Mid

Todays Useless Fact

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A Petabyte

a unit of information equal to one thousand million million (1015) or, strictly, 250 bytes.

To store a single PB would take over 745 million floppy disks or 1.5 million CD-ROM discs, clearly not an efficient way to collect a petabyte of information, but it's fun to think about!

info courtesy of google .

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So the disk structure would be called a "Peta-File"?  :D

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1 hour ago, Gissie said:

Only kids would understand that. 

Once you explain to them what a floppy disc is. 

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I think more shocking is that you are unaware of metric / SI prefixes.  

Here are some examples (pardon the poor formatting)

Prefix    Symbol    Multiplier    Exponential
yotta    Y    1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000    1024
zetta    Z    1,000,000,000,000,000,000,000    1021
exa    E    1,000,000,000,000,000,000    1018
peta    P    1,000,000,000,000,000    1015
tera    T    1,000,000,000,000    1012
giga    G    1,000,000,000    109
mega    M    1,000,000    106
kilo    k    1,000    103
hecto    h    100    102
deca    da    10    101
1    100
deci    d    0.1    10¯1
centi    c    0.01    10¯2
milli    m    0.001    10¯3
micro    µ    0.000001    10¯6
nano    n    0.000000001    10¯9
pico    p    0.000000000001    10¯12
femto    f    0.000000000000001    10¯15
atto    a    0.000000000000000001    10¯18
zepto    z    0.000000000000000000001    10¯21
yocto    y    0.000000000000000000000001    10¯24

 

 

So a Yottabyte (Yb) is 1,000,000,000  Petabytes (Pb).  

So?

 

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12 minutes ago, bugger said:

So?

apparently you missed the thread title :P

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1 hour ago, Mid said:

apparently you missed the thread title :P

You're right.  I was a bit snippy.  Sorry.  Bad day at work. 

Metric prefixes are INCREDIBLY powerful for making ballpark estimates.  Try estimating the number of atoms in the known universe to within 3 orders of magnitude:

20 Giga stars per galaxy x 20 Giga galaxies x 10^57 atoms/star (ok, I googled that but could have worked it out soon enough) = 4x10^76 atoms. 

For reference, a google is 10^100

A googleplex is 10^google

That's a lot of anything.  

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Perhaps, but Femto, Atto, Zepto and Yotto just happen to be the new Marx Brothers.

Femto is a cross dresser.

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27 minutes ago, bugger said:

You're right.  I was a bit snippy.  Sorry.  Bad day at work. 

Metric prefixes are INCREDIBLY powerful for making ballpark estimates.  Try estimating the number of atoms in the known universe to within 3 orders of magnitude:

20 Giga stars per galaxy x 20 Giga galaxies x 10^57 atoms/star (ok, I googled that but could have worked it out soon enough) = 4x10^76 atoms. 

For reference, a google is 10^100

A googleplex is 10^google

That's a lot of anything.  

isn't it googol?

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Just now, chester said:

isn't it googol?

Yes.  I stand corrected.   

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After gigabytes I was content with "Many"

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1 hour ago, bugger said:

Yes.  I stand corrected.   

You might want to sit down for this.

I don't know if it's a turning point for humanity, but some of the fundamental units of the SI system are going to be redefined.

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Don't fret - they do that periodically. It's always been pretty academic stuff that has no effect on the everyday world.

IIRC they once changed the definition of the meter from marks on a platinum bar to a certain number of angstroms.

All the old tape measures still worked.

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4 hours ago, bugger said:

So a Yottabyte (Yb) is 1,000,000,000  Petabytes (Pb).  

So?

Doesn't it go beyond yocto?

Yabbabyte, Dabbabyte, Doobabyte.

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Bytes suck.

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53 minutes ago, bplipschitz said:

You might want to sit down for this.

I don't know if it's a turning point for humanity, but some of the fundamental units of the SI system are going to be redefined.

It would be nice if they made the Celsius scale twice as large (water freeze at 0, water boil at 200).

