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I'd be more than happy just to have them along to tell me what to do. ;)

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6 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

I'd be more than happy just to have them along to tell me what to do. ;)

Me too.  However I not much point to come to Anacortes just to climb up & down a ladder and talk.  Besides, have been on the phone with Commodore & Wylie at length about the project anyhow.  We're all on the same page.

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8 minutes ago, Friggin' in the Riggin' said:

Great thread!  Stopped by for a lurk and was so pleasantly surprised!  Much more like the old days.  Sorry about your Dad Haji.  I'll find you at the show in Annapolis, buy you a rum.  

Looking forward to it.

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On 9/18/2018 at 8:59 PM, Haji said:

Interesting.  I'll have to look up his work.

http://www.radford-yacht.com/past/past.html

Have a look at this link, it tells the story of Joe Adams and Graham Radford who worked on from Joe's designs and developed a very successful design practice.

We have an Adams 13 similar in the style with long and narrow form, cat sailors have remarked on the "monomaran" style.

Keep up the great work and wish you all the success in the project.

Cheers,

Jim B)

15NOV14 PH to SH 4.jpg

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13 minutes ago, JimL said:

http://www.radford-yacht.com/past/past.html

Have a look at this link, it tells the story of Joe Adams and Graham Radford who worked on from Joe's designs and developed a very successful design practice.

We have an Adams 13 similar in the style with long and narrow form, cat sailors have remarked on the "monomaran" style.

Keep up the great work and wish you all the success in the project.

Cheers,

Jim B)

15NOV14 PH to SH 4.jpg

Thanks Jim!  I can see a likely influence on some of Tom Wylie's "monomarans"...for instance Rage, and even Ocean Planet!  Next time I talk with Tom I'll have to ask.

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Hi kids...just a quick update that I'll be back in the NW and resuming Improbable work on Oct 24th.  Will be doing as much as I can before heading back to Maine on Nov 6.  A little bit at a time....going to take a while however will keep moving forward to the goal...

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Loving all the old stories about this boat, the design, the folks who raced it back in the day, and Bruce's posts about the work going on now. Fantastic!

We lived in Shilshole in the 90's when Len was living there on Improbable with a pretty Tico girl. We had a lot of good evenings on Improbable with her cooking and Len's stories. 

The boat was jam packed with cruising stuff, including, as I recall,  a huge inflatable rolled up and jammed under the cockpit and a 25hp motor, (or maybe it was forward) but it still sailed like a daemon. We cruised together a few times and Improbable could always beat us downwind in a breeze. Len could even beat us single handing Improbable and he was a real fan of the powerful and fast acting double cylinder hydraulic autopilot he'd made so he could keep surfing all night on single handed offshore passages. He was a hard driving sailor.

I've often remembered fondly the times together with a great sailor who loved his life and his boat, and the photos of the white and red hull graphics really bring all those memories back.

Thank You,

Fred

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On 8/30/2018 at 1:11 AM, Haji said:

Here's a shot of the bow before I left for Maine. Lots of fine tuning and prep to do before painting...

IMG_20180827_074518852-1040x780.jpg

Bruce, a great project and commendable that you're doing the upgrades. Any thought to laminating lightweight spruce stiffeners to the braces you've created between the cutouts on the bulkhead/frames? Looking forward to seeing the amazing Improbable on the water again with renewed performance. Mentioned you to Ron Holland last week and he's excited to hear more.

 

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1 hour ago, wingssail said:

Loving all the old stories about this boat, the design, the folks who raced it back in the day, and Bruce's posts about the work going on now. Fantastic!

We lived in Shilshole in the 90's when Len was living there on Improbable with a pretty Tico girl. We had a lot of good evenings on Improbable with her cooking and Len's stories. 

