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How do you define Good Crew?

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This topic should bring out some interesting, humorous, and insightful comments...

How do you define Good Crew??

I'm sure there will be comments across the spectrum ranging from...

"A Good Crew is that guy from work I invited on a Wed Night 20 yrs ago who still shows up reliably every week and brings beer and trims the guy." ----- PHRF Boat Answer

"A Good Crew is a junior sailor who raced in college then transitioned to the big boat scene and has done every position bow to stern" --- OD Answer

 

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Simply the ones that get you across the line first.

the rest are crew

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Attitude.

We had a never-before-on-a-sailboat girl with us *during a hurricane*. Not one complaint and turned to when asked with a smile B) Turned out later she had no idea this kind of thing didn't happen every trip :lol:

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at the end of the day, good crew are the ones that are fun to sail with and have a good attitude. It's useless to sail with nice people that get frustrated easily, great sailors that are cunts, etc,. 

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Those that want to learn about their role and how to make the boat go, bring beer, clear up, splash antifoul, or are kind / fun all get big ticks. That said, those that turn up every feckin' time; rain, shine, snow, millpond or gale, they're my faves.

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1/ reliability

2/ reliability

3/ reliability

4/ reliability

5/ reliability

 

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No kids, flexible job, sick sense of humor, minimal criminal record so they can get to Canada, mechanically or electrically inclined, no mold allergies, and an unfettered desire to beat those other assholes.

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Compatibility 

Talent

Experience 

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1- 25% just can't do anything right.

2- 50% can do what they are asked and are good at it without question.

3- 20%  actually understand what they were asked to do and why they are doing it.

4- 5% know more than the skipper but they won't be on the boat long.

Apart from reliability, #3 is a good crew.

 

All that goes out the window if you look good on the foredeck in a bikini....

 

 

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The ones that bring good beer hidden on the back pack and know where to stack it on every tack

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People you’d be just as happy to hang out with if you weren’t sailing, and that know what they are doing on a boat.  

Someone you trust to save your life if shit hits the fan!

Know when to talk and when to shut up because everyone is sick of them gabbing. Maybe that in the camp of what makes good crew on a distance race.   

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You can teach someone how to sail, you can't unteach someone how not to be an asshole.

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Says a guy with a huge organ that winters in your anus and does farm animals.  Perfect crew!   

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Reliable and fun people to be with who can do what is right when the shit hits the fan

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PSYCHOS AND ANYONE WHO CAN KEEP IT TOGETHER WHEN THE SHIT FITS THE FAN 

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13 hours ago, Keysrock35 said:

No kids, flexible job, sick sense of humor, minimal criminal record so they can get to Canada, mechanically or electrically inclined, no mold allergies, and an unfettered desire to beat those other assholes.

Did you look at my bio? 

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I asked a local who did an AC campaign if he ever sailed on a boat where only two words were spoke: "Tack" or "Jibe?"  Where everyone on the boat knew their position but knew all other positions so no one else had to ask for anything to be done.  He said, "Yes, and it was on the AC boat, and it was an absolute delight to sail."

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Good Crew = Any person that understands that they're not perfect and that every race is an opportunity to learn something new.

Great Crew= Good Crew + a person who is on time for everything and does not bolt until the boat is put away.

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12 hours ago, Connor.kainalu said:

Me

i thought you were a helm?

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13 minutes ago, mustang__1 said:

i thought you were a helm?

 

Not all owners drive the bus...

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34 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 

Not all owners drive the bus...

well aware... when i owned a 29er i think i drove it in maybe three regattas, because crewing that boat is way more fun. 

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1) Good attitude - keeps calm, shows initiative, asks to help with the crap rigging and boat maintenance jobs; brings booze or food now and then. Sells out for the team.  

2) Always shows up including at tougher (and multi-day) weekend regattas and races - they aren't just  Wednesday Night Heroes. 

3) Always keeps learning - a desire to master their positions, then the other ones, then tactics.  OD answer, BTW.   

4) Through a combination of attitude and hard work, inspires the skipper to improve, to make it better for the crew. 

I have a lot of really good crew at the moment.

