DialedN_07

Keeping Boat Clean in Saltwater

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I'm bringing my new (to me) boat to the beach for the first time this weekend.  American 14.6. As far as I know it has no special treatment under the waterline. I'm not really concerned about algae and barnacles this weekend as I'm sailing it to the floating dock Saturday evening and taking it back out onto the trailer Sunday evening.

My questions are more for later this season. 

Can I leave it in the water for a couple of weeks without "damage"?

What if anything can I do to minimize growth?

When I do need to clean it, what are the best options? I don't mind swimming and scrubbing while in the water, or is it just easier to do it on the trailer?  What tools do you use? Soft bristle brush, hard bristle brush? Pot scraper (plastic), something else?

 

Thanks in advance for any and all advice. Boat has a mooring cover. And I can either store it tied to the dock, or on the trailer in the backyard of the house on the canal.

 

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Growth is exponential with temperature. I've seen 1/2"diameter barnacles in only 4 days in warm water--in Bridgeport CT in summer.
Leaving a boat in saltwater for 2 weeks in the S.E. in summer will be an unpleasant introduction to the tenacity of barnacles.

Your boat is a dinghy. I'd just pull it out of the water.

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9 minutes ago, fastyacht said:

Your boat is a dinghy. I'd just pull it out of the water.

I agree with you. I'd love to be able to figure out how to get it up and over the bulkhead without paying as much for a manual winch as I did for the boat itself.

It weighs 340lbs, but the bulkhead is 90 degrees to the water and about 2 feet higher. I can't figure out how to deadlift it up and over. And the load out pier is 2.3 miles down the intracoastal, I'm just thinking sometimes it may or may not work out to get it out of the water. I'm trying to plan for the worst case scenario.

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Put it on a dolly with 24” plastic wheels.  Roll over to the bulkhead and slide off and over.

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1 hour ago, DialedN_07 said:

I agree with you. I'd love to be able to figure out how to get it up and over the bulkhead without paying as much for a manual winch as I did for the boat itself.

It weighs 340lbs, but the bulkhead is 90 degrees to the water and about 2 feet higher. I can't figure out how to deadlift it up and over. And the load out pier is 2.3 miles down the intracoastal, I'm just thinking sometimes it may or may not work out to get it out of the water. I'm trying to plan for the worst case scenario.

If you bottom paint it, get a hard coat racing paint and do a good smooth job, make sure to put the waterline at least 2" or even more above the waterline, and buy the correct paint for your waterbody.

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Just slide it up on carpet on your floating dock

 

edit- unless there is a centerboard gasket you might tear off

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Dinghies don’t like to sit in water.

Anything from growth to staining and blisters. Not worth it to me. I’d find another way to get her out of the water.

Edit - Perhaps consider building a “slide ramp” out of carpeted 2x4s or PVC. You’ll need to find something to float off the end (someone with better math skills will correct me but I believe you’d need about 5-6 cu ft of volume to float 340 lbs) unless it’s shallow enough to set on the bottom.

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9 hours ago, DialedN_07 said:

I'm bringing my new (to me) boat to the beach for the first time this weekend.  American 14.6. As far as I know it has no special treatment under the waterline. I'm not really concerned about algae and barnacles this weekend as I'm sailing it to the floating dock Saturday evening and taking it back out onto the trailer Sunday evening.

My questions are more for later this season. 

Can I leave it in the water for a couple of weeks without "damage"?

What if anything can I do to minimize growth?

When I do need to clean it, what are the best options? I don't mind swimming and scrubbing while in the water, or is it just easier to do it on the trailer?  What tools do you use? Soft bristle brush, hard bristle brush? Pot scraper (plastic), something else?

 

Thanks in advance for any and all advice. Boat has a mooring cover. And I can either store it tied to the dock, or on the trailer in the backyard of the house on the canal.

 

 

It's difficult to clean the bottom of the boat on the trailer. For that matter, it's difficult to clean growth off the bottom under any conditions.

Two choices- don't leave the boat in the water for more than an overnight (even then it will pick up some soft growth which might need scraping/pressure washing). On the trailer is nice secure storage, I'm guessing this will not be with the mast up.

The other choice is to paint the bottom with an anti-fouling paint. These are expensive and toxic, fortunately you're only dealing with a small amount. In Wilmington they probably have pint cans of it in the hardware stores..... they do around here, seasonally. Not a wide choice of colors, but there is some choice. I would not be picky about a hard racing finish but that will make the boat nicer to sail. Soft paint (ablative) is very effective and less expensive, but it has a rough surface that causes drag.

Tools: any cheap-ass brush. I use 3" chip brushes. Rubber gloves and a throwaway shirt. Masking tape. Got a laser level? Excellent way to mark the waterline. Paint to an inch or two above the boat's floating waterline, then vigorously wax above the antifouling (car wax is fine)

Then, another option.......

8 hours ago, sailhmb said:

Put it on a dolly with 24” plastic wheels.  Roll over to the bulkhead and slide off and over.