The boat was jam packed with cruising stuff, including, as I recall,  a huge inflatable rolled up and jammed under the cockpit and a 25hp motor, (or maybe it was forward) but it still sailed like a daemon. We cruised together a few times and Improbable could always beat us downwind in a breeze. Len could even beat us single handing Improbable and he was a real fan of the powerful and fast acting double cylinder hydraulic autopilot he'd made so he could keep surfing all night on single handed offshore passages. He was a hard driving sailor.

I've often remembered fondly the times together with a great sailor who loved his life and his boat, and the photos of the white and red hull graphics really bring all those memories back.

Thank You,

Fred

Hey Wingssail/Fred,

Thanks for the great flashback.  My dad's girlfriend Dora (they were actually married for a while) stayed in close contact with him up to his passing earlier this year.  She's a sweetheart and loved my dad dearly.

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42 minutes ago, fromtas said:

Bruce, a great project and commendable that you're doing the upgrades. Any thought to laminating lightweight spruce stiffeners to the braces you've wisely created between the cutouts on the bulkhead/frames? Looking forward to seeing the amazing Improbable on the water again with renewed performance.

Hi Frontas,

The bulkhead ply is is Birch, and super stiff.  So the "braces" are plenty tough, and it's debatable whether any of all the added bulkheads need to be there at all anyhow.  However keeping them is sort of s tribute to my dad, and the philosophy of Improbable being the proverbial brick sh**house.  And so now she'll be both light, and bombproof...:-)

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The past few days have been pulling out all of the old wiring, lights, speakers, etc.  Got the mast out, and all of the batteries (11) that my dad had put on board. Just the batteries were 650 lbs!  Quite the exercise getting then all down to the ground...

 

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On 7/30/2018 at 10:20 AM, RKoch said:

In the picture I think I see bump at the bmax measurement point....about 1/2 way between the name and the white bottom paint. 

    IMPROBABLE's BMax bumps were actually nicely faired and barely noticeable.  Not those miserable tits that became the rage as IOR rule beating "progressed."  IMPROBABLE's bumps lowered her IOR rating about .5 foot, to 38.5', still a higher rating by a foot than her S&S Solent rivals, the 49 footers RAGAMUFFIN, BAY BEA, AURA, and 'MOUCHE. But to be honest, none of the IMPROBABLE crew liked the bumps.  They were heavy, yet fragile, and made rafting up on Cowes Harbor Trots problematical.

   After our unofficial record passage from Hobart to Auckland in the 1974 Trans-Tasman Race, IMPROBABLE became a Auckland "Harbor Racer" and training ship for 90 kids from the Torbay Boating Club's junior program, where Ron Holland had begun his early sailing career in the P Class.

  In late January we participated in the always festive Auckland Anniversary Day Regatta with 18 aboard, plus two dogs.

  • 1135276897_Improbablelift003.thumb.jpg.09493019b00ea1e53f98ad5c1d7bd573.jpg

 

We duked it out with BUCCANNEER, the always fast INNISMARA,  and D'arcy, Molly, and family on TEQUILA. Darce beat us across the line by a boat length, but later learned they had cut a mark, giving the overall to IMPROBABLE.  I was astonished to be handed a $200 check for the win at the Anniversary Day Regatta trophy presentation.  Winning money; That was a first for the Red Rocket.

206954535_IMprobableLift004.thumb.jpg.d114fe96d10633b877231ff21e207a65.jpg

 

   I was looking forward to delivering IMPROBABLE back to California, when word came from owner DWA that she was to be shipped in 3 weeks time aboard the PFEL PHILLIPINE BEAR.  It seems DWA's neighbor in Tiburon was President of PFEL (Pacific Far East Lines).  A deal had been reached that shipping costs would be waived, if we covered the loading/unloading.

    Sure thing, Boss.  Only problem: In this pre-Travel-Lift era, there were no slings and no crane in Auckland to hoist us from the Harbor and into the LASH barge. IMPROBABLE had to be gently tucked inside the 60 foot LASH Barge (Lighter Aboard SHip), a sort of giant floating container with two 20 foot opening hatches.  I reckoned I could get the boat inside the LASH Barge.  But IMPROBABLE was too high to stand on her keel and allow the giant steel hatches to be closed.  And the mast was 20 feet longer than the hatch opening....

