred unit well into the 70's just ahead of Aries.

Hasler was a war and post war hero of my father's ...who then passed the SH bug down :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Alice???

It's down a rabbit hole. Anything can happen ! 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

As for cats - a British woman, Rosie Swale-Pope, circumnavigated and also rounded Cape Horn with her husband in the early 1970s - first catamaran to round the Horn.  

I had never heard of her. She certainly is not one prone to sleeping in.

https://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/people/then-now-rosie-swale-adventurer-1.483868

Boat looked like a cross between those old round top Greyhound buses and a whale.

Speaking women my hero in the sailing department is Florence Arthaud. Won the Route du Rhum in 1990 and in the same year, broke the solo transatlantic record. Beat French legends like Philippe Poupon, Laurent Bourgnon and Francis Joyon.

Bullet proof tragically killed in a helicopter crash in Sth America few years back. She would be 61yo if alive today.

That finish line pic below by Thierry Martinez of Flo standing on the windward hull is a cracker. 

images (56).jpeg

2156903_16.jpeg

Screen-Shot-2015-03-11-at-17.12.55-copy.jpg

Screen-Shot-2015-03-11-at-17.13.46.png

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

I had never heard of her. She certainly is not one prone to sleeping in.

https://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/people/then-now-rosie-swale-adventurer-1.483868

Boat looked like a cross between those old round top Greyhound buses and a whale.

 

Rose Swale wrote a book called, I think, "Children of Cape Horn".. ... Yes here it is https://www.amazon.com/Children-Cape-Horn-Rosie-Swale/dp/0236177133

I have been lucky enough to meet a few of the single hander ladies. Of those Isabelle Autissier stands out, probably because I have drunk more wine with her than the others.. I remember her telling me once "that anybody can sail around the world alone; it takes somebody special to sail around the world alone and fast". Loneliness aside I think that is very, very, true. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, littlechay said:

I remember her telling me once "that anybody can sail around the world alone; it takes somebody special to sail around the world alone and fast". 

Flo's go fast view was "The devil does not want me"

Sailing SH in the Med late in the year she lost her balance while getting ready to have a piss and went in the drink.

She had bought only days before a water resistant cell phone and was carrying it in her pocket. She called her mother in Paris, who alerted the rescue authorities. They got her coordinates off the phone.

She was rescued after midnight and  transferred to hospital suffering from hypothermia.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, jack_sparrow said:

Flo's go fast view was "The devil does not want me"

Sailing SH in the Med late in the year she lost her balance while getting ready to have a piss and went in the drink.

She had bought only days before a water resistant cell phone and was carrying it in her pocket. She called her mother in Paris, who alerted the rescue authorities. They got her coordinates off the phone.

She was rescued after midnight and  transferred to hospital suffering from hypothermia.

I don't know what is wrong with pissing in the cockpit.. they all have drains .. :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, littlechay said:

I don't know what is wrong with pissing in the cockpit.. they all have drains .. :)

USCG stats show the vast majority of male bodies they find have their fly undone

Remembering Flo's story I now have a very unhealthy image of Susie to erase from my brain.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seems the RO when he gets back to HQ will shortly have studio style programs going to air drilling down in more detail on subjects like weather, gear and whether they are sailing nude or not etc.

My guess is Don will be dialing in here beforehand to get some pre-production inspiration so we can't disappoint.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, jack_sparrow said:

Flo's go fast view was "The devil does not want me"

Sailing SH in the Med late in the year she lost her balance while getting ready to have a piss and went in the drink.

She had bought only days before a water resistant cell phone and was carrying it in her pocket. She called her mother in Paris, who alerted the rescue authorities. They got her coordinates off the phone.

She was rescued after midnight and  transferred to hospital suffering from hypothermia.

Thanks Jack for bringing up those memories about „Flo“. Never met her but always admired her. What a tragic death.

Many thanks to all the contributors here in this great GGR forum.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good morning,

Some comments about the selfsteering used in the 1968 race.

Over the years I have read and re read the various books written by the 1968 competitors.