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There's a new computer that was just announced that does 200 petaflops. To put that in perspective:

At 200 petaflops – If everyone on Earth did 1 calculation/second, would take 1 year to do what Summit does in 1 second.

At 3 exaops of AI – If everyone on Earth did 1 calculation/second, would take 15 years to do what Summit can do in 1 second.

The computers have won. We're totally not ready to deal with AI of that kind of power. I hope there's safeguards against it becoming self aware.

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11 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

There's a new computer that was just announced that does 200 petaflops. To put that in perspective:

At 200 petaflops – If everyone on Earth did 1 calculation/second, would take 1 year to do what Summit does in 1 second.

At 3 exaops of AI – If everyone on Earth did 1 calculation/second, would take 15 years to do what Summit can do in 1 second.

The computers have won. We're totally not ready to deal with AI of that kind of power. I hope there's safeguards against it becoming self aware.

You just made me feel REALLY old.

When I worked for IBM we spoke about KIPS (thousands of instructions per second) and it was a major milestone when it went to MIPS (millions).

PETA makes it 4 orders of magnitude in 40 years.

Can we talk about punch cards and paper tape for a while?

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1 minute ago, SloopJonB said:

You just made me feel REALLY old.

When I worked for IBM we spoke about KIPS (thousands of instructions per second) and it was a major milestone when it went to MIPS (millions).

PETA makes it 4 orders of magnitude in 40 years.

Can we talk about punch cards and paper tape for a while?

When I started my 1st job out of college, I opened one of my desk drawers and there were these off--white rectangular paper cards in there. I asked my manager what they were for. He said, "Oh, you can throw those out. We just switched to dummy terminals to send programs to the AS400s."

I had no idea what he was blabbering about.

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17 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

You just made me feel REALLY old.

When I worked for IBM we spoke about KIPS (thousands of instructions per second) and it was a major milestone when it went to MIPS (millions).

PETA makes it 4 orders of magnitude in 40 years.

Can we talk about punch cards and paper tape for a while?

Sorry, Sloop, but I gotta check your math (I'm an engineer - can't help it).  

An order of magnitude is a power of 10.  

To go from Mega (10^6) to Peta (10^15) is NINE orders of magnitude in 40 years, or about a factor of 10 (order of magnitude) every 4-ish years.  Yikes. 

I started first year engineering school writing FORTRAN code on punch cards.  It was hellish.  

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You're right - good thing I haven't worked for a decade. :D

It's all just "many" or "really big" to me now.

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49 minutes ago, bugger said:

Sorry, Sloop, but I gotta check your math (I'm an engineer - can't help it).  

An order of magnitude is a power of 10.  

To go from Mega (10^6) to Peta (10^15) is NINE orders of magnitude in 40 years, or about a factor of 10 (order of magnitude) every 4-ish years.  Yikes. 

I started first year engineering school writing FORTRAN code on punch cards.  It was hellish.  

Especially when you tripped and your program went *everywhere*.

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16 hours ago, austin1972 said:

When I started my 1st job out of college, I opened one of my desk drawers and there were these off--white rectangular paper cards in there. I asked my manager what they were for. He said, "Oh, you can throw those out. We just switched to dummy terminals to send programs to the AS400s."

I had no idea what he was blabbering about.

You'd better mind your manners young man. Somebody might hit you with their cane

-DSK

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8 hours ago, Lying Malarky said:

Can someone translate it into imperial to help our American  friends?

million

trllion

brazillion.

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On 6/8/2018 at 2:04 AM, Shootist Jeff said:

So the disk structure would be called a "Peta-File"?  :D

 

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17 hours ago, austin1972 said:

When I started my 1st job out of college, I opened one of my desk drawers and there were these off--white rectangular paper cards in there. I asked my manager what they were for. He said, "Oh, you can throw those out. We just switched to dummy terminals to send programs to the AS400s."

I had no idea what he was blabbering about.