   I built a model of the boat and the LASH barge, and reckoned we could just squeeze IMPROBABLE inside if we laid her over on her side. I could only imagine what that was going to be like for the glass and foam BMax bumps.

   With a borrowed truck, I collected some 2" steel cable for lifting slings.  A quick trip to the Auckland Fire Dept. netted us some old fire hose for the cable covering.  Then to the Auckland Hospital where we were donated a half dozen old mattresses for the hull to lay on.

  No time to waste. We had appointment with the HIKANUI, Auckland's giant floating crane.  HIKANUI, to be rented at $500/hour, was taller than the tallest building on Auckland's waterfront, which at the time was the 3 story Travel Lodge Hotel. HIKANUI's 6 man crew was to be supplemented by a gang of  "Wharfies," stevedores who would handle the LASH Barge and it's steel hatches.

1543861834_IMPROBABLElift001.thumb.jpg.bb045d585c4af5e1c18547a2607b12c9.jpg

 

     Trouble ahead?  Not until IMPROBABLE was lifted from the water and was swinging 30 feet in the air in the fresh westerly.  Then everything stopped.  The Wharfies disappeared.  I asked the HIKANUI's captain what was going on?  "Raining, Mate."  "Wharfies don't work in the rain." 

1193188562_ImprobableLift002.thumb.jpg.bb8eeb001ed9152bafa06952b61783ae.jpg

 

It wasn't raining.  Barely misting. I said to the HIKANUI Captain, "who says it's raining?"  He pointed to a small office on a tower, far above the Wharf.  "Union boss is up there. Go talk with him."

   I climbed ladders upward and entered a small office at the top of the Wharf. The Union boss of the Wharfies made it clear IMPROBABLE would not be loaded while it was raining. "But it's not raining," I said politely.  He just smiled and said, "If my crew works in the rain, they get to go home the rest of the day with pay."  "What's that gonna cost?" I asked?  "$500 dollars'"  was his reply.

I looked out the window at IMPROBABLE's red hull swinging at eye level in the breeze. The wire lifting cables, even with the substantial fire hose protection, were not doing the glass and foam BMax eggshell bumps any good. Never liked the bumps anyway. Perhaps something good could come of this?

TBC

   

  

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Wow, I can't wait for the sequel!

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Who doesn't have a union-tale like that squeeze ?  

I had a classic at the Moscone center, years back - that boiled down to the classic:

 "You can't do that (carry some small boxes down an escalator) ,  WE have to do it...  And we're not doing it."

Great photos !   Love the drawings, thanks.

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On 10/29/2018 at 10:46 PM, Haji said:

The past few days have been pulling out all of the old wiring, lights, speakers, etc.  Got the mast out, and all of the batteries (11) that my dad had put on board. Just the batteries were 650 lbs!  Quite the exercise getting then all down to the ground...

 

 

Why in heavens name did you have 11 batteries????

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1 hour ago, billy backstay said:

 

Why in heavens name did you have 11 batteries????

My dad liked to fish and cruise the San Juan islands.  With a few solar panels and the big battery bank he could run several DC refrigerators (3 or 4!) which he would stuff full of salmon and ling cod. After sailing home he'd freeze the fish which would sometimes last him for months.  He had a DC generator, however he would avoid using it as much as possible.

I think he at least once got caught having too much fish!

He would catch crabs too.

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Well that explains that!!  Your dad sounds like he was quite the character!!  Best of luck with your project!

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I discovered yesterday that dad's "holding tank" was actually a diesel tank for his diesel cabin heater.  The big hose from the head went into the tank box and had hose clamps and plastic bags on the end to keep it from pulling out of the box...  Here is a shot after I got the top off...

