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ganbare.jpg

Hard to argue that Ganbare isn't the most important design in the modern era. How impressive to see that it is not only well-loved, but that it still wins! From the Doug Peterson FB page.

If Ganbare isn't the greatest, what is?

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I agree.  I remember reading about the One Ton worlds racing against Ydra in I think Sardinia.  Only a missed mark, or wrong rounding cost them the win.  Clearly Ganbare is the most important design under the IOR rule.

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That's If you like a modern era boat designs that enjoy pushing through water.  Not to give them the credit, but what about all the Farr-like designs.

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Ganbare changed things and made Peterson. The later Farr designs just improved things, they weren't fundamentally different the way Ganbare was. They didn't define an era.

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What SJB said. Our region was lousy with them. It was the race boat of choice for many years. I think we had 15 to 20 in Salish Sea area. Raced them years with some great success. An O.A. Swiftsure win. Two O.A. Southern Straits wins and the last one was one the recycled ones up into late 80's. Doesn't count the div. wins and podium honours too. Great boats in the light but it in 25 knots downwind they could be a handful 30+ ? It was an all-day plane crash!   

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1 hour ago, jdubes said:

That's If you like a modern era boat designs that enjoy pushing through water.  Not to give them the credit, but what about all the Farr-like designs.

The thread is about the most important single design.

With Farr you would have to start with Gerontius or 45 Deg South (Farr 727).  Gerontius did surprisingly well at AC and 45 Deg won the QTC

The difference is that the OTC was THE event of that era while the QTC was not of the same stature.  Ganbare dominated her fleet while 45 Deg did well enough to win.

You mention pushing water, but you have to remember Ganbare was ironically thought to be too small and light to be a competitive One Ton.

IIRC, when Gabare rounded the turning mark the wrong way, they were so far ahead that no one saw them do it.  They later retired once they realized their error.  I wonder how many pros would do the same thing today if they thought they could get away with it.

While Ganbare is certainly one of the most important single designs, I'll go with Windward Passage.  No boat I can think of had as long of an active and successful racing career.  Also perhaps the best name ever.   

2eyl1zb.jpg

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Was delivery crew on Passage back from Nassau in '82, IIRC?  First ever four-spreader rig, and when the Backstay was wanked down, the wooden plank seams leaked a bit of water.  Great boat that was, maybe still is?

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44 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Ganbare changed things and made Peterson. The later Farr designs just improved things, they weren't fundamentally different the way Ganbare was. They didn't define an era.

Other than being on the lighter side of the displacement spectrum the pintail designs were almost the complete opposite of the kiwi approach.

MH vs frac,

narrow stern vs broad stern.

Steep rise to the stern vs shallow rise

Large SA and short L vs small SA and Long L

Med Displacement vs Light Displacement

I'll agree Ganbare defined the era from 1973 to about 1976

But the writing was on the wall after the 1975 QTC win by 45 Deg South, and reinforced by the performance of Magic Bus at the 1976 QTC

I doubt you ever saw a new pintail design after 1976 or so.

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J105

First production boat with a retractable sprit 

Changed racing by at least as much as any other design

 

Maybe foils and DSS will be as big

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Infidel now known as ragtime , 62" hard chine plywood John spencer design . Launched in 1962 and still a beast 

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Ganbare was a dead end.  It's primary longterm contribution was that light is fast.  Bill Lee/George Olson were busy proving the same thing, maybe more dramatically.  

The Farr designs set a new direction for hull forms that shows up in almost every race boat since.  Swuzzle Bubble was an important one. 

Swuzzlebubble_77.thumb.jpg.ccc561993db498c4bde0f03a3178c6b2.jpg

Restored in 2014, showing s canoe body that could be pretty contemporary.

1696257791_Swuzzlebubblepre-keel9Apr14.jpeg.b8e5f6fb22586590f913b8fa2bb2f627.jpeg

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48 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

Ganbare was a dead end.  It's primary longterm contribution was that light is fast.  Bill Lee/George Olson were busy proving the same thing, maybe more dramatically.  