I picked up a Lily Tomlin album, featuring Ernestine the telephone company operator.  She ends the set by describing how to fuck over the phone company.  Take the punch card and soak it for 5 minutes in tepid water with a tablespoon of Snowy Bleach, then iron it to dry.  It shrinks it just enough that the holes are too small to read

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1 hour ago, Fat Point Jack said:

I picked up a Lily Tomlin album, featuring Ernestine the telephone company operator.  She ends the set by describing how to fuck over the phone company.  Take the punch card and soak it for 5 minutes in tepid water with a tablespoon of Snowy Bleach, then iron it to dry.  It shrinks it just enough that the holes are too small to read

Ha! I guess just before I got there, a good prank was to re-order one card in the set. The program would then abend and the programmer would have to figure out why.

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The second half of my enlistment was aboard a Navy destroyer where I cared for the missile fire control radar (Tartar Missile System). This required knowledge of and frequent visit to the bowels of the ship where the fire control computer lived. It was a pair of Univac MK 152 computers which was the military version of the Univac 1219 used commercially. It had a storage capacity of 64K. Yes..........64K.....and we hit everything we shot at.  Anyway, the fire control program was loaded on a large punch tape. The techs would mount it on a reader with a spool like a movie film and hit the feed/load button and it would race through the reader piling up on the deck below. Then when it was up and running, they had to put it on a winder and reel it back up for the next use. I have no idea what they did if it was damaged or became worn out. I was a radar geek.............

http://www.newbegin.com/html/misc__item_detail_44.html

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On 6/8/2018 at 10:02 PM, chester said:

:D

:D :D :D

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52 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

Ha! I guess just before I got there, a good prank was to re-order one card in the set. The program would then abend and the programmer would have to figure out why.

Abend - there's a word I haven't heard in a long, long time.

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20 hours ago, bugger said:

FORTRAN

someone is as old as me ....................................

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I missed the punch card era, but cobbled a lot of code together in "card languages" and migrated more than one data centre using 1600BPI (that's bits per inch) tape reels.  "Never underestimate the bandwidth of a station wagon full of tapes hurtling down the highway. "

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20 hours ago, bugger said:

I started first year engineering school writing FORTRAN code on punch cards.  It was hellish.  

So did I.  And I used a slide rule as a freshman, too.

It wasn't until my sophomore year that "cheap" calculators like the TI SR-50 and Kingspoint SC-40 came out.

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Tonight’s useless fact:

 

if if you had everybody hold hands in a line along the Equator, most of them would drown!

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I with Sloops that after a certain point, "Its a lot" and "many" suffice for a description of the quantity.

Not an engineer or computer programer, and there's a reason for that.  I dropped my Cobol programming elective class as a freshman in the first week.  And then later changed my major from Engineering to "pre-med" by the end of the first semester.  Math was definitely not my strongest subject.  Which was weird, because I excelled at Physics and Chemistry.  But I digress....

I recall my very first computer was an apple with 64K memory and the big floppy drives to run games.  I was somewhat surprised when I got out to the fleet flying fighters and the "brains" of the most advanced jet on the planet at the time (mid 90s) was slower than an x286.  But at the time, the processing power was enormous compared to other jets.  

And we still had to do all our mission planning and flight planning calculations on an E-6B whizz wheel.  Ugh, I hated that thing!  

e6b.jpg

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1 hour ago, Shootist Jeff said:

And we still had to do all our mission planning and flight planning calculations on an E-6B whizz wheel.  Ugh, I hated that thing!  

e6b.jpg

A few years back I was having a real shitty work day so I decided to play hooky and went on a $100 Cheeseburger run.  While I was eating, getting grease, mustard and ketchup on my brand new sectional and figuring out my return route, there was what appeared to be student and his instructor sitting at the next table..  The student was going on about his new fangled hand held GPS and how great it was... He had the whole flight in there along with all the E-6B computations... blah blah blah blah..

After a few minutes the instructor asked to take look at it, turned it over, took the batteries out, handed it back to the student, and then said, okay, now how are we going to get home?  Doe in the headlights doesn't even begin to describe it...   I was going to offer to help the guy, but the instructor gave me that... uh uh look!