IMG_20181030_183903755.jpg

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In pulling all of that stuff out, and going with a composting toilet forward, where it was originally.

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3 hours ago, Haji said:

I discovered yesterday that dad's "holding tank" was actually a diesel tank for his diesel cabin heater.  The big hose from the head went into the tank box and had hose clamps and plastic bags on the end to keep it from pulling out of the box...  Here is a shot after I got the top off...

IMG_20181030_183903755.jpg

That's quite the "Holding Tank" :blink:

I hope he at least double bagged.

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9 hours ago, Great Red Shark said:

 "You can't do that. WE have to do it...  And we're not doing it."

<laughing>

Back In The Day I did "PC support" at a defense contractor in the LA area.  t'was a union shop, and they decided that - although my job required me to *use* tools, I wasn't allowed to "carry" tools.

So every time someone's PC needed work, I had to call the shop steward, he'd send someone to my office, I'd hand them my little assortment of screwdrivers and chip pullers and such, they'd carry it to wherever I was going, hand it back to me, and wait.  When I was done - whether 10 mins or 2 hours later - I'd hand the tool-bag back to him, he'd walk with me back to my office and give it back to me.

It was almost funny...

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Yes, totally fake holding tank.  He was a good man, but a very bad boy!

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13 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

That's quite the "Holding Tank" :blink:

I hope he at least double bagged.

 

So the bag is covering up a thru-hull???

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A nice old Baby Blake.  Those were the business "for the business" back then.  Standard equipment in all Swans of the 70s.

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9 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 

So the bag is covering up a thru-hull???

Nope.  There is a another hose out of view to the left of the pic, that went to a thru-hull for "offshore" use only...;-)

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22 minutes ago, sledracr said:

<laughing>

Back In The Day I did "PC support" at a defense contractor in the LA area.  t'was a union shop, and they decided that - although my job required me to *use* tools, I wasn't allowed to "carry" tools.

So every time someone's PC needed work, I had to call the shop steward, he'd send someone to my office, I'd hand them my little assortment of screwdrivers and chip pullers and such, they'd carry it to wherever I was going, hand it back to me, and wait.  When I was done - whether 10 mins or 2 hours later - I'd hand the tool-bag back to him, he'd walk with me back to my office and give it back to me.

It was almost funny...

That sort of stupidity is what gave the right wingers ammo against unions.

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10 hours ago, Great Red Shark said:

Who doesn't have a union-tale like that squeeze ?  

I had a classic at the Moscone center, years back - that boiled down to the classic:

 "You can't do that (carry some small boxes down an escalator) ,  WE have to do it...  And we're not doing it."

Great photos !   Love the drawings, thanks.

Moscone was something else.  As was doing a tradeshow in Chicago.  Three unions, pipe union, drape union, electrical union.  To erect a 10' x 20' pipe and drape booth and plug in an extension cord, really a 5 minute job for two small children and a dog, you had to stand in line at the counter and do 3 requisitions. 

Then (eventually) one gang, always three men, would show up.  The drape gang.  But no pipe guys.  Drape guys can't touch pipe, and vice versa.  So everyone stands and waits.  Eventually the pipe guys show up, and the two teams spend a half hour fiddling about, being careful not to touch the other bloke's stuff.

Then they find a stray 4-gang electrical extension which has crept into our booth from an adjoining one, and all 'work' stops until an electrical gang is called (with another requisition sheet) to move the offending article six inches, as nobody else is allowed to touch it.  

I once "accidentally" kicked an offending object a foot into the neighboring booth, and everyone walked off my job.  We didn't get the booth done until half an hour before opening time the next day.

Running tradeshows grayed the hair I hadn't already lost.

Back to Improbable.....

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37 minutes ago, Haji said:

Yes, totally fake holding tank.  He was a good man, but a very bad boy!