* Edited:  Model-like good looks don't hurt.  Doesn't harm new crew recruiting, and somebody has to make up for the skipper.

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26 minutes ago, jamhass said:

Someone who doesn't break stuff

i didn't break it, the physics did. 

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1. Sow up when you say you are going to.

2. Stay til the boat's put away.

3. Be competent or at least don't think you know more than everyone else.

4. Be fun to sail with.

5. Bring beer.

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Minimum Requirement # 1 to be an owner: Puts the safety of his/her crew above everything else. Can keep their cool when things go from race mode to survival mode.

Minimum Requirement # 2 to be an owner: maintains their boat to ensure seaworthiness. A vessel that Starbuck would have no problem taking out.

Good Owner: takes the time to fill their boat with good crew.

Great owner: All of the above + commits the time and money to the boats performance. Race ready hull, race ready sails. Plans out entire seasons and will think about destination events

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1 hour ago, Lex Teredo said:

1) Good attitude - keeps calm, shows initiative, asks to help with the crap rigging and boat maintenance jobs; brings booze or food now and then. Sells out for the team.  

2) Always shows up including at tougher (and multi-day) weekend regattas and races - they aren't just  Wednesday Night Heroes. 

3) Always keeps learning - a desire to master their positions, then the other ones, then tactics.  OD answer, BTW.   

4) Through a combination of attitude and hard work, inspires the skipper to improve, to make it better for the crew. 

I have a lot of really good crew at the moment.

* Edited:  Model-like good looks don't hurt.  Doesn't harm new crew recruiting, and somebody has to make up for the skipper.

Pffft. You're describing a Unicorn.

The best crew, is no crew.

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One who can competently  perform in any position on the boat with a boatspeed merchant mentality  I cringe when a prospective crew shows up and says "Hi, I'm Tim and I only trim main."  Also  I'm suspicious of anyone who  has never stepped out of the cockpit.  I  raced a few years with a crew who only did port primary winch and nothing else.  On the other side of the coin  I get a bad feeling when I sign up and the skipper asks "What do you do?"  and get a quizzical look when I reply "Any position on the boat."

Except the tactician, they're a special breed of cat worth their weight in gold if they're good, even if they don't know which way the winches spin.

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5 hours ago, mustang__1 said:

i thought you were a helm?

Keelboats mate, this ain't dinghy anarchy no more

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a guy or gal that leaves the dock expecting nothing but a win will suffice, even when at the first mark your 9th out of 8 boats and holds that mindset all race. And then helps clean up and is just fine with the finish, just wants to learn and do better next time out. 

and brings beer.....

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To quote Woody Allen:

"99% of life is just showing up."

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41 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

aww you newbs are so cute...  

definitely one that can make french toast

or knows how to tension the rig

 

tensiometro_1_.jpg

I was waiting for that.

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6 minutes ago, ropetrick said:

French Toast Girl is obviously delivery crew not racing crew.

She ist on the oweneres "specialle teames" rostere.            :)

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Possibly I have a different viewpoint. I have been racing quite a while and now seek crew that want to learn. I don't care if they have never been on a boat, I just want them to want to learn it and maybe grow to love it. Some don't "get it" and stop coming out, the ones that stay learn. We are not the hot racing boat in our fleet but we are out there learning, every race. We don't win many flags but I have enough of those. 

A few years back I noticed 6 boats on the starting line that belonged to my former crew. I am not bragging, I figure they thought they could do it better (and many did). The idea is to get some young people out to see what fun sailing (and racing sailboats) is.

I "learned" to sail by myself ate age 21 with a brand new boat (literally with a "how to sail" book open on the deck). I am still learning 42 years later. I wish I had someone invite me on their racing boat back then......

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Trustworthy

Loyal

Helpful

Friendly

Courteous

Kind

Obedient

Cheerful

Thrifty

Brave 

Clean 

Reverent

:D

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3 minutes ago, Crash said:

Trustworthy

Loyal

Helpful

Friendly

Courteous

Kind

Obedient

Cheerful

Thrifty

Brave 

Clean 

Reverent

:D

That crew is going to earn a Merit Badge.

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Crew that bring a new winch handle to the next race after losing one overboard

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A good crew is someone who's company you still enjoy on the third dawn watch of the race. And who brings there own gunga.

