Bigdamdork

Putting Boat on the Hard suggestions

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Hey everyone.  So I'm pulling my boat out for the first time in a few weeks and wanted to ask for any suggestions on any major things I should be doing.  1985 Shock 35.   I've been told the boatyard where I'm going into isn't super friendly on the "here's what you should do" front (unless you're a commercial fisherman" so trying to walk into it with some knowledge ahead of time and not be a total noob. (just 90%)   

My current list is:

1) Clean, visually inspect, and then paint bottom

2) Check transducers.  I've stated before I'm pretty stupid about these things so I apologize in advance but I'm pretty sure I have a speed and depth sensors but the wiring to both has been cut to both inside the cabin. I guess I'll figure out how to test them.  No instruments on the boat so not sure how.  Potential dumb question....Is GPS replacing thru-hull speed sensors? 

3) Check the cutlass bearing, prop, zincs, shaft, etc. I have a minor vibration above 1500rpm and a pretty decent sized vibration at any RPM when it's in reverse.  It's a two-blade folding prop...should I pull it and see about having it cleaned and balanced?  I'll probably set up some kind of micrometer setup to check the prop shaft. 

 4) The rudder isn't especially easy to turn.  To give you an idea how sticky I can pretty much be hands off in 10kts of wind and it doesn't move at all.  If we are sitting on the mooring ball in a good swell it'll swing a little but not much. Is there a common problem associated with a sticky rudder bearings I should look for?  Should I just plan on dropping the rudder and replacing bearings? 

Other than these four things is there anything I am missing? Anything I should get lined up ahead of time and ready to go so I'm not waiting three weeks for parts.  I have access to West Marine 1.9 miles from where I work but have discovered "shopping around" is sometimes prudent when it comes to purchasing things from there.   Thanks for any suggestions...I appreciate them all.  I've learned a lot for these forums and hope I can be more of a contributor one day and less of a sponge.  

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If you're planning on doing rudder work, think about that beforehand. Once you are on the hard, you would probably have to dig a pretty big pit to be able to drop the rudder. I don't know what boatyards are like by you, but you may want to pay them to drop the rudder when they are pulling the boat.

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12 minutes ago, fucket said:

If you're planning on doing rudder work, think about that beforehand. Once you are on the hard, you would probably have to dig a pretty big pit to be able to drop the rudder. I don't know what boatyards are like by you, but you may want to pay them to drop the rudder when they are pulling the boat.

That's a really good call...thanks.  Love your name....LOL

 

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4 hours ago, Bigdamdork said:

 Potential dumb question....Is GPS replacing thru-hull speed sensors? 

GPS gives you SOG - speed over the ground while speedos give you speed through the water.

Having both gives you data about currents fair & foul.

SOG is what really matters for most of us unless we're racing. GPS is a lot more reliable and accurate than paddle wheel speedos too.

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Hey, I've been going through my own refit and learned many lessons thus far.

When the boat comes out, have the yard, or yourself clean the bottom with high pressure (don't try with a small high pressure unit from home, you won't get the stuff off in a hurry, use the yards if they have one). Then, when it's all wet on the hull, wait a minute or two and have a look along the length of the hull. What you're looking for are swells or bumps and slight dints or hollows. Check the rudder as well. This may indicate blisters, seeing your boat is of age.

Make sure you take the log (speed) out before they put slings under the boat to pull it out. Many have their little paddlewheels broken if the sling covers it and gets weighted. I like having SOG and STW (speed through water) to help with currents etc. but you may not.

As for the vibrations on your drive, it could be just some fouling on the prop. Mine didn't have geared blades like the type that opens the prop blades simultaneously, but independently. With that arrangement, a little fouling on one will vibrate. And more in reverse, where the blades don't open fully against the stop, like they do when going forwards. Could be a matter of just cleaning the prop. It will, or may already have worn out the cutlass. Push the prop from side to side, up and down to see how much movement there is within the cutlass. A tiny amount is ok, but large movements indicate wear.

As for the rudder, if it is that hard to move, I would drop it. It could fully seize on you while you're underway (guess how I know?) Ask the yard if that should be done while pulling the boat out (travel lift), or in a special location in the yard that has a pit etc. Just a matter of checking with them. If you find there is an issue with the bearings, then have a supplier close by who can replace quickly, as sourcing when the boat is out, could take quiet some time and cost in yard fees etc. Maybe have it checked by a professional prior to hauling?! If there are issues with the rudder itself, ie, rust showing, large blisters... it could indicate that it has taken on water. I'm in the process of rebuilding mine, but I should have just taken a mold and built a new one right away. Most people who have gone through this seem to agree on this. Building a new one will minimize time in the yard and reduce costs if you start fixing and then take a long time to repair.

Also, check your through hulls from the inside (you can do this while it's in the water) for corrosion and operation of the valves. This is the time to quickly replace them if required. Again, source your materials before hauling to minimize time and costs on the hard

Just my experiences, but hope this helps a bit.

Good luck

 

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Have the yard "service" all thru hulls, including lubricating and operating seacocks, checking hoses for cracking, clamps etc. Then go through yourself and check that they really did it, seacocks and gate valves should operate easily. (never leave a gate valve "all the way" open, always leave it a fraction of a turn from full on, so that you can twist it that 1/10 rotation and feel that it was already open, keeps someone from putting pliers on it to free a stuck valve) 

Check keel bolts and keel/hull joint 

look for any local blistering (coin sized)  indicative of osmotic absorbtion, not sure if that vintage of Schock was susceptible or not. If the boat is cored, take a plastic faced hammer and tap over the hull, listening for any "dead" spots, alternatively a moisture meter would be a good thing. Especially check near your thru hulls. 

Depending on your expected use, budget and yard policy: Consider whether you need to barrier coat, and if you do, what level of gelcoat removal & fairing you want to do below it. 