I degrees, today, Foreflight, WxBrieff, and mardid of other online planning resources, along with my $1000 (10 years ago) new fangled hand held GPS or my go-to's now a days...  But, I still do play with whizwheel and charts on the dinning room table from time to time and use some of the on-line quizzes... you never know!!!!  Even had the kid playing with it the last time...  the questions he asked helped me understand how & why he is getting honors science and math...   

 

 

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My senior Advanced Programming class final project was writing a compiler for a PDP-8. Nothing like machine language programming to make your head explode.  

First major center I worked in had a 3,000 sq foot room filled with Univac stuff. Booting up involved getting the tape, card deck and 9 platter disk set out of the safe (classified program), loading the tape, card deck and disk set and then toggling in the boot strap instructions one step at a time. If you got it right, he tape reader cane to life, then the card reader and finally the disk drive. About 30 minutes and a mug of coffee to start the day. Losing power during a run would cause loss of 3-4 hours of processing. 

My iPhone 8 has more power than that entire center  

 

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We had a 360/40, a 360/50 and a 360/67 and your phone would crush them all.

Less than 2 megabytes of storage in total. :D

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3 hours ago, Mid said:

someone is as old as me ....................................

Or is a physicist ...

All over the world, even today, there are physicists still setting up experiments and coding in Fortran. It's like some weird time loop, but the reality of physicists is that they tend to see their lab computers as any other utensil, if it isn't broken, why fix it? They can pick up thirty year old Fortran code, change it a bit and have something running in a day and a half.

I've seen Tera Electron Volt level collider beam lines, worth hundreds of millions in installed costs, connected to 286 computers that boot off of 20 MB hard drives, running Fortran code. And that might produce spectral data used right alongside output from a government supercomputer.

If it's not broke, don't fix it.

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58 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

We had a 360/40, a 360/50 and a 360/67 and your phone would crush them all.

Less than 2 megabytes of storage in total. :D

Yeah, but that core memory would survive anything up to and including an EMP pulse.

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It didn't survive a can of Coke being left on the vent grating on top which later spilled into the core.

We had several pissed off techs who had to clean it up..

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1 minute ago, SloopJonB said:

It didn't survive a can of Coke being left on the vent grating on top which later spilled into the core.

We had several pissed off techs who had to clean it up..

Stupid is nature's fifth fundamental force and nothing can resist it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fifth_force

Though I've made many, many mistakes, the one thing I've done right on every instrument I've designed is to put all the vents on the sides of the box.

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Australia has it's own mathematical language.

There are 1,000 Fuckin' Heaps to a Shitload; 10,000 Shitloads to a Fuckin' Huge Shitload, and so on.

In the opposite direction, a Poofteenth is 1/100th of a Bee's Dick, 1/10th of a Cunthair.

And distances are measured in beer cans. "Oooh that's about a six-can drive from here."

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2 hours ago, Happy said:

Australia has it's own mathematical language.

There are 1,000 Fuckin' Heaps to a Shitload; 10,000 Shitloads to a Fuckin' Huge Shitload, and so on.

In the opposite direction, a Poofteenth is 1/100th of a Bee's Dick, 1/10th of a Cunthair.

And distances are measured in beer cans. "Oooh that's about a six-can drive from here."

A 2 slab drive is a really long trip

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On 6/8/2018 at 1:04 PM, Shootist Jeff said:

So the disk structure would be called a "Peta-File"?  :D

 

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snap

On 6/9/2018 at 10:37 PM, silent bob said:

 

 

5 hours ago, Derek Grebe said:

 

 

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On 6/10/2018 at 6:05 PM, Happy said:

Australia has it's own mathematical language.

There are 1,000 Fuckin' Heaps to a Shitload; 10,000 Shitloads to a Fuckin' Huge Shitload, and so on.

In the opposite direction, a Poofteenth is 1/100th of a Bee's Dick, 1/10th of a Cunthair.