The Farr designs set a new direction for hull forms that shows up in almost every race boat since.  Swuzzle Bubble was an important one. 

Restored in 2014, showing s canoe body that could be pretty contemporary.

 

I think the idea of light equaling fast and suitable for offshore races dates way more back to the time of Zeevalk, a van de Stadt design and Fastnet class winner of 51.

zeevalk.jpg

Not such a nice canoe body, though, rather somewhat edgy...

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Getting close with Infidel / Ragtime but the boats  that lead us out of the RORC / IOR  wilderness were  Prospect of Ponsonby and Tituscanby  from  Bruce Farr.These boats were a joy to sail compared to the displacement hole diggers ....like Ganbare !  Thanks to Kiwi designers like Bruce, John Spencer , Jim Young , Laurie Davidson Bob Stewart and others the world is a better place to sail on

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On a second thought...

Who needs this modern era anyway?

Kipcke-bricht-in-daenische-Phalanx-ein_b

The most gracious, simple and elegant smallest greatest. Always has been, always will be.

And having her and the IF built in GRP was truly era-defining for the late 70ies and early 80ies, no arguing around that.

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2 hours ago, 12 metre said:

The thread is about the most important single design.

With Farr you would have to start with Gerontius or 45 Deg South (Farr 727).  Gerontius did surprisingly well at AC and 45 Deg won the QTC

The difference is that the OTC was THE event of that era while the QTC was not of the same stature.  Ganbare dominated her fleet while 45 Deg did well enough to win.

You mention pushing water, but you have to remember Ganbare was ironically thought to be too small and light to be a competitive One Ton.

IIRC, when Gabare rounded the turning mark the wrong way, they were so far ahead that no one saw them do it.  They later retired once they realized their error.  I wonder how many pros would do the same thing today if they thought they could get away with it.

While Ganbare is certainly one of the most important single designs, I'll go with Windward Passage.  No boat I can think of had as long of an active and successful racing career.  Also perhaps the best name ever.   

2eyl1zb.jpg

I don't know much about the success of Ganbare as a boat with a crew, i'm speaking purely from a design standpoint.  Sure it was considered lighter for it's time, which is a good trend for any moving object you want to get going faster....make it lighter.

The Farr-like designs changed how a sailboat dealt with water.  And that will have staying power for a very long time.  Foiling is a the next stage, have almost no wetted surfaces.

 

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1 hour ago, Left Shift said:

Ganbare was a dead end.  It's primary longterm contribution was that light is fast.  Bill Lee/George Olson were busy proving the same thing, maybe more dramatically.  

The Farr designs set a new direction for hull forms that shows up in almost every race boat since.  Swuzzle Bubble was an important one. 

Swuzzlebubble_77.thumb.jpg.ccc561993db498c4bde0f03a3178c6b2.jpg

Restored in 2014, showing s canoe body that could be pretty contemporary.

1696257791_Swuzzlebubblepre-keel9Apr14.jpeg.b8e5f6fb22586590f913b8fa2bb2f627.jpeg

Exactly!  Don't fight the water.

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Yup, really only credit for one issue- taking the weight out of the boat.  It's 1975 and except for a few Kiwi "experiments" Ganbare was the first recognized competing effort that shed serious weight.  Bill Lee, Olsen, etc. really started coming on 5 years later.  Farr cleaned up the sterns, he and others finally broadened/flattened them out and made planning common.  But Ganbare killed the 7KSB.

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1 hour ago, boatcat65 said:

Yup, really only credit for one issue- taking the weight out of the boat.  It's 1975 and except for a few Kiwi "experiments" Ganbare was the first recognized competing effort that shed serious weight.  Bill Lee, Olsen, etc. really started coming on 5 years later.  Farr cleaned up the sterns, he and others finally broadened/flattened them out and made planning common.  But Ganbare killed the 7KSB.

I would add that Peterson also came up with the trapezoidal keel - which is still a pretty efficient planform. 

It also had the added advantage of working well with the IOR CGF

And as noted in another thread, Peterson really began the trend to higher SA/D ratios in IOR.

