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Contumacious Tom

Cen$oring Google

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Cen$oring Google
 

Quote

 

...

on Friday, Google announced that it would, at least temporarily, stop accepting ads for political campaigns within the state of Maryland. This follows on the heels of a similar move in Washington a month ago, after the state enacted "emergency" rules required real-time reporting disclosure of online ad buys including "descriptions of the geographic areas and locations targeted and the total number of views generated by the ads." According to a Google spokesperson, the company values transparency but doesn't have the tools to comply with these rules as written.

It's not as though Google is resisting transparency itself. The company has been working to provide more information about online political ad buys. In May it announced it would start verifying the identities of people purchasing political ads to make sure they were American citizens or lawful residents. It's building a database of political ads that includes sources of funding and how much gets spent.

...

These rules don't impact everybody in the political sphere equally. Google's decision makes it harder for challengers with less money and connections to reach voters. The incumbents, who wrote and voted for these regulations, get the benefits. They have years of press coverage. They have war chests. They have name recognition.

 

So "we're going to protect you from $pecial interests and Ru$$ian$ and Rainbow Bernie" boils down to "we're going to protect incumbents."

Again.

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Meanwhile, over on Facebook, the Declaration of Independence is hate speech.
 

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...

Stinnett says that he cannot be sure which exact grievance ran afoul of Facebook's policy, but he assumes that it's paragraph 31, which excoriates the King for inciting "domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavored to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian Savages."

The removal of the post was an automated action, and Stinnett sent a "feedback message" to Facebook with the hopes of reaching a human being who could then exempt the Declaration of Independence from its hate speech restrictions.

Fearful that sharing more of the text might trigger the deletion of its Facebook page, The Vindicator has suspended its serialization of the declaration.

In his article, Stinnett is remarkably sanguine about this censorship. While unhappy about the decision, he reminds readers "that Facebook is a business corporation, not the government, and as such it is allowed to restrict use of its services as long as those restrictions do not violate any laws. Plus, The Vindicator is using Facebook for free, so the newspaper has little grounds for complaint other than the silliness of it."

Of course, Facebook's actions here are silly. They demonstrate a problem with automated enforcement of hate speech policies, which is that a robot trained to spot politically incorrect language isn't smart enough to detect when that language is part of a historically significant document.

None of this is meant as a defense of referring to Native Americans as "savages." That phrasing is clearly racist and serves as another example of the American Revolution's mixed legacy; one that won crucial liberties for a certain segment of the population, while continuing to deny those same liberties to Native Americans and African slaves. But by allowing the less controversial parts of the declaration to be shared while deleting the reference to "Indian savages," Facebook succeeds only in whitewashing America's founding just as we get ready to celebrate it.

A more thoughtful approach to Independence Day—for both celebrants and social media companies alike—would be to grapple with those historical demons.

 

This reminds me of a recent attempt to watch an "edited for modern TV" version of Blazing Saddles. They took out the word nigger. Unwatchable.

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On 7/3/2018 at 5:16 AM, Uncooperative Tom said:

Cen$oring Google
 

So "we're going to protect you from $pecial interests and Ru$$ian$ and Rainbow Bernie" boils down to "we're going to protect incumbents."

Again.

This line in your oped

Quote

Google's decision makes it harder for challengers with less money and connections to reach voters.

 

is a blatant lie, or someone is a moron and doesn't know how Google Adwords work or more likely thinks there audience are morons who don't know how ads are sold. Remember, Adwords is an auction - the person with the deeper pockets can always win at auction.

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1 hour ago, Mismoyled Jiblet. said:

This line in your oped

Quote

Google's decision makes it harder for challengers with less money and connections to reach voters.

 

is a blatant lie, or someone is a moron and doesn't know how Google Adwords work or more likely thinks there audience are morons who don't know how ads are sold. Remember, Adwords is an auction - the person with the deeper pockets can always win at auction.