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9 hours ago, Rushman said:

Crew that bring a new winch handle to the next race after losing one overboard

That a good way to lose crew. Just go steal one off another boat after the race and buy the poor crew a beer! 

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13 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

That a good way to lose crew. Just go steal one off another boat after the race and buy the poor crew a beer! 

If the crew do it on their own accord, why would the skipper lose them?

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I might be confused. If a crew member loses your winch handle overboard it’s their fault and responsibility to replace?

I wouldn’t expect a crew member taking time out of their lives to crew for free to replace something that I own and asked them to use to help me win a race. At $50+ I would not crew again if I were  expected to replace overboard items.

Hell, if that’s the case, I owe Scott and Donna a new Assym to replace the 10 year old one I blew out on them in a puff on their Melges 24 back in ‘02. Someone even took a pic of the blowout and I never got a bill!

As an aside. Guy helping a new member get gear out of his truck and crew for him. Opens the door and a handle of Captain Morgan crashes out on the ground. The owner says”It looks like you owe me a handle of rum!” The guy says back “Looks like you need crew today!” And walked away. 

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1 hour ago, Sail4beer said:

I might be confused. If a crew member loses your winch handle overboard it’s their fault and responsibility to replace?

I wouldn’t expect a crew member taking time out of their lives to crew for free to replace something that I own and asked them to use to help me win a race. At $50+ I would not crew again if I were  expected to replace overboard items.

Hell, if that’s the case, I owe Scott and Donna a new Assym to replace the 10 year old one I blew out on them in a puff on their Melges 24 back in ‘02. Someone even took a pic of the blowout and I never got a bill!

As an aside. Guy helping a new member get gear out of his truck and crew for him. Opens the door and a handle of Captain Morgan crashes out on the ground. The owner says”It looks like you owe me a handle of rum!” The guy says back “Looks like you need crew today!” And walked away. 

"Sorry skipper I screwed up, I will cover this one" is not quite the same as requiring or expecting crew to cover damages.

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21 hours ago, Connor.kainalu said:

Keelboats mate, this ain't dinghy anarchy no more

Ha! 

Keelboats are way easier to drive, except those IOR bitches ddw

FB...... Doug 

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9 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

I might be confused. If a crew member loses your winch handle overboard it’s their fault and responsibility to replace?

I wouldn’t expect a crew member taking time out of their lives to crew for free to replace something that I own and asked them to use to help me win a race. At $50+ I would not crew again if I were  expected to replace overboard items.

Hell, if that’s the case, I owe Scott and Donna a new Assym to replace the 10 year old one I blew out on them in a puff on their Melges 24 back in ‘02. Someone even took a pic of the blowout and I never got a bill!

As an aside. Guy helping a new member get gear out of his truck and crew for him. Opens the door and a handle of Captain Morgan crashes out on the ground. The owner says”It looks like you owe me a handle of rum!” The guy says back “Looks like you need crew today!” And walked away. 

The topic is about GOOD CREW.

Crew loses winch handle, a good crew purchases new handle and brings it the following race without the skipper/owner saying anything. No fuss, no fanfare

The GOOD SKIPPER should immediately pull out their wallet, "You didn't have to do that, let me fix you up for the cost. Thanks for saving me the trip to the shop"

 

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Damn! That is a good crew!

And a great skipper!!

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Winch handles are for poofs.

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They either bring one of these or they are one of these.

 

Related image

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I don’t race and sail solo most of the time. Lately I’ve been taking my grandkids (singly, there’s too many of the little buggers to all come at once) out for two or three days at a time to see if any of them show an interest. One, 13 years old, is as keen as mustard. 

Suddenly, having someone to pass my experience on to is a blessing. She can tack the boat tending helm or sheets, trim the sails, handle dock lines, hang fenders, brew coffee, set a course on chart or plotter (with a bit of help), never gets seasick, do a backsplice and eyesplice in 3-strand, not fazed by the intricacies of the sea toilet, and bring us into an anchorage while I’m on the foredeck prepping the anchor. She’s a good crew who I hope will take me out sailing in my dotage.