And distances are measured in beer cans. "Oooh that's about a six-can drive from here."

Anything less than a 2 can drive becomes a 6 can walk.....

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On 6/10/2018 at 11:44 AM, Rushman said:

A 2 slab drive is a really long trip

Roughly the distance between sheep stations.

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On 6/9/2018 at 10:48 AM, Shootist Jeff said:

I with Sloops that after a certain point, "Its a lot" and "many" suffice for a description of the quantity.

Not an engineer or computer programer, and there's a reason for that.  I dropped my Cobol programming elective class as a freshman in the first week.  And then later changed my major from Engineering to "pre-med" by the end of the first semester.  Math was definitely not my strongest subject.  Which was weird, because I excelled at Physics and Chemistry.  But I digress....

I recall my very first computer was an apple with 64K memory and the big floppy drives to run games.  I was somewhat surprised when I got out to the fleet flying fighters and the "brains" of the most advanced jet on the planet at the time (mid 90s) was slower than an x286.  But at the time, the processing power was enormous compared to other jets.  

And we still had to do all our mission planning and flight planning calculations on an E-6B whizz wheel.  Ugh, I hated that thing!  

e6b.jpg

I have one of those in my desk drawer.  Not that I know how to use it, but it keeps my slide rules company.

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On 6/9/2018 at 1:52 PM, mikewof said:

Or is a physicist ...

All over the world, even today, there are physicists still setting up experiments and coding in Fortran. It's like some weird time loop, but the reality of physicists is that they tend to see their lab computers as any other utensil, if it isn't broken, why fix it? They can pick up thirty year old Fortran code, change it a bit and have something running in a day and a half.

I've seen Tera Electron Volt level collider beam lines, worth hundreds of millions in installed costs, connected to 286 computers that boot off of 20 MB hard drives, running Fortran code. And that might produce spectral data used right alongside output from a government supercomputer.

If it's not broke, don't fix it.

. . .and plenty of those old programs have been rewritten in other languages (typically for faster execution), but you still have to enter data like it's FORTRAN, on lines that are considered "cards".  Your input becomes a "deck."  Radio aerial modelling comes to mind. . .

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On 6/8/2018 at 3:01 PM, SloopJonB said:

You just made me feel REALLY old.

When I worked for IBM we spoke about KIPS (thousands of instructions per second) and it was a major milestone when it went to MIPS (millions).

PETA makes it 4 orders of magnitude in 40 years.

Can we talk about punch cards and paper tape for a while?

MIPS?   Going back to about '88 or so, I wrote some code that extracted a particular job's "MIPS Cost" from the S/370 JES logs for billing purposes - we thought we were doing some high-powered stuff back then. 

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1 minute ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

MIPS?   Going back to about '88 or so, I wrote some code that extracted a particular job's "MIPS Cost" from the S/370 JES logs for billing purposes - we thought we were doing some high-powered stuff back then. 

You were.

The IBM compute center I worked at was on the ground floor of an office building and we used to have spectators at the windows at night to watch the flashing lights on the main console. Large scale mainframe operations were total Buck Rogers stuff in those days.

How many people here even know what S/370 JES even means? :D

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1 hour ago, bplipschitz said:

. . .and plenty of those old programs have been rewritten in other languages (typically for faster execution), but you still have to enter data like it's FORTRAN, on lines that are considered "cards".  Your input becomes a "deck."  Radio aerial modelling comes to mind. . .

Actually, Fortran is faster than most languages - the compiler has to make fewer assumptions so it is able to write faster code.

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PL1

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8 hours ago, slap said:

Actually, Fortran is faster than most languages - the compiler has to make fewer assumptions so it is able to write faster code.

Are modern FORTRAN compilers still column-sensitive?

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On 6/8/2018 at 2:47 PM, austin1972 said:

There's a new computer that was just announced that does 200 petaflops. To put that in perspective:

At 200 petaflops – If everyone on Earth did 1 calculation/second, would take 1 year to do what Summit does in 1 second.