Knox- Johnston used a home-made vane operating a trimtab aft of the rudder. He lost most of it as he entered the Roaring Forties. His boat self steered well and he did not realy miss it.

Moitessier had a very simple home-made trim tab system on the rudder and it worked well. In his book he wrote that he only hand steered on about three or four occasions.

Nigel Tetley had a home made system as well. Two vanes linked directly to the helm. I am going on memory here but I recall that it worked so-so but his boat self steered well enough to get him around. He would set double headsails on booms etc to balance the rig.

Crowhurst had a Hasler vane on his trimaran.

Bill King had a Hasler on Gallway Blazer. Interesting, but his boat was a fin and skeg design, not a full keel. He retired to Cape Town after capsizing and dismasting as he entered the Souther Ocean.

Chay Blyth used a Hasler. His boat was a 30ft bilge keeler and only lasted about 400 miles after rounding the Cape of Good Hope and he retired into East London , SA. The boat simply had no chance of running before a heavy blow.

John Ridgway, also on a bilgekeeler had a Hasler. He pulled out and headed to port somewhere in South America.

Prior to the '68 race, both Chichester and Alec Rose went around with Hasler vanes.

Regards.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I forgot to add this one to the list early but another sister-ship of Crowhurst's tri that came to a sad end was Tony Allan's. I went to a talk by him this evening, very entertaining. He's just published a book. 

https://www.amazon.com/Alone-Tasman-Allan-Story-Survival/dp/1927167353

https://www.facebook.com/AloneInTheTasman/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Flo's go fast view was "The devil does not want me"

Sailing SH in the Med late in the year she lost her balance while getting ready to have a piss and went in the drink.

She had bought only days before a water resistant cell phone and was carrying it in her pocket. She called her mother in Paris, who alerted the rescue authorities. They got her coordinates off the phone.

She was rescued after midnight and  transferred to hospital suffering from hypothermia.

I remember that story well  - remarkable. And I’m pretty sure she fell off at night, to boot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

I remember that story well  - remarkable. And I’m pretty sure she fell off at night, to boot.

Around midnight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, littlechay said:

I forgot to add this one to the list early but another sister-ship of Crowhurst's tri that came to a sad end was Tony Allan's. I went to a talk by him this evening, very entertaining. He's just published a book. 

https://www.amazon.com/Alone-Tasman-Allan-Story-Survival/dp/1927167353

https://www.facebook.com/AloneInTheTasman/

A success among the early ocean racing multis was Alain Colas’ Manureva.  (Marred by her disappearance later in the Route du Rhum.)

Apparently (reading last night on the Wiki page for Alain Colas, etc.) it was so well known in France, it inspired a pop song (way too poppy and cheesy considering its very somber topic)

https://g.co/kgs/VGWY5g

Manu Manuréva
Où es-tu, Manu Manuréva?
Bateau fantôme toi qui rêvas
Des îles et qui jamais n'arriva
Où es-tu Manu Manuréva
Porté disparu Manuréva
Des jours et des jours tu dérivas
Mais jamais-jamais tu n'arrivas
Là-bas
 
Manureva where are you 
Phantom ship who dreamed
Of the islands but who’ll never arrive
Etc. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

“I needed the break just to relieve the pressure,” admitted Cousot. “It was important for me mentally to make sure that everything is working…And it was good to have a hamburger and a beer! This is a personal challenge – a huge adventure. You have no idea, even reading Moitessier’s book and those of other singlehanders, about what it is like being alone. They talk about the sea and the environment, but they don’t talk about what is going on inside.”

http://sfbaysss.org/resource/doc/SinglehandedTipsThirdEdition2.pdf

Check out chapter 2, "The Mental Challenge" including emotions & crying, stress & coping, hallucinations, psychological breakdown, etc.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, Foolish said:

http://sfbaysss.org/resource/doc/SinglehandedTipsThirdEdition2.pdf

Check out chapter 2, "The Mental Challenge" including emotions & crying, stress & coping, hallucinations, psychological breakdown, etc.