Might leave my boat to her in my will.

At any other time Good Crew is someone who buys the first round ashore and drinks rum on board.

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6 hours ago, Para Handy said:

I don’t race and sail solo most of the time. Lately I’ve been taking my grandkids (singly, there’s too many of the little buggers to all come at once) out for two or three days at a time to see if any of them show an interest. One, 13 years old, is as keen as mustard. 

Suddenly, having someone to pass my experience on to is a blessing. She can tack the boat tending helm or sheets, trim the sails, handle dock lines, hang fenders, brew coffee, set a course on chart or plotter (with a bit of help), never gets seasick, do a backsplice and eyesplice in 3-strand, not fazed by the intricacies of the sea toilet, and bring us into an anchorage while I’m on the foredeck prepping the anchor. She’s a good crew who I hope will take me out sailing in my dotage.

Might leave my boat to her in my will.

At any other time Good Crew is someone who buys the first round ashore and drinks rum on board.

Damn, that's marvelous.

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On 6/28/2018 at 8:28 PM, Hugh Jorgan said:

You can teach someone how to sail, you can't unteach bad habits someone how not to be an asshole.

You got that right. I have someone who is a decent sailor but has the weird notions like

  • Low and Slow is Pure VMG...OMG
     
  • Raise the pole on a tight reach to flatten the middle of the spin. I makes it easier to trim.
    Which is true but SLOW. Dave Ullman told him this and it works for short distances if you need to fetch a mark instead of doing multiple sail changes to fetch the mark and after. But this guy wants to do it for miles on end.
     
  • What the F is burping a sail, Can't you just say Ease it?  How Homo is Burping a sail? I thought you burped babies.
     
  • Actually thinks that trimmers spin the kite in a gybe instead of the driver turning the boat under the kite and keeping it in the flow of wind.

On top of all that stupid shit, sometimes he acts like he owns the boat. I know that being a disabled owner/skipper limits what I can do, but when someone tries to override my 38 years of experience, I just want to stand up and throw his ass off the boat sometimes. Sometimes I after a race, I say to myself, this is it, I'm done. He knows I need people and there are not lines of people ready to crew on 26' boats. Most want to sit on big boats in our area.

The funny thing is we win plenty and he still wants to do the weird shit when I tell him all the time to shut the fuck up with the stupid shit.

So, anyone want a race ready boat? Buy and Sail, Turnkey purchase? I can help deliver.

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On ‎6‎/‎28‎/‎2018 at 5:17 PM, Sail4beer said:

Simply the ones that get you across the line first.

the rest are crew

I have to disagree with this.  Screamers, those who belittle others with less knowledge, people who manipulate other crew members to make them look better, people who do not take time to pass on knowledge, and worst of all, those who consistently question every tactical decision and delight in being right later.

A crew is a cohesive team, not one dick with an ego.  So no, getting across the line first is great but if it poisons the people you have been training for years you will have nothing.

 

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Broad brush, but I understand what you’re saying. I think the term narcissist is what you’re describing. They are not good crew or crew period on my boat! 

 

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Formula for Good Crew =

A - Turn up

B - Don't Fuck Up

C - Return to A.

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When it all hits the fan they are the one standing next to you, in what they were wearing in bed, & stay there until things are safe!

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On 6/30/2018 at 7:44 PM, Rushman said:

The topic is about GOOD CREW.

Crew loses winch handle, a good crew purchases new handle and brings it the following race without the skipper/owner saying anything. No fuss, no fanfare

The GOOD SKIPPER should immediately pull out their wallet, "You didn't have to do that, let me fix you up for the cost. Thanks for saving me the trip to the shop"

 

+1 it's a learning experience for the crew to know how much those things cost and hang onto them.  Skipper should still pay in the end. 

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I'm happy to race with any crew I can learn from.  Always a treat to learn new tricks. 

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I get the OP wanted a broad discussion, but the question inherently requires subjective answers. 

So I guess my answer would be a good crew is someone who furthers the objective(s) of the owner, which can could be wide range of things (have fun, be competitive, team development for larger programs, pitching in financially).

 

 

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3 minutes ago, olshitsky said:

I get the OP wanted a broad discussion, but the question inherently requires subjective answers. 