Yes the Santa Cruz ULDB movement was making boats go faster, but not within the confines of IOR - which at that time was the only thing that really mattered.

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3 hours ago, Cazzate said:

Infidel now known as ragtime , 62" hard chine plywood John spencer design . Launched in 1962 and still a beast 

YES!!!

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3 hours ago, armchairadmiral said:

Getting close with Infidel / Ragtime but the boats  that lead us out of the RORC / IOR  wilderness were  Prospect of Ponsonby and Tituscanby  from  Bruce Farr.These boats were a joy to sail compared to the displacement hole diggers ....like Ganbare !  Thanks to Kiwi designers like Bruce, John Spencer , Jim Young , Laurie Davidson Bob Stewart and others the world is a better place to sail on

Ron Holland too.......

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I vote for Ganbare. Yes, the Farr designs wound up being better (faster) boats but Ganbare changed the world, instantly.  Besides, I own a Ganbare offspring and after 39 years it's still an absolutely lovely boat and we still win, and my wife and I can handle it, any direction, any conditions.

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5 hours ago, Matagi said:

On a second thought...

Who needs this modern era anyway?

Kipcke-bricht-in-daenische-Phalanx-ein_b

The most gracious, simple and elegant smallest greatest.

Nothing beats a Folkboat for simplicity, elegance and economy. 

Below is another classic yacht that truly made an impact and is still actively campaigned today. She will still be going strong decades after today's carbon-everything wonders are on the scrapheap.

dorade.jpg

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6 hours ago, Left Shift said:

Ganbare was a dead end.  It's primary longterm contribution was that light is fast.  Bill Lee/George Olson were busy proving the same thing, maybe more dramatically.  

The Farr designs set a new direction for hull forms that shows up in almost every race boat since.  Swuzzle Bubble was an important one. 

Swuzzlebubble_77.thumb.jpg.ccc561993db498c4bde0f03a3178c6b2.jpg

And then Bruce King took the Light Displacement to a new level.
The planing hull circa mid 80's. Also the forerunner to the modern sport boat design.

Trude%20008.JPG

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Each of the boats were/are a place marker in the history of yacht design, America was probably the first and they still compete for a cup named after her. (sort of)

Passage is always the coolest boat in my book, every since I saw her as a 10yo on Transpac Row in '69. Ganbare killed them at her time, Ragtime did, Merlin did, even the J24 made its mark. There are too many to list but certain boat names always stand-out for the mark they made in the sport, Ganbare coming out of nowhere to dominate for a brief period of time.

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+1 vote for Passage, a lot of history for sure.  I think I might add Merlin/Blondie to the list as what I kind of view the pro type SC 70 and then the "new and improved" version.  That said it is a pretty subject list and you could include everything from a Laser upwards and not be wrong.


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Looking back, this must also count as a defining and changing moment in sailing history:

starsstripes.jpg

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7 minutes ago, Matagi said:

Looking back, this must also count as a defining and changing moment in sailing history:

starsstripes.jpg

It certainly was - that was when the AC died.

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Why are you all obsessing with the 1970s?

Most of that decade's racing was dominated by dead-end design elements. Pintail sterns, mad distortions, high CoG, high displacement, stupid rig.  Ganbare included most of those follies; she was light only when compared with other heavyweights.

The boats which restored sanity were the Farr designs.  But Farr's boats merely picked up on a tradition established a generation earlier.

The modern offshore boat began with the Uffa Fox-designed Flying 30 back in 1951: a planing offshore boat launched a full 25 years before Californian ULDBs put planing back on the offshore menu.  The Irish-built and Irish-owned Flying 30 Huff of Arklow is believed to be the only surviving Flying 30.   Huff is ten feet longer than Ganbare, but only about 20% heavier.

Or look at the 1959 Van de Stadt Black Soo: a superlight, chined, planing boat with a D/L ratio which makes Ganbare look like a Sumo wrestler.

So if you're looking for the most important design in the modern era, forget Ganbare.  She's just a roadbump from the dark days when the IOR channelled topflight racing into ridiculously slow and ill-mannered designs.