Andrew,

Have you ever read “North to the Night”?  Not a traditional “singlehanded sailing story” —rather, a planned winter-over in the Arctic on a sailboat that was supposed to be two people, and became one due to unexpected circumstances. Fascinating “self-study” on being solo.  I also often wonder how Trevor Robertson (s/v Iron Bark; google him - FYI good profile article of him on James Baldwin’s site, s/v Atom ) did the incredibly long nonstop passages he’s done (like Australia-Canada or something like that), and choosing to winter over in Antarctica alone.  Anyway - North to the Night is a great reflection on solitary sailing/adventuring (wintering over!). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Foolish said:

http://sfbaysss.org/resource/doc/SinglehandedTipsThirdEdition2.pdf

Check out chapter 2, "The Mental Challenge" including emotions & crying, stress & coping, hallucinations, psychological breakdown, etc.

I remember Ellen MacArthur crying in frustration at a repair she was trying to carry out on B&Qs rig in the Southern Ocean.  And the grief she got from some armchair idiot on here for being "girly".   

Single handing is for special people.  Not for me.

 

image.php.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Andrew,

Have you ever read “North to the Night”?  Not a traditional “singlehanded sailing story” —rather, a planned winter-over in the Arctic on a sailboat that was supposed to be two people, and became one due to unexpected circumstances. Fascinating “self-study” on being solo.  I also often wonder how Trevor Robertson (s/v Iron Bark; google him - FYI good profile article of him on James Baldwin’s site, s/v Atom ) did the incredibly long nonstop passages he’s done (like Australia-Canada or something like that), and choosing to winter over in Antarctica alone.  Anyway - North to the Night is a great reflection on solitary sailing/adventuring (wintering over!). 

Trevor rafted up alongside me after one of his long sojourns alone. I invited him for dinner along with a couple of other mates who were working their boat. It was an entertaining dinner as Trevor sat at the end of the table and held court... I guess you just need to talk a lot after not speaking to anybody for many months :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are Wiig has succumbed and turned left. There must be some force at work at that end of CV. Easy to think stuck in the 4 zone is slow but reality is that is still 2/3 their top average.

Looks like a frustrating time ahead for everyone through to next week... Tomy and Lepage might find themselves in an interesting position come then.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, littlechay said:

Trevor rafted up alongside me after one of his long sojourns alone. I invited him for dinner along with a couple of other mates who were working their boat. It was an entertaining dinner as Trevor sat at the end of the table and held court... I guess you just need to talk a lot after not speaking to anybody for many months :)

He must have some incredible stories to relate!  Where were you that you randomly crossed paths - somewhere at the ends of the earth, no doubt.  Small world...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

He must have some incredible stories to relate!  Where were you that you randomly crossed paths - somewhere at the ends of the earth, no doubt.  Small world...

I suppose it wasn't entirely random.. It was in Puerto Williams, Chile. I was spending a winter in the Beagle Channel area skiing and climbing he had spend 10 months alone in the fiords. 

His boat has an engine, a tiny air cooled thing. One day he said he was going to refuel, and was placing cans into his little tender; thinking that after 10 months at sea he would need quite a bit of fuel I offered to help with the zodiac I had at the time (now I use a little ply rowing tender like his, much more practical and useful). He declined saying that the row to town would do him good and that the two cans he had were all that he needed (one 20L and one 10L can). Not bad fuel efficiency ;) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

He must have some incredible stories to relate!  Where were you that you randomly crossed paths - somewhere at the ends of the earth, no doubt.  Small world...

I met Trevor when we hauled Iron Bark in Trinidad eighteen years ago. He was in our yard at the same time as James Baldwin. Had a number of good conversations with each of them - as well as many of the other quirky itinerants that passed through. Good times, but boat numbers here have dwindled severely since those days.

I recall Trevor being an incredibly modest and good humoured chap - one of the saner single-handers I have met. Most SH types are a bit 'nuts', and I theorised that they either sail alone because of that, or are that way because they sail alone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, seabell said:

I met Trevor when we hauled Iron Bark in Trinidad eighteen tears ago. He was in our yard at the same time as James Baldwin. Had a number of good conversations with each of them - as well as many of the other quirky itinerants that passed through. Good times, but boat numbers here have dwindled severely since those days.