I have seen a few "holding tanks" that had a pipe going straight through to a discharge.  Not uncommon to find on old boats.   

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Thanking my lucky stars that I don't need a union to get this stuff off the boat...

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On 10/30/2018 at 9:36 PM, sleddog said:

    To be honest, none of the IMPROBABLE crew liked the bumps.  They were heavy, yet fragile, and made rafting up on Cowes Harbor Trots problematical.......

     Trouble ahead?  Not until IMPROBABLE was lifted from the water and was swinging 30 feet in the air in the fresh westerly.  Then everything stopped.  The Wharfies disappeared.  I asked the HIKANUI's captain what was going on?  "Raining, Mate."  "Wharfies don't work in the rain." 

1193188562_ImprobableLift002.thumb.jpg.bb8eeb001ed9152bafa06952b61783ae.jpg

It wasn't raining.  Barely misting. I said to the HIKANUI Captain, "who says it's raining?"  He pointed to a small office on a tower, far above the Wharf.  "Union boss is up there. Go talk with him."

   I climbed ladders upward and entered a small office at the top of the Wharf. The Union boss of the Wharfies made it clear IMPROBABLE would not be loaded while it was raining. "But it's not raining," I said politely.  He just smiled and said, "If my crew works in the rain, they get to go home the rest of the day with pay."  "What's that gonna cost?" I asked?  "$500 dollars'"  was his reply.

I looked out the window at IMPROBABLE's red hull swinging at eye level in the breeze. The wire lifting cables, even with the substantial fire hose protection, were not doing the glass and foam BMax eggshell bumps any good. Never liked the bumps anyway. Perhaps something good could come of this? 

Watching IMPROBABLE swinging in the fresh breeze, high above Auckland Harbor, I could see the wire lifting cables beginning to slice the BMax bumps.  I couldn't really blame the stevedore union boss for shaking me down..these LASH barges were the beginning of a future container era for Auckland, and I couldn't imagine the stevedores were very happy with that automation in their future.  In addition, I had learned just a few months earlier one of the 60 foot LASH Barges had split open it's bottom, dropping 375 tons of steel I beams into Auckland Harbor and closing the port while that mess was cleaned up.

I paid up.... the union boss made a quick radio call, and the missing stevedores magically appeared, fitted out in yellow foulies against the non-existent rain.   Simultaneously, HIKANUI lowered IMPROBABLE into the waiting maw of the LASH Barge.  Having explained my plan with the model and sketches, the stevedores knew the drill: IMPROBABLE was rested on her keel inside the LASH Barge then slowly lowered further so her port side rested on the hospital mattresses.  A timber framework was quickly built so the hull wouldn't shift.

As this was work was going on, IMPROBABLE's mast was also lowered inside the barge and secured.  It was a tight fit: squeezing a 60 foot spar inside a 60 foot barge through a 40 foot opening.

The giant, multi-ton hatches were lowered, and I bid bon voyage to my favorite boat.

IMPROBABLE was again living up to her name.

Flash ahead 3 weeks.  PHILLIPINE BEAR had arrived in Oakland, CA from Auckland, NZ. We knew what to expect. As IMPROBABLE was lowered into Oakland Harbor and the mast laid on deck, it was clear to all the BMax bumps had not survived, even with the mattress padding.

IMPROBABLE was motored to Ronnie Anderson's Yard in Sausalito to be hauled.  In less than a day, the damaged bumps were permanently  removed, and we were back to the original hull, which is what Haji has now: one of the most fun and sea kindly designs I've been privileged to sail aboard.

  • philippinebear.jpg

improbable3.jpg

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Thanks so much Skip!!  I sure hope that i can get you to Anacortes at some point...

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Here's several hundred pounds of stuff removed from Improbable...

IMG_20181102_081415276.jpg

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You couldn't pay me enough to lift the liid on the head.  Nice job making the old girl lose some weight.  

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It was splashing out interesting water while I was carrying it down the ladder...