At 3 exaops of AI – If everyone on Earth did 1 calculation/second, would take 15 years to do what Summit can do in 1 second.

The computers have won. We're totally not ready to deal with AI of that kind of power. I hope there's safeguards against it becoming self aware.

I will be impressed when they can make a version of Windows that is bloated and works flawlessly.  Until then, I just don't give a flop.

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8 hours ago, slap said:

Actually, Fortran is faster than most languages - the compiler has to make fewer assumptions so it is able to write faster code.

 

Back in the 80s I was a coder for DEC (Digital Equipment Corp).

VAX/VMS had all its languages compile to a common machine language which was then linked to create the executable image.

The FORTRAN dudes had been saying that tripe above for years.

 

The pinko/commie language guys were now bragging about C.

Had enough.

 

So I wrote the same subroutine in COBOL, FORTRAN, C, PASCAL and MACRO.

Wrote a program to display a timing from the executor clock buffer, run the subroutine and return to display the time again.

They all ran the same.

If the compiler guys know what they are doing, there is no difference.

 

Also remember seeing a price list for memory of the mid 60s.

Back then it was hand wound and not some piece of sand.

4K was like $65,000.

Back then, that would buy you a 10 new cars.

 

Final memory that shows how far we have come (and how fucking old I am..)

I remember the most compute intensive routine of any of our customers in late 70s.

Took 10 days of constant processing time on a 36 bit decsystem 10 to output the results.

The application?   Routine to compile the sounds for the kid's Speak And Spell toy.

Voice creation was just staring and it took a lot to boil down Meow, Woof, and Moooooo to fit on a memory chip..     ;<)

 

 

 

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On 6/10/2018 at 1:05 AM, Happy said:

Australia has it's own mathematical language.

There are 1,000 Fuckin' Heaps to a Shitload; 10,000 Shitloads to a Fuckin' Huge Shitload, and so on.

In the opposite direction, a Poofteenth is 1/100th of a Bee's Dick, 1/10th of a Cunthair.

And distances are measured in beer cans. "Oooh that's about a six-can drive from here."

Unless it's Fosters, then you'll die several obscure ailments before you get there.

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23 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

How many people here even know what S/370 JES even means? :D

I know what JCL is!

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17 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

I know what JCL is!

GTFO - Really?   You've done some mainframe programming/ops stuff?  Seems like there's a bunch of us who used to do dino coding. 

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12 minutes ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

GTFO - Really?   You've done some mainframe programming/ops stuff?  Seems like there's a bunch of us who used to do dino coding. 

Oh yeah, and going though hex dumps to the point of having black fingers. Programming. I liked it.

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9 minutes ago, austin1972 said:

Oh yeah, and going though hex dumps to the point of having black fingers. Programming. I liked it.

What's a S0C4?   (to keep your foot warm)   What's a S0C7?  (to keep your foot and two toes warm)..... 

Arghg - I thought I'd forgotten all that stuff. 

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2 minutes ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

What's a S0C4?   (to keep your foot warm)   What's a S0C7?  (to keep your foot and two toes warm)..... 

Arghg - I thought I'd forgotten all that stuff. 

Fuck, I forgot about sorts. Wayback machine right there.

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Now the memories are turning bad.

I fucking hated programming, JCL, all that shit. It was like playing Sudoku all day.

Machine ops and management were my thing.

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I went to a small school -- we didn't have a mainframe.  Our "computer lab" consisted of Apple II computers, whereas the physics lab had an Apple II+ with (gasp) 128k of RAM.  CS students were tasked with writing an algorithm to figure PI to something like 30(?) places.  Tied up ever Apple in the lab, and they all ground to a halt.  Then the prof told them about the weird, old-looking  little terminal in the corner might actually help them.  It was hooked up the mainframe (I think an S/360) at the local state school.

Completed their computations, and quite quickly.  Good lesson to learn: use the right tool, even if it looks ancient.