I recall Trevor being an incredibly modest and good humoured chap - one of the saner single-handers I have met. Most SH types are a bit 'nuts', and I theorised that they either sail alone because of that, or are that way because they sail alone.

I reckon that he must be pretty sane, as a petroleum geologist (I think I read that was his trade, allowing him to work and travel) and doing the hugely risky undertakings he has - takes huge preparation and calculation!  Overwintering solo in Antarctica after sailing there just blows my mind.

(Meanwhile the GGR fleet meanders toward/through the sweltering Doldrums, looking for wind...not for nothing the French call the area the “pot au noir”...which I guess maybe translates sort of as “witches cauldron?!?”  The black pot full of bubbling meteorological mysteries...where else would that descriptive term (as compared to the rather boring English “Doldrums”) come from?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This sat image is 2 hours old (19/7 2300 UTC) and tracker update now 1 hour old. (20/7 0000 UTC).

This clearly shows why the front runners will be in trouble if they don't/can't get some westing in.

Note: This is not an actual picture but a Airmass Composite constructed using data from different channels in particular infrared and water vapour channels. Airmass Composites are very useful for tracking cyclones/hurricanes/typhoons. These composites are produced within one hour of real time.

Unfortunately they are not of high enough resolution to see what colour outfits they are wearing, plus it is also midnight.

IMG_20180720_111306.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two days ago, I predicted that Are would be in the lead by now.  Not quite.  He's gained 40 miles on Slats, still 100 behind on the same line at the same speed.

Now I'm watching Tomy, sailing at right angles to the next waypoint so not registering a 24 hour run but with good speed in the wrong direction.  Hopefully, he'll stay in a different breeze and come around them.

But I won't ruin his chances with any predictions.

Go the underdogs.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/18/2018 at 7:50 AM, jgbrown said:

Any idea what kind of price this is likely to go for? 

I really do wish there was more information on the fit out of the boats, that in itself could have provided a lot of story and interest to look at the different choices on everything from sails to food to gear to boat modifications, especially the structural ones like collision bulkheads etc

Just for you. Owes him €100K it seems. 

He is literally stepping off and walking away. Not sure if the few Euro sitting on the chart table go with the deal.

Looks to be his preperation was rushed with stuff all over the place and leaving with a rig looking like a licorice stick. Notwithstanding his SAS/3 X Everest pedigree I think this thing did his head in thinking it may be easier than it was.

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, harrygee said:

Two days ago, I predicted that Are would be in the lead by now.  Not quite.  He's gained 40 miles on Slats, still 100 behind on the same line at the same speed.

Now I'm watching Tomy, sailing at right angles to the next waypoint so not registering a 24 hour run but with good speed in the wrong direction.  Hopefully, he'll stay in a different breeze and come around them.

But I won't ruin his chances with any predictions.

Go the underdogs.

Tomy might wish his boat grew foils and could lift out and fly around the dead zone, but alas, I fear his flyer will not pan out so well.  I to cheer for the underdog, but this may be a road too far.

In a crazy twist Peche may have made the best unconscious choice once again for he may cross the zone in light but consistent air and start to move out into the southern Atlantic.

There is a strange two boat, four boat tango between Susie and Gregor dodging islands and Tapio and Uku slogging it east of them, but bow to bow distances have them @ 40 miles apart with good separation.  Not sure if Susie will go east or west of (let's call it) Rabil Island, but East may be better.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

This sat image is 2 hours old (19/7 2300 UTC) and tracker update now 1 hour old. (20/7 0000 UTC).

This clearly shows why the front runners will be in trouble if they don't/can't get some westing in.

IMG_20180720_111306.jpg

Jack - Can you explain a bit how this “clearly shows why the front runners will be in trouble if they don't/can't get some westing in.”

How does the airmass composite/water vapour “picture” show where the good wind (west?) is?  Just curious, roughly speaking, how you interpret the pic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, bucc5062 said:

In a crazy twist Peche may have made the best unconscious choice once again for he may cross the zone in light but consistent air and start to move out into the southern Atlantic.

