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Many of you (as I do) have to lash your shrouds in a 4 or 8:1 cascade to properly tension them for sailing and then have to detention for trailering.  I've been doing it "OK" for years using multiple half hitches, but the final knot most times takes a marlin spike (which I carry) to undo since it's been crushed.  Now, I see on the Colligo website that their lashings are somehow terminated (tied off) in the middle of the cascade instead of at the top or bottom--how do you do that?  Someone have a video to enlighten me?  I'd appreciate the help since this new boat requires it done each time and past boats didn't need it done very often.

AND, while the Colligo stuff is pretty, it is also pricey so if your load on each strand of lashing is less than 1K pounds, you might consider Ronstan XL shocks (sheaveless blocks)--all they do is organize the lashings so there aren't overlaps which cause issues with tensioning and loosening. 

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Thanks.  My tiny lashing lines might still not slip...the key seems to be the 1/3 up from the bottom so the first couple pass throughs don't slide down.  Not sure how to keep tension while passing tiny lines under themselves, but I'll give it a go.  Thanks again.  Just what I was looking for. 

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1 hour ago, Rasputin22 said:

New and Improved Lashing Instructions!

 

Nice one Ras, that's gone into the rigging & rope folder!

There was another lashing method I've seen done that involves half hitches but it goes through the middle of the cascade (between the strands) and it means that the lashing can't slowly rotate around the cascade and loosen. I'll see if I can find it.

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For passing under the load line, a small piece of extra line temporarily tied in a loop gives you something to pull when passing your line through.  Easy trick for any lashing without an easy finish point.

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That Colligo link is so cool; lashings are no longer a mystery. 

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1 hour ago, knobblyoldjimbo said:

Why don't you use hifield levers?

weight

 

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1 hour ago, Rasputin22 said:

Why not this?

 

Weight

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On 6/27/2018 at 11:45 PM, mookiesurfs said:

That Colligo link is so cool; lashings are no longer a mystery. 

simple rolling hitch.. and also relies on the expanding shape of the purchases.

 

Neat, but hardly rocket surgery.

 

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2 hours ago, duncan (the other one) said:

simple rolling hitch.. and also relies on the expanding shape of the purchases.

 

Neat, but hardly rocket surgery.

 

True enough, but even though I've been sailing for 20+ years, I mostly rely on bowlines and half hitches, figure 8s and stoppers.  They all work and even half hitches for the lashing worked (kept my rig from falling down).  The Colligo lashing (and a rolling hitch) would be easier to untie though.  Recently I learned alpine butterfly which is cool to use if you need a loop and don't have the ends and a very similar knot to join two lines that is more secure than square or physicians knots. 

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I wouldn't trust the bitter end of my Colligo lashings to anything other than a Camel Hitch...

    Camel spit and snot is slippery stuff!

 

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Well, this lashing didn't stay secure and loosened during the sail and even jammed so I still had to use the marlin spike to untie the last knot.  Probably because my lashings are 2 mm dyneema. 

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I've been using 2mm for lashings on the forestay for some time and have been simply using a number of 1/2 hitches in a pattern of 2 clockwise and then 2 anti clockwise for about 6 hitches. They will come undone though at that point unless you simply use an old Australian secret of taking the tail through the centre of the lashings and pulling it down tight against the top hitch. The 1/2 hitches seem to stay tight and the tail never seems to move.

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16 minutes ago, Waynemarlow said:

 taking the tail through the centre of the lashings and pulling it down tight against the top hitch. The 1/2 hitches seem to stay tight and the tail never seems to move.

Was with you until here.  I even get "tail through the centre of the lashings" .  Pull down against the top hitch-...?then more half hitches vertically around the stack of half hitches? 

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I use a very inexpensive 7/16mm kevlar line to rig a homemade L7 23' folding trimaran.  Its been solid for 1 1/2 years now in the sun and the lashing is done up using stainless steel anchor eyelets.  You can see the lashing very tight on the side of ama as the boat is folded up.  When unfolded the lashings extend over 1 and 1/2 feet or so I do a tack or two and tighten them up.  I love synthetic rigging would go with Colligo if a bigger vessel but for the smaller tri making my own stuff is just fine.  I bought a big reel of kevlar line from a local used boat supply so have rigging for boats lifetime.  We like the lightweight torqeedo for power too!  The rear capshroud is dyneema about 5/16" .  Its wearing out much slower than the kevlar.  Forestay is dyneema 7/16" and takes the most abuse.  We use two facnors up front for headsails.  Boat is about 1000 lbs empty.  Using rolling hitches as they are easy to tie and untie and hold well.  The kevlar is very slippery but the lashings hold.