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On 6/12/2018 at 1:24 AM, SloopJonB said:

How many people here even know what S/370 JES even means? :D

anyone who knows how to use google 1174178107_oldfaranginpattaya.gif.ba8d461563da09a95d892f3685695546.gif

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I no a man withe wooden legge naimed Smithe.                                   :)

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AAyxND2.jpg.eb455f2c87d677184f3c24abbcb7f16a.jpg

It would take you nine years to try every product

Remaining at the very top of the soft drinks leaderboard for over 120 years, the Coca-Cola Company now sells 1.9 billion servings of its 400+ brands every day. In fact, Coke makes so many products, if you tried one product from its portfolio every day, it would take you nine years to try them all.

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3 hours ago, Snaggletooth said:

I no a man withe wooden legge naimed Smithe.                                   :)

What is the name of his other leg?

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I don't know about all that...but I do know that when experiencing Shebytes it's not very good on the download...

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On 6/12/2018 at 7:50 AM, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

GTFO - Really?   You've done some mainframe programming/ops stuff?  Seems like there's a bunch of us who used to do dino coding. 

I'm only an ex-/400 guy.  RPG and CL with some COBOL if the group was in a panic.  But, does it count for anything if I just laid my hands on an HP-41 clone?  (side note, the DM41 is pretty damn good and programming skills that have been dormant since the early '90s come back in no time!)

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Never did much programming but used to replace heads on the CDC washing machine drives. 

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On 6/13/2018 at 7:10 AM, Point Break said:
On 6/13/2018 at 3:45 AM, Snaggletooth said:

I no a man withe wooden legge naimed Smithe.                                   :)

What is the name of his other leg?

 

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5 hours ago, Gissie said:

Never did much programming but used to replace heads on the CDC washing machine drives. 

I only stayed at a Holiday Inn Express.

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zip-jean-ykk.jpg.e1071b5742c4c9746f709fd90fe3924d.jpg

The YKK on your zipper stands for Yoshida Kogyo Kabushikigaisha.

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26 minutes ago, Mid said:

 

The YKK on your zipper stands for Yoshida Kogyo Kabushikigaisha.

I actually knew that.....I have no idea why........except I never could have spelled it...or pronounced it....come to think of it I guess I really didn’t know that much about it after all.

Never mind.....carry on.

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1 hour ago, Mid said:

zip-jean-ykk.jpg.e1071b5742c4c9746f709fd90fe3924d.jpg

The YKK on your zipper stands for Yoshida Kogyo Kabushikigaisha.

Maybe so but it was invented in Canada.

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8 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Maybe so but it was invented in Canada.

That figures. "Yoshida Kogyo Kabushikigaisha" is the Japanese translation of "Robertson". 

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21 minutes ago, IStream said:

That figures. "Yoshida Kogyo Kabushikigaisha" is the Japanese translation of "Robertson". 

:lol:

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I have a useless fact ...

About one out of every twelve men prefer to wear women's undergarments over men's. So if you have 100,000 Dallas Cowboys fans in Arlington, say, 60% are males older than 18. And if you separate out the female underwear wearers, that would be about 5,000 of them, enough to fill a fleet of 500 Greyhound passenger buses ... 500 buses filled with men who prefer the silky soft comfort of a well-made set of ladies' undercrackers.

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12 minutes ago, mikewof said:

About one out of every twelve men prefer to wear women's undergarments over men's. So if you have 100,000 Dallas Cowboys fans in Arlington, say, 60% are males older than 18. And if you separate out the female underwear wearers, that would be about 5,000 of them, enough to fill a fleet of 500 Greyhound passenger buses ... 500 buses filled with men who prefer the silky soft comfort of a well-made set of ladies' undercrackers.

So, whearre do you anthe guyes go in thoise bussis?                  :)

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Here's another ... the nitrogen pressure system in a can of pressurized cheese contains trace quantities of an industrial gas which has been shown to cause severe amnesia in dogs.

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2 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

So, whearre do you anthe guyes go in thoise bussis?                  :)

As long as you're okay with going to the sports bar again for hot wings and beer, we'll just go there.

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