Not crazy and not an unconcious choice. Both he and Heede would have had this approach nailed before leaving le Sables. They are just a tad more east than they planned at this point courtesy of localised conditions that are very hard for them to plot on voice forecasts. Their loss up ahead is real but will produce a dividend down the track being on the left side of the race track.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, jack_sparrow said:

Just for you. Owes him €100K it seems. 

He is literally stepping off and walking away. Not sure if the few Euro sitting on the chart table go with the deal.

Looks to be his preperation was rushed with stuff all over the place and leaving with a rig looking like a licorice stick. Notwithstanding his SAS/3 X Everest pedigree I think this thing did his head in thinking it may be easier than it was.

 

 

Thank you!  Damn that's (well) out of my budget.  Probably a great deal for somebody though, what an opportunity to walk into!   Like most things boat it wouldn't surprise me at all if everyone involved had a bit more last minute rush than anticipated.   Must be a real challenge to walk away from something with such global exposure, I'm impressed by the people who decide it's beyond them too.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Jack - Can you explain a bit how this “clearly shows why the front runners will be in trouble if they don't/can't get some westing in.”

How does the airmass composite/water vapour “picture” show where the good wind (west?) is?  Just curious, roughly speaking, how you interpret the pic.

Simple less and narrower cloud band to the west more stability.

Remembering this is a narrow band maybe 600 mile wide centred very roughly over the equator where moist air/winds from the latitudes above and below the equator merge. So long periods of calms alternated by heavy rains and thunderstorms.

The little or no wind associated with these large coherent horizontal banks of cloud over the equator is because they are caused by the moist air warming and rising straight up rather than blowing horizontally.

Sometimes a double ITCZ can form, with one located north and another south of the Equator caused by a narrow ridge of high pressure formed between the two.

Hence why the above Airmass Composite comprising infra red and water vapour produces such an accurate picture.

The one below is just a Low Res Infra Red from earlier today to make the east/west point and the cloud band dramatically narrowing south south/west of the Verdes.

IMG_20180720_142427.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heede and Peche now into the cloud and stalled, Slatts is still cloud free and moving. The leaders are still 700+ mile shy of the equator so notwithstanding that cloud should get moving again, and hopefully more west. Peche being the furthest east and maybe already too far left to correct, might even be better off chasing land mass assisted breeze subject to current, to get south then west as a Plan B.

Wiig is dead in the water so he may have underestimated the lee effect of cutting in between those two islands. Tomy still powering along and has lots of good air through the ITCZ, though he may need to wake up and go south as I don't think Cuba is in the GGR brochure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Heede and Peche now into the cloud and stalled, Slatts is still cloud free and moving. The leaders are still 700+ mile shy of the equator so notwithstanding that cloud should get moving again, and hopefully more west.

Wiig is dead on the water so he may have underestimated the lee effect of cutting in between those two islands. Tomy still powering along and has lots of good air through the ITCZ, though he may need to wake up and go south as I don't think Cuba is in the GBR brochure.

 

Good morning,

The GGR live tracker has a weather overlay which is quite nice. Look at the bar across the top of the screen, towards the right hand side, it's a little flag. You can chose between the current weather as well as the predicted forecast.

Regards.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think that Peche has a cunning plan :) He will sail SSE to roughly the latitude of Freetown and then hang a right heading SSW (ish) aiming to pick up a pressure isobar to follow around the St. Helena high.. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the era. Adrian Cronauer, the military radio DJ who came up with the "Good Morning, Vietnam" catchphrase made famous by the late Robin Williams in the film of the same name, has just died aged 79.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, littlechay said:

I think that Peche has a cunning plan :)

A lot of work getting there and maybe self doubt to wrestle with, but I agree chay. Big dividend once through to the other side even though more miles involved.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, trisail said:

Good morning,

The GGR live tracker has a weather overlay which is quite nice. 

I don't trust it...I think it is a Russian hack.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, Ease the sheet. said:

Being able to motor allows for some unorthodox approaches through the doldrums.