 

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OK- there's more to it than what's been covered so far.  I've owned two hot planning sailboats, both of which have been around for a long time, in fact long before anything that's been discussed so far.  In 1938 Olin Stephens designed the 19' Lightning and had a pretty successful run with it.  Planes all the time.  And in 1945 Sandy Douglas came out with his 17' Thistle- a real terror- fast and wet in all the right ways.  So the whole sport boat craze really isn't that new of a concept.  With that in mind, what Ganbare did was move performance out of the dingy class and into big (relative- now more so than ever) boats.  As I said earlier Petersen killed the 7KSB- suddenly you weren't limited to 7-9knots in something with a cabin and a head.  The real question is why did it take so long to scale up the concept of a Lightning or Thistle into a real blue water capable yacht?  Ganbare showed that big boats could also be light, fast, and seaworthy.  That this transition took place within the craptastic distortions of the IOR rule is just mind boggling!  But thankfully it did- because the IOR was huge, completely dominating- and hence lots of people who loved sailing and had money noticed.  And the first fundamental change in yacht design standards/expectations since America was on....

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As far as being ahead of the game goes...

Amaryllis 1876

Image result for herreshoff catamaran

Bona Fide 1890, bulb keel and separate rudder. Won the 1900 Olympics.

Image result for bona fide sloop

Bona-Fide-002.jpg

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6 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

It certainly was - that was when the AC died.

Not really, but it was a timebomb clicking that exploded in 2007...

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Here's my list of game changers.

Cal 40. Finally nixed the full keel with attached rudder idiocy.

Santa cruz 27. Just a big wow for the day.

J24. One design keelboat can be good for the masses.

J35. Said a big fuck off to shitty ior rule.  Beat much bigger ior pos boat for boat and ushered in clean lines and light disp trend for bigger keelboats.  

Whitbread 60s.  The 1st of new generation big boat with out of the box thinking.

TP52. Nuff said.

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5 hours ago, boatcat65 said:

The real question is why did it take so long to scale up the concept of a Lightning or Thistle into a real blue water capable yacht?  Ganbare showed that big boats could also be light, fast, and seaworthy.

The real answer is that it didn't take so long.

The  Uffa Fox-designed Flying 30 launched in 1951, and Van de Stadt's Black Soo in 1959.

Twenty years later, Ganbare was way heavier than either Huff or Black Soo.  It was still a non-planing boat, which hadn't caught up

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16 minutes ago, DavidG said:

Imp

Imp won races.  But didn't set any significant new design direction

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2 hours ago, bgytr said:

Here's my list of game changers.

Cal 40. Finally nixed the full keel with attached rudder idiocy.

Santa cruz 27. Just a big wow for the day.

J24. One design keelboat can be good for the masses.

J35. Said a big fuck off to shitty ior rule.  Beat much bigger ior pos boat for boat and ushered in clean lines and light disp trend for bigger keelboats.  

Whitbread 60s.  The 1st of new generation big boat with out of the box thinking.

TP52. Nuff said.

Hard to argue against the TP52.  17, 18 years into the rule now???  I think if you look at race boat design since, the TP52 made light and powerful cool again.  Every performance boat designed since wants to be a TP52.  Maybe it was West Coast ULDB's that inspired the trend but all that got lost with IMS, basically as stupid as IOR when it came to designing boats that go fast.  TP52's set the world back on track.

I'm going to say the single greatest design however is the Capri 25, because I own one and she's the best thing ever!

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When I look at Yendys, there are so many things you will see in a modern skiff, and modern racing yachts: a humongeous bowsprit, a wide stern, acres of sail area, flat bow... 

Frankly, I can't get my head around how all this knowledge could get lost along the way...

Large_All_eyes_on_the_kite.jpg

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8 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

Why are you all obsessing with the 1970s?

Most of that decade's racing was dominated by dead-end design elements. Pintail sterns, mad distortions, high CoG, high displacement, stupid rig.  Ganbare included most of those follies; she was light only when compared with other heavyweights.