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10 minutes ago, longy said:

What were the hydraulic hoses for?

Those in that particular pile were for the massive autopilot system my dad had put in. There were also (not pictured) two hydraulic backstay rams and a clunky pump/reservoir that was built into the front of the cockpit.  I donated those to NW Rigging.

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Sincere congratulations on your efforts to restore this vitally important and historic yacht to her original (or near original) spec.  Just delighted to see the progress.  I hope to be able to come North to see her in the New Year.  

As my late father, a prominent surgeon used to say, "If in doubt, cut it out."  

No, not really.  But the idea's right.

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On 11/2/2018 at 10:51 AM, P_Wop said:

Sincere congratulations on your efforts to restore this vitally important and historic yacht to her original (or near original) spec.  Just delighted to see the progress.  I hope to be able to come North to see her in the New Year.  

As my late father, a prominent surgeon used to say, "If in doubt, cut it out."  

No, not really.  But the idea's right.

I'm following your dad's advice pretty closely...;-)

Seriously though, almost everything I'm doing on Improbable is stuff I've thought about for 30+ years...

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A few of you might remember...about 12 years ago I got locked in an internet cafe in La Rochelle, France. I was working late, went to the bathroom...  The young cafe attendant forgot I was still there, locked up, and left.  I was there all night, but at least I had free internet so most everyone knew I was in there.  Except the next cafe attendant who got a bit of a shock to find me at work inside in the morning...

Well, this Saturday afternoon working on Improbable at Betts' Enterprises, the last employee to leave didn't notice Star (the official Improbable support car) parked under the boat.  Thinking everyone was gone, he chained the gate, and left...

Being Saturday night by the time I noticed that I was locked in, everyone was out of town.  On the plus side I could slide myself out under the fence/gate, however Star was trapped inside.  So I walked over to downtown Anacortes, where I had dinner at the Agave Taqueria.  I was going to get a cab to where I'm staying, however I posted a report to Facebook and a sailor I know from Maine who now lives in Anacortes saw the update and came to pick me up. Small world this is... Will bike to the boat tomorrow.

Hopefully Star won't be trapped inside till Monday...

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You'd make a lousy burglar. :D

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

You'd make a lousy burglar. :D

Good one...;-)

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On 11/2/2018 at 3:33 PM, Cal20sailor said:

You couldn't pay me enough to lift the liid on the head.  Nice job making the old girl lose some weight.  

That looks like a Baby Blake. Retails for about £4,000 (sic). Spares kit still available, AFAIAA. 

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1 hour ago, Presuming Ed said:

That looks like a Baby Blake. Retails for about £4,000 (sic). Spares kit still available, AFAIAA. 

No offer refused!

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I'm no ship builder, but I'm capable of complex ;) tasks like; sand, paint, carry, cart, pull, terminate, etc... I'd be happy to come up and lend a hand! Let me know when you'll be back in Washington!

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45 minutes ago, Chris_p said:

I'm no ship builder, but I'm capable of complex ;) tasks like; sand, paint, carry, cart, pull, terminate, etc... I'd be happy to come up and lend a hand! Let me know when you'll be back in Washington!

 Awesime, will do! Possibly in Dec however mid-late Jan for sure.

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Before you hop on that plane to Maine, wrap her up good against wind and rain. We get a few 40-knot blows every winter.

 

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2 minutes ago, Somebody Else said:

Before you hop on that plane to Maine, wrap her up good against wind and rain. We get a few 40-knot blows every winter.

 

Good thing the mast is out...

Hard to stop every leak, some were already there... however overall she's pretty secure.

Anyone need a Lewmar anchor windlass?  It's a 12V H2 or H3, not sure of the difference...

IMG_20181104_113150737_HDR.jpg

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Bird's nest discovered in the bow...

IMG_20181105_135839226.jpg

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Whoops, turn the pic 90deg clockwise...