If one party in the auction is an establishment candidate with lots of money and the other is an outsider with little money, does it really matter if

Quote

Google announced that it would, at least temporarily, stop accepting ads for political campaigns

It doesn't matter how much money you can throw at the auction if you're excluded.

What does matter is that this decision means that one cost-effective way of reaching voters is off limits to both parties in that situation. That's where the part you clipped out starts to really matter:

Quote

The incumbents, who wrote and voted for these regulations, get the benefits. They have years of press coverage. They have war chests. They have name recognition.

Meaning it's easier for them and harder for outsiders, as the op-ed said.

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T

21 minutes ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

Meaning it's easier for them and harder for outsiders, as the op-ed said.

so it's easier for the person that has more $peach backing them?  what's the problem Tom? Is all $peach no longer the same?

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On 7/3/2018 at 3:16 AM, Uncooperative Tom said:

Cen$oring Google
 

So "we're going to protect you from $pecial interests and Ru$$ian$ and Rainbow Bernie" boils down to "we're going to protect incumbents."

Again.

 You left out George $orro$...

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6 hours ago, Mismoyled Jiblet. said:

T

so it's easier for the person that has more $peach backing them?  what's the problem Tom? Is all $peach no longer the same?

Yes, it is.

The problem is the same as ever: incumbents who wish to protect us from all that evil $peech actually want to protect themselves from outside challengers. Cen$or$hip protects those in power from us, not the other way around.

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9 hours ago, Ease the sheet. said:

Surely all adds should require some transparency regarding who the buyer is?

I assume you mean all political ads.

Your thought is exactly why Google is no longer accepting political ads.

People have that thought who have no idea how these ads are bought and sold and make rules that can't be followed.

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11 minutes ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

I assume you mean all political ads.

Your thought is exactly why Google is no longer accepting political ads.

People have that thought who have no idea how these ads are bought and sold and make rules that can't be followed.

Google made a commercial decision to not take certain adds because they couldn't be fucked meeting the regulations that went with taking those adds. Considering the issues surrounding the presidential election,  Americans needed the new regulations.

 

Free reign for advertisers and ignorant people created this. Governments heavy handed solution is the result.  Advertisers will find a way to comply because money will find a way. Money always finds away, green shoots of hope not withstanding

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22 minutes ago, Ease the sheet. said:

Google made a commercial decision to not take certain adds because they couldn't be fucked meeting the regulations that went with taking those adds. Considering the issues surrounding the presidential election,  Americans needed the new regulations.

 

Free reign for advertisers and ignorant people created this. Governments heavy handed solution is the result.  Advertisers will find a way to comply because money will find a way. Money always finds away, green shoots of hope not withstanding

It's like a clueless but well-intentioned powerboater decided to rewrite the rules so that sailboats must go directly toward their destination. No more of this confusing zig-zagging!

And then complains that sailors "can't be fucked to obey necessary rules."

Do you mean people who are ignorant of the difference between reign, rein, and rain? If so, I guess I agree, but it's still a heavy handed and unworkable rule. As Eva Dent, since companies don't just stop taking money if taking the money is an option.

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Facebook's robot is not the first to repudiate the Declaration.

What the Declaration Means

Quote

Later, the Declaration also assumed increasing importance in the struggle to abolish slavery. It became a lynchpin of the moral and constitutional arguments of the nineteenth-century abolitionists. It was much relied upon by Abraham Lincoln. It had to be explained away by the Supreme Court in Dred Scott. And eventually it was repudiated by some defenders of slavery in the South because of its inconsistency with that institution.

 

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6 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

People have that thought who have no idea how these ads are bought and sold

and you do? because you seem to be regurgitating google's bullshit.

google & facebook are moving to moderating content because that's what their customers - the ad purchasers - want. Proctor & Gamble doesn't want to have their ads for Tide appear before a skinhead propaganda video on Youtube; the Gap doesn't want a Facebook ad to be attached to the latest neo-nazi clavern meetup request. Like all moderated content the decision ultimately has to be made by a human; call it editing and you are more honest.

