Para Handy

How do you define bad crew?

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I'll start. I once had the misfortune to sail with a guy who would come on deck at night wearing a head torch. Did wonders for everyone else's night vision. He couldn't understand why yachts weren't fitted with headlights.

Another bloke who, because he was a bodybuilder, though he was God's gift to winches. Yes, he was strong, as his ability to rip the clew out of a jib when the lazy sheet got jambed testified. And because of his bodybuilder's diet he had the worst flatulence I have ever encountered. We eventually made him sleep in the cockpit as the stench was unbearable.

Despite being told several times not to take a turn round her hand when hauling on the sheets, one female crewmember broke two fingers and dislocated another two during a gybe when the mainsheet pulled her hand into the blocks.

Then you have the ones who complain about being left behind, saying, "I was only quarter of an hour late." when we had a tide to catch.

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Bad crew is the one you were counting on to be there, then they bail on you at the last minute.

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I sailed on the big grey boats. 

Somehow those boats manage to (generally) get where they are supposed to be while loaded with all kinds of dangerous stuff (like bombs and aviation fuel), shoot at things, get shot at, and then (generally) return home safely.  All this with a crew that includes borderline psychotics, sociopaths, drunks, drug addicts, criminals, ex-cons and people with very low intelligence (some barely literate / numerate).  

I think there was an expression that there are no bad crew members only bad leaders.  Not really sure how true that was.  But we worked with what we had and made the best of it.  

 

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While I will agree that as a skipper you sometimes just have to work with what you've got,  sometimes you get a real head-shaker.

I'm generally pretty accommodating of having a guest or two on when asked and for years was actively developing race crew from casual sailors that came down for the Friday night beer can races out of the Ala Wai - have had some success training up folks from rail-meat to decent hands and a lot of great times with visitors to our fair shores,  from parts all over the world.

ONE guys stands out.  Crazy Japanese dude that wore a new foul-weather jacket (first warning,  nobody wears that stuff here unless going to another island) - anyway,  he went from reasonably communicative to suddenly very non-English comprehending as he dove to the leeward cockpit  (on a ULDB, in breeze)  to....chainsmoke… and grin back at us with crazy eyes.  Didn't go full mutiny but didn't contribute any effort to the actual sailing - just thought we were there to take him for a boat-ride ?

 

 

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I don't go offshore without having taken the prospective crew member an an overnight - its amazing how quickly the turds shine an night.

Get scared and want to shrink or drop sails, they cleat sheets, make a mess below, won't volunteer to clean up dinner or the bilges, won't go forward for jib changes, aren't on deck on time for sail or watch changes, etc. All the while boasting how they are gods gift......

 

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16 minutes ago, Great Red Shark said:

While I will agree that as a skipper you sometimes just have to work with what you've got,  sometimes you get a real head-shaker.

I'm generally pretty accommodating of having a guest or two on when asked and for years was actively developing race crew from casual sailors that came down for the Friday night beer can races out of the Ala Wai - have had some success training up folks from rail-meat to decent hands and a lot of great times with visitors to our fair shores,  from parts all over the world.

ONE guys stands out.  Crazy Japanese dude that wore a new foul-weather jacket (first warning,  nobody wears that stuff here unless going to another island) - anyway,  he went from reasonably communicative to suddenly very non-English comprehending as he dove to the leeward cockpit  (on a ULDB, in breeze)  to....chainsmoke… and grin back at us with crazy eyes.  Didn't go full mutiny but didn't contribute any effort to the actual sailing - just thought we were there to take him for a boat-ride ?

 

 

Sh*t, I bet I know this dude....

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6 hours ago, Brass said:

Sunny JIm?  The Tar?

Nah. They're fine. It's Hurricane Jack you have to look out for.

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12 hours ago, Para Handy said:

Despite being told several times not to take a turn round her hand when hauling on the sheets, one female crewmember broke two fingers and dislocated another two during a gybe when the mainsheet pulled her hand into the blocks.

Fuckeng luckey break rite theire.                             :)

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The worst is that person, usually new to the boat, who, for some reason, has the skipper's ear and keeps loudly giving really bad tactical advice, usually loudly and usually based upon some article they just read.

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I've been really bad crew, jump on a boat and point out the sails are toast, the bottom is  rough,  a ton of cruising gear is stowed below,  the crew is  a bunch a clowns who are dangerous when it's blowin', and worst of all the skipper/driver can't steer worth a shit.