Motoring Fuel Allowance per Set of ITCZ & Horse Latitudes @ 30n/s

(160 litres / 2 equators) = 80 litres. Say (80L X 0.7 charging contingency factor*) = 56L. 80 - 56 = 24 Litres per ITCZ 

* Charging Contingency for less solar further distance from equator, wind/sea state allowing hydro in SO and for general charge source breakdowns, more loads ie time on the SSB when they get frightened in SO etc.

24/1.5 L per hour = 16 hours  X 6K = 96 miles per ITCZ/Horse Set or 32 mile each crossing.

Not a lot, maybe why man mountain Slatts brought along oars and has used them already. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder what colour Peche's sails are now? The Harmatten is in full swing which, as a nice side effect, will reduce the chance of any hurricanes forming along Tomy's track.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I suspect the oars are just there to mess with the heads of his competitors.

Moving one of these boats with oars would be a challenge but I suppose he's used to challenges.

With the limited amount of fuel, I'd be motoring at 4 knots, about 1 litre per hour, using ten hp.

That still doesn't get you far.

Kevin's boat presents okay.  The big ticket items are hull, rig, sails and engine.  The engine is rebuilt, which could be new everything or a paint job.

I'll wait until they reach Tasmania, the delivery will be easier.

That should be written in Vulture Font but so should a lot of this stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, harrygee said:

I'd be motoring at 4 knots, about 1 litre per hour, using ten hp.

That still doesn't get you far.

Unless my math is wrong , it gets you no further than 6 knots at 1.5 LPH?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

...... maybe why man mountain Slatts brought along oars and has used them already. 

I think he has :P  ...........  but overdid it a bit

GGR 20-7

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, spyderpig said:

I wonder what colour Peche's sails are now? The Harmatten is in full swing 

I wonder how Dacron would stand up to a sandblast versus Carbon?? Maybe a new Norths carbon line going back to the old days of tanbark coloured cotton cruising sails.

As I mentioned up thread how Cape Verdes gets it Western Sahara fine sand for construction purposes and mined on the eastern side of the high islands. 

This thread is like a geography class. I can't wait for the canned food cooking recipies :-)

 

images (57).jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Laser1 said:

I think he has :P  ...........  but overdid it a bit

I think he thinks so too.

FB_IMG_1532071194224.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, harrygee said:

With the limited amount of fuel, I'd be motoring at 4 knots, about 1 litre per hour, using ten hp.

 

40 minutes ago, spyderpig said:

Unless my math is wrong , it gets you no further than 6 knots at 1.5 LPH?

Not "no more but less". 6 mile versus 9 mile on 1 1/2 litres. A present of a "GGR Special Edition Calculator" for you both signed by  Donald Crowhurst :-)

images (58).jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, jack_sparrow said:

Not "no more but less". 6 mile versus 9 mile on 1 1/2 litres. A present of a "GGR Special Edition Calculator" for you both signed by  Donald Crowhurst :-)

images (58).jpeg

Don't confuse me at this time of day - 4k at 1 LPH = 4K per Litre. 6K at 1.5 LPH = 4K per Litre so same distance travelled for same fuel used -- no I am getting too old for this shit. (we had aba cursers at school

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, spyderpig said:

Don't confuse me at this time of day - 4k at 1 LPH = 4K per Litre. 6K at 1.5 LPH = 4K per Litre so same distance travelled for same fuel used -- no I am getting too old for this shit. (we had aba cursers at school

You didn't factor in the "displacement/speed/ enertia up wave" factor nor the "speed / skin friction release" factor. :-)

Farebrother happy to go around with a fixed blade prop indicates he was not aware of these hydrodynamic secrets utilised in this class of racing. :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Peche etc will be listening to radio Monaco, and get this information.
CAP TIMIRIS. Variable 2 to 4, becoming North or Northwest 3 to 5 in east soon, then Northerly everywhere later, locally 6 with gusts in far northeast at end. Moderate, locally slight in far east. Some thundersqualls with gusts in far southeast. Sand haze. SIERRA LEONE. In northwest : Northeasterly 2 to 4. In southeast : Southwesterly 2 to 4. Moderate, locally slight near coast. Thundersqualls with severe gusts, mainly in southeast. GULF OF GUINEA. Southerly 3 or 4. Moderate, locally slight near coast. Thundersqualls with severe gusts, mainly in north and near coast.