I'm sorry the reality of big business is going to crush your libertarian fantasy. It's like that's what happens, always.

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It always comes down to the money.

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12 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

It's like a clueless but well-intentioned powerboater decided to rewrite the rules so that sailboats must go directly toward their destination. No more of this confusing zig-zagging!

And then complains that sailors "can't be fucked to obey necessary rules."

Do you mean people who are ignorant of the difference between reign, rein, and rain? If so, I guess I agree, but it's still a heavy handed and unworkable rule. As Eva Dent, since companies don't just stop taking money if taking the money is an option.

Every one knows that advertisers such as google are kingly.....

 

Your article says only two state elections is affected, and that's temporary. When google etc get their head around the regulations, it will be business as usual.

As an aside, our government lowered the threshold at which imported goods attract a gst. Companies need to collect gst and pass that back to the government.  Amazon no longer ships stuff to Australia, book suppository and others no longer ship stuff to Australia because they don't want to do the collection and pass work. Instead companies are now starting up new businesses in Australia. My long winded point, that companies find ways to work within the system.

And yes, I have to pay more tax.......

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11 hours ago, Ease the sheet. said:

Your article says only two state elections is affected, and that's temporary. When google etc get their head around the regulations, it will be business as usual.

You are assuming that the states are asking for something that's technically possible. That's a heroic assumption. It may not be true.

If true, you may be right. If by "business as usual" you mean political $pending requires a legal staff to get it cleared, so incumbents can manage it but challengers can't. That's how cen$or$hip generally works to entrench the powerful and exclude the rest.

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2 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

You are assuming that the states are asking for something that's technically possible. That's a heroic assumption. It may not be true.

If true, you may be right. If by "business as usual" you mean political $pending requires a legal staff to get it cleared, so incumbents can manage it but challengers can't. That's how cen$or$hip generally works to entrench the powerful and exclude the rest.

It will be the provider, not the buyer who does the work.

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5 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

You are assuming that the states are asking for something that's technically possible. That's a heroic assumption. It may not be true.

It's a heroic assumption that Google can create a database of who looked at ads that were paid for by people?

That's how google makes money.

Google doesn't want to provide transparency because it'll reveal how ineffectual lots of the $ spent on them is.

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19 hours ago, Mismoyled Jiblet. said:

It's a heroic assumption that Google can create a database for real-time reporting disclosure of online ad buys including "descriptions of the geographic areas and locations targeted and the total number of views generated by the ads."

 

I fixed your post to reflect the actual subject.

And yes, it's a heroic assumption that this can be done and disclosed in real time. That's why Google said they can't do it.

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1 hour ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

And yes, it's a heroic assumption that this can be done and disclosed in real time

yup, it's a heroic assumption that a company that charges ad-buyers for views/clicks they receive on targeted ads (including geolocation targeting) has the technical capability to log what ads were sold to whom.

I could buy adwords for "Libertarian Retards" target them to punta gorda, fl - maybe even down to specific businesses - and google would charge me whatever the CPC is for clicks on that. they know what my adwords are, where I'm targeting, and who they are billing.

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1 minute ago, Mismoyled Jiblet. said:

yup, it's a heroic assumption that a company that charges ad-buyers for views/clicks they receive on targeted ads (including geolocation targeting) has the technical capability to log what ads were sold to whom.

Wouldn't that be like, uh, metadata?

Who has the right to see it?

 

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20 hours ago, Mismoyled Jiblet. said:
21 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

And yes, it's a heroic assumption that this can be done and disclosed in real time

yup, it's a heroic assumption that a company that charges ad-buyers for views/clicks they receive on targeted ads (including geolocation targeting) has the technical capability to log what ads were sold to whom and disclose that information in real-time in a bureaucratically-approved way and without compromising trade secrets or the financial privacy of customers.

 

Yes, That's what I was saying. At least, after I added in the parts you wish to ignore.

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21 hours ago, Saorsa said:

Wouldn't that be like, uh, metadata?

Who has the right to see it?

 

Add owners get access to metadata from google and facebook now.....

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7 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

Yes, That's what I was saying. At least, after I added in the parts you wish to ignore.

so you agree with me that their answer is don't want to not can't

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17 hours ago, Mismoyled Jiblet. said:

so you agree with me that their answer is don't want to not can't

Not at all. I'm aware of the fact that bureaucrats are often clueless and will ask for the impossible. See the red part?

disclose that information in real-time in a bureaucratically-approved way and without compromising trade secrets or the financial privacy of customers.

Do you know that what was being required is actually possible?

If so, let's see your source.

The idea that a business "doesn't want to" do what they do to make money makes about as much sense as a lot of your economic ideas. But it's not one I believe in. I think businesses want to make sales and won't simply stop making sales because they "don't want to."

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2 hours ago, Uncooperative Tom said:

The idea that a business "doesn't want to" do what they do to make money makes about as much sense as a lot of your economic ideas. But it's not one I believe in. I think businesses want to make sales and won't simply stop making sales because they "don't want to."

Many highly profitable companys don't wish to showcase in public documents how ineffectual their product can be. Google would much rather people think them an evil advertising super genius throwing elections, than a company that makes billions off of fraudulent clicks on useless ads.

http://www.siliconbeat.com/2017/05/12/google-makes-billions-by-failing-to-properly-police-rampant-click-fraud-on-ads-lawsuit-by-vacaville-man/

that's just one, there's many.

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On 7/9/2018 at 8:45 AM, Mismoyled Jiblet. said:

Google would much rather people think them an evil advertising super genius throwing elections, than a company that makes billions off of fraudulent clicks on useless ads.

If what you're trying to say there is that Rainbow Bernie really didn't change everything, I think we may have found a point of agreement.

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Plaintiff Dropping Case in Which He Got Order to Google to Vanish Photo from Search Results

Quote

 

As I wrote on Aug. 3, a New Jersey state court (in Malandrucco v. Google) issued an order requiring Google to remove the photograph of the plaintiff from its search results. Also, in a parallel case (Malandrucco v. Chicago Tribune), the plaintiff was seeking an order requiring the Chicago Tribune to take down a blog post about the plaintiff that also included that photograph. The judge orally stated at the hearing that he was indeed ordering the Tribune to do so, but the written order didn't reflect that.

You can read more details about that order (including links to the underlying documents) here. The short version of the legal analysis is "the order was clearly unconstitutional." The short version of the facts is that the photo was a picture of plaintiff after he had been beaten by the police in 2010; he then sued the city, successfully, and became an anti-police-brutality activist, but around 2016 concluded that he wanted the stories about him, as well as the photo, removed.

 

 

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Meanwhile Google Is Doing The Wrong Thing In China
 

Quote

 

...

Google left China in 2010 after realizing that there was no end to the demands and intrusions the government would make, no matter how the tech firm tried to comply. But now the company appears willing to do almost anything asked to win access to the vast market. And what's being asked of the company is that it help the government control its people.

A "memo, authored by a Google engineer who was asked to work on the project, disclosed that the search system, codenamed Dragonfly, would require users to log in to perform searches, track their location—and share the resulting history with a Chinese partner who would have 'unilateral access' to the data," The Intercept reports about a new search engine Google is developing for China.

 

Unsurprisingly, the results delivered by the new search engine will be as considerate of state demands as are its tracking capabilities. Dragonfly will serve up only fare approved by government officials, according to the Intercept's Ryan Gallagher.

When a person carries out a search, banned websites will be removed from the first page of results, and a disclaimer will be displayed stating that "some results may have been removed due to statutory requirements." Examples cited in the documents of websites that will be subject to the censorship include those of British news broadcaster BBC and the online encyclopedia Wikipedia.