The boats which restored sanity were the Farr designs.  But Farr's boats merely picked up on a tradition established a generation earlier.

The modern offshore boat began with the Uffa Fox-designed Flying 30 back in 1951: a planing offshore boat launched a full 25 years before Californian ULDBs put planing back on the offshore menu.  The Irish-built and Irish-owned Flying 30 Huff of Arklow is believed to be the only surviving Flying 30.   Huff is ten feet longer than Ganbare, but only about 20% heavier.

Or look at the 1959 Van de Stadt Black Soo: a superlight, chined, planing boat with a D/L ratio which makes Ganbare look like a Sumo wrestler.

So if you're looking for the most important design in the modern era, forget Ganbare.  She's just a roadbump from the dark days when the IOR channelled topflight racing into ridiculously slow and ill-mannered designs.

 

I think people are just nostalgic for the boats of their era. For a lot of people it's '70s IOR boats. I cut my keelboat teeth on a J/29. I'm sure in twenty years people will be questioning my affection for a design from an age before every beercan racer sailed 50 knot human-optional foilers. And I'll be sitting on the porch of the Yacht Club grumbling about how sailing was better in my day. And for me, it always will be.

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29 minutes ago, Sisu3360 said:

I think people are just nostalgic for the boats of their era. For a lot of people it's '70s IOR boats. I cut my keelboat teeth on a J/29. I'm sure in twenty years people will be questioning my affection for a design from an age before every beercan racer sailed 50 knot human-optional foilers. And I'll be sitting on the porch of the Yacht Club grumbling about how sailing was better in my day. And for me, it always will be.

Agree. I think it's just the same as with music... 

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I CUT MY TEETH IN THE 80S IOR DAYS TO ME IT WOULD BE TWO BOATS THE J41 AND HOLLAND 40 IMP

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6 hours ago, bgytr said:

Here's my list of game changers.

Cal 40. Finally nixed the full keel with attached rudder idiocy.

Santa cruz 27. Just a big wow for the day.

J24. One design keelboat can be good for the masses.

J35. Said a big fuck off to shitty ior rule.  Beat much bigger ior pos boat for boat and ushered in clean lines and light disp trend for bigger keelboats.  

Whitbread 60s.  The 1st of new generation big boat with out of the box thinking.

TP52. Nuff said.

and in the days the big boats were driven nuts by their downwind speed...  in that category also 'waarschip 1/4 ton' :

 

Afbeeldingsresultaat voor waarschip 1/4 tonner

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heres a game changer: Magic-Hempel-Trimaran-9.JPG

 

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On 7/16/2018 at 11:56 AM, Editor said:

ganbare.jpg

Hard to argue that Ganbare isn't the most important design in the modern era. How impressive to see that it is not only well-loved, but that it still wins! From the Doug Peterson FB page.

If Ganbare isn't the greatest, what is?

Someone up thread listed "game changers" and that is what "Ganbare" was....DP's early under bodies...keel and rudder foils along with NS state of the art everything from design,to cloth..to helm and crew were the greatest combination of the era...."Ganbare" is a boat for all time

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8 hours ago, bgytr said:

Here's my list of game changers.

J35. Said a big fuck off to shitty ior rule.  Beat much bigger ior pos boat for boat and ushered in clean lines and light disp trend for bigger keelboats.  

And yet, an old 36 ft pos IOR shitter (the venerable Sweet Okole) is currently 120 miles ahead of the J/35 in this years Pacific Cup.  Actually, she is ahead of every other boat that started the same day.  OK, so, she is actually a Farr One Ton, and made from dead trees at that, but still.  And way nicer looking than any J/35.

sweet_okole.thumb.jpg.26bf2d03ec8d54fb7659720bdf32d787.jpg

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On 7/16/2018 at 4:56 PM, Editor said:

If Ganbare isn't the greatest, what is?

45 degrees South.

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This boat gave the finger to IOR in NZ . Elliott 45 "party pro" 1986 .

that reverse sheer is mirrored in quite a few very recent designs , add a reverse bow and it could almost be the new carkeek fast 40 . 

image.png

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Hobie 16

 

Brought more people into sailing than all the other boats mentioned combined.  More fun than any other boat mentioned.