Steve L7 Firefly

IMG_20180722_153356747.jpg

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1 hour ago, Malolo_F9A said:

I use a very inexpensive 7/16mm kevlar line to rig a homemade L7 23' folding trimaran.  Its been solid for 1 1/2 years now in the sun and the lashing is done up using stainless steel anchor eyelets.  You can see the lashing very tight on the side of ama as the boat is folded up.  When unfolded the lashings extend over 1 and 1/2 feet or so I do a tack or two and tighten them up.  I love synthetic rigging would go with Colligo if a bigger vessel but for the smaller tri making my own stuff is just fine.  I bought a big reel of kevlar line from a local used boat supply so have rigging for boats lifetime.  We like the lightweight torqeedo for power too!  The rear capshroud is dyneema about 5/16" .  Its wearing out much slower than the kevlar.  Forestay is dyneema 7/16" and takes the most abuse.  We use two facnors up front for headsails.  Boat is about 1000 lbs empty.  Using rolling hitches as they are easy to tie and untie and hold well.  The kevlar is very slippery but the lashings hold.

Steve L7 Firefly

IMG_20180722_153356747.jpg

Good to see a Leneman boat still out there.  Amazing it is only 1000 pounds since my 19 is near that.  I see that it is a sliding tube, though, not folding, right? 

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It is actually L7 #1 the prototype.  Previous owners attempted R2AK lasted 3 days then suffered a broken mast.  I picked up the blue mast off craigslist from a Stilleto cat?? cut off about 5 feet of length and re-rigged for L7 using all synthetic stays.  Boat is sliding but much easier on trailer than water so we dry sail it out of Huntington Harbor.  We duck a bridge on the way to the ocean but its an easy drop and raise.  Sometimes we anchor and take our time other times we do it while motoring.  Easy when there is no wind or tide harder to do when the tide or wind is up and running.  Boat is very solid construction we fixed a few things but basically sail it a lot.  Boat is fast but not as fast as my F9A.  Can handle 4 adults with ease as Mike made the cockpit quite large and nets are level with deck which makes moving around easy.  Very simple yet fun boat! should last a lot longer.  Yes it slides open not folding using pultruded fiberglass I beams, very clever !!!  Searail 19 ?? looks very cool and fast.  These size trimarans are very fun and easy to deal with.

L7 Firefly

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Practical sailor tested a whole bunch of hitches and stated the icicle hitch is best, but takes a long time to do and undo.  I'm a little worried about using any hitch to rely on to keep my mast upright.  https://www.practical-sailor.com/issues/35_8/features/Gripping-Hitches_5815-1.html 

I could use something less slippery than 2 mm dyneema for lashing.  Or I can  be satisfied with a less than perfectly tight shrouds and use a bowline. 

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Since Spectra creeps at a sustained load over about 20% of breaking strength, rigging is upsized to avoid this.  Spectra stretches more than steel, and rigging is upsized to bring stay stretch into a desired range.  Lashings, in my experience, also stay under 20% of breaking strength for the same reason.  Every loop you add, reduces lashing line load.  The original picture takes this idea and has at least 3 more loops than the Colligo hardware intended.  I didn't have the Colligo instructions when I lashed my first deadeyes 12 years ago.  I used an eye splice to start, and  finished with a pressure loop on the upper deadeye big opening followed by at least 3 same direction half hitches on the last line.  After that knots were just to use up tail.  12 years, thousands of miles, 2 boats, all rigs standing, never a slip, untie without tools.

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Thanks, Bill, I've decided to do something similar.  My lashings start with an eye splice.  Then I go through a 5:1 cascade.  Rather than terminate with the Colligo lashing, I've decided to take the end back up to the sailmaker's eye and make a friction loop or two around it before terminating with half hitches.  That should use most of the lashing line which I will finish with a bowline around the sailmaker's eye.  If the wind ever dies to below 30, I might get a chance to go out and try it.

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