I generally don't get invited back, 'cept when the boat jumps up to third after being season long at the DFL finish slot.  How can that be done?  Endlessly tutor the driver/trimmer/sail transition people during the race, and the fact that your competition is in even worse shape.  And keep it simple, no fancy maneuvers.

 I think you've got to be honest with the owner about your observations; if he's smart he'll take to heart.  If not, you don't want to be racing with him/her.   I'm not braggin',  I've raced on boats where the boat,  every crew and the owner were tits and I said nothing, done my job and hiked like a  monkey, totally absorbed in a learning mode.

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6 minutes ago, Somebody Else said:

The worst is that person, usually new to the boat, who, for some reason, has the skipper's ear and keeps loudly giving really bad tactical advice, usually loudly and usually based upon some article they just read.

True, except when their calls are generally spot on and benefit the boat.  Loud is not bad if it's the right call.

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Pretty much grateful to anyone who shows up on a regular basis.  Even more grateful to those who know what they are doing, or at least eager to contribute and improve.  But pet peeves:  The guy who is always late.  The guy who is the only guy to use the head every week, even though we are on the water for an hour and ten minutes a week.  The guy who makes a move to the windward side but won't sit on the rail, much less hike.

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People who do not pay attention and learn.

If you do not learn a specific beginner position, take for example on my 26' uldb the tweakers or twings. One on and One off, after a few races it should be easy if you are interested and paying attention.
If you do not pay attention and learn, it shows you are not interested or are unable to learn.

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The guy who hits the committee boat under power an hour before the start of a Bermuda race, and damages the rig.

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the one who pukes on the liferaft................

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The guy who during a local distance race on a 54’ boat tells us his only experience is on beach cats right after he cuts his pinky and ring finger off in a huge turning block because he unwrapped the jib sheet and never let go.

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55 minutes ago, Kevlar Edge said:

The guy who during a local distance race on a 54’ boat tells us his only experience is on beach cats right after he cuts his pinky and ring finger off in a huge turning block because he unwrapped the jib sheet and never let go.

Having seen what happens when a ring is caught in a turnbuckle split-pin when someone jumps into the dinghy, I no longer allow rings to be worn on board my yacht. (belly; nose; nipple or finger; clit on the other hand is allowed)

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Whats wrong with boob rings?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

944743.jpg

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AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRRRRRRGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!

 

EYE BLEACH, STAT!!

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5 hours ago, dacapo said:

the one who pukes on the liferaft................

It's not like you ever wanted to use it anyway.

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I have never seen a woman with that much hair on her chest.

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The one who tries to flush a baby wipe down the heads on a 700 mile offshore.

Very clear instructions on proper use of the facilities were given before the race, nothing goes in unless you have eaten it first.

Same guy appeared in the main saloon a few days later with a handfull of brown baby wipes after taking a shit in the re-purposed bilge bucket and asked "so where do I put these?"

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The crew who treats brand new sails terribly. Stuffs them down, steps on them, doesn’t put them away properly. Crew who doesn’t put the new rudder in the bag then drops it. Then there’s the crew who refuses to help do anything when asked.

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On 7/6/2018 at 9:56 PM, Para Handy said:

I'll start. I once had the misfortune to sail with a guy who would come on deck at night wearing a head torch. Did wonders for everyone else's night vision.

i have the prefect solution to overly keen newbie head touch wearers. Get them to sit forward of the mast and tell them to light the tell tail on the jib. Vital that they do not stop. After an hour their neck is so fucked they faint. So make them wear a harness.

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57 minutes ago, LB 15 said:

i have the prefect solution to overly keen newbie head touch wearers. Get them to sit forward of the mast and tell them to light the tell tail on the jib. Vital that they do not stop. After an hour their neck is so fucked they faint. So make them wear a harness.

9036d0b7d163090d10d81b90289f9e05.thumb.jpg.907378a23f93b6c16f01f3e75b6f55fe.jpg

Never liked wearing them myself either, especially the IOR Maxi version.

 

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3 hours ago, LB 15 said:

i have the prefect solution to overly keen newbie head touch wearers. Get them to sit forward of the mast and tell them to light the tell tail on the jib. Vital that they do not stop. After an hour their neck is so fucked they faint. So make them wear a harness.

I'll disagree when using the modern head torches with red lights and low illumination options (even a bright SOS feature). .