Discuss bottom paint with your diver, and apply two different colors sequentially to have a signal on wear. Add a partial third coat on leading edges, and within a foot of the waterline. 

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If you are in mud dauber wasp country get some fine wire mesh and block up all the holes in your hull ESPECIALLY the cockpit drains which need to be done top and bottom. 

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Pretty certain Schock 35 had Harken rudder bearing - look at your upper bearing for markings. It has failed due to aluminum corossion. The rudder post is SS, and the HK bearing has aluminum races. The outer bearing race, which is on the post, has corossion between the ss/alum joint, which is causing the races to distort & bind the steering. PYI has a Jefa replacement for it. Plan on (carefully) cutting the lower bearing off the shaft.

   Cutlass bearing slop - you should not be able to move the shaft more than 1/8" in the bearing - if more than that, replace cutlass bearing. Carefully look at shaft going into & exiting bearing, should be dead center each end. If not, shaft alignment is out.

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9 hours ago, lahana said:

Hey, I've been going through my own refit and learned many lessons thus far.

When the boat comes out, have the yard, or yourself clean the bottom with high pressure (don't try with a small high pressure unit from home, you won't get the stuff off in a hurry, use the yards if they have one). Then, when it's all wet on the hull, wait a minute or two and have a look along the length of the hull. What you're looking for are swells or bumps and slight dints or hollows. Check the rudder as well. This may indicate blisters, seeing your boat is of age.

Make sure you take the log (speed) out before they put slings under the boat to pull it out. Many have their little paddlewheels broken if the sling covers it and gets weighted. I like having SOG and STW (speed through water) to help with currents etc. but you may not.

As for the vibrations on your drive, it could be just some fouling on the prop. Mine didn't have geared blades like the type that opens the prop blades simultaneously, but independently. With that arrangement, a little fouling on one will vibrate. And more in reverse, where the blades don't open fully against the stop, like they do when going forwards. Could be a matter of just cleaning the prop. It will, or may already have worn out the cutlass. Push the prop from side to side, up and down to see how much movement there is within the cutlass. A tiny amount is ok, but large movements indicate wear.

As for the rudder, if it is that hard to move, I would drop it. It could fully seize on you while you're underway (guess how I know?) Ask the yard if that should be done while pulling the boat out (travel lift), or in a special location in the yard that has a pit etc. Just a matter of checking with them. If you find there is an issue with the bearings, then have a supplier close by who can replace quickly, as sourcing when the boat is out, could take quiet some time and cost in yard fees etc. Maybe have it checked by a professional prior to hauling?! If there are issues with the rudder itself, ie, rust showing, large blisters... it could indicate that it has taken on water. I'm in the process of rebuilding mine, but I should have just taken a mold and built a new one right away. Most people who have gone through this seem to agree on this. Building a new one will minimize time in the yard and reduce costs if you start fixing and then take a long time to repair.

Also, check your through hulls from the inside (you can do this while it's in the water) for corrosion and operation of the valves. This is the time to quickly replace them if required. Again, source your materials before hauling to minimize time and costs on the hard

Just my experiences, but hope this helps a bit.

Good luck

 

This is fantastic advice...thank you very much.

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6 hours ago, longy said:

Pretty certain Schock 35 had Harken rudder bearing - look at your upper bearing for markings. It has failed due to aluminum corossion. The rudder post is SS, and the HK bearing has aluminum races. The outer bearing race, which is on the post, has corossion between the ss/alum joint, which is causing the races to distort & bind the steering. PYI has a Jefa replacement for it. Plan on (carefully) cutting the lower bearing off the shaft.

   Cutlass bearing slop - you should not be able to move the shaft more than 1/8" in the bearing - if more than that, replace cutlass bearing. Carefully look at shaft going into & exiting bearing, should be dead center each end. If not, shaft alignment is out.

I started watching YouTube videos on how to change out a rudder bearing today.  I've wrenched on cars off and on so the basic skill sets are there mechanically speaking but still all new tasks.  I did watch one video where they had to cut off the old bearing.....good to see.  I'l be sure to discuss with the Yard manager before pulling my boat and I'll reach out to Jefa to see what they have...thanks! 

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7 hours ago, LionessRacing said:

Have the yard "service" all thru hulls, including lubricating and operating seacocks, checking hoses for cracking, clamps etc. Then go through yourself and check that they really did it, seacocks and gate valves should operate easily. (never leave a gate valve "all the way" open, always leave it a fraction of a turn from full on, so that you can twist it that 1/10 rotation and feel that it was already open, keeps someone from putting pliers on it to free a stuck valve) 

Check keel bolts and keel/hull joint 

look for any local blistering (coin sized)  indicative of osmotic absorbtion, not sure if that vintage of Schock was susceptible or not. If the boat is cored, take a plastic faced hammer and tap over the hull, listening for any "dead" spots, alternatively a moisture meter would be a good thing. Especially check near your thru hulls. 

Depending on your expected use, budget and yard policy: Consider whether you need to barrier coat, and if you do, what level of gelcoat removal & fairing you want to do below it. 

Discuss bottom paint with your diver, and apply two different colors sequentially to have a signal on wear. Add a partial third coat on leading edges, and within a foot of the waterline. 

Two different colors is something I totally would not have thought of...that is a great suggestion...thanks!  I have been told my yard caters more to commercial boats than sail boats (aka- "Be prepared to figure your own shit out")  but I'm hoping the proper placement of a case of beer might win me some favor.  Thanks again for the advice. 

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If you intend to sand the bottom buy one of these and a h/d broom handle.

It is usually described as a drywall sanding head and it makes sanding the bottom MUCH easier as you can work standing up and use both arms,

drywall_pole_sander-300x261.jpg

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