So I guess my answer would be a good crew is someone who furthers the objective(s) of the owner, which can could be wide range of things (have fun, be competitive, team development for larger programs, pitching in financially).

 

 

"Pitching in Financially"......... That is definitely a hot button topic.

Some would respond, buy a smaller boat you can afford to race.

or, isn't the crew giving up their weekend already a contribution for you to drive the bus without paying a boat load of pros?

Curious if you are referring to bringing lunch or buying winch handles...

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Heard of a boat owner - ultra competitive but not so hot on the racecourse - who wanted his crew to fund the boats annual sailing. Was a manager in a top tech company as well and regarded crew as his minions... 

He still can't understand why nobody (with any experience) will go sailing with him.

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27 minutes ago, SteveC said:

Heard of a boat owner - ultra competitive but not so hot on the racecourse - who wanted his crew to fund the boats annual sailing. Was a manager in a top tech company as well and regarded crew as his minions... 

He still can't understand why nobody (with any experience) will go sailing with him.

Haha. I think that puts it well... "no one with experience will go sailing with him"

Owners can always drag newbies off the seawall for a "Sat Boat Ride" and guilt them into bringing sandwiches the following weekend.

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Good crew are people who move like a cat on the deck, have their hand on the sheet/halyard a split second before the helm/skipper/tactician ask them to ease it, get the kite prepared, ready to hoist 3 lengths before the windward mark (not 50 before or 5 after!). They seem to teleport themselves to the windward rail a split second after the tack, they give valuable information to the tactician (like boats on the left are experiencing a header rather than "we should tack"), to the helm ("pressure in the kite sheet is down" rather than "our speed is crap") and when the boat goes into a crash gybe, they sort out the mess rather than start yelling their disagreement....

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show up

bring cigars

don't whine

rig the boat in the morning 

clean up the boat when you get in

don't be a dickhead

don't jabber during the race

don't crash the van

tell funny stories between races

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On 7/2/2018 at 10:44 AM, Meat Wad said:
  • What the F is burping a sail, Can't you just say Ease it?  How Homo is Burping a sail? I thought you burped babies.

 

You can't burp a sail but you can certainly burp a halyard.

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Sorry I missed this one.  

Morning of the Port Huron to Mackinac the owner had to bail.  The boat was going.  On the motor to the start, we decided to split the crew based on which of his daughter's you had slept with.  Two of us (including me) didn't qualify, but luckily, two of the crew could have been on either watch.  Most fun I've ever had sailing.

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7 hours ago, stayoutofthemiddle said:

"Pitching in Financially"......... That is definitely a hot button topic.

Some would respond, buy a smaller boat you can afford to race.

or, isn't the crew giving up their weekend already a contribution for you to drive the bus without paying a boat load of pros?

Curious if you are referring to bringing lunch or buying winch handles...

I wasn't referring to any thing specifically.  I just know the crew of some boats shoulder more of the burden than others (lunches, winches, or more).  I don't have an opinion either way.  I guess my point is that when it comes down to it, the person who evaluates whether or not the crew is good is the skipper, and that skipper will have his own unique set of criteria.

 

And if you don't disagree with that criteria...then you should probably find another boat.

 

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Going upwind in a dinghy, good crew acts more like a tactician then like movable ballast. 

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pays attention to what is going on around us, where competition is, calls puffs, looks for pressures and relays info to tactician/helm. 

Not coming off the rail before the tack is initiated.

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Ask questions and listen to the answers.

Do not hesitate when asked to do something. (if unclear, speak up)

Be willing to take advice and don't ever say "but this is how I've always done it" Do it like that on your boat, this ain't yours.

Have fun, encourage fun onboard. If things go wrong, correct them, figure out how to avoid it in the future and move on. Do NOT play the blame game or let it ruin the day.

If going below, always ask if drinks are needed.

Lastly, please for the love of god have thick skin.

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On 7/11/2018 at 8:00 AM, More Cowbell2 said:

pays attention to what is going on around us, where competition is, calls puffs, looks for pressures and relays info to tactician/helm. 

Not coming off the rail before the tack is initiated.

+ 1,000,000

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