 

Cathy Collins learned to sail on one.  She was later known as Bo Derek.

 

Have a Hobie Day.

bo-derek-90s-70786.jpg

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MERLIN

Whether it was the first or not can be debated. Probably not the first ULDB but certainly the one the first ULDB that made everyone sit up and pay attention.

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7 minutes ago, Bob Perry said:

MERLIN

Whether it was the first or not can be debated. Probably not the first ULDB but certainly the one the first ULDB that made everyone sit up and pay attention.

I will have to beg to differ.  Merlin was fabulous, but for big ultra-lights, RAGTIME* (AKA Infidel) came first and we all sat up and took notice.  Rags made everyone on the West Coast recognize what was coming out of New Zealand. 

If you want to promote ground-breaking Bill Lee boats - and who doesn't! - the SC27 would be the place to start.  

*I remember that big banner hanging from the Ilikai hotel in that cartoon typeface after Rags won in 1973 (and then again in '75.)  Merlin came along in 1977.

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On ‎7‎/‎17‎/‎2018 at 5:49 AM, Left Shift said:

Ganbare was a dead end.  It's primary longterm contribution was that light is fast.  Bill Lee/George Olson were busy proving the same thing, maybe more dramatically.  

The Farr designs set a new direction for hull forms that shows up in almost every race boat since.  Swuzzle Bubble was an important one. 

Swuzzlebubble_77.thumb.jpg.ccc561993db498c4bde0f03a3178c6b2.jpg

Restored in 2014, showing s canoe body that could be pretty contemporary.

1696257791_Swuzzlebubblepre-keel9Apr14.jpeg.b8e5f6fb22586590f913b8fa2bb2f627.jpeg

Like I said Ed you know shit about boats and have no sense of history.

From above to below on just on 5 years of 1/2 ton evolution

And you wank on about Ganbare

S&S 30 Design 2098 - Defiance 

Triple planked Oregon 

Launched September 1972

First boat launched to IOR Mk IIIa

IMG_0715 (002).jpg

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I think we were spoilt in NZ. A lot of the designers were happy to ignore rating rules and design fast, well mannered boats. Bob Stewart, Greg Elliott Murray Ross, Farr, Young, etc. we were lucky   

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1 hour ago, Alcatraz5768 said:

I think we were spoilt in NZ. A lot of the designers were happy to ignore rating rules and design fast, well mannered boats. Bob Stewart, Greg Elliott Murray Ross, Farr, Young, etc. we were lucky   

Hear hear ! 

But I do worry , all those blokes are in their twilight years and there doesn't seem to be any youngsters coming through .

we do have Kevin dibley , Dan leech , Brett bakewell-White and Greg young to see us through for awhile .

all these designers built their own designs to get recognition , sadly that seems to have died off in this day and age in NZ 

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17 hours ago, Matagi said:

When I look at Yendys, there are so many things you will see in a modern skiff, and modern racing yachts: a humongeous bowsprit, a wide stern, acres of sail area, flat bow... 

Frankly, I can't get my head around how all this knowledge could get lost along the way...

Large_All_eyes_on_the_kite.jpg

You forgot to mention the revolutionary weight saving anchor.

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33 minutes ago, Priscilla said:

You forgot to mention the revolutionary weight saving anchor.

And low drag flag 

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21 hours ago, bgytr said:

Here's my list of game changers.

Cal 40. Finally nixed the full keel with attached rudder idiocy.

Santa cruz 27. Just a big wow for the day.

J24. One design keelboat can be good for the masses.

J35. Said a big fuck off to shitty ior rule.  Beat much bigger ior pos boat for boat and ushered in clean lines and light disp trend for bigger keelboats.  

Whitbread 60s.  The 1st of new generation big boat with out of the box thinking.

TP52. Nuff said.

 

21 hours ago, bgytr said:

Here's my list of game changers.

Cal 40. Finally nixed the full keel with attached rudder idiocy.

Santa cruz 27. Just a big wow for the day.

J24. One design keelboat can be good for the masses.

J35. Said a big fuck off to shitty ior rule.  Beat much bigger ior pos boat for boat and ushered in clean lines and light disp trend for bigger keelboats.  

Whitbread 60s.  The 1st of new generation big boat with out of the box thinking.

TP52. Nuff said.

the Whitbread 60's were seriously bad ass boats, simple and tough, too. one of my all time favorite designs.

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By citing Ganbare I guess we are talking about IOR advances.

How about Farr Design 136, starting with Pacific Sundance, et al.

Southern Cross Cup 1983, Clipper Cup 1984,Kenwood Cup 1986.

I remember coming on watch at dawn in the 83 Hobart,seoond day and seeing all those Frers 44s, Holland pigs, hull down on the horizon behind us after a night on the wind in 18-25,

That was a boat.

Fraser Beer 

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Surely the Myth of Malham type has a claim......excellent pre ior medium displacement with lightweight structure.

Farr must get credit for the first Cat 1 all rounder that planed.

By comparison,  easy to make a downwind oriented sled.

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1 hour ago, KZ1 said:

By citing Ganbare I guess we are talking about IOR advances.

How about Farr Design 136, starting with Pacific Sundance, et al.

Southern Cross Cup 1983, Clipper Cup 1984,Kenwood Cup 1986.

I remember coming on watch at dawn in the 83 Hobart,seoond day and seeing all those Frers 44s, Holland pigs, hull down on the horizon behind us after a night on the wind in 18-25,

That was a boat.

Fraser Beer 

Still is. Bernie has her looking sharp down at pier 21, raced the last couple of coastals on her, good bunch of guys. Upwind, when in her groove she is amazing.  However.... I've never been on a boat that just hits a brick wall, speed wise, like that thing. Gets to about 8-9 kts and just sinks lower. It's weird. 

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8 hours ago, Cazzate said:

Hear hear ! 

But I do worry , all those blokes are in their twilight years and there doesn't seem to be any youngsters coming through .

we do have Kevin dibley , Dan leech , Brett bakewell-White and Greg young to see us through for awhile .

all these designers built their own designs to get recognition , sadly that seems to have died off in this day and age in NZ 

Bring back the IOR ;)

Look at all the big names that rule created.

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11 hours ago, KZ1 said:

By citing Ganbare I guess we are talking about IOR advances.

How about Farr Design 136, starting with Pacific Sundance, et al.

Southern Cross Cup 1983, Clipper Cup 1984,Kenwood Cup 1986.

I remember coming on watch at dawn in the 83 Hobart,seoond day and seeing all those Frers 44s, Holland pigs, hull down on the horizon behind us after a night on the wind in 18-25,

That was a boat.

Fraser Beer 

Yeah very cool boat.  she was my first experience of crewing on keel boats and I caught the bug big time . The guy was on the helm was an absolute nipple but the boat kept bringing me back for more . Glad to hear she's still going strong .

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20 hours ago, Priscilla said:

You forgot to mention the revolutionary weight saving anchor.

A good 15 pounds of the front fell off too.

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8 hours ago, Cazzate said:

Yeah very cool boat.  she was my first experience of crewing on keel boats and I caught the bug big time . The guy was on the helm was an absolute nipple but the boat kept bringing me back for more . Glad to hear she's still going strong .

She was out just last Saturday, seen here doing what she does best...

RNZYS 20180704v2.JPG

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On 7/18/2018 at 2:40 PM, lydia said:

Like I said Ed you know shit about boats and have no sense of history.

From above to below on just on 5 years of 1/2 ton evolution

And you wank on about Ganbare

S&S 30 Design 2098 - Defiance 

Triple planked Oregon 

Launched September 1972

First boat launched to IOR Mk IIIa

IMG_0715 (002).jpg

Defiance was owned by my father. Built by Doug Brooker for his father then owned by my father and went on to the father in law of Phil Y. A great yacht.

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Pic was taken two weeks ago btw

 

Found a time machine in the shed.

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