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A couple of weeks ago the cover on a spinnaker halyard parted where it was held inside the clutch. I stitched a cover on at that point but then yesterday the cover and the core on the main halyard parted at a turning block. Neither event occurred in very strong winds

Time for new halyards I guess.

My feeling is that I want very low or no stretch spinnaker halyards (code 0 on a furler which needs to remain tight to operate properly) but could tolerate some stretch on the main and jib halyards.

What are the latest recommendations anybody might have in product? 33’ 10,000 pound RC. If you have put new halyards on your boat recently please let me know what you decided upon and why. I’m not certain but I think there is a huge cost difference between some of the possibilities.

This is also posted over in gear anarchy

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I've replaced a main and genoa halyard with the Yale crystaline and really like it.  No stretch, it splices very well, I have not noticed any slippage in clutches, and the cover so far has been durable with a descent hand.

The price I have found is very economical relative to the other "high tech" lines.

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I would suggest Yale Maxibraid instead.  It is the same cover as Crystaline, but dyneema/spectra core instead of vectran core.

APS also sells the bare cover cheaply, which is useful if you are making stripped halyards.  I've found it cheaper to buy 65' of cover and 125' of dyneema 12-strand than to buy 125' of dyneema core line.

For my example: Maxibraid is $2.41/foot in 3/8".  That is $301.25 for my halyard.  3/8" cover is $0.69/foot, Amsteel AS-78 is $1.29/foot for 1/4".  So that is 125*1.29 + 65*0.69 = $206 to buy cover and core as two parts.  With 5 halyards on my boat that saves about $500.  The labor to pull 65 of cover onto core isn't that different than the labor to remove 60' of cover from core.

 

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"My feeling is that I want very low or no stretch spinnaker halyards (code 0 on a furler which needs to remain tight to operate properly) but could tolerate some stretch on the main and jib halyards."

Are you sure about this? Maybe low stretch for a code 0 on a furler but I would have bet low stretch for headsails like genoas and jibs and maybe something with a little give for spinnakers launched from the deck. 

Always ready to learn something new. 

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On 6/19/2018 at 1:32 AM, kinardly said:

"My feeling is that I want very low or no stretch spinnaker halyards (code 0 on a furler which needs to remain tight to operate properly) but could tolerate some stretch on the main and jib halyards."

Are you sure about this? Maybe low stretch for a code 0 on a furler but I would have bet low stretch for headsails like genoas and jibs and maybe something with a little give for spinnakers launched from the deck. 

Always ready to learn something new. 

Don't even start. 

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I thought stretchy halyards were all the rage.:ph34r:

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Second the 12 braid with added cover, like the sk78 though there is a new flavor in dyneema. Also I like spinnaker halyard stretch, particularly for a nylon kite, though it might a poly one. If you have a zero then reach up on that.

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