Cape timiris is passed, they are in Sierra Leone area. Which covers the whole West to East passage area for the sailors, so not much info...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, LeoV said:

Some thundersqualls with gusts in far southeast.

Leo that says it all ..seems to me Peche doesn't mind chasing the hard work even though he is using hanks not furlers. I know the guy and to say he is "focused" is an underestimate but very respectfull of wiley Mr Heede and the maybe the not so experienced but big and younger Dutchman Slatts.

A great grouping at the front of individuals with different talents in exactly the same boats set up to their ability.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, forgot to copy the most important info from forecast, as always;

Part 2 : General synopsis, Friday 20 at 00 UTC Thundery low area 1013 over Spain and east of France, with little change. New low expected 1012 over extreme southwest England, moving south, expected 1013 over Brittany by 21/12 UTC. Thermal low 1004 over Mauritania, slow-moving, expected 1008 by 21/12 UTC. High 1035 41N36W, slow-moving, with little change. Tropical wave along 20W from 18N to 06N, moving west at 10-15 kt. Tropical wave from 18N35W to 10N36W to 04N35W, moving west at 15 kt. Monsoon trough from 16N16W to 10N22W to 07N30W to 07N40W.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, LeoV said:

Peche etc will be listening to radio Monaco, and get this information.

Leo your word etc is the key to watching Peche.

Every competitor has access to the same public access voice HF forecasts. Yet you look at Peche being prepared to sail more miles and punch the corners just as he is doing right now more than anyone else using effectively the same forecasts. Why has he done this? Does he interperate that information differently and for better or worse than everyone else?

My guess is he is drawing upon more weather information than other competitors using the same voice/Ham network than others could have but don't and he set this up long before leaving le Sables. Afterall the secret to going fast in a RTW race is "weather and platform". Doesn't matter what sort race it is and whether you are in Jules Verne record breaking multi like he has done or in a slug like he is now on.

Firstly platform.

I think the closest anyone anyone to him is Heede for preparing their boat around the opportunities and constraints of the SI's and their own capability. The first three pics below is from Peche's Rustler being launched in December 2017 when he was still chasing a major sponsor. No one went this far, short of Tomy building a Suhile replica in wood epoxy. Peche having done everything to a weight reduction he could and being penalised by the RO by having to carry an extra underpins his platform approach. More power storage down low he must regret that penalty :-)

Secondly the weather.

We won't know this until early next year after Peche gets back to le Sables, but my guess is not better/worse interpretation of public access weather available to everyone like Radio Monaco, but more weather SSB/HF voice weather data available than anyone else went looking for.

He spent a lot of time setting this up as constrained by the SI's using the HAM network where he can only have access to official but in his case more local forecasts. 

For example his easterly route of the Verdes that has many perplexed. The Verdes has half a dozen active HAM operators. There are two in particular one down by the harbour with a substantial antenna above his house (pic below) the other a Russian guy with literally a HF superstation on top of Monte Verde who is the world guru of Ham operators. See last two pics below.

My guess is Peche has tapped into this HAM network to avail himself of legitimate local forecasting and not just relying upon High Seas forecasts via public access HF like Monaco Radio and others that everyone else is largely relying upon.

By the way I have no inside information in this regard and only started to think about it from my own post above today being;

5 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Peche being the furthest east and maybe already too far left to correct, might even be better off chasing land mass assisted breeze subject to current, to get south then west as a Plan B.

And then Chay chimined in upthread with;

4 hours ago, littlechay said:

I think that Peche has a cunning plan :) He will sail SSE to roughly the latitude of Freetown and then hang a right

Peche launched his boat last December with no sponsor and adorned with a "I need money" message (see pics 1 - 3 below) and then spent a lot of time proving it up before the start. He put on hold a successful marine hardware business in another country (Aust) for two years to do this escapade. He finally walked out of PRB with a sponsor cheque, probably the biggest in this fleet.