And some queries are considered so sensitive that they'll return no results at all—though users' interest in pursuing forbidden paths of inquiry will certainly become part of their permanent record. That's no joke in a country that's rapidly modernizing the hoary old mechanisms of the police state with a modern "social credit" system that can effectively place people under house arrest with nary a trench coat in sight.

"A poor Chinese social credit score can lead to bans from travel, certain schools, luxury hotels, government positions, and even dating apps," notes the Brookings Institution. Liu Hu, an investigative journalist, incurred the Chinese government's wrath for exposing corruption among Communist Party officials. He's among millions who have been punished with a tanked social credit score that prevents him from easily working or even leaving his hometown.

I suspect that a few officially disfavored internet searches on topics like "Tianenmen Square" could easily ding a social credit score, and a person's life. Google is happily dedicating hundreds of employees to making that nightmare become a reality.

 

I suspect a Dragonfly search for Winnie the Pooh would not be much fun at all.

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Tumblr and now Facebook have decided that naughty pictures are bad.

Among the banned activities:

Quote

Explicit sexual solicitation, which is defined as offering or asking for sex or sexual partners, sex chats or conversations and nude images

I know it's not FRIDAY but I'm hoping for lots of nude images in response to this post.

Of pretty girls.

That should go without saying but I know what I'll get around here.

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On 7/4/2018 at 8:20 PM, dogballs Tom said:

Meanwhile, over on Facebook, the Declaration of Independence is hate speech.
 

This reminds me of a recent attempt to watch an "edited for modern TV" version of Blazing Saddles. They took out the word nigger. Unwatchable.

So have they not heard Rap and Hip Hop lately?  Seems that Nigger is the favourite word for black artists.  Not once but mutliple times in the same chorus.

I find it offensive.

Kendrick Lamar’s Onstage Outrage: Why Rap Should Retire the N-Word for Good

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2 minutes ago, random said:

So have they not heard Rap and Hip Hop lately?  Seems that Nigger is the favourite word for black artists.  Not once but mutliple times in the same chorus.

I find it offensive.

Kendrick Lamar’s Onstage Outrage: Why Rap Should Retire the N-Word for Good

People who find the word offensive regardless of context are the reason Blazing Saddles is unwatchable and unfunny on commercial TV.

 

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43 minutes ago, dogballs Tom said:

People who find the word offensive regardless of context are the reason Blazing Saddles is unwatchable and unfunny on commercial TV.

 

No, I don't find the word Nigger offensive.  I find the abuse of it by black artists offensive.  It's as if there is a competition on to see how many times it can be repeated in the shortest possible time.

I give a track two 'Niggers' before I press the 'next' button.

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3 hours ago, random said:

No, I don't find the word Nigger offensive.  I find the abuse of it by black artists offensive.  It's as if there is a competition on to see how many times it can be repeated in the shortest possible time.

I give a track two 'Niggers' before I press the 'next' button.

Does spelling matter?

And is rapping the words somehow different from posting them on a forum?

I ask because I may have offended you in the Censoring T-Bizzle thread with this:

On 4/24/2018 at 5:58 PM, dogballs Tom said:

The hate crime in question:

Quote

[Verse 1]
I was chillin' with my bitch, we was gettin' high as shit
Fuck around and start trippin', I was thinking about a lick
Then I called my twin told him bring the F&N
He said he already got it, make sure you bring your friend
He say I see you in about ten, we met up at the Coney
Seen an old head with a cuban and a rolley
Nigga run that shit, you better not make a move
He tried to run back up in the Coney with his food
I seen my brother shot him, so I shot him too
Get that cuban and the rolley, fuck it, get the money too
I was trippin' hard, fuck the white and blue
Oh shit we gotta go, before we end up on the news

[Chorus]
Off a whole gram of molly, and my bitch think I'm trippin'
Now I'm clutchin' on my forty, all I can think about is drillin'
I hate fuck shit, slap a bitch nigga, kill a snitch nigga, rob a rich nigga
I think I'm trippin', I think I'm trippin'

