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Coquina012

Leakage into hull on CL 16 Wayfarer copy

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We have acquired a CL 16 Wayfarer copy, one of the Canadian made boats, and by appearance in very good shape.    I am not a fiberglass boat guy (we have six wooden boats right now) but the transaction was for a trailer and the boat ended up in our driveway too.  We sailed it yesterday for the first time, and it handled beautifully--no planing yet but winds were about 10 or 12.  I understand it is a double-hulled boat, BUT NOT WATER BALLASTED (I emphasize because if it is, this explains everything) and by inspection, we see no fractures or spidering under the hull, even where the keel runs up to the front rubber roller.  However, the boat has a serious drinking problem, worse than mine even,.  She gorges herself from the get-go.  The cockpit sole is dry, very clean, also no fractures,  but when we pulled the boat onto the ramp and let the lower drain plug out, it ran like bath water for ten minutes.  It must have had 20 or 30 gallons of water in it.  The water was newly acquired and clean--it had some flora in it consistent with the lake--and it wasn't old water that had been in there from sitting.  The ports along the centerboard revealed the case was full, nearly even to the cockpit sole floor.  Any speculation about the leakage?  How is the centerboard axle attached in these boats?  We can see a large stainless steel bolt that forms part of the centerboard pivot pin, and it is hand tight.  Is there a gasket there which requires greater torque for sealing?  We also have through-hull cockpit bailers, and although the gaskets on the top look pretty good, might that be a source of leakage?  No fractures along the stern...has to be either the bailer, the pivot pin, or a fracture within the centerboard case that we can see.  Any experience with these boat, or similar issues in Wayfarers?  

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Sailed again yesterday.  Have a better idea of what is going on.  Looks like the pivot pin--which is actually a SS threaded bolt, --is either stripped or not seating correctly on the threaded side, therefore running a slight stream into the hull while heeled.  I can see how running aground hard with the CB down could torque this and damage or break the fitting.  I can see several ways to fix it, but what would standard repair be?  Again, I build wooden boats so the repair would be annoying but dead obvious  on a wooden boat centerboard trunk.  I have a visual through ports on both sides.  The difficulty is on starboard side, which is the threaded side, the bolt turns into what you see as the back of the centerboard trunk. Therefore, the threaded insert is not visible from starboard side portal.    This morning I will remove CB bolt, remove centerboard, inspect damage, photograph. Anyone have any standard repairs on this type of thing?  I would guess this is not an uncommon issue on a boat that has been used...  

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Alan, I see you are in Bay Area.  This might be the boat you were looking at.  This one was over on Treasure Island in a yacht club yard.  It was in very good shape when I bought it about two weeks ago.  We have done a week long trip sailing in Oregon and it is is in bad need of a shave, but the boat was in remarkably good shape.  The seller believed the sails had been lost or stolen, so he sold it to me for price of trailer.  But when we came to pick it up, he went to wash the trailer and boat (had been sitting two years) and he saw the sailbag sitting on a shelf in a shed next to the saltwater wash area, with intact sails.  He said he had put them there two years prior, obviously when he washed the boat coming out of the water, and thought they blew out of his truck or were stolen.  I offered to cancel the deal and said he couldn't keep paying yard fees, and gave it to me for the trailer.     SO NOW I WANT AN OSPREY. 

 

I have it sorted out.  The pivot pin had backed out of its threaded insert (probably a SS nut embedded in fiberglass) and jammed at a cocked, odd angle into the CB trunk insert.  So it was supporting the CB, but grinding on the lip of the insert, and allowing water to pour in like a sieve.  It was my intent to pull the CB out and try to repair whatever it was, but first I tried simply re-inserting.  It worked.  We sailed in hard winds yesterday, about 3 hours; we didn't have an anemometer but I am certain we were in 25s with gusts well into the 30s--and it is my policy to underreport wind speeds rather than exaggerate.   We took on about a 1/2 gallon of water.   It was an exhausting fight with the tiller in winds that hard.  The boat performed beautifully, and planed off and on the whole day.   I had an 8 year old with me and my wife and he took great pride hanging out over the rail.  I had some moments of terror.  But it is a very, very good boat, even though plastic.  

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