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3 hours ago, axolotl said:

I'll disagree when using the modern head torches with red lights and low illumination options (even a bright SOS feature). .

Yes like many things they are safe in the right hands. But when the newbie turns to tell the helm something with high beam on, I want to tear them of their heads and stick them somewhere where the sun don't shine.

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On 7/6/2018 at 7:36 PM, bugger said:

I sailed on the big grey boats. 

Somehow those boats manage to (generally) get where they are supposed to be while loaded with all kinds of dangerous stuff (like bombs and aviation fuel), shoot at things, get shot at, and then (generally) return home safely.  All this with a crew that includes borderline psychotics, sociopaths, drunks, drug addicts, criminals, ex-cons and people with very low intelligence (some barely literate / numerate).  

I think there was an expression that there are no bad crew members only bad leaders.  Not really sure how true that was.  But we worked with what we had and made the best of it.  

 

When I raced, it was for fun. It wasn't my job to sort out miscreants, idiots, assholes and the chronically lazy and/or disorganized. When a crew member became stressful and they did not respond to our polite conversations about the problem,  their invitation to sail was withdrawn.

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had one gal,  god's gift to sailing ,  when she stepped on the boat wouldn't stop taking until she stepped off..    .  it was a two day regatta... i have purposely forgoten her name..

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I define bad crew very simply.

Will I invite them back?

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All of the rudeness, obliviousness, no-show, equipment breakage, "chatty-kathy" complaints are small potatoes. I had all of that. I sailed a shit boat so I had to cast a wide net for crew, so I netted the entire spectrum of stupidity.

What broke my back was the willful disregard of the safety rules that I made 100% crystal clear beforehand. I refuse to stand before a board of inquiry and answer questions because someone was too fucking stupid to take common, basic steps to preserve their own life.

Sure, I could have ejected just those individuals but racing just isn't worth it to me to wonder every time, "Is this the time I lose someone?"

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While we're fixing up our Olson 30 in the yard, a 20 something came up to us and asked if he could crew. Referred to me, I asked him what he liked to do. He said I usually drive. 

After I digested this, I informed him that that position was filled. We did ask him once, and he was not to bueno.      I hope he CAN drive.  

On a C&C 61, we had a full of himself east coaster who thought he was God's gift. After we put his boots in the deep freeze, he didn't get the hint. So on another off watch, we put handfulls of powdered sugar in his sleeping bag. Try it some time. It makes a suspiciously white stickygoo. He was never invited back. We

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

I define bad crew very simply.

Will I invite them back?

This. I've had the axolotl type on my boat before - definitely knew his way around a race course, had sailed some good high tech boats, and had some race results to back it up. Note that I have yet to call him a good sailor. In my mind, a good sailor takes some time to evaluate not only the boat, but crew that's there - strengths, weaknesses, what could be done better, what looks good for the level of racing currently happening, and whether there is interest in bringing a program to a higher level. Anyone who starts barking orders at my crew (or at me) is never getting invited back. I started racing my own boat and building my own team to get away from that kind of egotistical crap and have found we race well together with no yelling, even when things go wrong. As a result, I've got some rockstars that sail with me and make me (and them, and the boat) look good pretty consistently. "Will I invite them back" may be the best summation of the criteria.

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On 7/7/2018 at 9:36 AM, Kevlar Edge said:

The guy who during a local distance race on a 54’ boat tells us his only experience is on beach cats right after he cuts his pinky and ring finger off in a huge turning block because he unwrapped the jib sheet and never let go.

I remember that. Near Montauk

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19 hours ago, ryley said:

Anyone who starts barking orders at my crew (or at me) is never getting invited back. 

Didn't say I was barking orders at anyone, just that if something's not right I'll speak up, as in "Should we try softening the backstay  to see if more sag in the forestay powers up the genoa in this light air?"  As opposed to keeping silent as we watch boat transoms get smaller.

Concerning barkers,  it depends on who it is.  If he/she's a paid MIR  aboard for a single race for training purposes  then if that's their personality the unpleasantness is trumped by  their expertise.  You'd really kick somebody like Dee Smith off your boat just because he has a big mouth?

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17 hours ago, footlong said:

I remember that. Near Montauk

Yup we were leading by a lot and had to pull in to montauk harbor and unload him on an ambulance. Fun days

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4 minutes ago, Kevlar Edge said:

Yup we were leading by a lot and had to pull in to montauk harbor and unload him on an ambulance. Fun days

At least the food was good.