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7 minutes ago, SailBlueH2O said:

 

I have Ron's book... great stuff.

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Just now, Haji said:

I have Ron's book... great stuff.

I'll be seeing him Friday night for the first time in 40 + years...I built many of his early designs 73-79 and sailed with him in Florida before "Eyghtene" and the rocket launch of his career....what a remarkable life he has lived

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3 minutes ago, SailBlueH2O said:

I'll be seeing him Friday night for the first time in 40 + years...I built many of his early designs 73-79 and sailed with him in Florida before "Eyghtene" and the rocket launch of his career....what a remarkable life he has lived

Wow, cool.  Please tell Ron hi, and that when we get sailing again would love to get him out for a ride on his old steed.

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4 hours ago, Haji said:

Bird's nest discovered in the bow...

I've seen osprey nest at mastheads.  And blackbirds hatch their babies in my boom.  But a nest in the very bow of IMPROBABLE?  That is decidedly unusual. But maybe not.  I wonder if our feathered friends used for their front door the DORADE inspired, vents with baffles in IMPROBABLE's bow that lets in air,  but not water, when sailing to weather. Did Len know? Guessing Mr. Mull would have approved of this alternate usage. (Vent visible in below photo.)

ImpROBABLE7.jpg.a4ef6c91012c14590d368b83f5e6f274.jpg

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1 hour ago, sleddog said:

I've seen osprey nest at mastheads.  And blackbirds hatch their babies in my boom.  But a nest in the very bow of IMPROBABLE?  That is decidedly unusual. But maybe not.  I wonder if our feathered friends used for their front door the DORADE inspired, vents with baffles in IMPROBABLE's bow that lets in air,  but not water, when sailing to weather. Did Len know? Guessing Mr. Mull would have approved of this alternate usage. (Vent visible in below photo.)

ImpROBABLE7.jpg.a4ef6c91012c14590d368b83f5e6f274.jpg

The bow dorade vent setup is/was very cool, however I'm opening it up on the inside and going to seal up the bow holes.  Besides, the birds that lived there (while in Birch Bay?) will probably never find the boat again...

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19 hours ago, SailBlueH2O said:

I'll be seeing him Friday night for the first time in 40 + years...I built many of his early designs 73-79 and sailed with him in Florida before "Eyghtene" and the rocket launch of his career....what a remarkable life he has lived

I am severely bumming that I will not be in-country to see him at SPYC.  Do you think OH will be over there at some point?  Anyway, have fun at the gathering.

With all of that gear and structure removed, does Improbable become less improbable, more improbable or is just a constant, I=Improbable?

I have been enjoying reading this thread on the history of Improbable and your refit project.    My father would take me to wander the docks of SPYC during the SORC season when I was very young and I saw Improbable way back then.   I am glad she is in good your good hands.   Good luck on the refit and future fun!

- Stumbling

 

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19 hours ago, SailBlueH2O said:

I'll be seeing him Friday night for the first time in 40 + years...I built many of his early designs 73-79 and sailed with him in Florida before "Eyghtene" and the rocket launch of his career....what a remarkable life he has lived

I'll be there too, St. Pete YC.

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11 minutes ago, stumblingthunder said:

I am severely bumming that I will not be in-country to see him at SPYC.  Do you think OH will be over there at some point?  Anyway, have fun at the gathering.

 

 

Yes, I was speaking with him Saturday and he is planning to be there.

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Go Improbable, Haji, knew your dad pretty well, he was a one off.  I am so happy to see the old girl getting the attention she deserves.  Will stop by Betts and have a look.

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1 hour ago, zenmasterfred said:

Go Improbable, Haji, knew your dad pretty well, he was a one off.  I am so happy to see the old girl getting the attention she deserves.  Will stop by Betts and have a look.

Please do.  I'm flying back to Maine tomorrow however feel free to check out the progress.  I'll be back in Dec to keep the momentum going.

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