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SeattleB

Newbie from Seattle eyeing getting this boat...

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Afternoon from the PNW everyone.  I moved here 18 months ago and caught the sailing bug, after living in land locked Oklahoma for 20 years.  My wife just got back from R2AK on a friends boat.  She has more experience than me now, but were both pretty new to boats.  I now am really jealous I didn't go on R2AK.  But there is always next year, or buy a boat of my own.  So I am on the hunt, but going into this very blindly.  My main requirements that I know for sure are: around 30 ft long, needs to have a head and room for 3-4 people for a weekend, nice galley, $22k or so, etc.  I am not going to race it, just take out in the sound during the weekends (perhaps a yearly longer trip).  

I am not worried that much about yearly costs, just want to make sure I have a very reliable boat.  I am a bit concerned about being able to resell the boat if I have to move in 2-3 years.  I found this boat on craigslist/YW that seems to fit the bill, its looks in amazing shape after a restoration.  Its seems to click all the right buttons, buts its a bit weird its been for sale for at least a year or more. 

What do you guys think about this boat?

 

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1971/Newport-30-3088084/Anacortes/WA/United-States?refSource=standard listing#.W0RJzNVKipo

 

 

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Renovations make a boat more appealing on the market, but usually add almost zero value, and this one seems a bit over priced IMO. 

The biggest issue with this boat is hanging off the transom.  You may not mind an outboard, but generally speaking few people will consider a 30 or more foot cruiser with an outboard or even gas inboard.  Makes it very difficult to sell.   People expect an inboard diesel once you get into the 30 ft range.

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Lots of new stuff, engine sails instrumentation etc, almost a perfect newbie boat, it saves you from spending in wrong stuff.

A good but beaten down one cost 10.000, spend an evening tallying the costs of the new stuff and you will have an insight if its worth it.
I would go and visit it.

Engine, yeah outboard is for some a nono, for some a yes. Just market it right in the future; ready for electronic propulsion :)
They had inboards, so it could handle an inboard.

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Thats a good boat, you're better off buying the best one you can afford even if its a few k more than an average example. You simply cannot make up the difference in price with your labour. As for the OB, 6 of one and half a dozen of the other, its quiet, out of the way, super easy to maintain etc. On the down side, not the best in short steep chop, not as much range as a diesel, exposed to breaking seas etc but that should not be a problem if not doing passages.

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That boat is way overpriced and shouldn't have an outboard.  Outboard motors have their place, but not on 30 foot cruisers. 

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It looks like someone spent some time and money on this boat. If it had new sails, it wouldn't be that bad of a deal. I've had both outboards and inboard diesels. I'd prefer an inboard diesel for cruising. As said above it would have better range, better alternator for charging, quieter, better in heavy chop, etc. Definitely advantages to an outboard as well. It would be $1800 to replace that outboard (that one is probably new). If something major breaks, you can just go get a new one. They are easy pull off, take home and do maintenance and a lot less weight if you do end up racing. A new diesel is going to be 10-15K, but with good maintenance will last a lot longer. You'll want to have a sail ready to go if it does get choppy, starts to swamp and pull out in the waves, but you probably won't be running into that often in the Puget Sound during the summer.

A Catalina 30 is another good boat to look at. I had one and actually raced it. A good bang for the buck. They seem to hold their value well and are easy to sell. Avoid the atomic 4 gasoline inboard common to many of the older ones.

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If you are going to cruise offshore, then the outboard has the disadvantage of hobbyhorsing out of the water in a head sea, which can damage the motor (overspeeding, and water intakes come out of water and you'll overheat) and be ineffective at the worst time, if you're trying to get away from a lee shore for example.   In sheltered waters, you'd probably be okay.

I make no comment on the price.  The boat looks very clean. 

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Newports were lightly built boats, but a good one should be fine for the PNW, and has the advantage of less boat to push with the outboard. It is not an offshore boat anyway. We do have some short chop and tidal rips around here and I have been a few situations even in summer where an outboard would be a liability. I agree getting the price down would be good because for just a few thousand more you should be able to find a solid 30 footer with an inboard diesel.

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My Catalina 25 would hobbyhorse in regular chop around Puget Sound and the outboard would get out of the water.  The Newport is 5' longer and it'll be a lot worse.  Docking a bigger/heavier boat with an outboard also just isn't fun, especially if the engine controls aren't lead to the cockpit.  I just wouldn't consider a 30' cruiser with an outboard and would prefer to have an Atomic-4 over an outboard.  It would be a different thing if this were a race boat and the outboard was only ever used to get in and out of the harbor.

I think you can do a lot better in the same price range.  I sold my Pearson 28-2 for $21k two years ago with almost new sails (and a pretty large inventory), good running Yanmar diesel, clean and fresh bottom, new standing and running rigging, and all deck fittings rebedded.  I don't know what Steele's old Tartan 30 sold for, but it was also a much nicer boat (we were on the same dock). Both of these are also much better built boats than the Newport.

I would watch Craigslist more than Yachtworld for under $20k boats.  Most brokers have a minimum $2k brokerage fee (or 10%), so broker sold boats tend to have a larger markup at $20k and under.

Good deals happen in fall when there are less people buying and sellers are motivated not to pay for winter moorage.  Fall/winter is also the main time when you can get a slip at Shilshole or pretty much anywhere else besides Elliot Bay.

 

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For less $$, I think I would rather have this local (to you) Ranger 32:  https://seattle.craigslist.org/skc/boa/d/ranger-32-sailboat-racer/6639503736.html

Not renovated, but looks to be well maintained with a diesel IB and half decent older sails.  Probably lots of other even nicer boats in the Seattle, Vancouver, Portland areas - but this one was pretty much the first one I stumbled across in Seattle CL

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BUT!  If you want to do the R2AK in it, it’s a hell of a lot easier to take the outboard off than digging out an inboard...

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22 minutes ago, Amati said:

BUT!  If you want to do the R2AK in it, it’s a hell of a lot easier to take the outboard off than digging out an inboard...

Very true, but you probably want something a lot lighter and with just enough room for 3 people. Like a Moore 24. 

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This is the fun part of the forum; shopping with somebody else's money!

Most important is to get a boat that is solid and feels right when you're on it.  It's not necessary to obsess over design minutia, just go sailing!

A quick look on craig's list found quite a few candidates, either better boats (the Ranger 32) or a lot less money.  

Several Catalina 30's, although a few have had some odd color or dodger choices.  Mixed reviews on the Atom 4 gas engines. 

There's an Ericson 27 I'd look at for $7K, or a nice Islander 28 (I have one of those), that might be priced a bit high at $13K.  Two couples need to get along well at that size. 

 

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4 hours ago, 12 metre said:

For less $$, I think I would rather have this local (to you) Ranger 32:  https://seattle.craigslist.org/skc/boa/d/ranger-32-sailboat-racer/6639503736.html

Not renovated, but looks to be well maintained with a diesel IB and half decent older sails.  Probably lots of other even nicer boats in the Seattle, Vancouver, Portland areas - but this one was pretty much the first one I stumbled across in Seattle CL

This boat just jumped back on the market after a buyer backed out.  Any big concern with this one being easy to operate with just two people?  

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That is a much better looking boat. I’d find out why the buyer backed out and see if there is a survey that they had done and which is available.

One minor thing: CNG isn’t really available anymore, budget about $1500 to $2000 to switch to a propane system and stove. I had to do this on my boat too.  It seems like it is still in your budget even with that. 

32’ will probably feel overwhelming to two brand new sailors, but so will 25’. With experience that is an easy size to single hand. 

Get any boat surveyed too, ads always look better than reality. 

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12 minutes ago, Alex W said:

That is a much better looking boat. I’d find out why the buyer backed out and see if there is a survey that they had done and which is available.

One minor thing: CNG isn’t really available anymore, budget about $1500 to $2000 to switch to a propane system and stove. I had to do this on my boat too.  It seems like it is still in your budget even with that. 

32’ will probably feel overwhelming to two brand new sailors, but so will 25’. With experience that is an easy size to single hand. 

Get any boat surveyed too, ads always look better than reality. 

Whats the reason for the lack of places to refill CNG?  Is there anywhere in Seattle that does it?  

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21 posts in and no one has given the greeting? fuck this place has jumped the shark.

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7 minutes ago, basketcase said:

21 posts in and no one has given the greeting? fuck this place has jumped the shark.

last time i told a newb i got blasted .. this place has definitely jumped the shark .

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25 minutes ago, bigrpowr said:

last time i told a newb i got blasted .. this place has definitely jumped the shark .

Maybe it has just passed puberty?

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1 hour ago, bigrpowr said:

mid 80's built catalina 30 ?

This. ^^^^^^^

Hundreds of them still sailing. Decent build quality for what it is. Good resale market. Try to find one with a 21hp diesel.  The ones with the older Universal 11ish hp diesel are a bit underpowered. Almost 11' beam so lots of interior space. Survey is essential.  Any surveyor worth his/her fee knows what to look for.

 

 

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1 hour ago, SeattleB said:

Whats the reason for the lack of places to refill CNG?  Is there anywhere in Seattle that does it?  

It is a dead system, no one has made parts for them for years. I think Sure Marine was the last place in Seattle doing CNG and I’ve heard that they stopped about a year ago. 

There are CNG stations for cars in Seattle (Dr Dans in Ballard was one, he is also a sailor) and maybe they can refill a tank.

Some ranges can have the burners and regulator swapped for propane ones. Ours was missing basic safety gear (a thermocouple to turn off the gas if the flame blew out) so it was better just to replace the whole thing. 

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3 hours ago, basketcase said:

21 posts in and no one has given the greeting? fuck this place has jumped the shark.

Especially considering he said in OP that he has a wife, and that she's sailed more than him. That was an open invitation for the obligatory welcome.

 

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Moving right along....A Newport 30 was never intended to be powered by an outboard.  Old Atomic 4 gas or Universal diesel I think were the 'normal' power plants.  CNG, yup, that means you don't have a cooking system on board until you do something else.  Lots of Newport 30's had the old pressure alcohol system---ewww.

Knock the price down by enough to fix those two items and maybe it's not too bad. But I never liked their plastic (not marelon) through hulls that were held in place by caulking or 5200...  Otherwise than that, the 30's make good serviceable Puget Sound cruisers/weekenders.

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1 hour ago, albanyguy said:

Especially considering he said in OP that he has a wife, and that she's sailed more than him. That was an open invitation for the obligatory welcome.

 

The joys of living in Oklahoma for most of my life.  Lots of wind, but not much water.

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Hobot very much like that particular Ranger 29 (too bad the site keeps Amazon spamming me though).

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11 hours ago, 12 metre said:

For less $$, I think I would rather have this local (to you) Ranger 32:  https://seattle.craigslist.org/skc/boa/d/ranger-32-sailboat-racer/6639503736.html

Not renovated, but looks to be well maintained with a diesel IB and half decent older sails.  Probably lots of other even nicer boats in the Seattle, Vancouver, Portland areas - but this one was pretty much the first one I stumbled across in Seattle CL

That boat looks like somebody loved it loooong time. In a good way.

6 hours ago, SeattleB said:

This boat just jumped back on the market after a buyer backed out.  Any big concern with this one being easy to operate with just two people?  

You can simplify things to meet your abilities.

And, for completeness and the avoidance of doubt as to a proper welcome...

Fuck off and show us your wife's/girlfriend's/SO's tits.

There. Everybody happy now?

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Welcome to it. 

Another vote for Catalina 30. It has enough sport in it to keep things fun, is super easy to handle and has tons of room down below. Really well designed for the average user.

Since you’re in Seattle you naught also want to take a look at the market in British Columbia. Your purchasing power will increase by almost 30% and there’s usually an interesting inventory in the greater Vancouver area. Importation should be easy, if you have your papers in order. 

Start your Canadian search at www.kijiji.ca. Select the province. Sailboats are listed in the cars & vehicles section. $20k USD will buy you quite a bit. 

You might also find other options there that are/were popular in Canada. A C&C 27 MK V would be amazing. Niagara 30, Ontario 28 offer more cruiseR-like options. You might even find an older Beneteau or Jeanneau - renowned builders of seaworthy boats, both. If you can go below 27 feet and find a Kelt 7.6 or Laser 28, run to it...

Good luck. 

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That Newport is over priced as it has an outboard. Also will be VERY hard to resell as it has an outboard expect to get 4-6 k max. 

On the other hand a Catalina 30 with an inboard diesel will resell easily and has a better interior layout. Here is a younger boat with a diesel for similar money

Catalina 30 tall rig

Do not buy ANYTHING around 30 ft untill you and the better half have looked below on a Catalina 30. 

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Used boats and whores have 2 things in common they like to hide their past usage and ask for the highest price...set a price for yourself @ 10 G and look around for awhile you will be surprised what is out there at times... just because you are horny is the reason not to jump on the first one you see

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If there's a nice boat that's overpriced and you aren't in a hurry, don't be afraid to bid low. However, do it in a nice way like "Your boat is over my budget but I have $10K to spend so if that's something you'd consider now or in the future, please hang on to my contact info."

In these situations I've also found it helpful to put a very generous "survey allowance" in place for the seller, basically assuring them in writing that you won't torpedo the sale if the survey finds less than $XXX dollars in faults. That helps assure them that you're not wasting their time in addition to lowballing their price.

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I got a lot of really great advice here on this thread, couldn't have found my boat without it: 

 

My advice, just go look at every boat you can. The pictures are almost always wrong. And if your wife is the sailor - make sure to take her!

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Freewheelin has good advice.

Also don't fall in love with the boat until the surveyor has told you everything that is wrong with it.  Don't buy a first boat in this price range without a survey.  A survey on a 30 foot boat will end up being around $750 (for surveyor time plus quick haul), but will likely net you more than $750 in negotiating power.

I am in Seattle and tried shopping for boats in BC, but it's pretty hard to line up one weekend where you can look at a lot of boats.  Figure that you'll make a minimum of 3 trips for any boat that you are going to buy: 1 to look, 1 to survey, 1 to bring it home.  Plan on a 4th trip to do repairs before you can bring it home.  If the boat is an hour away that isn't a big deal.  If it is 3 hours away it starts to get pretty annoying.  If it is 5+ hours away (like on Vancouver Island) then it better be a pretty amazing boat at an amazing price.

I'm not as excited about the Catalina 30 as everyone else on here.  Even if you are primarily cruising it is a lot more fun to have a boat that is good in light air around here.

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If you guys are newbies, I can't stress highly enough the value of getting out and actually looking at boats.  When I bought my first "big" boat, I was going from a J-24 to a 30 footer my wife and I could race and cruise (Chesapeake Bay).  We must of looked at 40 boats.  We learned a lot in looking at all those boats, that helped make our final choice a good one that we were very happy with, and continued to inform the next 3 boat I bought, and is informing my current boat search ("Perfect" compromise boat thread).  Yachtworld, Sailboat Listings, Craiglist, etc are all sources, but don't "decide" on a boat based on the listing.  Use those sources to generate a listing of types of boats worth looking at, then go see as many as you can.  From 27 feet to 33 feet or so.  From boats listed at 50% or less of your budget to boats listed at 250% or so of your budget.  Don't only look just at "cruisers" either.  While you don't plan to race, there are lots of good boats that have a slant towards racing that make great cruisers.  J-30's, S2 9.1s, Olson 911s, etc should all be looked at.

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10 hours ago, Black Sox said:

That boat looks like somebody loved it loooong time. In a good way.

You can simplify things to meet your abilities.

And, for completeness and the avoidance of doubt as to a proper welcome...

Fuck off and show us your wife's/girlfriend's/SO's tits.

There. Everybody happy now?

I am checking with her this afternoon.  I will keep you posted.  

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4 hours ago, IStream said:

If there's a nice boat that's overpriced and you aren't in a hurry, don't be afraid to bid low. However, do it in a nice way like "Your boat is over my budget but I have $10K to spend so if that's something you'd consider now or in the future, please hang on to my contact info."

In these situations I've also found it helpful to put a very generous "survey allowance" in place for the seller, basically assuring them in writing that you won't torpedo the sale if the survey finds less than $XXX dollars in faults. That helps assure them that you're not wasting their time in addition to lowballing their price.

This.

I’ve found that a very effective tactic as well. Was actually offered a boat in good shape for free if I’d come get it from the old couple going into a retirement home because they couldn’t find a buyer and couldn’t bear to have it broken down... 

The closer you get to haul out, the better the price will become.

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I'd pick a Cal 34 over a Newport 30 any day. Good sailing boat, seaworthy, nicer interior.
Ranger 33 would be another good choice.

Of course, all the normal warnings about 50-year-old boats apply...

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Couple other points I'll throw out there as a PNW sailor:

Around the Seattle area, most marinas have standard slips for 30' and under, but any bigger and you may end up paying a premium for, say, a 40' slip for your 32 footer. Might want to check this out before you consider something bigger than 30'.

I agree that light air performance should be a big consideration, unless you're OK with motoring much of the time during the summer.

I also agree that an outboard on a 30 footer isn't desirable, especially if you plan to motor a lot (see above).

In the type of boat you're looking for, you'll see a few with Atomic 4's. There's LOTS of debate around here on the merits of an A4 Vs diesel, but in general:

- The A4 is every bit as reliable as diesel

- The A4 is much cheaper to maintain, fix and replace than a diesel

- The A4 swallows about 1.5 times more fuel than a diesel

- Boat price/value with an A4 should be considerably less than with a diesel

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On 7/9/2018 at 10:55 PM, SeattleB said:

Afternoon from the PNW everyone.  I moved here 18 months ago and caught the sailing bug, after living in land locked Oklahoma for 20 years.  My wife just got back from R2AK on a friends boat.  She has more experience than me now, but were both pretty new to boats.  I now am really jealous I didn't go on R2AK.  But there is always next year, or buy a boat of my own.  So I am on the hunt, but going into this very blindly.  My main requirements that I know for sure are: around 30 ft long, needs to have a head and room for 3-4 people for a weekend, nice galley, $22k or so, etc.  I am not going to race it, just take out in the sound during the weekends (perhaps a yearly longer trip).  

I am not worried that much about yearly costs, just want to make sure I have a very reliable boat.  I am a bit concerned about being able to resell the boat if I have to move in 2-3 years.  I found this boat on craigslist/YW that seems to fit the bill, its looks in amazing shape after a restoration.  Its seems to click all the right buttons, buts its a bit weird its been for sale for at least a year or more. 

What do you guys think about this boat?

 

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1971/Newport-30-3088084/Anacortes/WA/United-States?refSource=standard listing#.W0RJzNVKipo

 

 

 

1 hour ago, Ripply said:

This might be a real nice first boat to grow with, and way less cash:

https://cwb.org/boats-for-sale/1984-21-freedom-sailboat/

Decent little boat, but MUCH shorter than what the OP stated as one of his main requirements.

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Details. :)  

Just wanted to throw in a local "less is more" option.  He also says "very blindly" in his post, so I'm taking his requirements with a grain of salt.  How much is actually required to get into sailing and take a boat out for the weekend in Puget Sound?  Certainly not more than this modest little Freedom.  To the poster: we just watched a Hobie 20 beach cat make it to Ketchican via Haida Gwaii!

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35 minutes ago, Ripply said:

Details. :)  

Just wanted to throw in a local "less is more" option.  He also says "very blindly" in his post, so I'm taking his requirements with a grain of salt.  How much is actually required to get into sailing and take a boat out for the weekend in Puget Sound?  Certainly not more than this modest little Freedom.  To the poster: we just watched a Hobie 20 beach cat make it to Ketchican via Haida Gwaii!

I can't argue with that.

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On 7/10/2018 at 12:46 PM, 12 metre said:

For less $$, I think I would rather have this local (to you) Ranger 32:  https://seattle.craigslist.org/skc/boa/d/ranger-32-sailboat-racer/6639503736.html

Not renovated, but looks to be well maintained with a diesel IB and half decent older sails.  Probably lots of other even nicer boats in the Seattle, Vancouver, Portland areas - but this one was pretty much the first one I stumbled across in Seattle CL

I going to try and check this one out this weekend.  

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1 hour ago, SeattleB said:

I going to try and check this one out this weekend.  

Ranger 29 is a good all-round boat. But, as a newbie buyer, the main thing to beware is that old boat "upgrades" are almost all useless to the next buyer. You want/need good sails, updated hardware (blocks, cleats, winches, other rigging), and nice new lines (of the appropriate type for their use is low-stretch backyards etc). Upgraded plumbing and wiring would be next. 

But that shit is boring, plus it is expensive (VERY!) and takes skilled labor to install correctly..... incorrect installation makes it an even bigger fuckstory than it's absence.

Go look! Nothing like doing your own legwork. And go sailing in the meanwhile.... not buying a boat right away is a smart call.....  unpopular though. Go back and read Captpiratedog's advice one or two more times

On 7/11/2018 at 1:03 AM, Black Sox said:

That boat looks like somebody loved it loooong time. In a good way.

You can simplify things to meet your abilities.

And, for completeness and the avoidance of doubt as to a proper welcome...

Fuck off and show us your wife's/girlfriend's/SO's tits.

There. Everybody happy now?

TRADITION.......... TRADITION!!!!!!!!!

FB- Doug

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Most of the alternative boats being mentioned were all built at the same place (Cal, Ranger, Newport, others).  Quality issues abound with the same era.  So let's look at sailing qualities.  If I was to buy a 45+yo boat, a few would stand out.  If 30' is a target, the best all-around 30' in '72 was the Tartan 30.  Were built better than the above but will have issues.  It will hold the Newport on a reach and kill it on a beat.  Much better all-around boat and you would own something of a classic.  The Newport is not in the same class although a roomy boat.  But if cabin volume is your thing, Catalina 30.  

Make sure your budget is in place for the boat you are buying and it's needs.  Some are immediate, some can be put off.  When I owned my boat, I though I owed it to my crew to put a well prepared boat on the line.  That meant newer sails, etc.  None of this is cheap.  But it's a labor of love and one of great reward and you don't want to someday  be dying in bed wishing you had done it.  Buy a 30' boat, minimize your immediate investment, fix what you can, sail the hell out of it with old sails and at the end of the summer, your path will be clear.  

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4 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

TRADITION.......... TRADITION!!!!!!!!!

FB- Doug

Tevye?  It's me, Lazzur Wolf, I still want to fuck your daughter!

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28 minutes ago, Cal20sailor said:

  investment

Not a word that gets used very often here.....

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This is the west coast, so you might look for a Yankee 30 over a Tartan. Almost the same design, different builders, both are good boats. 

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1 hour ago, hobot said:

Not a word that gets used very often here.....

Correction, expense.  

Hobot, has anyone figured out how to get your thread to a single spot that could be downloaded?  Best thread ever and something I'd love to be able to browse on my own.  I don't have the knowledge,  but if it's just a matter of moving, deleting, etc.  I am happy to help.  It's a a classic and thank you.  

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1 hour ago, Alex W said:

This is the west coast, so you might look for a Yankee 30 over a Tartan. Almost the same design, different builders, both are good boats. 

Very close in performance and both great boats.  Upwind in a breeze, the Yankee comes alive vs Tartan.  THESE ARE NOT PERFORMANCE BOATS.  But very fun to sail and a great Wednesday warrior.  

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On 7/10/2018 at 5:51 PM, SeattleB said:

Whats the reason for the lack of places to refill CNG?  Is there anywhere in Seattle that does it?  

The fuel dock at Shilshole has it. No need to refill, they do bottle exchange

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On 7/10/2018 at 5:51 PM, SeattleB said:

Whats the reason for the lack of places to refill CNG?  

In the '70s it experienced some popularity but the negatives are many. 1000 psi pressurized tanks and fittings are somewhat of an issue. Availability is getting worse, not better.

West Marine runs down a decent description of common stove fuels along with pros and cons of each fuel.

Despite all the safety rigor required, propane has the advantage of being pretty widely available. But if you really want availability in any part of the world, diesel stoves will fill that bill. Unfortunately, diesel stoves are dirty and smelly.

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9 hours ago, Somebody Else said:

I forgot:
If you don't plan on going full Martha Stewart, go with a gimballed Jetboil. Simple, self-contained. economical.

 

Attach the system to the top of the existing stove?

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13 hours ago, SeattleB said:

Attach the system to the top of the existing stove?

Huh?

No. Instead of a normal stove with oven, it is a single burner camping stove. Highly efficient, brutally simple, but you pay the price by being limited to 1-pot meals, pretty much. More for race boats. Still, there's something comforting about stark simplicity.

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I gutted the alcohol stove insert on my Ericson 27, left the stainless tray and the bar for the pot clamps and then installed one of these and it all worked great!

 

 

s-l300.jpg

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3 hours ago, hobot said:

I gutted the alcohol stove insert on my Ericson 27, left the stainless tray and the bar for the pot clamps and then installed one of these and it all worked great!

 

 

s-l300.jpg

Fantastic cookers for the price! I once gave a stubborn metho stove a sea burial, co owner of the boat with me was stumped for a second then we both burst out laughing! I still remember the day, cracks us both up. 

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A note on the Catalina 30. You want the Tall Rig version (it has a short bowsprit) and you want the Fin Keel. Do not get the shoal draft version as it kills the boat's performance, and the tall rig does much better in light air venues.

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In my I28, I removed the original pressurized alcohol stove, and put one of the non-pressurized versions in the same gimbal.  

The Origo wasn't the right dimensions, but another brand (cookmate) fit well. 

I'm quite happy with it... not as fast as propane, but safe and easy. 

 

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I’ve had Origo and Cookmate stoves and they’ve both been great. Their oven doesn’t seem as good, which is why I switched to propane on my current boat. 

I didn’t think that Shilshole still had CNG, but it is good news if they do. 

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On 7/12/2018 at 2:59 PM, SeattleB said:

I going to try and check this one out this weekend.  

if those pics are true, I'd like to see the boat the owner is replacing it with...   there's going to be some tears shed somewhere..

 

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