[Verse 2]
So I called up sosa, he said we about to take off
Gotta keep that bitch on me
Cause they gonna start hatin' on me
So I walked outside with my Mac 10
Some niggas rolled up on me sayin', "Snap you shot my man"
So I upped my shit and let off about ten
Then they pulled off, now they got me on ten
Hopped up in my shit, then I peeled up
Pull up on them niggas seen they mans bleeding out
That's what you get for acting tough
You about to end up like your mans
Hopped out the whip, blew those niggas like a fan


[Chorus]
Off a whole gram of molly, and my bitch think I'm trippin'
Now I'm clutchin' on my forty, all I can think about is drillin'
I hate fuck shit, slap a bitch nigga, kill a snitch nigga, rob a rich nigga
I think I'm trippin', I think I'm trippin'

 

Sorry 'bout all the hate.

 

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Google Data Protection Regulation
 

Quote

 

The GDPR's many problems are by now well understood. The vague and expansive legislation has introduced regulatory uncertainty for businesses operating in member states. The combination of unclear wording and extreme financial penalties means that companies must spend billions of dollars to maybe be considered compliant.

This may be a headache for large firms, but hardly insurmountable: they have the deep pockets and armies of lawyers needed to stay on the right side of the law. But GDPR can be a death knell for small or not-yet-formed ventures, many of which are not even data-focused tech companies, who could never hope to spend enough money to comply.

Indeed, many companies and online platforms have decided to just shut their doors to Europe completely rather than risk the $25 million or 4 percent of annual revenue at stake for inadvertently running afoul of the GDPR. There are more unseen casualties as well. We will never know the developments that could have been that the GDPR prematurely quashed.

Consequently, the GDPR has had the unintended (but wholly predictable) consequence of consolidating market power behind the mega firms that privacy advocates hoped to take down. There is a reason that the GDPR earned its informal nickname of the "Google Data Protection Regulation": small adtech vendors lost dramatic EU market share after the GDPR was implemented. Only Google's market share increased.

It makes sense why Google would support another "GDPR" in the US. Last week, Pichai publicly confirmed these suspicions.

During the hearing, Rep. Eric Swalwell asked Pichai whether he thought the US should adopt a national GDPR-style data framework, requiring that users affirmatively "know, understand and consent" to all data usage. Pichai responded that he thought global regulatory harmonization is a good idea. But he didn't just offer vague platitudes: he said he actively supported the GDPR as a "well thought-out" law and thought it was a good idea to bring to the States.

Is anyone surprised? Although the company had to spend billions of dollars to try to be compliant with the GDPR, so did its competition. Google is one of the most well-capitalized companies in the world. It can afford compliance costs, its upstart competitors probably cannot.

 

And more regulations sold as attempts to rein in the powerful wind up entrenching the powerful. Again.

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How shall we censor? Let NYPD Count The Waze!
 

Quote

 

The application in question is Waze, a community-based navigation app that allows users to report car accidents, traffic jams, and police activity. While there isn't a specific feature that lets people report checkpoints meant to catch intoxicated offenders, users can leave comments specifying the type of police activity, according to The New York Times.

"Individuals who post the locations of DWI checkpoints may be engaging in criminal conduct since such actions could be intentional attempts to prevent and/or impair the administration of the DWI laws and other relevant criminal and traffic laws," reads a February 2, 2019 cease-and-desist letter to Google from Ann Prunty, the NYPD's acting deputy commissioner in charge of legal matters. "The posting of such information for public consumption is irresponsible since it only serves to aid impaired and intoxicated drivers to evade checkpoints and encourage reckless driving. Revealing the location of checkpoints puts those drivers, their passengers, and the general public at risk," Prunty adds in the letter, which was first reported by StreetsBlog NYC.

 

Cops have hated Waze since before Google bought it because people seem to mostly like to use it to speed.

It doesn't "only" serve to aid those people, though. I might choose an alternate route if Waze said I'd be going through a checkpoint ahead just because I don't wish to be bothered.

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