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1 hour ago, axolotl said:

Didn't say I was barking orders at anyone, just that if something's not right I'll speak up, as in "Should we try softening the backstay  to see if more sag in the forestay powers up the genoa in this light air?"  As opposed to keeping silent as we watch boat transoms get smaller.

Concerning barkers,  it depends on who it is.  If he/she's a paid MIR  aboard for a single race for training purposes  then if that's their personality the unpleasantness is trumped by  their expertise.  You'd really kick somebody like Dee Smith off your boat just because he has a big mouth?

Dee Smith couldn't get on my boat because, you know, handicapped and all.

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yeah I think we had rosemary roasted leg of lamb that night

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Most faults can be atoned for by turning up for your night watch 5 minutes early.

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bad attitude, complainers, whiners & pessimists, insultingly poor effort (like they are trying to send a message) and not proactive.

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Having a new bowman watch for boats / call the line, then he proceeds to sit in the bow pulpit and look aft.  WTF!

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I'll add one other comment

 

Another person who is not normally on the boat, but is a competent sailor, looked around at the crew we had that day and said " I feel like I am on the Island of Misfit Toys"

Funnier yet, one of the "toys" said a couple of weeks afterwards "no one wants a Charlie in the box"

 

Priceless

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19 hours ago, Whinging Pom said:

Most faults can be atoned for by turning up for your night watch 5 minutes early.

Ideally carrying a mug of rum laced cocoa. :rolleyes:

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Anyone who sucks the joy out of sailing. I don't actually care about your skill, if you're being a prick then I'm not interested. Conversely, if I have to literally tell you everything but how to breath and you're not catching on. After a few tacks, when the helm calls out "prepare to tack", go to the spot I told you to the last three times.

 

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I once sailed with a guy who was clearly god's gift to sailing. It was a pretty big breeze and he talked a pretty big game about "everyone needs to stay on the rail for the long tight reaching leg if we wanna have a shot at winning."  Ok... I can appreciate that kind of enthusiasm.

He then proceeded to try to piss to windward while sitting on the high side and seemed genuinely surprised when he managed to urinate all over himself and the rest of us who were sitting aft of his spot. Clearly the physics of windward vs. leeward and forward momentum upwind escaped him. About 40 min later, he got cold and went down below.

He was on the boat for precisely 1 race. We didn't even ask if he wanted to do the return delivery.

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On 7/10/2018 at 11:47 AM, Kevlar Edge said:

Yup we were leading by a lot and had to pull in to montauk harbor and unload him on an ambulance. Fun days

Did you give him the finger(s)?

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On 7/10/2018 at 6:48 PM, axolotl said:

Didn't say I was barking orders at anyone, just that if something's not right I'll speak up, as in "Should we try softening the backstay  to see if more sag in the forestay powers up the genoa in this light air?"  As opposed to keeping silent as we watch boat transoms get smaller.

Concerning barkers,  it depends on who it is.  If he/she's a paid MIR  aboard for a single race for training purposes  then if that's their personality the unpleasantness is trumped by  their expertise.  You'd really kick somebody like Dee Smith off your boat just because he has a big mouth?

People have. :P

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On 7/6/2018 at 2:36 PM, bugger said:

I sailed on the big grey boats. 

Somehow those boats manage to (generally) get where they are supposed to be while loaded with all kinds of dangerous stuff (like bombs and aviation fuel), shoot at things, get shot at, and then (generally) return home safely.  All this with a crew that includes borderline psychotics, sociopaths, drunks, drug addicts, criminals, ex-cons and people with very low intelligence (some barely literate / numerate).  

I think there was an expression that there are no bad crew members only bad leaders.  Not really sure how true that was.  But we worked with what we had and made the best of it.  

 

Well said.

And the leaders who deserved the most respect were the ones who led without having to resort to sociopathy, savagery, trickery, divisiveness, belittling, petulance and allowing a toxic atmosphere of gossip to infect that toxic mix of personalities...

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My favourite crew ever also happened to be assembled by the skipper who I’ve  yet to have a found a peer to. He was slightly above average as a sailor but worthy of high esteem as a leader.

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31 minutes ago, Peanut Butter said:

The one who cries when it’s his turn in the barrel...

Sounds as if you enjoy your turn though...

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Does handing out Crew Shirts upon arrival, and when we take a Crew Picture 90 minutes later, he already pawned it off, count?

 

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1 hour ago, mad said:

Sounds as if you enjoy your turn though...

Why. You looking for a date, sweet cheeks...? 

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2 minutes ago, Peanut Butter said:

Why. You looking for a date, sweet cheeks...? 

You really need to up your game....

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1 hour ago, mad said:

Sounds as if you enjoy your turn though...

Why. You looking for a date, sweet cheeks...? 

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42 minutes ago, mad said:

You really need to up your game....

You’re right. I should aim higher. 

Is your brother a doctor? 

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My worst was in the '96 PH-MAC where it was apparent even on Sunday Morning  that we were in for a very slow race.  Having come on the heels of a few quick rides, we were not fully prepared for a Tuesday finish.  So, we started talking rationing on Sunday night and the fellow who cooked had a solid plan that would get us to Tues noon from which none of us would die.  So, a fellow who had done nothing to help make the boat go fast other than sit on the rail wakes up Monday around noon, gets out of his bunk in his boxers scratching his nuts, goes to the cooler, reaches down and takes all the remaining lunch meat (our full crew's lunch for Monday) and wolfs it.  I turn to the guy across pipe berths and said, if we kill and gut him now, it will be still be edible.  I was not kidding.  We finished Tuesday evening and were second in our class.  The cool part, none of us questioned boat prep which included finishing every MAC I started on both sides.  So what if you miss a few meals but in the future, I would have a dozen MREs somewhere.  

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Brother of co-owner/tactitian, the guy hadn’t sailed on the boat before, not attended any of the training sessions and told to keep on the rail or out of the way. 

Doing 16 knts under a huge asym with a huge 180degree wind shift approaching. We all get in position for the drop, me out on the pointy end ready to spike, when the skipper yells “Tack”. Unfortunately, when the Skipper does I can’t reach the Tack because said Brother of co-owner had released the whole tack line. Kite hits the water like an anchor, ensues furious tugging at the back of the boat to get it in. Wind shift hit us and the mast fell. So ends our S2H just South of Jervis Bay. He didn’t even realize what he had done. 

I guess my take away is: when in doubt cut the Tack line, but not really my goto move in a long race. 

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On 7/9/2018 at 5:36 PM, ryley said:

This. I've had the axolotl type on my boat before - definitely knew his way around a race course, had sailed some good high tech boats, and had some race results to back it up. Note that I have yet to call him a good sailor. In my mind, a good sailor takes some time to evaluate not only the boat, but crew that's there - strengths, weaknesses, what could be done better, what looks good for the level of racing currently happening, and whether there is interest in bringing a program to a higher level. Anyone who starts barking orders at my crew (or at me) is never getting invited back.

When I crew, I keep my mouth shut and only volunteer comments or suggestions about sailing when there's an immediate safety issue (which is rare).

"It's better to remain silent and be thought a fool, than to speak and remove all doubt".

 

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Bad crew is anyone who dare's to question my greatness or any call I make. They are the ones that don't regularly pinch themselves in disbelief that they get to sail with me. Bad crew offer opinions and don't understand that it is never my fault. I am the Owner God damit!

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Last 40 or so miles of a 300 mile offshore race. Blowing 35 gusting 40+.... absolutely hard on the wind (pointing like a Japanese Tour Guide) slightly too much sail up, but laying the headland 4 or 5 miles to windward, after which we can crack-off 10 degrees and send it, so decision is to stick with what we had (working jib) and live with it, because we'd lose enough changing down to heavy weather jib that we'd have to tack back out to lay the headland. So we have a crew of 10... all sitting on the rail,  legs over, except driver and main trim who had their backs hard against the liferlines... it was cold and wet and we were wearing plenty of green ones.... except for the one crew who was sitting down below on the saloon setee.... because they were cold.

 

Also, any crew who walks on your sails

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7 hours ago, Cal20sailor said:

My worst was in the '96 PH-MAC where it was apparent even on Sunday Morning  that we were in for a very slow race.  Having come on the heels of a few quick rides, we were not fully prepared for a Tuesday finish.  So, we started talking rationing on Sunday night and the fellow who cooked had a solid plan that would get us to Tues noon from which none of us would die.  So, a fellow who had done nothing to help make the boat go fast other than sit on the rail wakes up Monday around noon, gets out of his bunk in his boxers scratching his nuts, goes to the cooler, reaches down and takes all the remaining lunch meat (our full crew's lunch for Monday) and wolfs it.  I turn to the guy across pipe berths and said, if we kill and gut him now, it will be still be edible.  I was not kidding.  We finished Tuesday evening and were second in our class.  The cool part, none of us questioned boat prep which included finishing every MAC I started on both sides.  So what if you miss a few meals but in the future, I would have a dozen MREs somewhere.  

During one of the slower Chi Mac races, we did run out of food.  The skipper remembered he had stashed some MRE's on the boat, ones that had the catalytic flameless heaters.  Tasted awful.  There was soon a line forming at the head. 

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19 hours ago, Peanut Butter said:

My favourite crew ever also happened to be assembled by the skipper who I’ve  yet to have a found a peer to. He was slightly above average as a sailor but worthy of high esteem as a leader.

mine was a gal who liked to wear tennis skirts occaisionally..  we practiced gybing alot..

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On 7/6/2018 at 3:17 PM, DarkHorse said:

I don't go offshore without having taken the prospective crew member overnight -

 

 

 

  You do realize that since the #MeToo movement we no longer have to sleep with the skipper before getting a cew spot.

 

Harvey.jpg.5cf99b13041bfa8d8be33c959a1a78db.jpg

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Like a bad tack... a bad crew is usually the result of a bad decision .    

I try not to blame the person but analyze my selection process.  

Here is a family story. Our son brought his new girlfriend racing with us one weekend last year. I think he thought it would be a great way to "meet the parents" and to reassure us that the family racing squad was not about to be disbanded.  She was a sweetheart but (gosh I hope she isnt reading this) hopeless in every way.

I was lying in bed with my husband later that evening and turned to him and said "Were we awful?".   H paused before answering, and chose his words carefully "Well I think you might have been a bit harsh on her at times" .   Eye "Like when?"   H "I think maybe less profanity when explaining the difference between leeward and windward but... (pause)...... her feelings were probably  hurt when you told her that she should go inside the cuddy cabin and lie down over the keel out of the way until the race was over. (cough) Although I must admit it was not a bad idea."

I sprung out and called my son at 11pm .   " Dinner next Saturday at a fancy restaurant at our expense. Sorry, lets do this the old fashioned way"  

I am pleased to report that they are still together. She really did turn out to be a sweetheart.  She has come sailing (not racing) with us many more times, learnt the ropes and I hear they are contemplating doing some racing together......Alls well that ends well.      

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56 minutes ago, EYESAILOR said:

  You do realize that since the #MeToo movement we no longer have to sleep with the skipper before getting a cew spot.

There's a downside to everything.

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14 hours ago, LB 15 said:

Bad crew is anyone who dare's to question my greatness or any call I make. They are the ones that don't regularly pinch themselves in disbelief that they get to sail with me. Bad crew offer opinions and don't understand that it is never my fault. I am the Owner God damit!

a good skipper can figure out some way to blame anyone for anything.

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1 hour ago, Parma said:

a good skipper can figure out some way to blame anyone for anything.

Thast a goode skippere?  Ime am thicking no.                           :)

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On ‎7‎/‎6‎/‎2018 at 2:36 PM, bugger said:

I sailed on the big grey boats. 

Somehow those boats manage to (generally) get where they are supposed to be while loaded with all kinds of dangerous stuff (like bombs and aviation fuel), shoot at things, get shot at, and then (generally) return home safely.  All this with a crew that includes borderline psychotics, sociopaths, drunks, drug addicts, criminals, ex-cons and people with very low intelligence (some barely literate / numerate).  

I think there was an expression that there are no bad crew members only bad leaders.  Not really sure how true that was.  But we worked with what we had and made the best of it.  

 

Pity the poor dumb bastard who speaks up when the crew is getting dressed down .

"Sir, I believe this was a leadership problem".

 

All crew have some degree of potential. But out of the box, ready for prime time, well there just isn't a deep pool of those. So training become imperative. Find and teach those that know their way around a boat but need tutorial to develop or hone a specific skillset. Also you have to try and match people with their interests. If you have a person who really, really wants to trim spinnaker, let them. Or Jib or Main or Mast or Pit or Bow, whatever they fancy. Folks do better when their tasks are matched with their interests.

That said, sometimes you just gotta shake hands and part ways.

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