Getting it back up is the hard part! It is possible to build a rack...... similar to trailer bunks, with roller etc, on the bulkhead. Couple hundred more bucks, no screwing around with anti-fouling, and you can leave the mast up. Nice way to go if you can pull together the resources and permission to put it there (some neighborhoods have restrictions on this kind of thing). A floating dock is even better.

FB- Doug

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We do have a floating dock, but there is a ramp going down to it.  I have slid my tandem kayak on it before and it fit (at an angle) but that was only 65 lbs soaking wet.

I have thought of building a PVC ramp that would attach to the bulkhead and float on the water end. This could work with a winch attached to the corner of the house to pull it up.

I wont keep it in the water for more than 24 hours.  And between now and next time I'll come up with a better solution.

If I can float it or pull onto floating dock I'll leave mast up with mooring cover on.  If I pull onto dry land mast will go down and it will be stored under the house (house is on stilts)

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Congratulations on your new boat! Have fun.

Sand is also a big enemy in a beach environment.

There's a recent discussion here about wax and sealers. Scroll down a bit and you'll see it. As with everything, there's no clear best choice on the topic but nonetheless some good recommendations.

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This is not my house, but a good example of what I'm dealing with.  This is pretty much high tide.

Our floating dock is similar to the one on the right, but we don't have the large pylons on either side, its attached at the point closest to the house instead, leaving more room.

Any thoughts of getting it into the grass from the bulkhead?

SmartSelect_20180608-114827_Gallery.jpg

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This picture looks like it'd be shallow enough to setup a slide ramp into the grass. Heck, I'd consider leaving the mast up sitting on bunks.

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16 minutes ago, OutofOffice said:

This picture looks like it'd be shallow enough to setup a slide ramp into the grass. Heck, I'd consider leaving the mast up sitting on bunks.

The canal is not deep.  It however, does go at a 45% angle down right at the grass.  I have a better picture somewhere of the old concrete bulkheads that slope down before the 90% were installed.

SmartSelect_20180608-123011_Gallery.jpg

SmartSelect_20180608-123042_Gallery.jpg

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10 minutes ago, DialedN_07 said:

The canal is not deep.  It however, does go at a 45% angle down right at the grass.  I have a better picture somewhere of the old concrete bulkheads that slope down before the 90% were installed.

SmartSelect_20180608-123011_Gallery.jpg

SmartSelect_20180608-123042_Gallery.jpg

with these photos. More than before I think a slide ramp will work. you won't need floats on the end or anything, it'll rest on the concrete slope. As long as its anchored well on shore, it should work wonderfully. get a cheap come-a-long if you need some muscle to get it up the ramp.

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29 minutes ago, DialedN_07 said:

The canal is not deep.  It however, does go at a 45% angle down right at the grass.  I have a better picture somewhere of the old concrete bulkheads that slope down before the 90% were installed.

SmartSelect_20180608-123011_Gallery.jpg

SmartSelect_20180608-123042_Gallery.jpg

There must be a cat or a squirrel on the other side....... something sure is fascinating to the dogs!

A floating dock is the best answer but those are expensive. A pair of big PVC pipes.... or even four slightly skinner ones secured with a slight "v"...... angled up to the edge of the bulkhead, would do the trick. A trailer winch isn't that expensive but OofO's idea with a cheap come-along would work too.

To be a sailor means to be resourceful and practical about how to get stuff done!

FB- Doug

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I'll research building regulations this weekend regarding permanently (or temporarily) affixing anything to the bulkhead other than a dock.  There must be some regulation concerning that.

My other question would be, do the PVC's just lay down into the canal, or do they need to be fixed to a point within the water.  I certainly don't want to dredge out at the bottom of the concrete slope, and seriously doubt I should anchor bolt anything to the conrete itself.  

I don't see any scenario where the angle of approach to the bulkhead is less than 40-45%.  as it pertains to a come along or a winch, that's a tough road to haul, pulling something more or less with horizontal force, but sliding it up a 45% angle.  I'd have to mount the winch right at the bulkhead and 5 or more feet off the ground to actually pull "up".

Anyway, I'm chasing my tail again. Next decision will come after I put eyes on it this weekend.

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16 minutes ago, DialedN_07 said:

I'll research building regulations this weekend regarding permanently (or temporarily) affixing anything to the bulkhead other than a dock.  There must be some regulation concerning that.

I have to assume they will not be happy drilling into that bulkhead. I was thinking more about ground anchors. As far as in the water, you’d have to make a base to space the PVC on the water side anyways, just make it flat. As far as the winch/come along. I thought I read you were willing to winch from the house stilts. That would give you a better angle.

I wonder how difficult it would be to drag over a few rollers attached to the side of your floating dock. Less height difference and cleaner looking. Added benefit of its your dock vs their bulkhead and a constant distance from the water. Heck you might even be able to create a block and tackle setup to give you some mechanical advantage. I’d want a set of bunks for it to rest on, but it’s an idea.

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