I don't know the French launguage equivalent for it but my guess is when the PRB money guy asked,  "Why should we give you money Philippe?", Peche simply said.. "I have a plan and I'm not here to fuck spiders".

Weather info and no desire to fuck spiders is the secret to winning this race/crawl is my guess.

FB_IMG_1532078147278.jpg

FB_IMG_1532078167672.jpg

FB_IMG_1532078179296.jpg

Pulu_D44AC_2001_House_Mindelo_Cabo-Verde_Cape-Verde.jpg

5.jpeg

6.jpeg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Latest update: Susie and Gregor also sucked left. What is it with these people. Wiig after his dumb fuck lee park up is out and going. Up front moving best they can in light and variable, that won't change for days. Peche with the plan to keep us guessing ..Slattts looking good. Heede in the middle.

The big news is Commander Tomy has gybed south and stopped hallucinating thinking he had a crew and his Vane was Florence Arthaud wearing a white swimsuit and taking him to Cuba.

Mrs Tomy will be glad that dream is over and he is back on track.

images (59).jpeg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jack,

that is the problem with Ham, you can set up communication if you want.
The Frenzies are good in offshore weather stuff, lots of clinics, good books, but available to all.
So maybe a mix of that. And being able to use your engine makes a straight line easier. Fire it up when totally out of wind.
The rest is normally all sailing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LATEST SAT> TEXT MESSAGES from FRUSTRATED entrants ...Hot, no wind, no idea where to go...watch the LIVE TRACKER..very interesting... #GGR2018

Susie…TRYING TO KEEP THEBOATMOVING IN NO WIND
Philippe..ALL GOOD
Antoine.. MON AIS SONNE MAIS LES CARGOS DE L AFRIQUE RESTENT INVISIBLES
Loic… AU LARGE DE LA MAURITANIE SOUS LE CRACHIN BISOUS
Coconut… 20N EXPERIENCES 1% CALMS IN JULY APPARENTLY – STREWTH
ARE… CAL IRIDIUM DID BREAK.TRYED CALL 3TIMES MORE.
Susie.. MAKING THE MOST OFLIGHTWINDS PLASTIC SAMPLE TRAWLING
Mark slats.. GETTING TOSTED IN THE SUN AND LIGHT WINDS HERE
JL VDH.. ALWAYS LIGHT WIND WITH SPI NIGHT AND DAY.HOPING SE TRADEWIND
UKU.. Per aspera ad astra. The seaman's life is not easy
Tomy.. BEEN DRIZZLING. BUT NOT ENOUGH FOR A SHOWER
Antoine.. MON AIS SONNE MAIS LES CARGOS DE L AFRIQUE RESTENT INVISIBLES
Antoine.. MON REMEDE CONTRE LA SOLITUDE & L ENNUI, LE JAZZ MANOUCHE!
Gregor.. 22LIGHT TO NO WIND THE LAST WHILE.GOT A SWIM IN THIS MORNING
Tapio… 6ABSOF-INGLUTELYNOWIND-INACOUPLEOFMONTHSONEMIGHTAPPRECIATEADAYL
Philippe.. VENT SUD EST ATEL!ER REPARAT!ON SP!

 

Someone is looking ahead :huh:

By the end of this race I may have learned French.  I think Antoine was saying his cure for solitude is jazz.  With Are, Is Iridium the Sat phone (yep, looked it up) so, if that was a safety equipment required by the GGR RO, what happens if both stop working?  (with a guess of , he just keeps on going and we don't get to hear from Are till the next checkpoint?)

 

Thank you Jack for the info on Peche.  I see now both the level of preparation and overall skill are what has him up front so some of what he does is from conscious preparation, and then some still has to come from an unconscious deep pool of past experience. The macro and micro working together.  A hard combination to beat.  With that, Susie is doing a heck of a job holding position given the span of experience between her and the front runners.  Would love to see her in a VG boat next time around.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites