OffCallsailing

1st post, need help understanding Westsail 32

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Long time reader, first post.  Kind of a dilemma.  I have this dream, easily attainable financially, but I’m a bit discouraged.  I’m currently on va action on a tropical island with my 10 and 12 year old.  Single dad full time custody.

 

we “chartered” a Westsail 32 for a 6 hour daysail.  My problem is that now I want to kill myself.  Not literally of course but god what a boring, slow, nauseating ride.  Prior to this, my only other charter was a 4 hour out of Seabrook on a 43’ Hunter.  I know, I know everyone hates Hunters and I get it, but it was 1,000 times more fun and enjoyable than this thing I just spent all day on.

 

my question is, does sailing get better than what I’ve experienced and how does one go about experiencing this?  I thought this charter was going to be amazing, nope.  I swear we made 3 knits max and hobby horses all day.  Guess I just want to hear it gets better.

 

head down in paradise.

mark

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It sure as fuck gets one hell of a lot better, just not on that 3ksb.

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You would be hard pressed to find a boat that is more boring in light air than the Westsnail.  Particularly for a 6 hour daysail, where it’s stengths will not be apparent.

That said, you are on a tropical island with your kids on a sailboat. How bad can it be?  Is there something else going on?

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Is the Ed running a troll farm for hits?

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Don’t know what an ED is and to answer your question, yes we are having a blast.  It’s just this charter got me down I guess.  I thought it would be different.

 

what type of boat should I charter in the future?  I’m thinking of going to San Carlos Mexico in December and try again.  Real nice folks down there at the marina.  I’m told a lot of locals hang out on the docks offering charters.  Should I stick to the lighter production type boats for more “fun sailing” ?

 

thanks

mark

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3 minutes ago, OffCallsailing said:

Don’t know what an ED is and to answer your question, yes we are having a blast.  It’s just this charter got me down I guess.  I thought it would be different.

 

what type of boat should I charter in the future?  I’m thinking of going to San Carlos Mexico in December and try again.  Real nice folks down there at the marina.  I’m told a lot of locals hang out on the docks offering charters.  Should I stick to the lighter production type boats for more “fun sailing” ?

 

thanks

mark

Yes. 

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33 minutes ago, mad said:

Is the Ed running a troll farm for hits?

And I came looking for tits. (Didn't FIFY)

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It took years for my wife to get over her first sailing experience on a Westsail 32.  Essentially they are repurposed lifeboats with too much teak, tiny cockpit, not enough sail and a horrible hull.  The very British idea was that if you were going ocean cruising, you might as well start out in a lifeboat, and just get the pain done with.  

After she got out of therapy for that painful day, she ended up driving an ultra-light 56'er to Hawaii with a grin on her face.

There used to be a lot of small charter companies with odd, sometimes cool, boats for charter.  Now there is The Moorings and random chance.   

If you're walking down a dock w/ lots of "Captains"offering charters look for clean, large cockpit, built sometime in the last few decades, clean, light, airy below decks, clean, decent sails and lines, clean, and a collection of toys to play with.  Windsurfers, snorkel gear, kayaks, what have you.  And a sober "Captain.

 

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1 hour ago, OffCallsailing said:

...we “chartered” a Westsail 32 for a 6 hour daysail.  My problem is that now I want to kill myself.  Not literally of course but god what a boring, slow, nauseating ride.  Prior to this, my only other charter was a 4 hour out of Seabrook on a 43’ Hunter.  I know, I know everyone hates Hunters and I get it, but it was 1,000 times more fun and enjoyable than this thing I just spent all day on.

The Westsail 32 more-or-less started the whole "very heavy, very stout, fiberglass cruiser" genre.

All of what follows is opinion but based on 50 years of sailing on, well, everything.

If you think about the boat as a survival pod for hurricanes, a lifeboat that's hard to damage, something that, when the bad weather hits, you can seal yourself down below and ride out the storm with minimal effort, the Westsail 32 might be your ride. They are pigs on all points of sail and the moniker "WetSnail" pretty much sums it up. If you basically hate sailing but feel the need to sort-of do it anyway, not that bad a choice; you probably won't die.

However, there are dozens of boats in this basic category and size which sail better without sacrificing the safety aspects of the design. For example, the Valiant 32 weighs a little more than half as much and has much better sailing characteristics. Or step up to a Tayana 37 which is a proven round-the-world design that can sail quite well. These are the designs which set the tone for the "performance cruiser" genre.

Or forsake the pirate-boat look altogether and go for a '70s-era Cal, Ericson, Islander, Pearson, Tartan, etc. moderate displacement racer/cruiser. Again, these are fairly sturdy boats but can still move along half-way decently. Sturdier, certainly, than their more modern-day equivalents which tend to be more lightly built and rigged with undersized hardware with the understanding that the vast majority of their owners will never sail beyond sight of land. I'm not going to name names but by virtue of not naming certain mfgs, you can infer what you may.

To move to more thrilling sailing--if you want that--you would need to start to either forsake a lot of creature comforts and/or pay a lot more money (mostly for lighter, higher-tech construction).

As speed potential increases, it's sort of implied that you need to have a bit more experience to (a) extract the speed and (b) remain safe. Hours/days spent on the water will eventually lead to a better feel as to what it takes to hustle a sailboat close to its potential. There is a traditional school of thought which says to start on very safe boats but, in my opinion, this can greatly retard your learning curve. By renting small boats like Hobie Cats, Lasers, or, really, anything with the promise of "performance," whatever that is, you will learn how to (a) extract the speed and (b) remain safe in an accelerated time frame. The effects of sail trim and boat trim are much more in-your-face--much more immediate and obvious. Everything you learn on tiny performance boats is applicable to larger boats. For the most part, flailing about on zippier boats means leaving the kids on shore as you expand your limits.

Others, please feel free to correct or modify my observations.

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They didn't earn the nickname "WetSnail 32" for no reason !  The reason they rent them is they are un-killable.  Unless chartering in Force 6 conditions or above you'll be wondering if your left the docklines on.

 

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I'm with snags on this. if you're in some tropical paradise, rent a hobie and get the kids wet blasting around whatever little archipelago you're in. unless you were chartering to explore the islands, why would you charter a big heavy boat? hell,  you'll be worn out and happy after 2 hours on the beach cat.

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3 hours ago, Varan said:

And I came looking for tits. (Didn't FIFY)

 

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Dont denigrate the W32. It was not designed for 6 hour charter but for ocean crossing. I suppose it is a good, low budget alternative f or  that. 

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4 hours ago, Varan said:

And I came looking for tits. (Didn't FIFY)

I remember your preferences.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5670679901_d242bda514.jpg

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6 minutes ago, VWAP said:

I remember your preferences.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5670679901_d242bda514.jpg

You never cease to impress. VWAP posts are always a mark of quality. 

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20 minutes ago, VWAP said:

I remember your preferences.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5670679901_d242bda514.jpg

I'm I looking at two tits, or two on both sides?

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12 minutes ago, Cal20sailor said:

I'm I looking at two tits, or two on both sides?

better angle for you 

 

wp-1477090355150.jpg

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1950’s and 60’s whitewalls seem to be making a big comeback!

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The one nice thing about those insane Vendee boats is that you don't spend a whole lot of time on them.

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18 hours ago, mad said:

Is the Ed running a troll farm for hits?

I'd estimate half the threads, it's probably in the mods job description.

But so what, I'd do the same thing. He's running a business, has bills to pay and people like talking boats.

For my part I avoid the obvious schill topics, like this:

"Hey OP please post a photo or 2 of you & your boys on the W32. What? No photos? That's odd."

 

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19 hours ago, OffCallsailing said:

Long time reader, first post.  Kind of a dilemma.  I have this dream, easily attainable financially, but I’m a bit discouraged.  I’m currently on va action on a tropical island with my 10 and 12 year old.  Single dad full time custody.

 

we “chartered” a Westsail 32 for a 6 hour daysail.  My problem is that now I want to kill myself.  Not literally of course but god what a boring, slow, nauseating ride.  Prior to this, my only other charter was a 4 hour out of Seabrook on a 43’ Hunter.  I know, I know everyone hates Hunters and I get it, but it was 1,000 times more fun and enjoyable than this thing I just spent all day on.

 

my question is, does sailing get better than what I’ve experienced and how does one go about experiencing this?  I thought this charter was going to be amazing, nope.  I swear we made 3 knits max and hobby horses all day.  Guess I just want to hear it gets better.

 

head down in paradise.

mark

Mark - The real question is what do you want to get out of sailing? Did the kid's bitch and moan during your sail or did they seem to have fun?  How much actual sailing did you do or did you have a crew to do all the work? You need to figure out what you want. I have spent awful times on a sail boat but they are far outweighed by the wonderful times.

How about sending you kids to sailing school and letting them catch the bug? Then it will become more fun for them and you will enjoy a true family activity.

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I am so tired of folks dissing the Westsail 32.  It was a ground-breaking boat, not with design, but with expanding the dreams of many sailors and would be sailors.  It was made to take whatever punishment (weather or incompetent owners) was thrown at it and not to win races or day-sail about.   And, contrary to popular belief, they do move, even in light air.  If sailed properly.  We won our class in a 6 1/2 day Bermuda 1-2 drifter

You don't like it?  Don't buy it.      Just do not opine on something you have not experienced first hand (not directed at the OP).

Thank You.  Rant out.

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23 minutes ago, sail69 said:

I am so tired of folks dissing the Westsail 32.  It was a ground-breaking boat, not with design, but with expanding the dreams of many sailors and would be sailors.  It was made to take whatever punishment (weather or incompetent owners) was thrown at it and not to win races or day-sail about.   And, contrary to popular belief, they do move, even in light air.  If sailed properly.  We won our class in a 6 1/2 day Bermuda 1-2 drifter

You don't like it?  Don't buy it.      Just do not opine on something you have not experienced first hand (not directed at the OP).

Thank You.  Rant out.

Just for the record, my post above was not intended as a rant against Westsail 32s - merely to show (sort of) the two extremes of “the sailing world.”  I’ve never sailed a W32.

As someone said above, it (naturally) depends what you want out of a boat.  And it also (naturally) is usually a compromise of some sort.

And, as a beginner (as it sounds like the OP is), figuring all this out can be daunting.  

 

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Jud,

Sorry, my comments were not directed at you, or others offering helpful perspective, but to those who repeat the same old cliches about the old girl...

Carry on.

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Hey,  I"M not the one that came up with "Wet Snail".   It is not an insult to call a crab-crusher what it is.

You want to sail around the world (slowly) with a bullet-proof boat you can buy for a song in locations all across the world ?  That'd be a candidate. 

Want to have some FUN sailing for an afternoon ?   well...  Would you put your full-size Station wagon on a go-Kart track for the pleasure of the driving experience ?  Fuck no.

It boils down to the old salesman's device:   " Compared to WHAT ? "

Is the Westsail a poor choice for day-chartering ?

compared to NOT getting on the water,  or compared to something that provides a visceral feel of sailing ?

 

 

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Is there a Westsail 32 one-design fleet anywhere?

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Westsail 32, one of the best all round boats ever built. Extremely competitive on Wednesday nights, capable of RTW success, have been known to show the Farr 40's a thing or two. There is no better cockpit layout, or interior design, and being a double ender whats not to like? Fast, responsive, brutally good looking, its a cruiser and racer par excellence, a chick magnet...

There is only one way to think about a  Westsail,  its a jizz machine

You should buy two

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4 hours ago, Gutterblack said:

Westsail 32, one of the best all round boats ever built. Extremely competitive on Wednesday nights, capable of RTW success, have been known to show the Farr 40's a thing or two. There is no better cockpit layout, or interior design, and being a double ender whats not to like? Fast, responsive, brutally good looking, its a cruiser and racer par excellence, a chick magnet...

There is only one way to think about a  Westsail,  its a jizz machine

You should buy two

Damn. I don’t usually get to laugh out loud at a post until I check what Rimas is up to.

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4 hours ago, Gutterblack said:

Westsail 32, one of the best all round boats ever built. Extremely competitive on Wednesday nights, capable of RTW success, have been known to show the Farr 40's a thing or two. There is no better cockpit layout, or interior design, and being a double ender whats not to like? Fast, responsive, brutally good looking, its a cruiser and racer par excellence, a chick magnet...

There is only one way to think about a  Westsail,  its a jizz machine

You should buy two

Yeah, they're automatic...systematic.....hydromatic...

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Offcall, if you want to sail in Mexico, head down to Banderas Bay. Hook up with Solarbri and go for a sail on Cat2fold!

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On 7/12/2018 at 7:23 PM, OffCallsailing said:

Don’t know what an ED is and to answer your question, yes we are having a blast.  It’s just this charter got me down I guess.  I thought it would be different.

 

what type of boat should I charter in the future?  I’m thinking of going to San Carlos Mexico in December and try again.  Real nice folks down there at the marina.  I’m told a lot of locals hang out on the docks offering charters.  Should I stick to the lighter production type boats for more “fun sailing” ?

 

thanks

mark

Almost anything else.  I'm guessing there will be a bunch of Jeunneaus and Beneteaus.  They will all be better sailors than the Westsnail.

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The Westsail 32 "Satori" was caught in the "Perfect Storm" of October 1991.  The crew panicked and against the wishes of the skipper called the Coast Guard.  When the Coast Guard arrived, they ordered everyone off the boat including the skipper.  The boat survived the storm without her crew and landed on the beach at Assateague.  She then survived being dragged off the beach and towed to Ocean City.  An account can be found at the following link.

http://westsail.org/satoristorm

 

Satori on a beach in Maryland.jpg

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Heres a free opinion, don't buy a boat until you have been racing in a good club for a while. Most will welcome you and your family, you'll learn more about boats in one years racing than 5 cruising plus you'll be in the "environment" talking to plenty of people who have real life experience. 

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On 7/12/2018 at 8:04 PM, Left Shift said:

  The very British idea was that if you were going ocean cruising, you might as well start out in a lifeboat, and just get the pain done with.  

 

 

that's some funny shit ....

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Hula, that same Westsail just today completed a circumnavigation of Vancouver Island with my wife and me.  Never have I been on a boat that gives me such confidence in it’s ability to survive tough situations.  The keel isn’t gonna fall off, (it’s internally ballasted), the rudder isn’t gonna get hit by a deadhead (we hit 2 big ones) because it’s behind the keel, crab pots and kelp aren’t a problem, and rounding Cape Scott at night just wouldn’t have been the same enjoyable relaxing trip in my other boat, a Hobie 33.  

     That being said, I agree that an overloaded Westsail 32 without a max-prop, faired rudder, and good sails would be a poor choice for a daysail.  

    

     

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The Hobie’s a foot longer?

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Tuesday is being a wee bit modest. With his Westsail 32 and crew he won his class and first place overall in the Foulweather Bluff Race last fall.

However, he's a very good sailor.

Just about every boat he's ever raced, he made a habit of sailing the boat to it's full potential, while using good sound course management.

Foulweather Bluff Race

Big Little Duel in Foulweather Bluff Race

Foulweather Blauff Race results

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On 7/17/2018 at 7:57 PM, boomer said:

Tuesday is being a wee bit modest. With his Westsail 32 and crew he won his class and first place overall in the Foulweather Bluff Race last fall.

However, he's a very good sailor.

Just about every boat he's ever raced, he made a habit of sailing the boat to it's full potential, while using good sound course management.

Foulweather Bluff Race

Big Little Duel in Foulweather Bluff Race

Foulweather Blauff Race results

Nevermind he won the Singlehanded Transpac in an Olson 30.

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Yes he did sailing the Olson 30 Intense in '88 in 11 days and 15 hours (9:06:49 corrected)to break the old Singlehanded Transpac record at the time.

History of the Singlehanded Transpac

However I'm talking  about him taking a Wetsnail 32 and beating most the faster boats on the sound in a well attended race on corrected time. In this race the slower boats start first. The first two slower rating classes only race to Pilot Point, while the faster rating classes race the much longer distance to Foulweather Bluff. If light winds are expected the day of the race, then all classes race to a buoy set off of Pilot Point, then to Scatchet Head Bell buoy and return to the start/finish, or to Scatchet Head bell buoy then to Pilot Point and return to the start/finish, as in the '17 Foulweather Bluff Race.  With Class 2 starting 30 minutes ahead of our Class 7, two in our class finally caught and passed him just before the finish as seen at the end of this video. Class 2 start at 00:36.

 

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