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sjacobso76

Worth repairing C-lark 14?

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So, two years ago I bought a C-lark 14 off a guy I know that was getting a bigger boat and his wife was making him sell off his other boat.  I've had it out four times total for short sailing adventures on local lakes/reservoirs.  

Last year we sunk the darn thing after tipping it over and losing one of the friction-fit inspection hatches.  Didn't lose it entirely; a happenstance kayaker held the bow line after it got about three feet under until a powerboat got out to us and tied off.  They pulled it and got it to beach on it's side, after which I got the sails down and the centerboard out so we could roll it onto its bottom and winch it out of the reservoir.

Some minor separation on the deck seemed to be the main result, though I'm not sure even that wasn't already there before the incident.

After seeing this damage, we decided to do some work on the boat to get it back to more like-new condition.  We decided to start on the bottom and with some help flipped the boat over and put it on sawhorses in the shop.  We started the process of sanding, and discovered a couple of soft spots in the bottom of the hull.  Figured I'd better open these up and do some glass-work while we have the boat upside-down.  So, we cut out the damaged glass and start sanding out the paint/gelcoat and feathering out the glass to add a repair.  As I get a bit of a view into the inside of the boat I see this:20180616_142448.thumb.jpg.2b89a504d5b0949a7587030d949d51c7.jpg

After scratching my head for a bit as to whether this should look like this, I start pressing down on the hull and can tell that what I assume to be a rib is broken along a few feet of its length.

I can't imagine this is a good thing, and I imagine I have to pretty much cut open the whole bottom of the boat to repair it.  I feel that I can probably make this happen with the help of a forum such as this, but I'm trying to decide if it's worth the effort, or if it's time to scrap the hull and find a different boat.  I'm rather surprised at just how thin the glass is on the bottom of this boat (must just be a layer or two), but this is my first boat work, so maybe that's normal?

If this was your boat, how would you proceed, or would you?  I'm willing to put some hours into the boat, but I also don't want to spend hundreds of dollars on a boat I bought for a few hundred dollars and end up with a boat worth a few hundred dollars.  That said, I enjoy sailing it, and the sails are in pretty good condition, so once I get the hull repaired I'll at least have something decent.

Thanks for advice.  I'm willing to spend some time learning on this boat; my plan is to own older boats for the rest of my life, so more time working on them never hurts.

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If you like the boat fix it, if it's just a boat scrap it. Lot's of cheap small boats out there, but most are pretty torn up.

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If you plan to own older boats for the rest of your life, repairing your C-Lark is a great way to hone your GRP skills. C-Larks are fun. I have one. Get in there and fix yours, and don’t worry about getting your money back.  Boats are not investments. One day you’ll buy a boat for $30,000, put another $30,000 into it, and end up with a $35,000 boat. What you’ll learn about GRP repair on your C-Lark will stay with you for every boat you ever work on, and it will be a relatively inexpensive lesson. 

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Yeah, I wasn't actually worried about the investment as much as just spending too much time and money on something that may not be worth it.  And I feel that at this point the only other option to fixing it right is to either fix it wrong, or to scrap the boat, both of which are not particularly palatable to me.

So now I'm hoping for some direction if I can proceed.  Is the next step to cut open a large slit in the bottom of the hull to expose the whole rib?  Should I try to go at it from the topside (I don't think that's very do-able)?  I'm also trying to picture how one repairs such a reinforcement from the underside...

I imagine another option is to glass over the current holes, and then perhaps add a layer or two of glass to the whole bottom to add strength and rigidity.  

Any direction is greatly appreciated.

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